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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from South Africa
Based on 17 articles published since 2008
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These are the 17 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from South Africa during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Double trouble: psoriasis and cardiometabolic disorders. 2018

Mahyoodeen, Nasrin Goolam / Crowther, Nigel J / Tikly, Mohammed. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Email: mahyoodeen@yahoo.com. · Department of Chemical Pathology, National Health Laboratory Services and University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. · Department of Internal Medicine, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. ·Cardiovasc J Afr · Pubmed #29293257.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis (PsO) is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory skin disorder associated with numerous co-morbidities. This descriptive review focuses on the cardiometabolic co-morbidities of PsO with reference to the epidemiology and pathogenetic mechanisms linking PsO and cardiometabolic disease (CMD). Registry-based studies have shown PsO to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Factors linking PsO and CMD include: chronic inflammation, obesity, classic cardiovascular risk factors, and the effects of systemic therapy used to treat PsO. Chronic inflammation is associated with PsO itself, and with obesity. Adipose tissue is responsible for the secretion of various adipokines, which together with pro-inflammatory cytokines arising from the psoriatic plaque, contribute to the pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic environment. Systemic therapy aimed at decreasing inflammation has been shown to improve CMD in PsO. Screening for and treating CMD and initiating lifestyle modifications will remain the most important interventions until further data emerge regarding the effect of systemic therapy on CMD progression.

2 Review Treatment of psoriatic arthritis with traditional DMARD's and novel therapies: approaches and recommendations. 2017

Maharaj, Ajesh B / Chandran, Vinod. ·a Department of Internal Medicine, Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital, Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine , University of KwaZulu-Natal , Durban , South Africa. · b Department of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Academic Medical Center , University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. · c Psoriatic Arthritis Program, Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, Krembil Research Institute , University Health Network , Toronto , Canada. · d Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada. · e Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada. · f Institute of Medical Science , University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital , Toronto , Canada. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #27826996.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Recent advances in the therapeutics of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) have provided more options to clinicians managing PsA. The purpose of this review is to update the reader on treatment options for PsA using conventional synthetic disease modifying agents (csDMARDs) and novel therapies including tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors, interleukin 12/23 inhibitor (ustekinumab), the interleukin 17 antagonists including secukinumab, brodalumab, ixekizumab, and the phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, apremilast. Areas covered: We reviewed published articles on the treatment of PsA. Our main sources of data included treatment recommendations, registry studies, systematic literature reviews, major randomised controlled trials for more recently approved drugs, and abstracts from the American College of Rheumatology and EULAR meetings. Expert commentary: An overview of the evidence for the use of various pharmacotherapeutic agents for treatment of this heterogeneous disease was compiled. Treatment options for the various domains of PsA are also discussed.

3 Review Assessing disease activity in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: impact on management and therapy. 2016

Chandran, Vinod / Maharaj, Ajesh B. ·a Department of Medicine, and Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology , University of Toronto , Toronto , Ontario , Canada. · b Institute of Medical Science , University of Toronto , Toronto , Ontario , Canada. · c Krembil Research Institute , University Health Network , Toronto , Ontario , Canada. · d Department of Internal Medicine , Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital, Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of Kwazulu-Natal , Durban , South Africa. · e Department of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Academic Medical Center , University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #26807494.

ABSTRACT: The management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis has undergone major advancements over the last decade. This has been made possible, in part, due to the introduction of new therapies for their management, as well as global collaboration in the development of outcome measures and "treat- to- target" paradigms. In this review article, we discuss how disease activity is measured and the outcome measures that have been recently developed for the management of PsA. The importance of assessing the individual domains as well as global assessments both from the physician and patient perspective, and the development of composite measures are discussed. The newer PsA specific measures are expected to be more commonly used in clinical trials as well as clinical practice.

4 Review Non-infectious aortitis: a report of 32 cases from a single tertiary centre in a 4-year period and literature review. 2015

Loricera, J / Blanco, R / Hernández, J L / Carril, J M / Martínez-Rodríguez, I / Canga, A / Peiró, E / Alonso-Gutiérrez, J / Calvo-Río, V / Ortiz-Sanjuán, F / Mata, C / Pina, T / González-Vela, M C / Martínez-Amador, N / González-Gay, M A. ·Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, IDIVAL, University of Cantabria, Santander, Spain. · Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, IDIVAL, University of Cantabria, Santander, Spain. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, IDIVAL, University of Cantabria, Santander, Spain. · Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, IDIVAL, University of Cantabria, Santander, Spain. · Department of Pathology, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, IDIVAL, University of Cantabria, Santander, Spain. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, IDIVAL, University of Cantabria, Santander, Spain, and University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #25437450.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Non-infectious aortitis often presents with non-specific symptoms leading to inappropriate diagnostic delay. We intend to describe the clinical spectrum and outcome of patients with aortitis diagnosed at a single centre. METHODS: We reviewed the clinical charts of patients diagnosed with non-infectious aortitis between January 2010 and December 2013 at the Rheumatology Division from a 1.000-bed tertiary teaching hospital from Northern Spain. The diagnosis of aortitis was usually based on FDG-PET-CT scan, and also occasionally on CT or MRI angiography or helical CT-scan. RESULTS: During the period of assessment 32 patients (22 women and 10 men; mean age 68 years [range, 45-87]) were diagnosed with aortitis. The median interval from the onset of symptoms to the diagnosis was 21 months. FDG-PET CT scan was the most common tool used for the diagnosis of aortitis. The underlying conditions were the following: giant cell arteritis (n=13 cases); isolated polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) (n=11); Sjögren's syndrome (n=2), Takayasu arteritis (n= 1); sarcoidosis (n=1), ulcerative colitis (n=1), psoriatic arthritis (n=1), and large-vessel vasculitis that also involved the aorta (n=2). The most common clinical manifestations at diagnosis were: PMR features, often with atypical clinical presentation (n=23 patients, 72%); diffuse lower limb pain (n=16 patients, 50%); constitutional symptoms (n=12 patients, 37%), inflammatory low back pain (n=9 patients, 28%) and fever (n=7 patients, 22%). Acute phase reactants were increased in most cases (median erythrocyte sedimentation rate 46 mm/1st hour, and a median serum C-reactive protein 1.5 mg/dL). CONCLUSIONS: Aortitis is not an uncommon condition. The diagnosis is often delayed. Atypical PMR features, unexplained low back or limb pain, constitutional symptoms along with increased acute phase reactants should be considered 'red flags' to suspect the presence of aortitis.

5 Review Unusual cause of limited elbow movement in a patient with psoriatic arthritis. 2014

Maharaj, Ajesh B / Chandran, Vinod. ·Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South Africa; maharaja30@ukzn.ac.za. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Staff Physician, Division of Rheumatology, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25452180.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Review Comprehensive treatment of psoriatic arthritis: managing comorbidities and extraarticular manifestations. 2014

Ogdie, Alexis / Schwartzman, Sergio / Eder, Lihi / Maharaj, Ajesh B / Zisman, Devy / Raychaudhuri, Siba P / Reddy, Soumya M / Husni, Elaine. ·From the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York, USA; Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South Africa, and Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Carmel Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa, Israel; Rheumatology, VA Sacramento Medical Center; Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, School of Medicine, UC Davis, Davis, California; Division of Rheumatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York; and the Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.A. Ogdie, MD, MSCE, University of Pennsylvania; S. Schwartzman, MD, Hospital for Special Surgery; L. Eder, MD, PhD, Toronto Western Hospital; A.B. Maharaj, MB, BS, HDipIntMed(SA), FCP(SA), Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal and Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam; D. Zisman, MD, Carmel Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Technion; S.P. Raychaudhuri, MD, Rheumatology, VA Sacramento Medical Center; Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, School of Medicine, UC Davis; S.M. Reddy, MD, Division of Rheumatology, New York University School of Medicine; E. Husni, MD, MPH, Cleveland Clinic. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25362717.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis that can lead to decreased health-related quality of life and permanent joint damage leading to functional decline. In addition to joint and skin manifestations, both psoriasis and PsA are associated with numerous comorbidities and extraarticular/cutaneous manifestations, which may influence the physician's choice of therapy. The objectives of this review are (1) to identify comorbidities in patients with PsA based on the available evidence; (2) to examine the effects of these comorbidities or extraarticular/cutaneous manifestation on the management of patients with PsA as well as the selection of therapy; and (3) to highlight research needs around comorbidities and treatment paradigms. This review is part of a treatment recommendations update initiated by the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA).

7 Review Spondyloarthritis in sub-Saharan Africa. 2014

Tikly, Mohammed / Njobvu, Panganani / McGill, Paul. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, P.O. Box Bertsham 2013, Johannesburg, South Africa, mohammed.tikly@wits.ac.za. ·Curr Rheumatol Rep · Pubmed #24744085.

ABSTRACT: Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is generally uncommon in sub-Saharan Africa, in part because of the rarity of HLA-B27 in this region. However, the relationship between HLA-B27 and SpA, particularly ankylosing spondylitis (AS), is complex. Despite the HLA-B 27:05 risk allele occurring in some West African populations, associated AS is not seen. In fact, most patients with AS are HLA-B27-negative, although there is emerging evidence that another class I HLA molecule, HLA-B 14:03, is associated with AS in black Africans. The Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society criteria for detecting early axial disease are of limited value in sub-Saharan Africa, because of both the rarity of HLA-B27 and very limited access to magnetic resonance imaging. Reactive arthritis (ReA), psoriatic arthritis, and undifferentiated SpA are seen mainly in the context of HIV infection, although the exact effect of the virus in the pathogenesis of arthritis is unclear. In Zambia, ReA is associated with the HLA-B*57:03 allele, which is paradoxically also associated with slow progression of HIV infection. HIV-associated ReA has a more protracted and aggressive course than standard ReA. Enthesitis-related arthritis is more common in children infected with HIV by vertical mother-to child transmission. Use of TNF inhibitors for axial disease is problematic, mainly because of cost, but also because of potential safety problems, especially reactivation of tuberculosis.

8 Article All-cause and cause-specific mortality in psoriasis: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2019

Dhana, Ashar / Yen, Hsi / Yen, Hsuan / Cho, Eunyoung. ·Division of Dermatology, Groote Schuur Hospital and University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. Electronic address: ashardhana@live.com. · Department of Dermatology, Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan. · Department of Dermatology, Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taoyuan, Taiwan. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Dermatology, The Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30590074.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An overview of mortality risk associated with psoriasis is lacking. OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of mortality risk in psoriasis. METHODS: We included studies reporting all-cause or cause-specific mortality risk estimates in psoriasis patients compared with general population or subjects free of psoriasis. We calculated pooled relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: We included 12 studies. The pooled RRs for all-cause mortality were 1.21 (95% CI 1.14-1.28) in psoriasis, 1.13 (95% CI 1.09-1.16) in mild psoriasis, and 1.52 (95% CI 1.35-1.71) in severe psoriasis. The pooled RRs for cardiovascular mortality were 1.15 (95% CI 1.09-1.21) in psoriasis, 1.05 (95% CI 0.92-1.20) in mild psoriasis, and 1.38 (95% CI 1.09-1.74) in severe psoriasis. For noncardiovascular causes, mortality risk from liver disease, kidney disease, and infection was significantly increased in psoriasis, regardless of disease severity. The mortality risk in liver and kidney disease was the highest. There was also a significantly increased mortality risk associated with neoplasms in severe psoriasis patients and chronic lower respiratory disease in all and mild psoriasis patients. LIMITATIONS: Although associations were consistent, their magnitude was heterogenous. CONCLUSION: Psoriasis is associated with an increased risk for mortality from all causes (in a dose-response manner with disease severity) and from several specific causes.

9 Article MiR-146a G/C rs2910164 variation in South African Indian and Caucasian patients with psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Maharaj, Ajesh B / Naidoo, Pragalathan / Ghazi, Terisha / Abdul, Naeem S / Dhani, Shanel / Docrat, Taskeen F / Ramkaran, Prithiksha / Tak, Paul-Peter / de Vries, Niek / Chuturgoon, Anil A. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital and School of Clinical Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa. · Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, Discipline of Medical Biochemistry and Chemical Pathology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, George Campbell Building - South Entrance, 3rd Floor, King George V Avenue, Howard College Campus, Durban, 4001, South Africa. · School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, Discipline of Medical Biochemistry and Chemical Pathology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, George Campbell Building - South Entrance, 3rd Floor, King George V Avenue, Howard College Campus, Durban, 4001, South Africa. chutur@ukzn.ac.za. ·BMC Med Genet · Pubmed #29587639.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are inflammatory associated autoimmune disorders. MicroRNA (miR)-146a plays a crucial role in regulating inflammation. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the miR-146a gene (rs2910164), aberrantly alters its gene expression and linked with the pathogenesis of several disorders, including psoriasis and PsA. In South Africa, psoriasis and PsA are extremely rare in the indigenous African population and most common in both the Indian and Caucasian population. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the miR-146a rs2910164 contributes towards psoriasis and PsA development in South African Indian and Caucasian patients. METHODS: South African Indian (n = 84) and Caucasian (n = 32) PsA patients (total n = 116) and healthy control subjects (Indian: n = 62 and Caucasian: n = 38; total n = 100) were recruited in the study. DNA was extracted from whole blood taken from all subjects, and genotyped for the miR-146a rs2910164 using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Data for laboratory parameters were obtained from pathology reports. The consulting rheumatologist collected all other clinical data. RESULTS: Unstratified data (Caucasians + Indians): A significant decrease in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in PsA patients was observed (CRP monitored at inclusion vs. after 6 months of treatment) (18.95 ± 2.81 mg/L vs. 9.68 ± 1.32 mg/L, p = 0.0011). The miR-146a rs2910164 variant C-allele frequency in PsA patients was significantly higher vs. healthy controls (35.78% vs. 26% respectively, p = 0.0295, OR = 1.59 95% CI 1.05-2.40). Stratified data (Indians): The variant C-allele frequency in Indian PsA patients was significantly higher vs. healthy Indian controls (35.71% vs. 22.58%, p = 0.0200, OR = 1.91 95% CI 1.13-3.22). Stratified data (Caucasians): The variant C-allele frequency distribution between Caucasian PsA patients and healthy Caucasian controls was similar. CONCLUSION: The rs2910164 variant C-allele may play a role in the progression of PsA in the South African Indian population. The main limitation in this study was the small sample size in the case-control cohorts, with a low overall statistical power (post-hoc power analysis = 19%).

10 Article The spectrum of psoriatic arthritis in a South African cohort. 2017

Kanyik, Jean-Paul Muzemb / Coi, Annibale / Kalla, Asgar Ali. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. drkanyik@hotmail.com. · Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. · Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. ·Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #28914378.

ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical features of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in a South African cohort. This is a retrospective analysis of patients contributing to development of the international classification criteria for PsA, ClASsification criteria for Psoriatic ARthritis (CASPAR). Patients were all seen at the arthritis clinics at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town. Demographic, clinical, laboratory and radiographic information was collected. This study describes the relevant findings relating to the clinical profile of the patients seen at our centre as well as the effect of family history and/or dactylitis in determining the severity of psoriatic arthritis. There were 45 patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1.25. The mean age of psoriasis onset was 38.34 years (SD 15.54), whilst that of arthritis onset was 43.86 years (SD 13.4). Polyarthritis was the commonest pattern and sacro-iliitis was uncommon. Dactylitis was present in 26%. The presence of family history or of dactylitis did not predict more severe disease. There was a significant correlation between tender and swollen joints. The mean Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score was 1.05. Eighty-three percent showed evidence of radiological changes, and distal interphalangeal (DIP) erosions were found in 54%. Arthritis mutilans was present in 31%. There were no black subjects in the cohort. The clinical patterns of PsA in our cohort are similar to those reported elsewhere. The paucity of blacks amongst this cohort requires further study. PsA-specific measures of disease activity need to be developed. PsA causes significant joint damage and disability.

11 Article IL-36γ Induced by the TLR3-SLUG-VDR Axis Promotes Wound Healing via REG3A. 2017

Jiang, Ziwei / Liu, Yuanqi / Li, Changwei / Chang, Leilei / Wang, Wang / Wang, Zhenhua / Gao, Xiaoguang / Ryffel, Bernhard / Wu, Yelin / Lai, Yuping. ·Shanghai Key Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, School of Life Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. · Laboratory of Experimental and Molecular Immunology and Neurogenetics (INEM), University Orleans, Orleans, France; University of Cape Town, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine (IDM), Rondebosch, South Africa. · Shanghai Key Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, School of Life Sciences, East China Normal University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: yplai@bio.ecnu.edu.cn. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #28774595.

ABSTRACT: IL-36 family members are highly expressed in hyperproliferative keratinocytes and play an important role in the pathogenesis of skin diseases such as psoriasis. However, whether and how IL-36 cytokines are induced to promote wound healing remains unknown. Here we showed that skin injury increased the expression of IL-36γ to promote wound healing. Mechanistically, the expression of IL-36γ was induced by RNAs from damaged cells via the activation of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing IFN-β (TRIF) followed by the induction of a zinc finger protein SLUG to abrogate the inhibitory effect of vitamin D receptor (VDR) on the promoter of IL-36γ gene. IL-36γ acted back on keratinocytes to induce REG3A, which regulated keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, thus promoting wound re-epithelialization. These observations show that skin injury increases IL-36γ via the activation of TLR3-SLUG-VDR axis and that IL-36γ induces REG3A to promote wound healing. These findings also provide insights into pathways contributing to wound repair.

12 Article Summary of Sensitivity and Specificity for Psoriatic Arthritis in a South African Cohort according to Classification Criteria. 2015

Maharaj, Ajesh B / Govender, Jayandran / Maharaj, Kasthurba / Rajkaran, Michelle / Tak, Paul P. ·From the Department of Internal Medicine, Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South Africa; and the Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and Federation of Clinical Immunology Societies (FOCIS) Center of Excellence, Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands.A.B. Maharaj, MB, BS (Varanasi), H Dip Int Med(SA), FCP (SA), Certificate in Rheumatology (SA), Department of Internal Medicine, Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal, and Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, EULAR and FOCIS Center of Excellence, Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam; J. Govender, BSc (Hons)(UDW), MB, ChB (Medunsa); K. Maharaj, MB, ChB (Natal), FCP (SA); M. Rajkaran, MBChB (Wits), FCP(SA), Department of Internal Medicine, Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal; P.P. Tak, MD, PhD (UvA), Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, EULAR and FOCIS Center of Excellence, Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25877500.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in a South African cohort. METHODS: Data from consecutive patients with PsA and other chronic inflammatory arthritides were collected prospectively. Subjects were classified according to the classification criteria. The sensitivity and specificity in each group of patients were compared with a clinical diagnosis made by a rheumatologist. RESULTS: The European Spondylarthropathy Study Group criteria exhibited the lowest sensitivity followed by the Moll and Wright criteria. The sensitivity and specificity of the ClASsification for Psoriatic ARthritis (CASPAR) criteria were 98.4% and 99.7%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The CASPAR criteria were evaluated in our cohort and they performed well.

13 Article Do the radiographic features of joint destruction in tophaceous gout imply a different pathophysiology to that of rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis? 2010

Arendse, Regan / Gcelu, Ayanda / Scott, Christiaan / Beighton, Peter / Kalla, Asgar. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Groote Schuur Hospital, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. regan@arendse.biz ·Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #20556451.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Minor Oral retinoids and depression. 2018

Lehloenya, R / Jessop, S. ·Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #29399783.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Minor Drs. Maharaj and Chandran reply. 2015

Maharaj, Ajesh B / Chandran, Vinod. ·Department of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Academic Medical center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; maharaja30@ukzn.ac.za. · Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, and Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #26034234.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Minor Pancytopenia in a patient with psoriatic arthritis treated with methotrexate and concomitant lithium. 2015

Maharaj, Ajesh B / Chandran, Vinod. ·Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South Africa; maharaja30@ukzn.ac.za. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25729049.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Minor Spondyloarthritis in African blacks. 2015

Maharaj, Ajesh B / Tak, Paul P. ·Certificate in Rheumatology (SA), Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South Africa, and the Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; maharaja30@ukzn.ac.za. · Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25554810.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --