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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Mount Sinai New York
Based on 158 articles published since 2008
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These are the 158 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Mount Sinai New York during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with biologics. 2019

Menter, Alan / Strober, Bruce E / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kivelevitch, Dario / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Stoff, Benjamin / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Davis, Dawn M R / Elewski, Boni E / Gelfand, Joel M / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Leonardi, Craig L / Lichten, Jason / Lim, Henry W / Mehta, Nehal N / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Rupani, Reena N / Siegel, Michael / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Elmets, Craig A. ·Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, San Francisco. · University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, San Francisco, California. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772098.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations based on the available evidence. The treatment of psoriasis with biologic agents will be reviewed, emphasizing treatment recommendations and the role of the dermatologist in monitoring and educating patients regarding benefits as well as associated risks.

2 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

3 Guideline Treatment of nail psoriasis: best practice recommendations from the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. 2015

Crowley, Jeffrey J / Weinberg, Jeffrey M / Wu, Jashin J / Robertson, Andrew D / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Anonymous1700814. ·Bakersfield Dermatology, Bakersfield, California. · Department of Dermatology, Mt Sinai Health System, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Department of Dermatology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #25471223.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Nail psoriasis can be difficult to treat and has a significant effect on quality of life. Relatively few controlled trials evaluating treatments for nail psoriasis have been published. There is an unmet need for treatment recommendations to guide therapeutic decisions. OBJECTIVE: To develop treatment recommendations for nail psoriasis from the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. EVIDENCE REVIEW: A PubMed search for publications on nail psoriasis treatments was performed from January 1, 1947, through May 11, 2014, without language restrictions. FINDINGS: Treatment recommendations for 4 clinical nail psoriasis scenarios were developed based on the evidence reviewed in this study and expert opinion of the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. Treatment of nail psoriasis should balance consideration of the extent of skin disease, psoriatic arthritis, and severity of nail disease with concomitant impairment of quality of life. All patients should be evaluated for onychomycosis because this may complicate psoriatic nail disease. For disease limited to the nails, high-potency topical corticosteroids with or without calcipotriol are initial options. For patients with significant nail disease for whom topical therapy has failed, treatment with adalimumab, etanercept, intralesional corticosteroids, ustekinumab, methotrexate sodium, and acitretin are recommended. For patients with significant skin and nail disease, adalimumab, etanercept, and ustekinumab are strongly recommended, and methotrexate, acitretin, infliximab, and apremilast are recommended. Finally, for a patient with significant nail, skin, and joint disease, adalimumab, etanercept, ustekinumab, infliximab, methotrexate, apremilast, and golimumab are recommended. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Treatment of nail psoriasis poses a clinical challenge. Clinical trial data are limited, and results are reported inconsistently, making comparisons among treatment options difficult. The treatment recommendations from the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation will help guide treatment decisions for clinicians who are treating patients with nail psoriasis.

4 Guideline From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation: Recommendations for screening for hepatitis B infection prior to initiating anti-tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitors or other immunosuppressive agents in patients with psoriasis. 2014

Motaparthi, Kiran / Stanisic, Vladimir / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Lebwohl, Mark G / Hsu, Sylvia / Anonymous1850775. ·Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: shsu@bcm.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #24220724.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: No consensus exists regarding the optimal laboratory screening for hepatitis B infection that should be performed before initiating therapy with tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitors or other immunosuppressive agents. OBJECTIVE: We sought to give guidelines on which tests to order for hepatitis B screening. METHODS: We review the pathophysiology and serology of hepatitis B infection and provide recommendations for screening for hepatitis B infection in patients with psoriasis before beginning anti-tumor necrosis factor-alfa therapy or other immunosuppressive agents. RESULTS: We propose the standardized use of triple serology testing: hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B surface antibody, and hepatitis B core antibody in combination with liver function tests as screening. LIMITATIONS: Conclusions based on review of available literature is a limitation. CONCLUSIONS: All patients with psoriasis who are candidates for tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitor should undergo screening for hepatitis B virus infection using the triple serology: hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B surface antibody, and hepatitis B core antibody. It is advisable that patients, who are candidates for ustekinumab, cyclosporine, or methotrexate undergo the same screening.

5 Guideline Optimizing topical therapies for treating psoriasis: a consensus conference. 2010

Zeichner, Joshua A / Lebwohl, Mark G / Menter, Alan / Bagel, Jerry / Del Rosso, James Q / Elewski, Boni E / Feldman, Steven R / Kircik, Leon H / Koo, John / Gold, Linda Stein / Tanghetti, Emil / Anonymous2630678. ·Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #21049712.

ABSTRACT: In 2010, an expert committee of physicians and researchers in the field of dermatology working together as the Psoriasis Process of Care Consensus Panel developed consensus guidelines for the treatment of psoriasis. As much as possible, the guidelines were evidence based but also included the extensive clinical experience of the dermatologists. Psoriasis is a lifelong disease that requires long-term treatment and 80% of psoriasis patients have mild to moderate disease. Topical therapies play an important role in the treatment of psoriasis, especially in patients with mild to moderate disease. Patients usually start with monotherapy; however, in more severe cases (> 10% body surface area [BSA], severely impaired quality of life [QOL], or recalcitrant psoriatic lesions), multiple treatment modalities may be used as part of combination, sequential, or rotational therapeutic regimens. Main treatment options include topical steroids, systemic therapies, topical vitamin D treatments such as vitamin D3 ointment, retinoids, phototherapy, and biologic therapies. Other topical therapies include the following steroid-sparing agents: coal tar, anthralin, calcineurin inhibitors, keratolytics, and emollients. Therapeutic considerations also should focus on adherence, improving QOL, and promoting a good patient-physician relationship.

6 Editorial The clock is ticking. 2018

Weinberg, Jeffrey M. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #29529107.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Phototherapy in dermatology: A call for action. 2015

Lim, Henry W / Silpa-archa, Narumol / Amadi, Ugochukwu / Menter, Alan / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Lebwohl, Mark. ·Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. Electronic address: hlim1@hfhs.org. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan; Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #25981004.

ABSTRACT: Of the wide range of treatment modalities available to dermatologists, few possess the history, efficacy, and safety of phototherapy. It should be emphasized that dermatologists are the only group of physicians optimally trained and qualified to understand the medical indications of phototherapy. Phototherapy, recognized for its cost-effectiveness, should remain a consideration in patient treatment. Continued training and education in residency and thereafter is needed to maintain the proficiency of physicians. In addition, payors need continued education to ensure that insurance coverage of phototherapy is not a barrier for patients to access this therapy. To further improve and optimize the outcome, phototherapy research needs to be supported.

8 Editorial Biologics for psoriasis: a translational research success story. 2015

Lebwohl, Mark. ·Department of Dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. Electronic address: Lebwohl@aol.com. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #25882456.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Review Biologics and Psoriasis: The Beat Goes On. 2019

Kim, Hee J / Lebwohl, Mark G. ·Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 5 East 98th Street, 5th Floor, PO Box 1048, New York, NY 10029, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 5 East 98th Street, 5th Floor, PO Box 1048, New York, NY 10029, USA. Electronic address: lebwohl@aol.com. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #30466686.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated, inflammatory skin disease that requires long-term therapy for disease control. This article reviews data presented in clinical trials to evaluate and compare various characteristics of biologics that are currently approved for the treatment of psoriasis. Attributes of biological agents that are examined in this article include efficacy, long-term maintenance, overall safety, median time to onset of efficacy, adjustment for body weight, frequency of injections, indication for psoriatic arthritis, and safety in pregnancy. Here, we evaluate what the ideal choice of biological therapy may be for psoriasis patients with specific needs.

10 Review Psoriasis: Which therapy for which patient: Focus on special populations and chronic infections. 2019

Kaushik, Shivani B / Lebwohl, Mark G. ·Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: docshivanib@gmail.com. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30017706.

ABSTRACT: Despite the availability of several new systemic agents for psoriasis treatment, choosing the right therapy in certain patient populations can be challenging. There are few up-to-date reviews on systemic drugs for moderate to severe psoriasis in pregnant and pediatric patients and in patients with concomitant chronic infections, such as hepatitis, HIV, and latent tuberculosis. These groups are usually excluded from clinical trials, and much of the available evidence is based on anecdotal case reports and case series. As a chronic disease, psoriasis requires long-term treatment, and there are concerns of adverse maternal-fetal outcomes, long-term side effects in children, and the reactivation of latent infections with the use of systemic agents in these patients. The second article in this continuing medical education series provides insights for choosing appropriate systemic agents for treating moderate to severe psoriasis in pregnant and pediatric patients and in the setting of chronic infections, such as hepatitis, HIV, and latent tuberculosis.

11 Review Psoriasis: Which therapy for which patient: Psoriasis comorbidities and preferred systemic agents. 2019

Kaushik, Shivani B / Lebwohl, Mark G. ·Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: docshivanib@gmail.com. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30017705.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a systemic inflammatory disease associated with increased risk of comorbidities, such as psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, malignancy, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases. These factors have a significant impact on the decision to use one therapy over another. The past decade has seen a paradigm shift in our understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis that has led to identification of new therapeutic targets. Several new drugs have gained approval by the US Food and Drug Administration, expanding the psoriasis armamentarium, but still a large number of patients continue to be untreated or undertreated. Treatment regimens for psoriasis patients should be tailored to meet the specific needs based on disease severity, the impact on quality of life, the response to previous therapies, and the presence of comorbidities. The first article in this continuing medical education series focuses on specific comorbidities and provides insights to choose appropriate systemic treatment in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis.

12 Review Update on the pathophysiology of psoriasis. 2018

Hugh, Jeremy M / Weinberg, Jeffrey M. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #30566550.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a genetically programmed pathologic interaction among skin cells, immunocytes, and numerous biologic signaling molecules that is triggered by environmental stimuli. The immune response is a cellular one; type 1 (TH1) and type 17 (TH17) T cells are activated by IL-12 and IL-23 secreted by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the skin. Through various cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, these cells cause a chronic inflammatory state and alter epidermal hyperproliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and neoangiogenesis that produce the cutaneous findings seen in this disease. The newer biologic therapies target the immunologic signaling pathways and cytokines identified in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and provide notable clinical improvement. Further study in the pathogenesis of psoriasis can help identify targets for future therapies.

13 Review Management of psoriasis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. 2018

Whitlock, Scott M / Enos, Clinton W / Armstrong, April W / Gottlieb, Alice / Langley, Richard G / Lebwohl, Mark / Merola, Joseph F / Ryan, Caitriona / Siegel, Michael P / Weinberg, Jeffrey M / Wu, Jashin J / Van Voorhees, Abby S. ·Department of Dermatology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. · Department of Dermatology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York. · Division of Clinical Dermatology and Cutaneous Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. Electronic address: vanvooas@evms.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29332708.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is a significant association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Many treatments for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are also used for IBD. OBJECTIVE: To assess therapeutic options for patients with psoriasis and concurrent IBD. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed for clinical studies of biologic and systemic psoriasis medications in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease, for the period from January 1, 1947, to February 14, 2017. Randomized, controlled, double-blinded studies were selected if available. If not, the next highest level of available evidence was selected. RESULTS: Of the 2282 articles identified, 132 were selected. Infliximab and adalimumab have demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative; colitis, and Crohn's disease. Ustekinumab has demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease. Certolizumab has demonstrated efficacy in psoriatic arthritis and Crohn's disease. Etanercept, secukinumab, brodalumab, and ixekizumab have demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis but may exacerbate or induce IBD. Guselkumab has demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis. LIMITATIONS: There are no known clinical trials of treatment specifically for concurrent psoriasis and IBD. CONCLUSIONS: Infliximab and adalimumab have demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease; other agents have demonstrated efficacy for some, but not all, of these indications.

14 Review Pediatric psoriasis: Evolving perspectives. 2018

Eichenfield, Lawrence F / Paller, Amy S / Tom, Wynnis L / Sugarman, Jeffrey / Hebert, Adelaide A / Friedlander, Sheila Fallon / Siegfried, Elaine / Silverberg, Nanette / Cordoro, Kelly M. ·Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Pediatric Dermatology, McGovern School of Medicine and Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USA. ·Pediatr Dermatol · Pubmed #29314219.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Childhood-onset psoriasis is a common skin disorder that has recently received increasing attention, particularly because of its significant medical, social, financial, and psychological burdens and its associated comorbidities. With limited data available and lack of standardized management guidelines for pediatric psoriasis, an expert panel desired to provide an updated critical overview and practical guidance for management of the affected population. METHODS: A panel of pediatric dermatologists with extensive experience in pediatric psoriasis defined and prioritized a core set of topics, performed an English-language literature review, prepared critical evaluations and presentations of topic areas, and carried out a consensus meeting and follow-up consensus manuscript. RESULTS: The summation of evolving perspectives in pediatric psoriasis includes epidemiology and natural history of the disease, precipitating factors and comorbidities, quality of life and burden of disease, clinical features and disease presentation, differential diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment, including topical, photo, and systemic therapies. CONCLUSION: Pediatric psoriasis is an important immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease with potential for significant impact on affected individuals and their caregivers. Current state-of-the-art care is based primarily on experience and expert consensus, but pediatric data are accumulating and therapeutic options are rapidly evolving.

15 Review Research Techniques Made Simple: Murine Models of Human Psoriasis. 2018

Hawkes, Jason E / Adalsteinsson, Jonas A / Gudjonsson, Johann E / Ward, Nicole L. ·Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, Rockefeller University, New York, New York, USA; Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. Electronic address: johanng@med.umich.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. Electronic address: nlw4@case.edu. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #29273150.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis vulgaris is a common, inflammatory skin disease affecting approximately 3% of the population in the United States. The etiology of psoriasis and its associated comorbidities are complex and the result of complicated interactions between the skin, immune system, disease-associated susceptibility loci, and multiple environmental triggers. The modeling of human disease in vivo through the use of murine models represents a powerful, indispensable tool for investigating the immune and genetic mechanisms contributing to a clinical disease phenotype. Nevertheless, modeling a complex, multigenic disease like psoriasis in mice has proven to be extremely challenging and is associated with significant limitations. Over the last four decades, more than 40 unique mouse models for psoriasis have been described. These models can be categorized into three major types: acute (inducible), genetically engineered (transgenic), and xenograft (humanized). The purpose of this Research Techniques Made Simple article is to provide an overview of the common types of psoriasis-like mouse models currently in use and their inherent advantages and limitations. We also highlight the need for improved psoriasis mouse model systems and several key factors to be considered as this field of laboratory science advances.

16 Review Cytokine Targeted Therapeutics for Alopecia Areata: Lessons from Atopic Dermatitis and Other Inflammatory Skin Diseases. 2018

Malik, Kunal / Guttman-Yassky, Emma. ·Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA; Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, USA; College of Medicine, SUNY Downstate, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA; Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, USA; Department of Genetics and Genomics Science, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA; The Immunology Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. Electronic address: Emma.Guttman@mountsinai.org. ·J Investig Dermatol Symp Proc · Pubmed #29273110.

ABSTRACT: Alopecia areata is a T-cell-mediated disease that shares phenotypic similarities with other inflammatory diseases, particularly atopic dermatitis, and lacks safe, effective, mechanism-specific treatments. Increasing data suggests that alopecia areata harbors contributions of T helper type 1, T helper type 2, T helper type 17/IL-23, and phosphodiesterase pathways. Antagonism of these axes is undergoing evaluation, and might elucidate the underlying molecular circuitry of alopecia areata, advancing the translational revolution for this disease.

17 Review Malignancy Risk and Recurrence with Psoriasis and its Treatments: A Concise Update. 2018

Geller, Shamir / Xu, Haoming / Lebwohl, Mark / Nardone, Beatrice / Lacouture, Mario E / Kheterpal, Meenal. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 16 East 60th Street, New York, NY, 10022, USA. gellers@mskcc.org. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 16 East 60th Street, New York, NY, 10022, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. ·Am J Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #29260411.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory cutaneous disease that affects approximately 120 million people worldwide. Systemic treatments have significantly improved disease burden, but concerns persist regarding their association with increased risk of malignancy. Patients with psoriasis have a slightly elevated baseline risk of lymphoproliferative diseases. Studies on methotrexate and cyclosporine, as well as older biological agents such as tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, have found no increased risk of non-cutaneous solid tumors; however, positive associations between cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas and certain therapies have been found. There is conflicting evidence regarding the risk of lymphoma and melanoma. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term safety of newer psoriasis treatments (interleukin [IL]-12/23, IL-17, Janus kinase 1/3, and phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors), specifically their safety in patients with a history of cancer. This review summarizes the most recent studies on malignancy risk from psoriasis, and its treatments in patients and cancer survivors, with the highest available level of evidence.

18 Review Psoriasis in Skin of Color: Insights into the Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, Genetics, Quality-of-Life Impact, and Treatment of Psoriasis in Non-White Racial/Ethnic Groups. 2018

Kaufman, Bridget P / Alexis, Andrew F. ·Mount Sinai St. Luke's, 1090 Amsterdam Avenue, Suite 11B, New York, NY, 10025, USA. bridgetkaufmanmd@gmail.com. · Mount Sinai St. Luke's, 1090 Amsterdam Avenue, Suite 11B, New York, NY, 10025, USA. ·Am J Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #29209945.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition affecting diverse racial/ethnic groups throughout the world. Large population-based studies suggest that psoriasis occurs most often in individuals of European ancestry, followed by black and Hispanic individuals, although the true prevalence of psoriasis in non-white individuals is likely underestimated. Despite similarities in psoriasis between ethnic groups, there are notable differences in the presentation, quality-of-life impact, and treatment of psoriasis with important implications for the management of non-white individuals. Overall, heterogeneity in psoriasis susceptibility alleles, in combination with cultural and socioeconomic factors, may explain these differences. In this article, we review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, genetic polymorphisms, quality-of-life impact, and treatment nuances of psoriasis in patients with skin of color.

19 Review Psychiatric adverse events during treatment with brodalumab: Analysis of psoriasis clinical trials. 2018

Lebwohl, Mark G / Papp, Kim A / Marangell, Lauren B / Koo, John / Blauvelt, Andrew / Gooderham, Melinda / Wu, Jashin J / Rastogi, Shipra / Harris, Susan / Pillai, Radhakrishnan / Israel, Robert J. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: lebwohl@aol.com. · K. Papp Clinical Research and Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · The McGovern School of Medicine of the University of Texas, Houston, Texas; Brain Health Consultants, Houston, Texas. · University of California San Francisco Psoriasis and Skin Treatment Center, San Francisco, California. · Oregon Medical Research Center, Portland, Oregon. · Skin Centre for Dermatology and Probity Medical Research, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada. · Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC, Bridgewater, New Jersey. · Dow Pharmaceutical (a division of Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC), Petaluma, California. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #28985956.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Individuals with psoriasis are at increased risk for psychiatric comorbidities, including suicidal ideation and behavior (SIB). OBJECTIVE: To distinguish between the underlying risk and potential for treatment-induced psychiatric adverse events in patients with psoriasis being treated with brodalumab, a fully human anti-interleukin 17 receptor A monoclonal antibody. METHODS: Data were evaluated from a placebo-controlled, phase 2 clinical trial; the open-label, long-term extension of the phase 2 clinical trial; and three phase 3, randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trials (AMAGINE-1, AMAGINE-2, and AMAGINE-3) and their open-label, long-term extensions of patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. RESULTS: The analysis included 4464 patients with 9161.8 patient-years of brodalumab exposure. The follow-up time-adjusted incidence rates of SIB events were comparable between the brodalumab and ustekinumab groups throughout the 52-week controlled phases (0.20 vs 0.60 per 100 patient-years). In the brodalumab group, 4 completed suicides were reported, 1 of which was later adjudicated as indeterminate; all patients had underlying psychiatric disorders or stressors. LIMITATIONS: There was no comparator arm past week 52. Controlled study periods were not powered to detect differences in rare events such as suicide. CONCLUSIONS: Comparison with controls and the timing of events do not indicate a causal relationship between SIB and brodalumab treatment.

20 Review Systemic immune mechanisms in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis with implications for treatment. 2018

Guttman-Yassky, Emma / Krueger, James G / Lebwohl, Mark G. ·Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA. · Center for Clinical and Translational Science, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #28266782.

ABSTRACT: Atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis are inflammatory skin diseases that negatively affect patients' quality of life. Although distinctions exist between these diseases, both are characterized by erythematous, thickened epidermal lesions that vary in intensity and affected body surface area. Early models of aetiology attributed symptoms of both diseases to cutaneous inflammation at lesion sites, but recent studies have established that activated immune mediators in the circulation drive disease severity. Activation of T helper 2 (Th2) and Th22 cells in the circulation appears to be the principal initiator of acute AD pathology, with the emergence of Th1 and Th17/interleukin (IL)-23 pathway activation marking the transition to a chronic state. The Th17/IL-23 pathway also has an important role in psoriasis. The role of systemic inflammation in AD and psoriasis is supported by the occurrence of non-cutaneous comorbidities that affect patients, most of which intensify morbidity and disability associated with lesional skin. Atopic dermatitis is associated with allergic disorders consisting of the "atopic march," whereas psoriasis is frequently accompanied by psoriatic arthritis. Patients with both disorders are at significantly higher risk of obesity, metabolic disorders, and cardiovascular diseases, all of which feature inflammatory components in their pathology models. These insights have led to novel therapeutics aimed at addressing psoriasis by targeting tumor necrosis factor- and Th17-related cytokine pathways. The success of these agents in psoriasis management is driving new therapeutic approaches for moderate-to-severe AD, including agents targeting the Th2 and Th17/Th22 cytokine pathways.

21 Review Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis: two different immune diseases or one spectrum? 2017

Guttman-Yassky, Emma / Krueger, James G. ·Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at the Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: Emma.Guttman@mountsinai.org. · Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA. ·Curr Opin Immunol · Pubmed #28869867.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis and atopic dermatitis (AD) are common T-cell mediated inflammatory diseases of the skin that can be treated by specific cytokine antagonists or more broad immunosuppressive drugs. The diseases are similar in that epidermal keratinocytes respond to T-cell derived cytokines by altering growth and differentiation responses, accounting for major parts of the overall disease phenotype. When studied across European-American populations, psoriasis and AD display differing T-cell polarity and different arrays of cytokines. Psoriasis is a disease largely driven by Th17 T-cells and associated IL-17 activation, while AD has a strong Th2 component associated with IL-4 and IL-13 over-production, and both diseases have activation of Th22 T-cells and Th1 pathways with increased IL-22 and IFNγ production, respectively. AD is a disease frequently associated with increased IgE production and overt allergies or asthma, most likely due to increased Th2 activation, which is largely lacking in psoriasis. Hence, psoriasis and AD can be viewed as distinct diseases with differing clinical, tissue, and molecular disease phenotypes, but this view does not account for specific subtypes of AD, including Asian-origin, intrinsic, and pediatric AD, that have a prominent IL-17 component and also tissue patterning that overlaps with distinctive psoriasis histopathology. Hence, when considering the range of AD phenotypes, a case can be made that psoriasis and AD exist across a spectrum where polar T-cell axes can be variably present and create some overlapping disease characteristics. Today, ∼90% of psoriasis patients have extremely controlled disease by targeting the IL-23/Th17 T-cell axis with IL-23 or IL-17-targeting antibodies. An outstanding question is whether targeting a single cytokine axis in AD, for example, Th2 axis, will lead to disease suppression in the majority of patients and across all subtypes, including those with higher IL-17 expression, or whether it is necessary to personalize therapies and target multiple T-cell axes to attain similar disease improvement to psoriasis.

22 Review Does Treatment of Psoriasis Reduce Cardiovascular Comorbidities? 2017

Lebwohl, Mark. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. Electronic address: lebwohl@aol.com. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #28735613.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis has been associated with an increase in myocardial infarctions. Several registries have shown reductions in major adverse cardiovascular events in psoriasis patients and rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists. Many assume that the reduction in cardiovascular events can be attributed to the anti-inflammatory effect of tumor necrosis factor blockers, but a 52-week study conducted by Bissonnette and coworkers failed to show a reduction in cardiovascular inflammation in psoriasis patients treated with adalimumab. Longer and larger studies are needed to explain why tumor necrosis factor-α blockade appears to reduce cardiovascular events in patients with severe psoriasis.

23 Review New biologics in psoriasis: an update on IL-23 and IL-17 inhibitors. 2017

Dong, Joanna / Goldenberg, Gary. ·Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #28319618.

ABSTRACT: As immune-related pathways involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis are elucidated, new biologic treatments targeting these steps of the psoriatic immune cascade are developed. In this article, we review the literature on IL-23 and IL-17 inhibitors in the pipeline for use in moderate to severe psoriasis. Numerous pipeline biologic therapies, including risankizumab, guselkumab, tildrakizumab, ixekizumab, and brodalumab, are being investigated in phase 2 and 3 studies to establish the efficacy and safety of these new agents. Of these newest biologics being studied for psoriasis, ixekizumab has been approved and brodalumab is pending approval by the US Food and Drug Administration.

24 Review Biosimilars in psoriasis: the future or not? 2017

Kellen, Roselyn / Goldenberg, Gary. ·Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #28319617.

ABSTRACT: As patents for the biologic agents reach their expiration dates, dermatologists must prepare for the coming of biosimilars. These agents have been deemed "highly similar" to their reference products in a process outlined by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In 2016, the FDA approved 3 biosimilars for various indications including plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. However, biosimilars are not the same as small-molecule generics because they have a complex manufacturing process that makes it impossible to produce identical products to their reference products. Therefore, should biosimilars be granted FDA approval for the same indications as their reference products? Furthermore, can biosimilars automatically be substituted for the branded drug at the pharmacy level? Putting aside these technical concerns, physicians must focus on the impact of biosimilars on patient care. These agents will have to be integrated into a complex health care system comprised of drug developers, employers, payers, and drug formularies.

25 Review Fixed combination calcipotriol plus betamethasone dipropionate aerosol foam in the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris: rationale for development and clinical profile. 2017

Paul, Carle / Bang, Bo / Lebwohl, Mark. ·a Professor and Chairman of the Department of Dermatology , Paul Sabatier University and Larrey Hospital , Toulouse , France. · b Medical Lead, Skin inflammation Projects , LEO Pharma A/S , Ballerup , Denmark. · c Professor and System Chair of the Department of Dermatology , Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai , New York , NY , USA. ·Expert Opin Pharmacother · Pubmed #27936972.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disorder with a significant negative impact on quality of life. Most patients with mild-to-moderate psoriasis manage their disease with topical therapies; the most commonly used formulations contain corticosteroids and/or vitamin D3 analogues. However, adherence to topical treatment remains a significant issue as the daily treatment regimen can be cumbersome and time consuming and many patients do not obtain complete/almost complete clearance. Areas covered: Published pre-clinical and clinical data evaluating calcipotriol 50 µg/g (Cal) and betamethasone 0.5 mg/g as dipropionate (BD) aerosol foam in patients with psoriasis. Expert opinion: Cal/BD aerosol foam, a once-daily, alcohol-free, paraffin-based vehicle with emollient properties, was developed to increase the therapeutic options available to patients. Cal/BD aerosol foam is rapidly effective for treating psoriasis and the greater efficacy compared with the ointment and gel formulations is consistent and clinically relevant. This enhanced efficacy is due to improved skin penetration of the active ingredients following the formation of a stable supersaturated solution on the skin. Studies have shown increasing patient satisfaction with Cal/BD aerosol foam. It is hoped that this optimized formulation of Cal/BD will improve adherence and help to address the unmet medical needs of patients with mild-to-moderate psoriasis.

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