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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Sweden
Based on 239 articles published since 2008
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These are the 239 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Sweden during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10
1 Guideline European S3-Guideline on the systemic treatment of psoriasis vulgaris - Update Apremilast and Secukinumab - EDF in cooperation with EADV and IPC. 2017

Nast, A / Spuls, P I / van der Kraaij, G / Gisondi, P / Paul, C / Ormerod, A D / Saiag, P / Smith, C H / Dauden, E / de Jong, E M / Feist, E / Jobling, R / Maccarone, M / Mrowietz, U / Papp, K A / Reich, K / Rosumeck, S / Talme, T / Thio, H B / van de Kerkhof, P / Werner, R N / Dressler, C. ·Division of Evidence-Based Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France. · Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, UK. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré Université Paris V, Boulogne, France. · St Johns Institute of Dermatology, Guys and St Thomas' Hospital Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid, Spain. · Radboud University medical center and Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Cambridge, UK. · Roma, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Psoriasis-Center University Medical Center Schleswig Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Waterloo, Canada. · Dermatologikum Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28895202.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders: 2015/2016 update. 2017

Agca, R / Heslinga, S C / Rollefstad, S / Heslinga, M / McInnes, I B / Peters, M J L / Kvien, T K / Dougados, M / Radner, H / Atzeni, F / Primdahl, J / Södergren, A / Wallberg Jonsson, S / van Rompay, J / Zabalan, C / Pedersen, T R / Jacobsson, L / de Vlam, K / Gonzalez-Gay, M A / Semb, A G / Kitas, G D / Smulders, Y M / Szekanecz, Z / Sattar, N / Symmons, D P M / Nurmohamed, M T. ·Departments of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Preventive Cardio-Rheuma Clinic, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Internal and Vascular Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Hôpital Cochin. Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris INSERM (U1153): Clinical epidemiology and biostatistics, PRES Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopedic Institute, Milan, Italy. · Institute for Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. · Sygehus Sønderjylland (Hospital of Southern Jutland), Aabenraa, Denmark. · King Christian 10's Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Graasten, Denmark. · Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Rheumatology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden. · PARE (patient research partners), Sint-Joris-Weert, Belgium. · Romanian League Against Rheumatism (Vice-President) and Board Member (General Secretary) of AGORA, the Platform of S-E organisations for patients with RMDs, Bucharest, Romania. · Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Center for Preventive Medicine and Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology & Inflammation Research, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and Section of Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · University of Cantabria, IDIVAL, Santander, Spain. · Head of Research and Development, Academic Affairs Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, University of Manchester, Russells Hall Hospital, Clinical Research Unit, Dudley, UK. · Faculty of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary. · Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Department of Rheumatology Reade, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27697765.

ABSTRACT: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint disorders (IJD) have increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk compared with the general population. In 2009, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) taskforce recommended screening, identification of CVD risk factors and CVD risk management largely based on expert opinion. In view of substantial new evidence, an update was conducted with the aim of producing CVD risk management recommendations for patients with IJD that now incorporates an increasing evidence base. A multidisciplinary steering committee (representing 13 European countries) comprised 26 members including patient representatives, rheumatologists, cardiologists, internists, epidemiologists, a health professional and fellows. Systematic literature searches were performed and evidence was categorised according to standard guidelines. The evidence was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Three overarching principles were defined. First, there is a higher risk for CVD in patients with RA, and this may also apply to ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Second, the rheumatologist is responsible for CVD risk management in patients with IJD. Third, the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids should be in accordance with treatment-specific recommendations from EULAR and Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society. Ten recommendations were defined, of which one is new and six were changed compared with the 2009 recommendations. Each designated an appropriate evidence support level. The present update extends on the evidence that CVD risk in the whole spectrum of IJD is increased. This underscores the need for CVD risk management in these patients. These recommendations are defined to provide assistance in CVD risk management in IJD, based on expert opinion and scientific evidence.

3 Guideline European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies: 2015 update. 2016

Gossec, L / Smolen, J S / Ramiro, S / de Wit, M / Cutolo, M / Dougados, M / Emery, P / Landewé, R / Oliver, S / Aletaha, D / Betteridge, N / Braun, J / Burmester, G / Cañete, J D / Damjanov, N / FitzGerald, O / Haglund, E / Helliwell, P / Kvien, T K / Lories, R / Luger, T / Maccarone, M / Marzo-Ortega, H / McGonagle, D / McInnes, I B / Olivieri, I / Pavelka, K / Schett, G / Sieper, J / van den Bosch, F / Veale, D J / Wollenhaupt, J / Zink, A / van der Heijde, D. ·Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS), Paris, France Department of rheumatology, AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Second Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · EULAR, representing People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe (PARE), London, UK. · Research Laboratory and Clinical Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto, Italy. · Medicine Faculty, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France Rheumatology B Department, APHP, Cochin Hospital, Paris, France. · Leeds NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, LTHT, Leeds, UK Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands. · North Devon, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne and Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. · Arthritis Unit, Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Clínic and IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain. · Belgrade University School of Medicine, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Section of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Sweden and School of Business, Engineering and Science, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. · Section of Musculoskeletal Disease, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Laboratory of Tissue Homeostasis and Disease, Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, KU Leuven, Belgium Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Potenza, Italy. · Institute and Clinic of Rheumatology Charles University Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Internal Medicine 3, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité, Berlin, Germany. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Centre for Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease, Dublin Academic Medical Centre, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Schoen Klinik Hamburg, Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, German Rheumatism Research Centre Berlin, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26644232.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Since the publication of the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in 2012, new evidence and new therapeutic agents have emerged. The objective was to update these recommendations. METHODS: A systematic literature review was performed regarding pharmacological treatment in PsA. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated based on the evidence and the expert opinion of the 34 Task Force members. Levels of evidence and strengths of recommendations were allocated. RESULTS: The updated recommendations comprise 5 overarching principles and 10 recommendations, covering pharmacological therapies for PsA from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), to conventional synthetic (csDMARD) and biological (bDMARD) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, whatever their mode of action, taking articular and extra-articular manifestations of PsA into account, but focusing on musculoskeletal involvement. The overarching principles address the need for shared decision-making and treatment objectives. The recommendations address csDMARDs as an initial therapy after failure of NSAIDs and local therapy for active disease, followed, if necessary, by a bDMARD or a targeted synthetic DMARD (tsDMARD). The first bDMARD would usually be a tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. bDMARDs targeting interleukin (IL)12/23 (ustekinumab) or IL-17 pathways (secukinumab) may be used in patients for whom TNF inhibitors are inappropriate and a tsDMARD such as a phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor (apremilast) if bDMARDs are inappropriate. If the first bDMARD strategy fails, any other bDMARD or tsDMARD may be used. CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations provide stakeholders with an updated consensus on the pharmacological treatment of PsA and strategies to reach optimal outcomes in PsA, based on a combination of evidence and expert opinion.

4 Guideline European S3-Guidelines on the systemic treatment of psoriasis vulgaris--Update 2015--Short version--EDF in cooperation with EADV and IPC. 2015

Nast, A / Gisondi, P / Ormerod, A D / Saiag, P / Smith, C / Spuls, P I / Arenberger, P / Bachelez, H / Barker, J / Dauden, E / de Jong, E M / Feist, E / Jacobs, A / Jobling, R / Kemény, L / Maccarone, M / Mrowietz, U / Papp, K A / Paul, C / Reich, K / Rosumeck, S / Talme, T / Thio, H B / van de Kerkhof, P / Werner, R N / Yawalkar, N. ·Division of Evidence Based Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, UK. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré Université Paris V, Boulogne, France. · Clinical Lead for Dermatology, St Johns Institute of Dermatology, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Third Faculty of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · St. Johns Institute of Dermatology, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid, Spain. · University Medical Center Nijmegen St Radboud, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Rheumatologie u. klinische Immonologie, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Cambridge, UK. · SZTE Borgyogyaszati Klinika, Szeged, Hungary. · Roma, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Psoriasis-Center University Medical Center Schleswig Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Waterloo, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France. · Dermatologikum Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, Universitätsklinik für Dermatologie, Bern, Switzerland. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #26481193.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Psoriasis - What's Up ? 2017

Ståhle, Mona / Schön, Michael P. ·Unit of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet Solna and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Dermatology Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center, Göttingen, Germany 4Lower Saxony Institute of Occupational Dermatology, University Medical Center, Göttingen, Germany. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #28337812.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Physical activity and lifestyle improvement in the management of psoriasis. 2016

Schmitt-Egenolf, M. ·Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology, Umeå University, SE-901 87, Umeå, Sweden. marcus.schmitt-egenolf@umu.se. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #27632957.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Telocytes, communicators in healthy stroma and relation to inflammation and fibrosis. 2016

Wollheim, Frank A. ·Institution of clinical sciences Lund (IKVL) Rheumatology, Lund University, 221 85 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: frank.wollheim@med.lu.se. ·Joint Bone Spine · Pubmed #27452296.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Review Human Langerhans Cells with Pro-inflammatory Features Relocate within Psoriasis Lesions. 2018

Eidsmo, Liv / Martini, Elisa. ·Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden. · Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. ·Front Immunol · Pubmed #29520279.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common skin disease that presents with well-demarcated patches of inflammation. Recurrent disease in fixed areas of the skin indicates a localized disease memory that is preserved in resolved lesions. In line with such concept, the involvement of tissue-resident immune cells in psoriasis pathology is increasingly appreciated. Langerhans cells (LCs) are perfectly placed to steer resident T cells and local tissue responses in psoriasis. Here, we present an overview of the current knowledge of LCs in human psoriasis, including findings that highlight pro-inflammatory features of LCs in psoriasis lesions. We also review the literature on conflicting data regarding LC localization and functionality in psoriasis. Our review highlights that further studies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that drive LCs functionality in inflammatory diseases.

9 Review Performing Skin Microbiome Research: A Method to the Madness. 2017

Kong, Heidi H / Andersson, Björn / Clavel, Thomas / Common, John E / Jackson, Scott A / Olson, Nathan D / Segre, Julia A / Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia. ·Dermatology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Electronic address: konghe@mail.nih.gov. · Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Core Facility NGS/Microbiome, ZIEL Institute for Food and Health, Technical University of Munich, Freising, Germany. · Institute of Medical Biology, A*STAR, Singapore. · Biosystems and Biomaterials Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA. · Translational and Functional Genomics Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Institute of Environmental Medicine, UNIKA-T, Technical University of Munich and Helmholtz Zentrum München-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Augsburg, Germany; Christine Kühne Center for Allergy Research and Education, Davos, Switzerland. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #28063650.

ABSTRACT: Growing interest in microbial contributions to human health and disease has increasingly led investigators to examine the microbiome in both healthy skin and cutaneous disorders, including acne, psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis. The need for common language, effective study design, and validated methods is critical for high-quality standardized research. Features, unique to skin, pose particular challenges when conducting microbiome research. This review discusses microbiome research standards and highlights important factors to consider, including clinical study design, skin sampling, sample processing, DNA sequencing, control inclusion, and data analysis.

10 Review T-helper 22 cells as a new player in chronic inflammatory skin disorders. 2015

Mirshafiey, Abbas / Simhag, Anita / El Rouby, Nadia M M / Azizi, Gholamreza. ·Department of Immunology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Karolinska Institutet Science Park AB, Huddinge, Sweden. · Department of Histology, Dubai Medical College, Dubai, UAE. · Imam Hassan Mojtaba Hospital, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran. · Research Center for Immunodeficiencies, Pediatrics Center of Excellence, Children's Medical Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. ·Int J Dermatol · Pubmed #26183243.

ABSTRACT: T-helper 22 (Th22) cell is a new subset of CD4+ T cells that secrets interleukin (IL)-22 but not IL-17 or interferon-γ. Th22 is distinct from Th17 and other known CD4+ T-cell subsets with distinguished gene expression and function. Th22 subsets have chemokine receptors CCR6+ CCR4+ CCR10+ phenotype and aryl hydrocarbon receptor as the key transcription factor. This T-helper subset, by producing cytokines such as IL-22, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α, is implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin disorder. This review discusses the role of Th22 and its cytokine IL-22 in the immunopathogenesis of inflammatory skin disorders such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

11 Review Oral psoriasis-a diagnostic dilemma: a report of two cases and a review of the literature. 2015

Mattsson, U / Warfvinge, G / Jontell, M. ·Associate Professor, Department of Oral Medicine and Pathology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: ulf.mattsson@liv.se. · Professor, Department of Oral Pathology, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Sweden. · Professor, Department of Oral Medicine and Pathology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. ·Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol · Pubmed #25944682.

ABSTRACT: Whether psoriasis can manifest itself in the oral mucosa has been a matter of debate for many years. If an oral version of psoriasis exists, most researchers regard this manifestation as rare. The present report describes two patients who presented with lesions possibly related to cutaneous psoriasis. One patient had patchy erythematous lesions on the gingiva, and one had serpiginous lesions in the hard palate. We discuss these cases in relation to the existing literature, with special emphasis on the clinical and histopathologic criteria for the diagnosis of oral psoriasis.

12 Review Reactive oxygen species in psoriasis and psoriasis arthritis: relevance to human disease. 2015

Khmaladze, Ia / Nandakumar, Kutty Selva / Holmdahl, Rikard. ·Division of Medical Inflammation Research, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. ·Int Arch Allergy Immunol · Pubmed #25824670.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis (Ps) is a chronic, immune-mediated, skin inflammatory disease affecting up to 3% of the population worldwide. Different environmental triggers initiate this complex multifactorial syndrome. Many individuals affected by Ps (6-26%) develop inflammatory disease in other organs, often in the joints as in psoriasis arthritis (PsA). Animal models that reflect the typical Ps syndrome, including both skin and joint pathology as in Ps and PsA, are valuable tools for dissecting disease pathways leading to clinical manifestations. In this context, we developed a new acute Ps and PsA-like disease model that appears after exposure to Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannan in certain mouse strains. The disease was found to be triggered by mannan-activated macrophages, leading to the activation of a pathogenic interleukin-17 pathway involving innate lymphocytes. Interestingly, the production of reactive oxygen species protected the mice from the triggering of this pathway and ameliorated Ps and PsA development.

13 Review Treatment patterns with topicals, traditional systemics and biologics in psoriasis - a Swedish database analysis. 2015

Svedbom, A / Dalén, J / Mamolo, C / Cappelleri, J C / Petersson, I F / Ståhle, M. ·OptumInsight, Stockholm, Sweden; Unit of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #24813476.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Little data exist on real-world treatment patterns in psoriasis, especially from European settings. OBJECTIVE: To estimate, for topicals, systemics and biologics, the time to non-persistency, switching, augmentation and insufficient treatment result (only for biologics), as well as to estimate the time to restart, in patients treated with each treatment class in Sweden based on registry data. METHODS: This database analysis utilized data from patients with psoriasis from several Swedish administrative registers. Patients were identified through combinations of diagnoses from two regional registers and filled prescriptions for relevant treatments from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Kaplan-Meier time-to-event ('survival') functions were estimated with relevant treatment events as failure and the proportions of patients having experienced an event at specific time-points were derived from the failure rates. RESULTS: For topicals, systemics and biologics the number of indexed treatment episodes were 25,396, 2963, and 628 respectively. One year after treatment initiation, the proportion of patients who were classed as non-persistent with topicals, systemics and biologics were estimated at 88.3%, 47.9% and 43.2% respectively. Among patients who remained persistent, within 1 year of treatment start the proportions of treatment episodes in which patients were augmented were estimated at 56.0% for topicals, 45.3% for systemics and 58.9% for biologics. In addition, within 1 year of non-persistence, 49.0% of topicals, 60.8% of systemics and 80.2% of biologics treatment episodes were re-initiated, with 35.4-52.5% re-initiated on the non-persistent treatment depending on treatment class. In addition, among patients on biologics, 29.2% of treatment episodes had an insufficient treatment result within 1 year of treatment start. CONCLUSION: Persistency to psoriasis treatments may be sub-optimal and patients who remain persistent relatively frequently receive augmentation therapy or switch to another therapy. Therefore, current treatment options in psoriasis may be insufficient.

14 Review Genetic polymorphisms altering microRNA activity in psoriasis--a key to solve the puzzle of missing heritability? 2014

Pivarcsi, Andor / Ståhle, Mona / Sonkoly, Enikő. ·Unit of Dermatology and Venerology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #24917490.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated skin disease in which the balance in the interplay of immune cells and keratinocytes is disturbed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small regulatory RNAs that stabilize cellular phenotypes and fine-tune signal transduction feedback loops through the regulation of gene networks. Through the regulation of their multiple target genes, miRNAs regulate the development of inflammatory cell subsets and have a significant impact on the magnitude of inflammatory responses. Since the discovery of deregulated miRNA expression in psoriasis, we have learned that they can regulate differentiation, proliferation and cytokine response of keratinocytes, activation and survival of T cells and the crosstalk between immunocytes and keratinocytes through the regulation of chemokine production. In recent years, it became apparent that genetic polymorphisms in miRNA genes and/or in miRNA binding sites of target genes can affect miRNA activity and contribute to disease susceptibility. Psoriasis has a strong genetic background; however, the contribution of genetic variants involving miRNAs is largely unexplored in psoriasis. We propose that changes in miRNA-mediated gene regulation may be a major contributor to the disturbed balance in immune regulation that results in chronic skin inflammation. In this viewpoint essay, we focus on the emerging new aspects of the role of miRNAs in psoriasis and propose that genetic polymorphisms that affect miRNA activity might be important in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

15 Review IL-18 in inflammatory and autoimmune disease. 2013

Sedimbi, Saikiran K / Hägglöf, Thomas / Karlsson, Mikael C I. ·Department of Medicine-Solna, Translational Immunology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, L2:04, 171 76, Stockholm, Sweden, Saikiran.Sedimbi@ki.se. ·Cell Mol Life Sci · Pubmed #23892891.

ABSTRACT: Inflammation serves as the first line of defense in response to tissue injury, guiding the immune system to ensure preservation of the host. The inflammatory response can be divided into a quick initial phase mediated mainly by innate immune cells including neutrophils and macrophages, followed by a late phase that is dominated by lymphocytes. Early in the new millennium, a key component of the inflammatory reaction was discovered with the identification of a number of cytosolic sensor proteins (Nod-like receptors) that assembled into a common structure, the 'inflammasome'. This structure includes an enzyme, caspase-1, which upon activation cleaves pro-forms of cytokines leading to subsequent release of active IL-1 and IL-18. This review focuses on the role of IL-18 in inflammatory responses with emphasis on autoimmune diseases.

16 Review Soluble biomarkers in psoriasis. 2011

Enerbäck, Charlotta. ·Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology and Dermatology, Linköping University, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden. charlotta.enerback@liu.se ·Eur J Dermatol · Pubmed #21856557.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, recurrent skin disorder, characterized by keratinocyte proliferation, T-cell activation and angiogenesis. The results of various clinical and experimental studies indicate that psoriasis is a complex, multifactorial disease with a genetic predisposition. During the past few years, many studies related to psoriasis biomarkers have been conducted. Biomarkers can relate to diagnosis, pathogenesis, prognosis, or therapeutic response. They could provide insight into disease susceptibility and natural history. The identification of biomarkers related to co-morbidities in psoriasis, such as arthritis, cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome, has attracted special interest. This review presents current knowledge of soluble biomarkers in psoriasis, including cytokines, chemokines, pro-angiogenic mediators, growth factors, antimicrobial proteins, neuropeptides and markers of oxidative stress.

17 Review Bench to bedside of CTLA-4: a novel immuno-therapeutic agent for inflammatory disorders. 2009

Sakthivel, Priya. ·Rheumatology Unit, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. priya.sakthivel@ki.se ·Recent Pat Inflamm Allergy Drug Discov · Pubmed #19519585.

ABSTRACT: Co-stimulatory molecules are antigen-independent generators of secondary signals which aid in maintaining the homeostasis of the immune system. CTLA-4 is one among extensively studied co-stimulatory molecules which down-regulate immune response. The attributes of immunosuppressive qualities and capacity to induce tolerance have made its recognition as a potential immuno-therapeutic agent for autoimmune mediated inflammatory disorders. In 2007, European Medical Drug Agency (EMEA) has approved administration of CTLA-4Ig (commercial name: Orencia; generic name: Abatacept), as a mean for co-stimulation blockade, for treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This review is focused on working mechanism of CTLA-4 from its recognition (bench) to its usage as a potential therapeutic agent (bedside) for several inflammatory diseases. The efficacious aspects of chimeric CTLA-4 in phase I, II and III clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis are concisely described. This article highlights recent patents and the future usage of co-stimulatory molecules as a therapeutic agent providing a promising immuno-modulatory approach in regulating inflammation.

18 Review MicroRNAs: novel regulators in skin inflammation. 2008

Sonkoly, E / Ståhle, M / Pivarcsi, A. ·Molecular Dermatology Research Group, Unit of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. ·Clin Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #18419608.

ABSTRACT: Compelling evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs), short, non-protein coding RNAs, are critical for the development and survival of multicellular organisms. Recently, miRNAs were implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and atopic eczema (AE), the two most common chronic inflammatory disorders in skin. In particular, miR-203, the first skin-specific miRNA, showing an intriguing expression profile being confined to skin epithelium, is specifically overexpressed in psoriasis. MiR-146a, another miRNA showing specific upregulation in psoriasis, is involved in the regulation of innate immune responses and the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha pathway. Interestingly, miR-125b, another miRNA involved in the TNF-alpha pathway, is also deregulated in psoriasis and AE. As skin inflammation may serve as a model for chronic inflammatory disorders, it is likely that miRNAs involved in skin inflammation will eventually emerge in other inflammatory or autoimmune disorders, and some of these may become disease markers and therapeutic targets. In this review we present an overview of what is currently known about the roles of miRNAs in chronic inflammatory skin disorders.

19 Clinical Trial Rapid cosmetic improvements in nail psoriasis patients treated with K101-03. 2018

Piraccini, Bianca Maria / Starace, Michela / Toft, Anders. ·Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti 1, 40138 Bologna, Italy. · Moberg Pharma AB, Gustavslundsvägen 42, 167 51 Bromma, Sweden. ·Eur J Dermatol · Pubmed #29724689.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Clinical Trial Secukinumab treatment in new-onset psoriasis: aiming to understand the potential for disease modification - rationale and design of the randomized, multicenter STEPIn study. 2018

Iversen, L / Eidsmo, L / Austad, J / de Rie, M / Osmancevic, A / Skov, L / Talme, T / Bachmann, I / van de Kerkhof, P / Stahle, M / Banerjee, R / Oliver, J / Fasth, A E R / Frueh, J. ·Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Academisch Medisch Centrum, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Novartis Healthcare Private Limited, Hyderabad, India. · Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland. · Novartis Sverige AB, Täby/Stockholm, Sweden. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #29633373.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To date, biological treatments have been assessed in subjects with a long-term history of psoriasis and previous failures to systemic and topical therapies. In rheumatoid arthritis and other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, early intensive systemic treatment prolongs treatment-free remission. We hypothesize that, by treating patients with psoriasis early with an effective systemic therapy, we may be able to alter the clinical outcome and the natural course of the disease. The STEPIn study (NCT03020199) investigates early intervention with secukinumab versus narrow-band ultraviolet B (nb-UVB) phototherapy in subjects with new-onset psoriasis. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether early intervention with either nb-UVB treatment or secukinumab in subjects with new-onset plaque psoriasis might modify the natural course of the disease. METHODS: One hundred and sixty subjects aged 18-50 years with new-onset (≤12 months) moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis and naïve to systemic treatment and phototherapy will be randomized to secukinumab 300 mg or nb-UVB. The Main Study has two treatment arms: Arm A1, subcutaneous secukinumab 300 mg at baseline, Weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4, and every 4 weeks thereafter until and including Week 52; Arm B1, one/two cycles of nb-UVB for 12 weeks each (maximum 28-week break between cycles). After treatment discontinuation, patients will be followed up and monitored for disease activity up to Week 208. A Mechanistic Sub-study will assess immunological changes and pathogenic tissue-resident memory T cells in skin biopsies. CONCLUSIONS: STEPIn is the first study to investigate whether early intensive treatment in new-onset psoriasis can modify the long-term natural course of the disease and thus become a novel treatment strategy for patients with psoriasis.

21 Clinical Trial LC-MS metabolomics of psoriasis patients reveals disease severity-dependent increases in circulating amino acids that are ameliorated by anti-TNFα treatment. 2015

Kamleh, Muhammad Anas / Snowden, Stuart G / Grapov, Dmitry / Blackburn, Gavin J / Watson, David G / Xu, Ning / Ståhle, Mona / Wheelock, Craig E. ·Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Division of Physiological Chemistry 2, Karolinska Institutet , SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. ·J Proteome Res · Pubmed #25361234.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is an immune-mediated highly heterogeneous skin disease in which genetic as well as environmental factors play important roles. In spite of the local manifestations of the disease, psoriasis may progress to affect organs deeper than the skin. These effects are documented by epidemiological studies, but they are not yet mechanistically understood. In order to provide insight into the systemic effects of psoriasis, we performed a nontargeted high-resolution LC-MS metabolomics analysis to measure plasma metabolites from individuals with mild or severe psoriasis as well as healthy controls. Additionally, the effects of the anti-TNFα drug Etanercept on metabolic profiles were investigated in patients with severe psoriasis. Our analyses identified significant psoriasis-associated perturbations in three metabolic pathways: (1) arginine and proline, (2) glycine, serine and threonine, and (3) alanine, aspartate, and glutamate. Etanercept treatment reversed the majority of psoriasis-associated trends in circulating metabolites, shifting the metabolic phenotypes of severe psoriasis toward that of healthy controls. Circulating metabolite levels pre- and post-Etanercept treatment correlated with psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) clinical scoring (R(2) = 0.80; p < 0.0001). Although the responsible mechanism(s) are unclear, these results suggest that psoriasis severity-associated metabolic perturbations may stem from increased demand for collagen synthesis and keratinocyte hyperproliferation or potentially the incidence of cachexia. Data suggest that levels of circulating amino acids are useful for monitoring both the severity of disease as well as therapeutic response to anti-TNFα treatment.

22 Clinical Trial Vitamin D status in psoriasis patients during different treatments with phototherapy. 2010

Osmancevic, Amra / Landin-Wilhelmsen, Kerstin / Larkö, Olle / Krogstad, Anne Lene. ·Dept of Dermatology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Amra.Osmancevic@vgregion.se ·J Photochem Photobiol B · Pubmed #20579901.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Phototherapy (broadband UVB (BUVB), narrowband UVB (NBUVB) and heliotherapy) is commonly used treatment modalities for widespread psoriasis. Vitamin D3, cholecalciferol, is produced in the epidermis by ultraviolet radiation (290-315 nm) of 7-dehydrocholesterol. 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D] are the major circulating metabolites. Sun exposure is the strongest factor influencing 25(OH)D. The similar wavelength spectrum of UVB responsible for D vitamin synthesis (BUVB, 280-315 nm) has been successfully used for years to treat psoriasis. PURPOSE: The aim was: (1) To increase the knowledge about the effects of phototherapy on vitamin D production during treatment of psoriasis. (2) To examine if there were differences between the effect of BUVB, NBUVB and heliotherapy on vitamin D synthesis in psoriasis patients. METHODS: Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)(2)D, PTH, calcium and creatinine, measured before and after phototherapy in white Caucasian patients with moderate to severe active plaque psoriasis, were aggregated from three studies. RESULTS: Psoriasis improved in all patients, with a reduction in PASI ((Psoriasis Area and Severity Index) score of about 75% on all regimes. Serum 25(OH)D increased and PTH decreased after the phototherapy. The increase in 25(OH)D was higher in the BUVB treated patients compared with NBUVB. There was no correlation between the dose of UVB and the increase of 25(OH)D. CONCLUSION: UVB and heliotherapy improved the psoriasis score, increased the serum 25(OH)D levels and reduced the serum PTH concentrations. Vitamin D production in psoriasis patients increased less with NBUVB than with BUVB phototherapy.

23 Clinical Trial Team-based rehabilitation improves long-term aerobic capacity and health-related quality of life in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis. 2010

Hagel, Sofia / Lindqvist, Elisabet / Bremander, Ann / Petersson, Ingemar F. ·Department of Rheumatology, Lund University and Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. sofia.hagel@med.lu.se ·Disabil Rehabil · Pubmed #20175678.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To examine the effect of an interdisciplinary, out-patient rehabilitation programme for patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis on aerobic capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). METHOD: One hundred and seventy-four patients, 115 with peripheral arthritis (PA) (91 women, mean age 53 years, disease duration 16 years) and 59 with spondylarthropathies (SpA), (27 women, mean age 46 years, disease duration 14 years) were consecutively enrolled in 18 days of interdisciplinary rehabilitation. We report data from evaluations at inclusion, at discharge, and at 4 and 12 months using a sub-maximal treadmill test of aerobic capacity and the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) (t-test). RESULTS: At inclusion, less than 20% of all patients tested had aerobic capacity classified as 'average' or better. At discharge, 41% (PA) and 54% (SpA) reached the 'average' level or better with improvements maintained for 12 months. The total NHP scores improved in both groups (mean change -12 (99%CI -15, -9) for PA; mean change -13 (99%CI -19, -8) for SpA) and were maintained. CONCLUSION: Aerobic capacity and HRQOL improved significantly in this interdisciplinary out-patient rehabilitation study, and improvements were maintained for 12 months. The preserved level of aerobic capacity after 12 months indicated a change to a more physically active lifestyle among the participants.

24 Clinical Trial The DESIRE study--psoriasis patients' satisfaction with topical treatment using a fixed combination of calcipotriol and betamethasone dipropionate in daily clinical practice. 2009

Claréus, Birgitta Wilson / Houwing, Ronald / Sindrup, Jens H / Wigchert, Suzanne. ·Läkarhuset Farsta Centrum, Hudmottagningen, Karlandaplan 6, 123 47 Farsta, Sweden. ·Eur J Dermatol · Pubmed #19726275.

ABSTRACT: Daivobet (Dovobet) is a fixed combination ointment of calcipotriol and betamethasone dipropionate. The real-life clinical use of calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate treatment was assessed in this multi-centre, single-group, non-interventional study. Patients with psoriasis vulgaris who had a recent calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate prescription prior to the study start evaluated their satisfaction with the treatment after a 4-week course and after repeated courses for up to 6 months. Of the 1224 patients enrolled, 81.5% completed the 6-month study period. Approximately 75% of the patients were satisfied/very satisfied after one calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate treatment course and the satisfaction was high regardless of initial disease severity. Repeated calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate courses were prescribed for 22.9% of the patients and treatment satisfaction remained high (about 80%). The majority (60%) of the patients were willing to provide co-payments for calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate within their national health insurance system.

25 Article Shared Decision Making in Psoriasis: A Systematic Review of Quantitative and Qualitative Studies. 2019

Larsen, Marie Hamilton / Hagen, Kåre Birger / Krogstad, Anne Lene / Wahl, Astrid Klopstad. ·Department of Health Sciences, Institute of Health and Society, Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Postboks 1130, Blindern, 0318, Oslo, Norway. m.h.larsen@medisin.uio.no. · The Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. · The Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Department of Health Sciences, Institute of Health and Society, Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Postboks 1130, Blindern, 0318, Oslo, Norway. ·Am J Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #30324563.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with psoriasis face numerous treatment and self-management decisions. Shared decision making is a novel approach where patients' preferences and values are considered in cooperation with healthcare professionals before making treatment decisions. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this systematic review was to explore what is illuminated in psoriasis research regarding shared decision making, and to estimate the effects of shared decision-making interventions in this context. METHODS: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods studies were eligible for inclusion. We searched six electronic databases up to January 2018. Two reviewers independently applied inclusion and quality criteria. The SPIDER framework was used to identify eligibility criteria for study inclusion. Narrative and thematic syntheses were utilized to identify prominent themes emerging from the data. RESULTS: A total of 23 studies were included in the review. Of these, we included 18 studies (19 papers) to describe what was illuminated with regard to shared decision making in psoriasis research. Four major themes emerged: interpersonal communication; exchange of competence and knowledge; different world view; and involvement and preference, organized under two analytical themes; "Co-creation of decisions" and "Organization of treatment and treatment needs". For shared decision-making effects, we included four controlled studies. These varied in scope and interventional length and showed limited use of shared decision making-specific outcome measures, reflecting the early stage of the literature. Because of study heterogeneity, a meta-synthesis was not justified. CONCLUSIONS: There appears to be a need to strengthen the relationship between medical doctors and patients with psoriasis. The evident lack of knowledge about each other's competence and the lack of self-efficacy for both patients and providers challenges the basic principles of shared decision making. The effects of shared decision making in psoriasis are inconclusive, and more research appears necessary to determine the possible benefits of shared decision-making interventions.

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