Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Singapore Republic
Based on 66 articles published since 2008
||||

These are the 66 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Singapore Republic during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3
1 Guideline Singapore Chapter of Rheumatologists consensus statement on the eligibility for government subsidy of biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic agents for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis. 2017

Lahiri, Manjari / Teng, Gim-Gee / Cheung, Peter P / Suresh, Ernest / Chia, Faith L / Lui, Nai-Lee / Koh, Dow-Rhoon / Koh, Wei-Howe / Leong, Khai-Pang / Lim, Anita Y N / Ng, Swee-Cheng / Thumboo, Julian / Lau, Tang-Ching / Leong, Keng-Hong. ·Division of Rheumatology, University Medicine Cluster, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Medicine, Alexandra Hospital (Jurong Health), Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. · Koh Wei Howe Arthritis & Rheumatism Medical Clinic, Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre, Singapore, Singapore. · Leong Keng Hong Arthritis and Medical Clinic, Gleneagles Medical Centre, Singapore, Singapore. ·Int J Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26353916.

ABSTRACT: AIM: In Singapore, patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) constitute a significant disease burden. There is good evidence for the efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) in PsA; however cost remains a limiting factor. Non-biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (nbDMARDs) hence remain the first-line treatment option in PsA in spite of limited evidence. The Singapore Chapter of Rheumatologists aims to develop national guidelines for clinical eligibility for government-assisted funding of biologic disease modifying anti- rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) for PsA patients in Singapore. METHODS: Evidence synthesis was performed by reviewing seven published guidelines on use of biologics for PsA. Using the modified Research and Development/University of California at Los Angeles Appropriateness Method (RAM), rheumatologists rated indications for therapies for different clinical scenarios. Points reflecting the output from the formal group consensus were used to formulate the practice recommendations. RESULTS: Ten recommendations were formulated relating to initiation, continuation and options of bDMARD therapy. The panellists agreed that a bDMARD is indicated if a patient has active PsA with at least five swollen and tender joints, digits or entheses and has failed two nbDMARD strategies at optimal doses for at least 3 months each. Any anti-TNF may be used and therapy may be continued if an adequate PsARC response is achieved by 3 months after commencement. CONCLUSION: The recommendations developed by a formal group consensus method may be useful for clinical practice and guiding funding decisions by relevant authorities in making bDMARD usage accessible and equitable to eligible patients in Singapore.

2 Editorial Fibromyalgia as a Contextual Factor Influencing Disease Activity Measurements in Spondyloarthritis and Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Leung, Ying Ying / Thumboo, Julian. ·Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital; and Duke NUS Medical School, Singapore; katyccc@hotmail.com. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital; Duke NUS Medical School; and Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #27803340.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Review Psychological Profile of Patients with Psoriasis. 2018

Lim, Derek Sy / Bewley, Anthony / Oon, Hazel H. ·Internal Medicine Residency, National Healthcare Group, Singapore. ·Ann Acad Med Singapore · Pubmed #30636268.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a global prevalence of approximately 2% and significant psychiatric comorbidity. There is a great deal of existing literature assessing different aspects of psychology in psoriasis. We aimed to conduct an in-depth review of current evidence linking psoriasis to personality traits and psychiatric comorbidities, as well as factors that put these patients at risk of psychopathology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A search of the PubMed database identified 1632 articles. We included articles studying psychological comorbidity in patients with psoriasis, looking especially at personality characteristics, and data linking psoriasis with increased risks of psychological distress, depression, anxiety and suicidality. In particular, we also evaluated subgroups in psoriasis found to be at risk. RESULTS: Patients with psoriasis are more likely to be alexithymic, lack body awareness and possess a Type D personality. Alcohol, but not illicit drug use, disorders are also more common in patients with psoriasis. Patient groups who are especially at risk of psychological distress include women, younger patients, patients with a younger age of disease onset, those who self-assess their psoriasis to be severe, and those with lesions on visible or sensitive areas. Adopting motivational interviewing skills and incorporating the use of learning materials during consultations have been found to be useful. CONCLUSION: The knowledge of personality characteristics, "at-risk" groups, and early recognition of psychological distress among patients with psoriasis can help clinicians provide better holistic care and encourage a change in patients' behaviour.

4 Review The epithelial immune microenvironment (EIME) in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. 2018

Dainichi, Teruki / Kitoh, Akihiko / Otsuka, Atsushi / Nakajima, Saeko / Nomura, Takashi / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kabashima, Kenji. ·Department of Dermatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. dainichi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp. · Department of Dermatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. · Department of Dermatology and Department of Immunology, Cutaneous Biology Research Core, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. kaba@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp. · Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN) and Institute of Medical Biology, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Biopolis, Singapore, Singapore. kaba@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp. ·Nat Immunol · Pubmed #30446754.

ABSTRACT: The skin provides both a physical barrier and an immunologic barrier to external threats. The protective machinery of the skin has evolved to provide situation-specific responses to eliminate pathogens and to provide protection against physical dangers. Dysregulation of this machinery can give rise to the initiation and propagation of inflammatory loops in the epithelial microenvironment that result in inflammatory skin diseases in susceptible people. A defective barrier and microbial dysbiosis drive an interleukin 4 (IL-4) loop that underlies atopic dermatitis, while in psoriasis, disordered keratinocyte signaling and predisposition to type 17 responses drive a pathogenic IL-17 loop. Here we discuss the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis in terms of the epithelial immune microenvironment-the microbiota, keratinocytes and sensory nerves-and the resulting inflammatory loops.

5 Review A systematic review of measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures in psoriatic arthritis: A GRAPPA-OMERACT initiative. 2018

Højgaard, Pil / Klokker, Louise / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Holmsted, Kim / Bartels, Else M / Leung, Ying Ying / Goel, Niti / de Wit, Maarten / Gladman, Dafna D / Mease, Philip / Dreyer, Lene / Kristensen, Lars E / FitzGerald, Oliver / Tillett, William / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Strand, Vibeke / Ogdie, Alexis / Terwee, Caroline B / Christensen, Robin. ·The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, Gentofte Hospital, Kildegaardsvej 28, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. · The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, 20 College Rd, the Academia, S169856, Singapore. · Division of Rheumatology, Duke University School of Medicine, Advisory Services, QuintilesIMS, Durham, NC. · VU University Amsterdam, Department of Medical Humanities, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology and Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, 399 Bathurst St, 1E-410B, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 2S8. · Division of Rheumatology Clinical Research, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Rheumatology, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath, UK. · Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-08, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, Paris, France; Pitie-Salpétrière Hospital, AP-HP, Rheumatology Department, 47-83 Bd de l'Hopital, Paris 75013, France. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Harehills Lane, Leeds LS7 4SA, UK. · Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: Robin.christensen@regionh.dk. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #29037523.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An updated psoriatic arthritis (PsA) core outcome set (COS) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was endorsed at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) meeting in 2016. OBJECTIVES: To synthesize the evidence on measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for PsA and thereby contribute to development of a PsA core outcome measurement set (COMS) as described by the OMERACT Filter 2.0. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO on Jan 1, 2017 to identify full-text articles with an aim of assessing the measurement properties of PROMs in PsA. Two independent reviewers rated the quality of studies using the COnsensus based standards for the Selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist, and performed a qualitative evidence synthesis. RESULTS: Fifty-five studies were included in the systematic review. Forty-four instruments and a total of 89 scales were analyzed. PROMs measuring COS domains with at least fair quality evidence for good validity and reliability (and no evidence for poor properties) included the Stockerau Activity Score for PsA (German), Psoriasis Symptom Inventory, visual analogue scale for Patient Global, 36 Item Short Form Health Survey Physical Function subscale, Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, PsA Impact of Disease questionnaire, PsA Quality of Life questionnaire, VITACORA-19, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue scale and Social Role Participation Questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: At least one PROM with some evidence for aspects of validity and reliability was available for six of the eight mandatory domains of the PsA COS.

6 Review Revisiting murine models for atopic dermatitis and psoriasis with multipolar cytokine axes. 2017

Kabashima, Kenji / Nomura, Takashi. ·Department of Dermatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawahara, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan; Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN) and Institute of Medical Biology, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Biopolis, Singapore. Electronic address: kaba@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp. · Department of Dermatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawahara, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan. ·Curr Opin Immunol · Pubmed #28915378.

ABSTRACT: Atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis are one of the common skin diseases. Animal models are a powerful tool to analyze these diseases, which are complicated by multiple cytokine pathways. However, many discrepancies between the human diseases and murine models have been noticed. Therefore, investigators should be aware of the differences between the murine AD models and human AD when translating murine data to human skin diseases. This review highlights the differences between the inflammatory profiles between murine models and human diseases focusing on AD and psoriasis.

7 Review Performing Skin Microbiome Research: A Method to the Madness. 2017

Kong, Heidi H / Andersson, Björn / Clavel, Thomas / Common, John E / Jackson, Scott A / Olson, Nathan D / Segre, Julia A / Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia. ·Dermatology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Electronic address: konghe@mail.nih.gov. · Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Core Facility NGS/Microbiome, ZIEL Institute for Food and Health, Technical University of Munich, Freising, Germany. · Institute of Medical Biology, A*STAR, Singapore. · Biosystems and Biomaterials Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA. · Translational and Functional Genomics Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Institute of Environmental Medicine, UNIKA-T, Technical University of Munich and Helmholtz Zentrum München-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Augsburg, Germany; Christine Kühne Center for Allergy Research and Education, Davos, Switzerland. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #28063650.

ABSTRACT: Growing interest in microbial contributions to human health and disease has increasingly led investigators to examine the microbiome in both healthy skin and cutaneous disorders, including acne, psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis. The need for common language, effective study design, and validated methods is critical for high-quality standardized research. Features, unique to skin, pose particular challenges when conducting microbiome research. This review discusses microbiome research standards and highlights important factors to consider, including clinical study design, skin sampling, sample processing, DNA sequencing, control inclusion, and data analysis.

8 Review Novel systemic therapies for the treatment of psoriasis. 2016

Tan, Ki-Wei / Griffiths, Christopher E M. ·a Dermatology Centre, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Salford Royal Hospital , University of Manchester, Manchester , UK. · b Department of Dermatology , Changi General Hospital , Singapore. ·Expert Opin Pharmacother · Pubmed #26548897.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The immunopathogenesis of psoriasis has led to the discovery and development of several promising treatment options for psoriasis, including those that target the IL-17 and IL-23 pathways as well as small molecules that act on intracellular signaling pathways including the Janus kinase inhibitor and phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Studies have demonstrated efficacy although long-term risks are not fully known. This review looks at novel systemic therapies for psoriasis that have emerged recently. AREAS COVERED: Systemic treatments for psoriasis that are in the late phase of development were reviewed, with the main focus on the efficacy and adverse effects of individual treatments. EXPERT OPINION: The future of psoriasis treatment is likely to be based on clinical, genetic and immune biomarkers that will individualize treatment and may potentially optimize disease outcome.

9 Review Therapeutic strategies in psoriasis patients with psoriatic arthritis: focus on new agents. 2013

Gan, Emily Yiping / Chong, Wei-Sheng / Tey, Hong Liang. ·National Skin Centre, 1 Mandalay Road, Singapore. emily.ganyp@gmail.com ·BioDrugs · Pubmed #23580094.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis affects approximately 6-42 % of patients with psoriasis. It is useful for physicians or dermatologists managing psoriasis patients to be aware of how to concurrently manage the joint manifestations, as it is preferable and convenient to use a single agent in such patients. However, only certain therapies are effective for both. Systemic agents, which can be used for both skin and joint manifestations, include methotrexate and ciclosporin. For the group of biologic agents, the tumor necrosis factor inhibitors such as adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, golimumab and certolizumab are effective. Ustekinumab is a more recently developed agent belonging to the group of anti-IL-12p40 antibodies and has been shown to be efficacious. Newer drugs in the treatment armamentarium that have shown efficacy for both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis consist of the anti-IL-17 agent, secukinumab, and a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, apremilast. The other anti-IL-17 agents, ixekizumab and brodalumab, as well as the oral Jak inhibitor, tofacitinib, have very limited but promising data. This review paper provides a good overview of the agents that can be used for the concurrent management of skin and joint psoriasis.

10 Review Nail psoriasis: a review. 2012

Tan, Eugene S T / Chong, Wei-Sheng / Tey, Hong Liang. ·National Skin Centre, Singapore. eugenetan@nsc.gov.sg ·Am J Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #22784035.

ABSTRACT: Nail psoriasis is common, occurring in up to half of patients with psoriasis and in 90% of patients with psoriatic arthritis. Left untreated, it may progress to debilitating nail disease, which leads to significant functional impairment. The most common clinical signs of nail psoriasis are nail plate pitting and onycholysis. Other classical signs include oil drop discoloration, subungual hyperkeratosis, and splinter hemorrhages. The modified Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (mNAPSI) can be used to grade the severity of nail psoriasis, while the Nail Psoriasis Quality of Life Scale (NPQ10) is a questionnaire that evaluates the impact of nail psoriasis on the patient's functional status and quality of life. Treatment of nail psoriasis should be individualized according to the patient's preferences, severity of nail changes, and presence of skin and/or joint involvement. Both topical and intralesional therapies are safe and effective treatment modalities for nail disease, but are limited by poor adherence and pain, respectively. Systemic therapy such as oral retinoids may be considered for widespread nail disease causing significant morbidity. Among biologic agents, tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors and T-cell-targeted therapies such as ustekinumab may be useful for refractory severe nail psoriasis.

11 Clinical Trial Phase 3, open-label, randomized study of the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of ixekizumab following subcutaneous administration using a prefilled syringe or an autoinjector in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis (UNCOVER-A). 2017

Callis Duffin, K / Bagel, J / Bukhalo, M / Mercado Clement, I J / Choi, S L / Zhao, F / Gill, A / Pangallo, B / Shuler, C / Mallbris, L / Jackson, K. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. · Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey, Windsor, NJ, USA. · Altman Dermatology Associates, Arlington Heights, IL, USA. · Lilly-NUS Centre for Clinical Pharmacology, Singapore City, Singapore. · Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA. · Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, UK. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #27500949.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The efficacy of ixekizumab, an anti-interleukin-17A (anti-IL-17A) monoclonal IgG4 antibody, was demonstrated in moderate-to-severe psoriasis patients when administered via prefilled syringe (PFS). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of two drug delivery devices on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of ixekizumab as well as efficacy and safety with both devices. METHODS: In the first 12 weeks of an open-label, phase 3 study, moderate-to-severe psoriasis patients were randomized to ixekizumab delivery via PFS or autoinjector device. Randomization was stratified by weight (<80 kg, 80-100 kg, >100 kg), injection assistance (yes/no) and injection site (arm, thigh or abdomen). Following a 160-mg initial dose at week 0, patients received subcutaneous 80-mg ixekizumab as a single injection every 2 weeks for 12 weeks. Blood samples were collected following the initial 160-mg dose on days 2, 4, 7, 10 and 14 for PK analysis. Primary PK parameters were maximum concentration (C RESULTS: Of 204 randomized patients, 192 were included in the PK analysis (PFS: 94; autoinjector: 98). The PFS and autoinjector showed similar geometric mean C CONCLUSION: The PK, efficacy and safety of ixekizumab administered subcutaneously by PFS and autoinjector were similar. Clinicaltrials.gov number: NCT01777191 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01777191.

12 Clinical Trial Population exposure-response model to support dosing evaluation of ixekizumab in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis. 2014

Tham, Lai-San / Tang, Cheng-Cai / Choi, Siak-Leng / Satterwhite, Julie H / Cameron, Gregory S / Banerjee, Subhashis. ·Lilly-NUS Centre for Clinical Pharmacology, Singapore. ·J Clin Pharmacol · Pubmed #24752880.

ABSTRACT: Ixekizumab (LY2439821), a humanized immunoglobulin G subclass 4 (IgG4) monoclonal antibody that selectively binds and neutralizes interleukin (IL) 17A has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of psoriasis. A population pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics model was developed using NONMEM 7.2 to describe the temporal relationship between ixekizumab concentrations and absolute Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) scores from a phase 2 dose-finding study in chronic plaque psoriasis. The objective was to inform dose-selection for further development. The primary endpoint, PASI 75 (75% or greater improvement from baseline PASI score) was then derived from each individual's absolute PASI score. The population pharmacokinetics of ixekizumab was characterized by a two-compartment model, while the exposure-response relationship was characterized using an indirect response model that described the pharmacological effects of ixekizumab and placebo in the form of inhibition of the formation of psoriatic skin lesions. PASI 75 responder status at the Week 12 primary endpoint was found to be a significant covariate on the concentration producing half maximal effect (EC50 ). While the results suggested patient may have different levels of sensitivity to ixekizumab, it is possible that nonresponder patients assigned to lower doses of ixekizumab may potentially become responders to ixekizumab if given doses that yield adequate exposures.

13 Article Cross-sectional study of clinical distinctions between neuropathic and inflammatory pruritus. 2018

Rosen, Jordan Daniel / Fostini, Anna Chiara / Chan, Yoing Huak / Nattkemper, Leigh Ann / Yosipovitch, Gil. ·Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida; Miami Itch Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida. · Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida; Miami Itch Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida; Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Biostatistic Unit, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida; Miami Itch Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida. Electronic address: gyosipovitch@med.miami.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29864468.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Article Content and Face Validity and Feasibility of 5 Candidate Instruments for Psoriatic Arthritis Randomized Controlled Trials: The PsA OMERACT Core Set Workshop at the GRAPPA 2017 Annual Meeting. 2018

Holland, Richard / Tillett, William / Ogdie, Alexis / Leung, Ying Y / Gladman, Dafna D / Callis Duffin, Kristina / Coates, Laura C / Mease, Philip J / Eder, Lihi / Strand, Vibeke / Elmamoun, Musaab / Højgaard, Pil / Chau, Jeffrey / de Wit, Maarten / Goel, Niti / Lindsay, Chris A / FitzGerald, Oliver / Shea, Bev / Beaton, Dorcas / Orbai, Ana-Maria. ·From the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Medical Centre, Sydney, Australia; Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore; University of Toronto, Krembil Research Institute, Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA; University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA; Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA; Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincents University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, The Capital Region of Denmark; Hong Kong Psoriatic Arthritis Association, Hong Kong, China; VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; IQVIA, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA; School of Epidemiology, Public Health, and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, and Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Musculoskeletal Health and Outcomes Research, St. Michael's Hospital and Institute for Work and Health, and Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, and the Institute for Health Policy Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · R. Holland, MB ChB, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Medical Centre; W. Tillett, BSc, MB ChB, PhD, MRCP, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases; A. Ogdie, MD, MSCE, University of Pennsylvania; Y.Y. Leung, MB ChB, MD, Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore; D.D. Gladman, MD, FRCPC, Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, Senior Scientist, Krembil Research Institute, Director, Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network; K. Callis Duffin, MD, MS, Department of Dermatology, University of Utah; L.C. Coates, MB ChB, PhD, University of Oxford; P.J. Mease, MD, Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine; L. Eder, MD, PhD, Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto; V. Strand, MD, Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University; M. Elmamoun, MBBS, MRCPI, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincents University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin; P. Højgaard, MD, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital; J. Chau, BA, MCS, Patient Research Partner, Hong Kong Psoriatic Arthritis Association; M. de Wit, PhD, Patient Research Partner, VU Medical Centre; N. Goel, MD, Patient Research Partner, IQVIA, Duke University School of Medicine; C.A. Lindsay, PharmD, Patient Research Partner; O. FitzGerald, MD, FRCPI, FRCP(UK), Newman Clinical Research Professor, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincents University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin; B. Shea, School of Epidemiology, Public Health, and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, and Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Clinical Epidemiology Program; D. Beaton, BScOT, PhD, Musculoskeletal Health and Outcomes Research, St. Michael's Hospital and Institute for Work and Health, and Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, and the Institute for Health Policy Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto; A.M. Orbai, MD, MHS, Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. · From the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Medical Centre, Sydney, Australia; Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore; University of Toronto, Krembil Research Institute, Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA; University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA; Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA; Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincents University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, The Capital Region of Denmark; Hong Kong Psoriatic Arthritis Association, Hong Kong, China; VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; IQVIA, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA; School of Epidemiology, Public Health, and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, and Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Musculoskeletal Health and Outcomes Research, St. Michael's Hospital and Institute for Work and Health, and Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, and the Institute for Health Policy Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. aorbai1@jhmi.edu. · R. Holland, MB ChB, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Medical Centre; W. Tillett, BSc, MB ChB, PhD, MRCP, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases; A. Ogdie, MD, MSCE, University of Pennsylvania; Y.Y. Leung, MB ChB, MD, Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore; D.D. Gladman, MD, FRCPC, Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, Senior Scientist, Krembil Research Institute, Director, Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network; K. Callis Duffin, MD, MS, Department of Dermatology, University of Utah; L.C. Coates, MB ChB, PhD, University of Oxford; P.J. Mease, MD, Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine; L. Eder, MD, PhD, Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto; V. Strand, MD, Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University; M. Elmamoun, MBBS, MRCPI, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincents University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin; P. Højgaard, MD, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital; J. Chau, BA, MCS, Patient Research Partner, Hong Kong Psoriatic Arthritis Association; M. de Wit, PhD, Patient Research Partner, VU Medical Centre; N. Goel, MD, Patient Research Partner, IQVIA, Duke University School of Medicine; C.A. Lindsay, PharmD, Patient Research Partner; O. FitzGerald, MD, FRCPI, FRCP(UK), Newman Clinical Research Professor, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincents University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin; B. Shea, School of Epidemiology, Public Health, and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, and Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Clinical Epidemiology Program; D. Beaton, BScOT, PhD, Musculoskeletal Health and Outcomes Research, St. Michael's Hospital and Institute for Work and Health, and Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, and the Institute for Health Policy Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto; A.M. Orbai, MD, MHS, Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. aorbai1@jhmi.edu. ·J Rheumatol Suppl · Pubmed #29858348.

ABSTRACT: The Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA)-Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Set working group is in the process of selecting core instruments for PsA clinical trials. During a 2-h workshop and breakout group discussions at the GRAPPA 2017 annual meeting in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, participants discussed the first set of candidate instruments to be taken through the OMERACT Filter 2.1 instrument selection process: 66/68 swollen/tender joint count (66/68JC), Spondyloarthritis Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) enthesitis index, patient's global assessment (GRAPPA and OMERACT formulations), Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Psoriatic Arthritis Impact of Disease (PsAID) questionnaires 9 and 12, and Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) Fatigue. Based on the assessment of domain match (content and face validity) and feasibility according to the OMERACT instrument selection criteria, the working group recommends continuing with appraisal of construct validity and discrimination for 66/68JC, SPARCC, PsAID 9 and 12, HAQ-DI, and FACIT-Fatigue. In addition, it recommends repeating the OMERACT Filter 2.1 process for patient global instruments because of insufficient votes. Additional sets of candidate instruments for the PsA core instrument set will be evaluated in a similar process.

15 Article Asian consensus on assessment and management of mild to moderate plaque psoriasis with topical therapy. 2018

Imafuku, Shinichi / Zheng, Min / Tada, Yayoi / Zhang, Xibao / Theng, Colin / Thevarajah, Suganthi / Zhao, Yi / Song, Hae Jun. ·Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka, Japan. · Department of Dermatology, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China. · Department of Dermatology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. · Institute of Dermatology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China. · The Skin Specialists & Laser Clinic, Singapore. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Dermatology, Beijing Tsinghua Changgung Hospital, School of Clinical Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. · Department of Dermatology, Guro Hospital, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, Korea. ·J Dermatol · Pubmed #29740870.

ABSTRACT: A working group of dermatologists in Asian countries assessed the current status of psoriatic management in the region to prepare a consensus report on topical treatment in mild to moderate plaque psoriasis. Even though the association of psoriasis with systemic comorbidities is increasingly acknowledged, psoriasis is still lower in health-care priority lists in the region. The psychosocial impact of psoriasis may be greater in Asian countries due to cultural norms and social discrimination. Non-adherence to treatment is also common among Asians. The current care given to patients with mild to moderate psoriasis needs to be streamlined, enhanced and organized with a patient-centered care approach to achieve better outcomes. A comprehensive assessment of the disease severity and its impact on a patient's life is required before initiating treatment. Education and active involvement of the patient in the treatment plan is an important part of psoriatic management. It is recommended to personalize topical treatment to meet the needs of the patient, depending on disease severity, psychosocial impact, the patient's expectations and, more importantly, the patient's willingness and ability to actively follow the treatment procedure. Fixed-dose combination of corticosteroid and vitamin D analogs is the preferred topical medication for both initial and maintenance phases of treatment. The fast containment of the disease is the goal of the initial phase of 4-8 weeks and it demands a potent fast-acting topical therapy. Satisfactory control of the disease and prevention of relapses should be achieved during the maintenance phase with twice a week or weekend applications.

16 Article The Genetics of Chronic Itch: Gene Expression in the Skin of Patients with Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis with Severe Itch. 2018

Nattkemper, Leigh A / Tey, Hong Liang / Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo / Lee, Helen / Mollanazar, Nicholas K / Albornoz, Christian / Sanders, Kristen M / Yosipovitch, Gil. ·Department of Dermatology, Miami Itch Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA. · Department of Dermatology, National Skin Center, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Dermatology, Temple University Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Miami Itch Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA. Electronic address: gyosipovitch@med.miami.edu. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #29317264.

ABSTRACT: To identify itch-related mediators and receptors that are differentially expressed in pruritic skin, we used RNA sequencing to analyze the complete transcriptome in skin from paired itchy, lesional and nonitchy, nonlesional skin biopsies from 25 patients with atopic dermatitis and 25 patients with psoriasis and site-matched biopsies from 30 healthy controls. This analysis identified 18,000 differentially expressed genes common between itchy atopic and psoriatic skin compared with healthy skin. Of those, almost 2,000 genes were differentially expressed between itchy and nonitchy skin in atopic and psoriatic subjects. Overexpression of several genes, such as phospholipase A2 IVD, substance P, voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7, and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1, in itchy skin was positively correlated with itch intensity ratings in both atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Cytokines such as IL-17A, IL-23A, and IL-31 had elevated gene transcript levels in both itchy atopic and psoriatic skin. However, expression of genes for TRP vanilloid 2, TRP ankyrin 1, protease-activated receptor 2, protease-activated receptor 4, and IL-10 was found to be increased only in pruritic atopic skin, whereas expression of genes for TRP melastatin 8, TRP vanilloid 3, phospholipase C, and IL-36α/γ was elevated only in pruritic psoriatic skin. This "itchscriptome" analysis will lead to an increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms of chronic pruritus and provide targets for itch treatment irrespective of disease state.

17 Article First Case Report of Aseptic Meningitis Induced by Adalimumab Administered for Treatment of Chronic Plaque Psoriasis. 2017

Wang, D Y / Chong, W S / Pan, J Y / Heng, Y K. ·National Skin Centre, Singapore. ·J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol · Pubmed #28570223.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Article Investigating the potential of Oxymatrine as a psoriasis therapy. 2017

Chen, Qian / Zhou, Hui / Yang, Yinxue / Chi, Mingwei / Xie, Nan / Zhang, Hong / Deng, Xingwang / Leavesley, David / Shi, Huijuan / Xie, Yan. ·Ningxia Medical University, Ningxia, China. · Department of Dermatology, General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Ningxia, China. · President of General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Ningxia, China. · Medical Affairs Office, General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Ningxia, China. · Tissue Organ Bank & Tissue Engineering Centre, General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Ningxia, China. · Tissue Organ Bank & Tissue Engineering Centre, General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Ningxia, China; Tissue Technologies, Institute of Medical Biology, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore; Skin Research Institute of Singapore, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore; School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia; Lee Kong Chain School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. · Department of Dermatology, General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Ningxia, China. Electronic address: shjyjm@163.com. · Tissue Organ Bank & Tissue Engineering Centre, General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Ningxia, China; School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address: y2.xie@qut.edu.au. ·Chem Biol Interact · Pubmed #28450041.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, stubbornly intractable, with substantial consequences for patient physical and mental welfare. Approaches currently available to treat psoriasis are not satisfactory due to undesirable side-effects or expense. Psoriasis is characterized by hyperproliferation and inflammation. Oxymatrine, an active component extracted from Sophora flavescens, has been demonstrated to possess anti-proliferation, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumorigenic, immune regulation and pro-apoptotic properties. This investigation presents a detailed retrospective review examining the effect of Oxymatrine on psoriasis and investigates the mechanisms underlying patient responses to Oxymatrine. We confirm that Oxymatrine administration significantly reduced the Psoriasis Area Severity Index score, with high efficacy compared to the control group. In addition, we have found that Oxymatrine significantly inhibits the viability, proliferation and differentiation of human keratinocyte in vitro. Immunohistochemical analysis indicates Oxymatrine significantly suppresses the expression of Pan-Cytokeratin, p63 and keratin 10. The results indicate that the suppression of p63 expression may lead to the anti-proliferation effect of Oxymatrine on human skin keratinocytes. Oxymatrine does not affect the formation of basement membrane, which is very important to maintain the normal function of human skin keratinocytes. In summary, Oxymatrine offers an effective, economical, and safe treatment for patients presenting with intractable psoriasis vulgaris.

19 Article RIG-I antiviral signaling drives interleukin-23 production and psoriasis-like skin disease. 2017

Zhu, Huiyuan / Lou, Fangzhou / Yin, Qianqian / Gao, Yuanyuan / Sun, Yang / Bai, Jing / Xu, Zhenyao / Liu, Zhaoyuan / Cai, Wei / Ke, Fang / Zhang, Lingyun / Zhou, Hong / Wang, Hong / Wang, Gang / Chen, Xiang / Zhang, Hongxin / Wang, Zhugang / Ginhoux, Florent / Lu, Chuanjian / Su, Bing / Wang, Honglin. ·Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of Chinese Ministry of Education, Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Shanghai Institute of Immunology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai, China. · Department of Dermatology, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, China. · Department of Dermatology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China. · Research Centre for Experimental Medicine of Rujin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore City, Singapore. · Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Guangdong Provincial Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, The Second Clinical School of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China. · Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of Chinese Ministry of Education, Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Shanghai Institute of Immunology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai, China honglin.wang@sjtu.edu.cn. · Shanghai Key Laboratory for Tumor Microenvironment and Inflammation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai, China. ·EMBO Mol Med · Pubmed #28377495.

ABSTRACT: Retinoic acid inducible-gene I (RIG-I) functions as one of the major sensors of RNA viruses.

20 Article Updating the Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set: A Report from the PsA Workshop at OMERACT 2016. 2017

Orbai, Ana-Maria / de Wit, Maarten / Mease, Philip J / Callis Duffin, Kristina / Elmamoun, Musaab / Tillett, William / Campbell, Willemina / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Goel, Niti / Gossec, Laure / Hoejgaard, Pil / Leung, Ying Ying / Lindsay, Chris / Strand, Vibeke / van der Heijde, Désirée M / Shea, Bev / Christensen, Robin / Coates, Laura / Eder, Lihi / McHugh, Neil / Kalyoncu, Umut / Steinkoenig, Ingrid / Ogdie, Alexis. ·From the Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington; Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; Quintiles, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina; Division of Immunology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California; Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam; Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases; Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals UK National Health Service (NHS) Trust, Leeds, UK; Toronto Western Hospital; University of Toronto; Krembil Research Institute; Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network; Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto; Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventative Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Paris, France; The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark; Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore; Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. aorbai1@jhmi.edu. · A.M. Orbai, MD, MHS, Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; M. de Wit, PhD, Patient Research Partner, VU Medical Centre; P.J. Mease, MD, Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center, and University of Washington School of Medicine; K. Callis Duffin, MD, Department of Dermatology, University of Utah; M. Elmamoun, MBBS, MRCPI, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin; W. Tillett, BSc, MB ChB, PhD, MRCP, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases; W. Campbell, BEd LLB, Patient Research Partner, Toronto Western Hospital; O. FitzGerald, MD, FRCPI, FRCP(UK), Newman Clinical Research Professor, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin; D.D. Gladman, MD, FRCPC, Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, and Senior Scientist, Krembil Research Institute, and Director, Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network; N. Goel, MD, Patient Research Partner, Quintiles, Duke University School of Medicine; L. Gossec, MD, PhD, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS), and AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Department of Rheumatology; P. Hoejgaard, MD, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital; Y.Y. Leung, MD, PhD, Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital; C.A. Lindsay, PharmD, Patient Research Partner; V. Strand, MD, Division of Immunology, Stanford University; D.M. van der Heijde, MD, PhD, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center; B. Shea, MSc, PhD, Senior Methodologist, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Adjunct Professor, School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa; R. Christensen, BSc, MSc, PhD, Head of Unit, Professor of Clinical Epidemiology, Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital; L. Coates, MB ChB, PhD, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust; L. Eder, MD, PhD, Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto; N. McHugh, MBChB, MD, FRCP, FRCPath, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases; U. Kalyoncu, MD, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Hacettepe University; I. Steinkoenig, BA, Patient Research Partner, Cleveland Clinic; A. Ogdie, MD, MSCE, University of Pennsylvania. aorbai1@jhmi.edu. · From the Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington; Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; Quintiles, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina; Division of Immunology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California; Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam; Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases; Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals UK National Health Service (NHS) Trust, Leeds, UK; Toronto Western Hospital; University of Toronto; Krembil Research Institute; Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network; Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto; Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventative Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Paris, France; The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark; Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore; Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. · A.M. Orbai, MD, MHS, Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; M. de Wit, PhD, Patient Research Partner, VU Medical Centre; P.J. Mease, MD, Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center, and University of Washington School of Medicine; K. Callis Duffin, MD, Department of Dermatology, University of Utah; M. Elmamoun, MBBS, MRCPI, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin; W. Tillett, BSc, MB ChB, PhD, MRCP, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases; W. Campbell, BEd LLB, Patient Research Partner, Toronto Western Hospital; O. FitzGerald, MD, FRCPI, FRCP(UK), Newman Clinical Research Professor, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin; D.D. Gladman, MD, FRCPC, Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, and Senior Scientist, Krembil Research Institute, and Director, Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network; N. Goel, MD, Patient Research Partner, Quintiles, Duke University School of Medicine; L. Gossec, MD, PhD, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS), and AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Department of Rheumatology; P. Hoejgaard, MD, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital; Y.Y. Leung, MD, PhD, Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital; C.A. Lindsay, PharmD, Patient Research Partner; V. Strand, MD, Division of Immunology, Stanford University; D.M. van der Heijde, MD, PhD, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center; B. Shea, MSc, PhD, Senior Methodologist, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Adjunct Professor, School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa; R. Christensen, BSc, MSc, PhD, Head of Unit, Professor of Clinical Epidemiology, Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital; L. Coates, MB ChB, PhD, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust; L. Eder, MD, PhD, Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto; N. McHugh, MBChB, MD, FRCP, FRCPath, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases; U. Kalyoncu, MD, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Hacettepe University; I. Steinkoenig, BA, Patient Research Partner, Cleveland Clinic; A. Ogdie, MD, MSCE, University of Pennsylvania. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #28148697.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To include the patient perspective in accordance with the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 in the updated Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and longitudinal observational studies (LOS). METHODS: At OMERACT 2016, research conducted to update the PsA Core Domain Set was presented and discussed in breakout groups. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was voted on and endorsed by OMERACT participants. RESULTS: We conducted a systematic literature review of domains measured in PsA RCT and LOS, and identified 24 domains. We conducted 24 focus groups with 130 patients from 7 countries representing 5 continents to identify patient domains. We achieved consensus through 2 rounds of separate surveys with 50 patients and 75 physicians, and a nominal group technique meeting with 12 patients and 12 physicians. We conducted a workshop and breakout groups at OMERACT 2016 in which findings were presented and discussed. The updated PsA Core Domain Set endorsed with 90% agreement by OMERACT 2016 participants included musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity, fatigue, pain, patient's global assessment, physical function, health-related quality of life, and systemic inflammation, which were recommended for all RCT and LOS. These were important, but not required in all RCT and LOS: economic cost, emotional well-being, participation, and structural damage. Independence, sleep, stiffness, and treatment burden were on the research agenda. CONCLUSION: The updated PsA Core Domain Set was endorsed at OMERACT 2016. Next steps for the PsA working group include evaluation of PsA outcome measures and development of a PsA Core Outcome Measurement Set.

21 Article Stiffness Is the Cardinal Symptom of Inflammatory Musculoskeletal Diseases, Yet Still Variably Measured: Report from the OMERACT 2016 Stiffness Special Interest Group. 2017

Halls, Serena / Sinnathurai, Premarani / Hewlett, Sarah / Mackie, Sarah L / March, Lyn / Bartlett, Susan J / Bingham, Clifton O / Alten, Rieke / Campbell, Ina / Hill, Catherine L / Holt, Robert J / Hughes, Rod / Kirwan, John R / Leong, Amye L / Leung, Ying Ying / Lyddiatt, Anne / Neill, Lorna / Orbai, Ana-Maria. ·From the Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England; University of Bristol Academic Rheumatology Unit, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds; Department of Rheumatology, Ashford and St. Peter's National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, Chertsey; Patient Research Partner PMR-GCA Scotland, Forest Lodge, Foulden, Berwickshire, UK; Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District; Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, New South Wales; University of Sydney, Sydney; Rheumatology Unit, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide; Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia; Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Division of Rheumatology, and Division Respiratory Epidemiology, McGill University/McGill University Health Centers, Montreal, Québec; Patient Research Partner, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto; Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group, Institute of Population Health, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois; Healthy Motivation and Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health the Bone and Joint Decade, Santa Barbara, California, USA; Schlosspark-Klinik, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Horizon Pharma LTD, Dublin, Ireland; Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore. serena.halls@uwe.ac.uk. · S. Halls, PhD, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England; P. Sinnathurai, BSc(Med) MBBS, FRACP, Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District, and Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, and University of Sydney; S. Hewlett, PhD, RN, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England; S.L. Mackie, BM, BCh, PhD, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine; L. March, MD, Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District, and Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, and University of Sydney; S.J. Bartlett, MD, Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Division of Rheumatology, and Division Respiratory Epidemiology, McGill University/McGill University Health Centers, and Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; C.O. Bingham III, MD, Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; R. Alten, MD, Schlosspark-Klinik, University Medicine Berlin; I. Campbell, BEd LLB, Patient Research Partner, Toronto Western Hospital; C.L. Hill, MBBS, MD, MSc, FRACP, Staff Specialist, Rheumatology Unit, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, and Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide; R.J. Holt, PharmD, MBA, University of Illinois-Chicago, and Horizon Pharma LTD; R. Hughes, MA, MD, FRCP, Department of Rheumatology, Ashford and St. Peter's NHS Foundation Trust; J.R. Kirwan, MD, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England, and University of Bristol Academic Rheumatology Unit, Bristol Royal Infirmary; A.L. Leong, MBA, Patient Partner, Healthy Motivation and Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health the Bone and Joint Decade; Y.Y. Leung, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital; A. Lyddiatt, Patient Research Partner, Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group, Institute of Population Health; L.M. Neill, BSc, CPhys, MInstP, Patient Research Partner, Trustee and Secretary, PMR-GCA Scotland; A.M. Morbai, MD, MHS, Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. serena.halls@uwe.ac.uk. · From the Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England; University of Bristol Academic Rheumatology Unit, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds; Department of Rheumatology, Ashford and St. Peter's National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, Chertsey; Patient Research Partner PMR-GCA Scotland, Forest Lodge, Foulden, Berwickshire, UK; Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District; Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, New South Wales; University of Sydney, Sydney; Rheumatology Unit, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide; Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia; Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Division of Rheumatology, and Division Respiratory Epidemiology, McGill University/McGill University Health Centers, Montreal, Québec; Patient Research Partner, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto; Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group, Institute of Population Health, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois; Healthy Motivation and Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health the Bone and Joint Decade, Santa Barbara, California, USA; Schlosspark-Klinik, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Horizon Pharma LTD, Dublin, Ireland; Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore. · S. Halls, PhD, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England; P. Sinnathurai, BSc(Med) MBBS, FRACP, Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District, and Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, and University of Sydney; S. Hewlett, PhD, RN, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England; S.L. Mackie, BM, BCh, PhD, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine; L. March, MD, Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District, and Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, and University of Sydney; S.J. Bartlett, MD, Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Division of Rheumatology, and Division Respiratory Epidemiology, McGill University/McGill University Health Centers, and Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; C.O. Bingham III, MD, Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; R. Alten, MD, Schlosspark-Klinik, University Medicine Berlin; I. Campbell, BEd LLB, Patient Research Partner, Toronto Western Hospital; C.L. Hill, MBBS, MD, MSc, FRACP, Staff Specialist, Rheumatology Unit, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, and Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide; R.J. Holt, PharmD, MBA, University of Illinois-Chicago, and Horizon Pharma LTD; R. Hughes, MA, MD, FRCP, Department of Rheumatology, Ashford and St. Peter's NHS Foundation Trust; J.R. Kirwan, MD, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England, and University of Bristol Academic Rheumatology Unit, Bristol Royal Infirmary; A.L. Leong, MBA, Patient Partner, Healthy Motivation and Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health the Bone and Joint Decade; Y.Y. Leung, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital; A. Lyddiatt, Patient Research Partner, Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group, Institute of Population Health; L.M. Neill, BSc, CPhys, MInstP, Patient Research Partner, Trustee and Secretary, PMR-GCA Scotland; A.M. Morbai, MD, MHS, Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #27980014.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objectives of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Stiffness special interest group (SIG) are to characterize stiffness as an outcome in rheumatic disease and to identify and validate a stiffness patient-reported outcome (PRO) in rheumatology. METHODS: At OMERACT 2016, international groups presented and discussed results of several concurrent research projects on stiffness: a literature review of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) stiffness PRO measures, a qualitative investigation into the RA and polymyalgia rheumatica patient perspective of stiffness, data-driven stiffness conceptual model development, development and testing of an RA stiffness PRO measure, and a quantitative work testing stiffness items in patients with RA and psoriatic arthritis. RESULTS: The literature review identified 52 individual stiffness PRO measures assessing morning or early morning stiffness severity/intensity or duration. Items were heterogeneous, had little or inconsistent psychometric property evidence, and did not appear to have been developed according to the PRO development guidelines. A poor match between current stiffness PRO and the conceptual model identifying the RA patient experience of stiffness was identified, highlighting a major flaw in PRO selection according to the OMERACT filter 2.0. CONCLUSION: Discussions within the Stiffness SIG highlighted the importance of further research on stiffness and defined a research agenda.

22 Article Integration of expression quantitative trait loci and pleiotropy identifies a novel psoriasis susceptibility gene, PTPN1. 2017

Yin, Xianyong / Lin, Yuan / Shen, Changbing / Wang, Ling / Zuo, Xianbo / Zheng, Xiaodong / Yang, Sen / Liu, Jianjun / Wilhelmsen, Kirk C / Zhang, Xuejun. ·Institute of Dermatology and Department of Dermatology, First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Anhui, China. · Key Laboratory of Dermatology, Ministry of Education (Anhui Medical University), Anhui, China. · Departments of Neurology and Genetics, Renaissance Computing Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Department of Human Genetics, Genome Institute of Singapore, A*STAR, Singapore, Singapore. ·J Gene Med · Pubmed #27976820.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease, whereas schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder with substantial comorbidity. Although these two disorders manifest with apparently unrelated phenotypes, there is some evidence suggesting that they share common genetic factors. METHODS: We implemented a genetic analysis incorporating pleiotropy and annotation to genome-wide association summary statistics data for approximately 120 000 psoriasis and schizophrenia samples, as well as whole blood expression quantitative trait loci in 5311 samples. RESULTS: We observed a significant pleiotropic effect between psoriasis and schizophrenia (p = 5.92 × 10 CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study highlight the expression quantitative trait loci enrichment and pleiotropy in psoriasis and schizophrenia, and also suggest a possible key role of the PTPN1 gene in the etiology of psoriasis.

23 Article Effect of ethnicity on disease activity and physical function in psoriatic arthritis in a multiethnic Asian population. 2017

Leung, Ying Ying / Fong, Warren / Lui, Nai Lee / Thumboo, Julian. ·Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, The Academia, level 4, 20 College Road, Singapore, 169856, Singapore. katyccc@hotmail.com. · Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore. katyccc@hotmail.com. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, The Academia, level 4, 20 College Road, Singapore, 169856, Singapore. · Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore. ·Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #27796663.

ABSTRACT: Geographic differences in manifestation of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) could be related to differences in genetic or environmental factors. We aimed to compare the disease activity and functional status using validated outcome measures among patients with PsA of different ethnicities living in the same environment. We performed a cross-sectional study on consecutive patients with PsA classified by the Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR) criteria from a single center. Sociodemographic data, clinical variables, and patient-reported outcomes were collected using a standardized protocol. Disease activities were assessed by validated composite scores: clinical Disease Activity Index for Psoriatic Arthritis (cDAPSA), Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index (CPDAI), and minimal disease activity (MDA). Physical function was assessed with Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and the Medical Outcome Study Short-Form 36 (SF36) physical function subscales. Linear regression analyses were performed to identify variables associated with disease activities and physical function. Ninety-eight patients (51.5%, men) with mean (±SD) age and duration of PsA of 51.5 ± 13.8 and 5.5 ± 8.4 years were recruited. Indian was overrepresented compared with the national distribution of ethnicities. Compared to Chinese, Indian patients were more likely to be using biological therapies, have higher tender joint count, and worse enthesitis. Higher proportion of Indians had higher disease activity categories measured by cDAPSA, CPDAI, and MDA and had poorer physical function. In the multivariable analysis, ethnicity was significantly associated with HAQ and SF36-PF. Compared to Chinese, Indians with PsA living in the same environment had worse disease activity and physical function measured by validated outcomes.

24 Article Major differences between human atopic dermatitis and murine models, as determined by using global transcriptomic profiling. 2017

Ewald, David A / Noda, Shinji / Oliva, Margeaux / Litman, Thomas / Nakajima, Saeko / Li, Xuan / Xu, Hui / Workman, Christopher T / Scheipers, Peter / Svitacheva, Naila / Labuda, Tord / Krueger, James G / Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte / Kabashima, Kenji / Guttman-Yassky, Emma. ·Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, Rockefeller University, New York, NY; Exploratory Biology, LEO Pharma A/S, Ballerup, Denmark; Regulatory Genomics, Integrative Systems Biology, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis, Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark. · Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, Rockefeller University, New York, NY. · Department of Dermatology and the Laboratory for Inflammatory Skin Diseases, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. · Exploratory Biology, LEO Pharma A/S, Ballerup, Denmark; Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Dermatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. · Regulatory Genomics, Integrative Systems Biology, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis, Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark. · Exploratory Biology, LEO Pharma A/S, Ballerup, Denmark. · In Vivo Biology, LEO Pharma A/S, Ballerup, Denmark. · Translational Medicine, LEO Pharma A/S, Ballerup, Denmark. · Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, Rockefeller University, New York, NY; Department of Dermatology, the Departments of Population Health Science and Policy, and the Icahn Institute of Genomics and Multiscale Biology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. · Department of Dermatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan; Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN) and Institute of Medical Biology, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Biopolis, Singapore. · Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, Rockefeller University, New York, NY; Department of Dermatology and the Laboratory for Inflammatory Skin Diseases, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. Electronic address: Emma.Guttman@mountsinai.org. ·J Allergy Clin Immunol · Pubmed #27702671.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is caused by a complex interplay between immune and barrier abnormalities. Murine models of AD are essential for preclinical assessments of new treatments. Although many models have been used to simulate AD, their transcriptomic profiles are not fully understood, and a comparison of these models with the human AD transcriptomic fingerprint is lacking. OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate the transcriptomic profiles of 6 common murine models and determine how they relate to human AD skin. METHODS: Transcriptomic profiling was performed by using microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR on biopsy specimens from NC/Nga, flaky tail, Flg-mutated, ovalbumin-challenged, oxazolone-challenged, and IL-23-injected mice. Gene expression data of patients with AD, psoriasis, and contact dermatitis were obtained from previous patient cohorts. Criteria of a fold change of 2 or greater and a false discovery rate of 0.05 or less were used for gene arrays. RESULTS: IL-23-injected, NC/Nga, and oxazolone-challenged mice show the largest homology with our human meta-analysis-derived AD transcriptome (37%, 18%, 17%, respectively). Similar to human AD, robust T CONCLUSION: No single murine model fully captures all aspects of the AD profile; instead, each model reflects different immune or barrier disease aspects. Overall, among the 6 murine models, IL-23-injected mice best simulate human AD; still, the translational focus of the investigation should determine which model is most applicable.

25 Article International patient and physician consensus on a psoriatic arthritis core outcome set for clinical trials. 2017

Orbai, Ana-Maria / de Wit, Maarten / Mease, Philip / Shea, Judy A / Gossec, Laure / Leung, Ying Ying / Tillett, William / Elmamoun, Musaab / Callis Duffin, Kristina / Campbell, Willemina / Christensen, Robin / Coates, Laura / Dures, Emma / Eder, Lihi / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna / Goel, Niti / Grieb, Suzanne Dolwick / Hewlett, Sarah / Hoejgaard, Pil / Kalyoncu, Umut / Lindsay, Chris / McHugh, Neil / Shea, Bev / Steinkoenig, Ingrid / Strand, Vibeke / Ogdie, Alexis. ·Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medical Humanities, Patient Research Partner, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-08, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, Paris, France. · Rheumatology Department, Pitie-Salpétrière Hôpital, AP-HP, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases and the University of Bath, Bath, UK. · St. Vincent's University Hospital and the Conway Institute, University College Dublin (UCD), Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. · Patient Research Partner, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, The Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. · Department of Nursing, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK. · Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Patient Research Partner, Advisory Services, Quintiles, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. · Patient Research Partner, Thousand Oaks, California, USA. · Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Patient Research Partner, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA. · Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27613807.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To identify a core set of domains (outcomes) to be measured in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) clinical trials that represent both patients' and physicians' priorities. METHODS: We conducted (1) a systematic literature review (SLR) of domains assessed in PsA; (2) international focus groups to identify domains important to people with PsA; (3) two international surveys with patients and physicians to prioritise domains; (4) an international face-to-face meeting with patients and physicians using the nominal group technique method to agree on the most important domains; and (5) presentation and votes at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) conference in May 2016. All phases were performed in collaboration with patient research partners. RESULTS: We identified 39 unique domains through the SLR (24 domains) and international focus groups (34 domains). 50 patients and 75 physicians rated domain importance. During the March 2016 consensus meeting, 12 patients and 12 physicians agreed on 10 candidate domains. Then, 49 patients and 71 physicians rated these domains' importance. Five were important to >70% of both groups: musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity, structural damage, pain and physical function. Fatigue and participation were important to >70% of patients. Patient global and systemic inflammation were important to >70% of physicians. The updated PsA core domain set endorsed by 90% of OMERACT 2016 participants includes musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity, pain, patient global, physical function, health-related quality of life, fatigue and systemic inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: The updated PsA core domain set incorporates patients' and physicians' priorities and evolving PsA research. Next steps include identifying outcome measures that adequately assess these domains.

Next