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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Northwell Health
Based on 20 articles published since 2010
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These are the 20 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Northwell Health during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation: Treatment targets for plaque psoriasis. 2017

Armstrong, April W / Siegel, Michael P / Bagel, Jerry / Boh, Erin E / Buell, Megan / Cooper, Kevin D / Callis Duffin, Kristina / Eichenfield, Lawrence F / Garg, Amit / Gelfand, Joel M / Gottlieb, Alice B / Koo, John Y M / Korman, Neil J / Krueger, Gerald G / Lebwohl, Mark G / Leonardi, Craig L / Mandelin, Arthur M / Menter, M Alan / Merola, Joseph F / Pariser, David M / Prussick, Ronald B / Ryan, Caitriona / Shah, Kara N / Weinberg, Jeffrey M / Williams, MaryJane O U / Wu, Jashin J / Yamauchi, Paul S / Van Voorhees, Abby S. ·Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: aprilarmstrong@post.harvard.edu. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Windsor Dermatology, East Windsor, New Jersey; University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro, Plainsboro, New Jersey. · Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana. · University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah. · University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California. · Northwell Health and Hofstra North Shore University Hospital, Long Island Jewish Medical Center School of Medicine, Manhasset, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California San Francisco Medical Center, San Francisco, California. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · St Louis University Medical School, St Louis, Missouri. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Baylor University Medical Center and Texas A&M Health Science Center, Dallas, Texas. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia; Virginia Clinical Research Inc, Norfolk, Virginia. · George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia. · Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Division of Dermatology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #27908543.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An urgent need exists in the United States to establish treatment goals in psoriasis. OBJECTIVE: We aim to establish defined treatment targets toward which clinicians and patients with psoriasis can strive to inform treatment decisions, reduce disease burden, and improve outcomes in practice. METHODS: The National Psoriasis Foundation conducted a consensus-building study among psoriasis experts using the Delphi method. The process consisted of: (1) literature review, (2) pre-Delphi question selection and input from general dermatologists and patients, and (3) 4 Delphi rounds. RESULTS: A total of 25 psoriasis experts participated in the Delphi process. The most preferred instrument was body surface area (BSA). The most preferred time for evaluating patient response after starting new therapies was at 3 months. The acceptable response at 3 months postinitiation was either BSA 3% or less or BSA improvement 75% or more from baseline. The target response at 3 months postinitiation was BSA 1% or less. During the maintenance period, evaluation every 6 months was most preferred. The target response at every 6 months maintenance evaluation is BSA 1% or less. LIMITATIONS: Although BSA is feasible in practice, it does not encompass health-related quality of life, costs, and risks of side effects. CONCLUSION: With defined treatment targets, clinicians and patients can regularly evaluate treatment responses and perform benefit-risk assessments of therapeutic options individualized to the patient.

2 Review Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. 2012

Espinosa, Maria / Gottlieb, Beth S. ·The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Children's Medical Center of New York, North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, NY, USA. ·Pediatr Rev · Pubmed #22753788.

ABSTRACT: Juvenile idiopathic arthrithis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease of childhood.JIA is a chronic disease that is associated with periods of disease flares and periods of disease inactivity.Early, aggressive treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, intra-articular corticosteroid injections, or methotrexate, has significantly improved the outcome of most children who have JIA. Biologics have been shown to be both safe and effective for the treatment of more aggressive forms of arthritis and for uveitis. Long-term safety data of biologics is still uncertain. In the near future, it is hoped that genetic testing will allow earlier diagnosis of JIA as well as help predict the disease course of children who have JIA. Genetic analysis also may allow physicians to target therapies more effectively. It is hoped that development of more specific therapies will decrease overall immunosuppression and other associated toxicities.

3 Article A systematic review of herpes zoster incidence and consensus recommendations on vaccination in adult patients on systemic therapy for psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis: From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. 2019

Baumrin, Emily / Van Voorhees, Abby / Garg, Amit / Feldman, Steven R / Merola, Joseph F. ·Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: ebaumrin@partners.org. · Department of Dermatology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. · Department of Dermatology, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Hempstead, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. · Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30885757.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Herpes zoster (HZ) incidence is linked to immunosuppression. Patients with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis (PsA) on systemic therapy might be at an increased risk for HZ. OBJECTIVE: To assess HZ risk in patients with psoriasis and PsA by systemic treatment and provide recommendations regarding HZ vaccination. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed for HZ in patients with psoriasis and PsA. HZ vaccination guidelines were reviewed, and the medical board of the National Psoriasis Foundation made consensus recommendations in psoriasis and PsA patients using graded evidence. RESULTS: In total, 41 studies met inclusion criteria. Systemic corticosteroids (strong, 1), tofacitinib (strong, 1), and combination therapy with biologic and conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (weak, 2a) carry increased HZ risk while monotherapy does not. There is insufficient evidence to determine risk with interleukin 12/23, 17, and 23 inhibitors or apremilast (weak, 2a). Recombinant zoster vaccine is recommended for all psoriasis and PsA patients >50 years old and patients <50 years old on tofacitinib, systemic steroids, or combination systemic treatment. Vaccination of patients <50 years old on other systemic therapies may be considered on a case-by-case basis. LIMITATIONS: There was significant heterogeneity between studies. CONCLUSION: HZ risk depends on disease severity and treatment class. Recombinant zoster vaccine should be given to all psoriasis and PsA patients >50 years old and younger patients at increased risk.

4 Article Achieving international consensus on the assessment of psoriatic arthritis in psoriasis clinical trials: an International Dermatology Outcome Measures (IDEOM) initiative. 2018

Perez-Chada, Lourdes Maria / Cohen, Jeffrey M / Gottlieb, Alice Bendix / Duffin, Kristina Callis / Garg, Amit / Latella, John / Armstrong, April Wang / Ogdie, Alexis / Merola, Joseph Frank. ·Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Dermatology, New York Medical College at Metropolitan Hospital, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY, USA. · International Dermatology Outcome Measures (IDEOM), Windsor, CT, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Division of Rheumatology and Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. jfmerola@bwh.harvard.edu. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. jfmerola@bwh.harvard.edu. ·Arch Dermatol Res · Pubmed #30167814.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is rarely assessed in psoriasis randomized controlled trials (RCT); thus, the effect of psoriasis therapy on PsA is unknown. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures (IDEOM) has included "PsA Symptoms" as part of the core domains to be measured in psoriasis RCT. This study aimed to achieve consensus about screening for PsA and how to measure for "PsA Symptoms" in psoriasis RCT. At the IDEOM 2017 Annual Meeting, stakeholders voted on the role of PsA screening in psoriasis RCT. To select measures for "PsA Symptoms", we adapted the Consensus-Based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) guidelines. Three potential measures were selected. At the meeting, stakeholders voted on the validity, feasibility, and responsiveness of these measures. Of the 47 stakeholders, 93% voted that all psoriasis trial participants should be screened for PsA. "PsA Symptoms" measures included Patient Global (PG)-arthritis, Routine Assessment Patient Index Data (RAPID)-3, and Psoriatic Arthritis Impact of Disease (PsAID)-9. During the voting, more than 50% of the voters agreed that RAPID3 and PsAID9 were good measures for PsA Symptoms, able to capture all its essential elements. PsAID9 was considered the most feasible instrument, followed by RAPID3 and PG-arthritis, respectively. Finally, most participants agreed that RAPID3 and PsAID9 were responsive measures. Most study participants voted that all subjects in a psoriasis clinical trial should be screened for PsA. RAPID3 and PsAID9 outperformed PG-arthritis in measuring PsA Symptoms. This will be followed by a Delphi survey involving a larger stakeholder group.

5 Article Are Your Patients Satisfied A Systematic Review of Treatment Satisfaction Measures in Psoriasis. 2018

Salame, Nicole / Perez-Chada, Lourdes M / Singh, Sanminder / Callis Duffin, Kristina / Garg, Amit / Gottlieb, Alice B / Latella, John / Merola, Joseph F / Armstrong, April W. ·University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, New Hyde Park, New York, USA. · Department of Dermatology, New York Medical College, Metropolitan Hospital, New York, New York, USA. · International Dermatology Outcome Measures (IDEOM), Windsor, Connecticut, USA. · Department of Dermatology and Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USAarmstrongpublication@gmail.com. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #30121657.

ABSTRACT: Treatment satisfaction is paramount to the field of dermatology. Treatment dissatisfaction directly impacts patient outcomes and health care delivery. A critical need exists for standardized, validated treatment satisfaction measures in dermatology. Comprehensive evaluation of the performance of treatment satisfaction instruments used in psoriasis is lacking. We sought to critically appraise the literature on measurement properties of treatment satisfaction instruments used in psoriasis. We performed a systematic review to identify treatment satisfaction instruments used in psoriasis and corresponding studies on their measurement properties. We followed the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) methodology to inform a best evidence synthesis. Eleven instruments were identified. Six achieved positive content validity ratings, 2 achieved positive reliability and structural validity ratings, and 1 achieved a positive internal consistency rating. The REFlective evaLuation of psoriasis Efficacy of Treatment and Severity (REFLETS) and the Spanish Satisfaction With Treatment of Psoriasis Questionnaire (SSWTPQ) had the highest overall performance. Measurement property data for treatment satisfaction instruments were found to be insufficient in identifying a single best treatment satisfaction instrument for psoriasis. Additional studies are required to better characterize the measurement properties of treatment satisfaction measures and allow for standardized assessments across psoriasis clinical trials and clinical practice.

6 Article Dietary Recommendations for Adults With Psoriasis or Psoriatic Arthritis From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation: A Systematic Review. 2018

Ford, Adam R / Siegel, Michael / Bagel, Jerry / Cordoro, Kelly M / Garg, Amit / Gottlieb, Alice / Green, Lawrence J / Gudjonsson, Johann E / Koo, John / Lebwohl, Mark / Liao, Wilson / Mandelin, Arthur M / Markenson, Joseph A / Mehta, Nehal / Merola, Joseph F / Prussick, Ronald / Ryan, Caitriona / Schwartzman, Sergio / Siegel, Evan L / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Wu, Jashin J / Armstrong, April W. ·Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey, East Windsor. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco. · Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco. · Department of Dermatology, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Hempstead, New York. · New York Medical College at Metropolitan Hospital, New York. · Hudson Dermatology, Somers, New York. · Department of Dermatology, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Blackrock Clinic, Dublin, Ireland. · Arthritis and Rheumatism Associates, PC, Rockville, Maryland. · Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. · Department of Dermatology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #29926091.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease and has significant associated morbidity and effect on quality of life. It is important to determine whether dietary interventions help reduce disease severity in patients with psoriatic diseases. Objective: To make evidence-based dietary recommendations for adults with psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis from the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. Evidence Review: We used literature from prior systematic reviews as well as additional primary literature from the MEDLINE database from January 1, 2014, to August 31, 2017, that evaluated the impact of diet on psoriasis. We included observational and interventional studies of patients with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale for observational studies and the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool for interventional studies. We made evidence-based dietary recommendations, which were voted on by the National Psoriasis Foundation Medical Board. Findings: We identified 55 studies meeting the inclusion criteria for this review. These studies represent 77 557 unique participants of which 4534 have psoriasis. Based on the literature, we strongly recommend dietary weight reduction with a hypocaloric diet in overweight and obese patients with psoriasis. We weakly recommend a gluten-free diet only in patients who test positive for serologic markers of gluten sensitivity. Based on low-quality data, select foods, nutrients, and dietary patterns may affect psoriasis. For patients with psoriatic arthritis, we weakly recommend vitamin D supplementation and dietary weight reduction with a hypocaloric diet in overweight and obese patients. Dietary interventions should always be used in conjunction with standard medical therapies for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Conclusions and Relevance: Adults with psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis can supplement their standard medical therapies with dietary interventions to reduce disease severity. These dietary recommendations from the National Psoriasis Foundation Medical Board will help guide clinicians regarding the utility of dietary interventions in adults with psoriatic diseases.

7 Article Identifying a Core Domain Set to Assess Psoriasis in Clinical Trials. 2018

Callis Duffin, Kristina / Merola, Joseph F / Christensen, Robin / Latella, John / Garg, Amit / Gottlieb, Alice B / Armstrong, April W. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen F, Denmark. · International Dermatology Outcome Measures Board of Directors, Windsor, Connecticut. · Department of Dermatology, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, New Hyde Park, New York. · Department of Dermatology, New York Medical College, Metropolitan Hospital, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles. · Clinical Evidence Synopsis Editor and Editorial Board Member. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #29874367.

ABSTRACT: Importance: There is no consensus on which domains should be measured or which instruments should be used in clinical trials for psoriasis therapies. Objective: To achieve international consensus among psoriasis stakeholders on a core set of domains that should be measured in all psoriasis clinical trials. Design, Setting, and Participants: Literature review, pre-Delphi survey exercises, nominal group discussions, and audience voting at 4 stakeholder meetings were used to develop candidate domains for 2 rounds of a Delphi survey. Stakeholders were patients or advocates of patients with psoriasis and health care professionals (HCPs) with expertise in psoriasis, including physicians, scientists, advocacy organization representatives, and regulators. Delphi surveys were conducted electronically from October through December 2015 and between September and October 2016. Stakeholder discussions with audience response voting were conducted at live meetings in the United States, Canada, and Italy from January 2013 to December 2016 to refine and ratify the core set of domains. Main Outcomes and Measures: Two rounds of an electronic Delphi survey were used to determine consensus. A domain was considered "core" (ie, should be measured in all trials) if a threshold consensus of at least 70% was met in both patient and HCP groups. Domains meeting consensus in only 1 group were considered to be important but were not required to be measured in all trials ("middle ring"). These domains were included for rerating in round 2. Domains that did not meet consensus in either of the groups ("outer ring") were considered to be of uncertain importance and were placed in the research agenda. Results: In round 1 of the Delphi survey, 107 HCPs and 14 patients participated. Most HCPs (72 [67%]) were dermatologists between 46 and 64 years old (71 [66%]), white (78 [73%]), and male (75 [70%]) from North America (60 [57%]) and Europe (34 [32%]).There were 10 pharmaceutical industry clinical or health economic scientists, 3 advocacy organization representatives, 2 regulatory agency representatives, and 5 "other." In the second round, 77 HCPs and 15 patients participated. Of the 20 candidate domains, the following 6 met consensus as core domains: skin manifestations, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis symptoms, health-related quality of life, investigator global assessment, patient global assessment, and treatment satisfaction. Secondary skin manifestations as well as nail, inverse, genital, and guttate psoriasis were classified as important but not mandatory. Psoriatic arthritis signs, work productivity or participation, economic impact (direct and indirect cost), and cardiovascular disease comprised the research agenda. Conclusions and Relevance: This iterative Delphi process yielded international consensus among professional and patient stakeholders on 6 domains that should be measured in all clinical trials for psoriasis. Future International Dermatology Outcome Measures group efforts will focus on development of a core outcome measurement set for psoriasis trials.

8 Article Oral vitamin D 2018

Ingram, Michelle A / Jones, M Beatrix / Stonehouse, Welma / Jarrett, Paul / Scragg, Robert / Mugridge, Owen / von Hurst, Pamela R. ·a School of Sport, Exercise and Nutrition , Massey University, Albany Campus , North Shore City, Auckland , New Zealand. · b Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Albany Campus , North Shore City, Auckland , New Zealand. · c Food and Nutrition Flagship , Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation , Adelaide, South Australia , Australia. · d Department of Dermatology , Middlemore Hospital , Otahuhu, Auckland , New Zealand. · e Department of Medicine , The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand. · f School of Population Health , The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand. ·J Dermatolog Treat · Pubmed #29480035.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The management of psoriasis remains a challenge for dermatologist and patient. This study aimed to determine whether vitamin D MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a randomized, doubled-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 101 participants ≥18 years with psoriasis were grouped by severity and allocated to 100,000 International Units (IU) vitamin D RESULTS: PASI did not differ between groups at any time (group F(1, 104) = 0.48, p = .49; group*time F(4, 384) = 0.26, p = .90). However, 25(OH)D increased in both groups, rendering these findings inconclusive. A significant inverse relationship existed between PASI and 25(OH)D, with elevation of 25(OH)D by up to 125 nmol/L associated with mild decreases in PASI (estimated range of decrease 0-2.6; p = .002). CONCLUSIONS: A direct benefit of vitamin D

9 Article Defining Outcome Measures for Psoriasis: The IDEOM Report from the GRAPPA 2016 Annual Meeting. 2017

Callis Duffin, Kristina / Gottlieb, Alice B / Merola, Joseph F / Latella, John / Garg, Amit / Armstrong, April W. ·From the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; New York Medical College, Valhalla; Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York; Department of Dermatology and Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; International Dermatology Outcome Measurers, West Granby, Connecticut; University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. Kristina.callis@hsc.utah.edu. · K. Callis Duffin MD, MS, University of Utah; A.B. Gottlieb, MD, PhD, Professor of Dermatology, New York Medical College; J.F. Merola, MD, MMSc, Assistant Professor of Dermatology, Department of Dermatology and Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School; J. Latella, BS, MS, Patient Research Partner, and Board Member, International Dermatology Outcome Measurers; A. Garg, MD, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine; A.W. Armstrong, MD, MPH, University of Southern California. Kristina.callis@hsc.utah.edu. · From the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; New York Medical College, Valhalla; Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York; Department of Dermatology and Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; International Dermatology Outcome Measurers, West Granby, Connecticut; University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · K. Callis Duffin MD, MS, University of Utah; A.B. Gottlieb, MD, PhD, Professor of Dermatology, New York Medical College; J.F. Merola, MD, MMSc, Assistant Professor of Dermatology, Department of Dermatology and Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School; J. Latella, BS, MS, Patient Research Partner, and Board Member, International Dermatology Outcome Measurers; A. Garg, MD, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine; A.W. Armstrong, MD, MPH, University of Southern California. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #28461532.

ABSTRACT: The International Dermatology Outcome Measures (IDEOM) psoriasis working group was established to develop core domains and measurements sets for psoriasis clinical trials and ultimately clinical practice. At the 2016 annual meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis, the IDEOM psoriasis group presented an overview of its progress toward developing this psoriasis core domain set. First, it summarized the February 2016 meeting of all involved with the IDEOM, highlighting patient and payer perspectives on outcome measures. Second, the group presented an overview of the consensus process for developing the core domain set for psoriasis, including previous literature reviews, nominal group exercises, and meeting discussions. Future plans include the development of working groups to review candidate measures for at least 2 of the domains, including primary pathophysiologic manifestations and patient-reported outcomes, and Delphi surveys to gain consensus on the final psoriasis core domain set.

10 Article Proceedings of the GRAPPA 2016 Retreat. 2017

Jadon, Deepak R / Gladman, Dafna D / Mease, Philip J / FitzGerald, Oliver / Chandran, Vinod / Goel, Niti / Rosen, Cheryl F / Maksymowych, Walter P / Ritchlin, Christopher T / Ogdie, Alexis / Coates, Laura C / Cauli, Alberto / Soriano, Enrique R / Husni, M Elaine / Campbell, Willemina / Azevedo, Valderilio F / Callis Duffin, Kristina / Armstrong, April W / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Garg, Amit / Helliwell, Philip S. ·From the Rheumatology Research Unit, Cambridge University Hospitals UK National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, Cambridge; UK National Institute for Health Research Clinical Lecturer, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds; Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK; Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital, Krembil Research Institute; Division of Dermatology, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario; University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington; Advisory Services, QuintilesIMS, Denver, Colorado; Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina; Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester; New York Medical College, Valhalla; Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, New York, New York; Medicine and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio; University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; University of Southern California, Los Angeles; University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California, USA; Newman Clinical Research Professor, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital; Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; Division of Rheumatology, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy, Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil. · D.R. Jadon, MBBCh, MRCP, PhD, Director, Rheumatology Research Unit, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust; D.D. Gladman, MD, FRCPC, Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, and Senior Scientist, Krembil Research Institute, Toronto Western Hospital; P.J. Mease, MD, Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine; O. FitzGerald, MD, FRCPI, FRCP( UK), Newman Clinical Research Professor, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin; V. Chandran, MBBS, MD, DM, PhD, Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital, Krembil Research Institute; N. Goel, MD, Patient Research Partner, Vice President, Advisory Services, QuintilesIMS, and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Duke University School of Medicine; C.F. Rosen, MD, FRCPC, Division of Dermatology, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto; W.P. Maksymowych, MD, FRCP(C), Professor of Medicine, University of Alberta; C.T. Ritchlin, MD, MPH, Professor of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology, University of Rochester Medical Center; A. Ogdie, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; L.C. Coates, MBChB, PhD, UK National Institute for Health Research Clinical Lecturer, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; A. Cauli, MD, PhD, Division of Rheumatology, University of Cagliari; E.R. Soriano, MD, MSC, Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires; M.E. Husni, MD, MPH, Cleveland Clinic; W. Campbell, BEd LLB, Patient Research Partner, Toronto Western Hospital; V.F. Azevedo, MD, PhD, Adjunct Professor of Rheumatology, Federal University of Paraná; K. Callis Duffin, MD, University of Utah; A.W. Armstrong, MD, MPH, University of Southern California; A.B. Gottlieb, MD, PhD, Professor of Dermatology, New York Medical College; A. Kavanaugh, MD, Professor of Medicine, University of California at San Diego; A. Garg, MD, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine; P.S. Helliwell, DM, PhD, FRCP, University of Leeds, and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. · From the Rheumatology Research Unit, Cambridge University Hospitals UK National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, Cambridge; UK National Institute for Health Research Clinical Lecturer, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds; Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK; Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital, Krembil Research Institute; Division of Dermatology, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario; University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington; Advisory Services, QuintilesIMS, Denver, Colorado; Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina; Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester; New York Medical College, Valhalla; Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, New York, New York; Medicine and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio; University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; University of Southern California, Los Angeles; University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California, USA; Newman Clinical Research Professor, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital; Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; Division of Rheumatology, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy, Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil. p.helliwell@leeds.ac.uk. · D.R. Jadon, MBBCh, MRCP, PhD, Director, Rheumatology Research Unit, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust; D.D. Gladman, MD, FRCPC, Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, and Senior Scientist, Krembil Research Institute, Toronto Western Hospital; P.J. Mease, MD, Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine; O. FitzGerald, MD, FRCPI, FRCP( UK), Newman Clinical Research Professor, Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin; V. Chandran, MBBS, MD, DM, PhD, Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital, Krembil Research Institute; N. Goel, MD, Patient Research Partner, Vice President, Advisory Services, QuintilesIMS, and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Duke University School of Medicine; C.F. Rosen, MD, FRCPC, Division of Dermatology, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto; W.P. Maksymowych, MD, FRCP(C), Professor of Medicine, University of Alberta; C.T. Ritchlin, MD, MPH, Professor of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology, University of Rochester Medical Center; A. Ogdie, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; L.C. Coates, MBChB, PhD, UK National Institute for Health Research Clinical Lecturer, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; A. Cauli, MD, PhD, Division of Rheumatology, University of Cagliari; E.R. Soriano, MD, MSC, Sección Reumatología, Servicio de Clínica Médica, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires; M.E. Husni, MD, MPH, Cleveland Clinic; W. Campbell, BEd LLB, Patient Research Partner, Toronto Western Hospital; V.F. Azevedo, MD, PhD, Adjunct Professor of Rheumatology, Federal University of Paraná; K. Callis Duffin, MD, University of Utah; A.W. Armstrong, MD, MPH, University of Southern California; A.B. Gottlieb, MD, PhD, Professor of Dermatology, New York Medical College; A. Kavanaugh, MD, Professor of Medicine, University of California at San Diego; A. Garg, MD, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine; P.S. Helliwell, DM, PhD, FRCP, University of Leeds, and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. p.helliwell@leeds.ac.uk. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #28461522.

ABSTRACT: In advance of its 2016 annual meeting, members of the steering committee of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) convened for a strategic planning meeting. The purpose of this advance meeting was to review the work of GRAPPA since its inception in 2003, ascertain and review the current priorities of the group, and devise a strategy for proceeding. The key accomplishments of GRAPPA to date, priorities and objectives for the next 5 years, and goals and opportunities for the GRAPPA committees were discussed. GRAPPA has a responsibility and commitment to patients, its members, and partners to innovate, inspire, and improve knowledge and the ability to care for people with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

11 Article Stiffness Is the Cardinal Symptom of Inflammatory Musculoskeletal Diseases, Yet Still Variably Measured: Report from the OMERACT 2016 Stiffness Special Interest Group. 2017

Halls, Serena / Sinnathurai, Premarani / Hewlett, Sarah / Mackie, Sarah L / March, Lyn / Bartlett, Susan J / Bingham, Clifton O / Alten, Rieke / Campbell, Ina / Hill, Catherine L / Holt, Robert J / Hughes, Rod / Kirwan, John R / Leong, Amye L / Leung, Ying Ying / Lyddiatt, Anne / Neill, Lorna / Orbai, Ana-Maria. ·From the Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England; University of Bristol Academic Rheumatology Unit, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds; Department of Rheumatology, Ashford and St. Peter's National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, Chertsey; Patient Research Partner PMR-GCA Scotland, Forest Lodge, Foulden, Berwickshire, UK; Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District; Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, New South Wales; University of Sydney, Sydney; Rheumatology Unit, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide; Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia; Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Division of Rheumatology, and Division Respiratory Epidemiology, McGill University/McGill University Health Centers, Montreal, Québec; Patient Research Partner, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto; Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group, Institute of Population Health, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois; Healthy Motivation and Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health the Bone and Joint Decade, Santa Barbara, California, USA; Schlosspark-Klinik, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Horizon Pharma LTD, Dublin, Ireland; Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore. serena.halls@uwe.ac.uk. · S. Halls, PhD, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England; P. Sinnathurai, BSc(Med) MBBS, FRACP, Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District, and Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, and University of Sydney; S. Hewlett, PhD, RN, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England; S.L. Mackie, BM, BCh, PhD, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine; L. March, MD, Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District, and Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, and University of Sydney; S.J. Bartlett, MD, Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Division of Rheumatology, and Division Respiratory Epidemiology, McGill University/McGill University Health Centers, and Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; C.O. Bingham III, MD, Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; R. Alten, MD, Schlosspark-Klinik, University Medicine Berlin; I. Campbell, BEd LLB, Patient Research Partner, Toronto Western Hospital; C.L. Hill, MBBS, MD, MSc, FRACP, Staff Specialist, Rheumatology Unit, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, and Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide; R.J. Holt, PharmD, MBA, University of Illinois-Chicago, and Horizon Pharma LTD; R. Hughes, MA, MD, FRCP, Department of Rheumatology, Ashford and St. Peter's NHS Foundation Trust; J.R. Kirwan, MD, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England, and University of Bristol Academic Rheumatology Unit, Bristol Royal Infirmary; A.L. Leong, MBA, Patient Partner, Healthy Motivation and Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health the Bone and Joint Decade; Y.Y. Leung, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital; A. Lyddiatt, Patient Research Partner, Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group, Institute of Population Health; L.M. Neill, BSc, CPhys, MInstP, Patient Research Partner, Trustee and Secretary, PMR-GCA Scotland; A.M. Morbai, MD, MHS, Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. serena.halls@uwe.ac.uk. · From the Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England; University of Bristol Academic Rheumatology Unit, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds; Department of Rheumatology, Ashford and St. Peter's National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, Chertsey; Patient Research Partner PMR-GCA Scotland, Forest Lodge, Foulden, Berwickshire, UK; Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District; Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, New South Wales; University of Sydney, Sydney; Rheumatology Unit, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide; Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia; Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Division of Rheumatology, and Division Respiratory Epidemiology, McGill University/McGill University Health Centers, Montreal, Québec; Patient Research Partner, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto; Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group, Institute of Population Health, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois; Healthy Motivation and Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health the Bone and Joint Decade, Santa Barbara, California, USA; Schlosspark-Klinik, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Horizon Pharma LTD, Dublin, Ireland; Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore. · S. Halls, PhD, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England; P. Sinnathurai, BSc(Med) MBBS, FRACP, Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District, and Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, and University of Sydney; S. Hewlett, PhD, RN, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England; S.L. Mackie, BM, BCh, PhD, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine; L. March, MD, Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District, and Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, and University of Sydney; S.J. Bartlett, MD, Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Division of Rheumatology, and Division Respiratory Epidemiology, McGill University/McGill University Health Centers, and Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; C.O. Bingham III, MD, Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; R. Alten, MD, Schlosspark-Klinik, University Medicine Berlin; I. Campbell, BEd LLB, Patient Research Partner, Toronto Western Hospital; C.L. Hill, MBBS, MD, MSc, FRACP, Staff Specialist, Rheumatology Unit, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, and Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide; R.J. Holt, PharmD, MBA, University of Illinois-Chicago, and Horizon Pharma LTD; R. Hughes, MA, MD, FRCP, Department of Rheumatology, Ashford and St. Peter's NHS Foundation Trust; J.R. Kirwan, MD, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the West of England, and University of Bristol Academic Rheumatology Unit, Bristol Royal Infirmary; A.L. Leong, MBA, Patient Partner, Healthy Motivation and Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health the Bone and Joint Decade; Y.Y. Leung, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital; A. Lyddiatt, Patient Research Partner, Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group, Institute of Population Health; L.M. Neill, BSc, CPhys, MInstP, Patient Research Partner, Trustee and Secretary, PMR-GCA Scotland; A.M. Morbai, MD, MHS, Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #27980014.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objectives of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Stiffness special interest group (SIG) are to characterize stiffness as an outcome in rheumatic disease and to identify and validate a stiffness patient-reported outcome (PRO) in rheumatology. METHODS: At OMERACT 2016, international groups presented and discussed results of several concurrent research projects on stiffness: a literature review of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) stiffness PRO measures, a qualitative investigation into the RA and polymyalgia rheumatica patient perspective of stiffness, data-driven stiffness conceptual model development, development and testing of an RA stiffness PRO measure, and a quantitative work testing stiffness items in patients with RA and psoriatic arthritis. RESULTS: The literature review identified 52 individual stiffness PRO measures assessing morning or early morning stiffness severity/intensity or duration. Items were heterogeneous, had little or inconsistent psychometric property evidence, and did not appear to have been developed according to the PRO development guidelines. A poor match between current stiffness PRO and the conceptual model identifying the RA patient experience of stiffness was identified, highlighting a major flaw in PRO selection according to the OMERACT filter 2.0. CONCLUSION: Discussions within the Stiffness SIG highlighted the importance of further research on stiffness and defined a research agenda.

12 Article International Dermatology Outcome Measures Initiative as Applied to Psoriatic Disease Outcomes: An Update. 2016

Merola, Joseph F / Armstrong, April W / Saraiya, Ami / Latella, John / Garg, Amit / Callis Duffin, Kristina / Gottlieb, Alice B. ·From Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California; Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine, Manhasset, New York; University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.J.F. Merola, MD, MMSc, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School; A.W. Armstrong, MD, University of Southern California; A. Saraiya, Tufts Medical Center; J. Latella, International Dermatology Outcome Measures (IDEOM) Patient Research Partner and IDEOM Board of Directors, West Granby, Connecticut, USA; A. Garg, MD, Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine; K. Callis Duffin, MD, University of Utah; A.B. Gottlieb, MD, PhD, Tufts Medical Center. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #27134269.

ABSTRACT: Previous publications have described the International Dermatology Outcome Measures (IDEOM) group, comprising patients, physicians, health economists, participating pharmaceutical industry partners, payers, and regulatory agencies. The goal of IDEOM is to create patient-centered, validated measures of dermatologic disease progression and treatment efficacy for use in both clinical trials and clinical practice. We provide an update of IDEOM activities as of our 2015 IDEOM meeting in Washington, DC, USA.

13 Article Genome-wide Association Analysis of Psoriatic Arthritis and Cutaneous Psoriasis Reveals Differences in Their Genetic Architecture. 2015

Stuart, Philip E / Nair, Rajan P / Tsoi, Lam C / Tejasvi, Trilokraj / Das, Sayantan / Kang, Hyun Min / Ellinghaus, Eva / Chandran, Vinod / Callis-Duffin, Kristina / Ike, Robert / Li, Yanming / Wen, Xiaoquan / Enerbäck, Charlotta / Gudjonsson, Johann E / Kõks, Sulev / Kingo, Külli / Esko, Tõnu / Mrowietz, Ulrich / Reis, Andre / Wichmann, H Erich / Gieger, Christian / Hoffmann, Per / Nöthen, Markus M / Winkelmann, Juliane / Kunz, Manfred / Moreta, Elvia G / Mease, Philip J / Ritchlin, Christopher T / Bowcock, Anne M / Krueger, Gerald G / Lim, Henry W / Weidinger, Stephan / Weichenthal, Michael / Voorhees, John J / Rahman, Proton / Gregersen, Peter K / Franke, Andre / Gladman, Dafna D / Abecasis, Gonçalo R / Elder, James T. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; Department of Biostatistics, Center for Statistical Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Center for Statistical Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. · Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, 24105 Kiel, Germany. · Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 2S8, Canada; Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, Toronto Western Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 2S8, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology and Dermatology, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden. · Department of Pathophysiology, Centre of Translational Medicine and Centre for Translational Genomics, University of Tartu, 50411 Tartu, Estonia; Department of Reproductive Biology, Estonian University of Life Sciences, 51014 Tartu, Estonia. · Dermatology Clinic, Tartu University Hospital, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, University of Tartu, 50417 Tartu, Estonia. · Estonian Genome Center, University of Tartu, 51010 Tartu, Estonia. · Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, 24105 Kiel, Germany. · Institute of Human Genetics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen, Germany. · Institute of Epidemiology I, Helmholtz Zentrum Munich, German Research Center for Environmental Health, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany; Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, 81377 Munich, Germany; Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Technical University Munich, 80333 Munich, Germany. · Research Unit of Molecular Epidemiology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany; Institute of Epidemiology II, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany. · Institute of Human Genetics, University of Bonn, 53127 Bonn, Germany; Department of Genomics, Life & Brain Center, University of Bonn, 53127 Bonn, Germany. · Neurologische Klinik and Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 80333 Munich, Germany; Institute of Neurogenomics, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Research Center for Environmental Health, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. · Saint Paul Rheumatology, Eagan, MN 55121, USA. · Seattle Rheumatology Associates, 601 Broadway, Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98122, USA. · Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14623, USA. · National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202, USA. · Memorial University, St. John's, NL A1C 5B8, Canada. · The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA. Electronic address: jelder@umich.edu. ·Am J Hum Genet · Pubmed #26626624.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) is a common inflammatory and hyperproliferative skin disease. Up to 30% of people with PsV eventually develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA), an inflammatory musculoskeletal condition. To discern differences in genetic risk factors for PsA and cutaneous-only psoriasis (PsC), we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 1,430 PsA case subjects and 1,417 unaffected control subjects. Meta-analysis of this study with three other GWASs and two targeted genotyping studies, encompassing a total of 9,293 PsV case subjects, 3,061 PsA case subjects, 3,110 PsC case subjects, and 13,670 unaffected control subjects of European descent, detected 10 regions associated with PsA and 11 with PsC at genome-wide (GW) significance. Several of these association signals (IFNLR1, IFIH1, NFKBIA for PsA; TNFRSF9, LCE3C/B, TRAF3IP2, IL23A, NFKBIA for PsC) have not previously achieved GW significance. After replication, we also identified a PsV-associated SNP near CDKAL1 (rs4712528, odds ratio [OR] = 1.16, p = 8.4 × 10(-11)). Among identified psoriasis risk variants, three were more strongly associated with PsC than PsA (rs12189871 near HLA-C, p = 5.0 × 10(-19); rs4908742 near TNFRSF9, p = 0.00020; rs10888503 near LCE3A, p = 0.0014), and two were more strongly associated with PsA than PsC (rs12044149 near IL23R, p = 0.00018; rs9321623 near TNFAIP3, p = 0.00022). The PsA-specific variants were independent of previously identified psoriasis variants near IL23R and TNFAIP3. We also found multiple independent susceptibility variants in the IL12B, NOS2, and IFIH1 regions. These results provide insights into the pathogenetic similarities and differences between PsC and PsA.

14 Article The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group: formation of patient-centered outcome measures in dermatology. 2015

Gottlieb, Alice B / Levin, Adriane A / Armstrong, April W / Abernethy, April / Duffin, Kristina Callis / Bhushan, Reva / Garg, Amit / Merola, Joseph F / Maccarone, Mara / Christensen, Robin. ·Department of Dermatology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. · American Academy of Dermatology, Schaumburg, Illinois. Electronic address: rbhushan@aad.org. · Department of Dermatology, Hofstra North Shore Long Island Jewish School of Medicine, Manhasset, New York. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Associazione per la Difesa delgi Proriasici, Rome, Italy. · Department of Rheumatology, Michigan State University, Parker Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #25486914.

ABSTRACT: As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis, the group aims to create a tool considerate of patients and providers using the input of all relevant stakeholders in assessment of disease severity and response to treatment. Herein, we delineate the procedures through which consensus is being reached and the future directions of the project.

15 Article Fine mapping major histocompatibility complex associations in psoriasis and its clinical subtypes. 2014

Okada, Yukinori / Han, Buhm / Tsoi, Lam C / Stuart, Philip E / Ellinghaus, Eva / Tejasvi, Trilokraj / Chandran, Vinod / Pellett, Fawnda / Pollock, Remy / Bowcock, Anne M / Krueger, Gerald G / Weichenthal, Michael / Voorhees, John J / Rahman, Proton / Gregersen, Peter K / Franke, Andre / Nair, Rajan P / Abecasis, Gonçalo R / Gladman, Dafna D / Elder, James T / de Bakker, Paul I W / Raychaudhuri, Soumya. ·Department of Human Genetics and Disease Diversity, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-0085, Japan; Laboratory for Statistical Analysis, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Yokohama 230-0045, Japan; Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. · Department of Biostatistics and Center for Statistical Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. · Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology, Kiel University, Kiel 24105, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 2S8, Canada; Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, Toronto Western Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 2S8, Canada. · Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, Toronto Western Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 2S8, Canada. · National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK. · Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel 24105, Germany. · Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL A1C5S7, Canada. · The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, North Shore - Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 2S8, Canada; Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, Toronto Western Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 2S8, Canada; Toronto Western Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA. · Department of Medical Genetics, Center for Molecular Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht 3584 CG, the Netherlands; Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht 3584 CG, the Netherlands. Electronic address: pdebakker@umcutrecht.nl. · Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA; Arthritis Research UK Epidemiology Unit, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK. Electronic address: soumya@broadinstitute.org. ·Am J Hum Genet · Pubmed #25087609.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) risk is strongly associated with variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, but its genetic architecture has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we conducted a large-scale fine-mapping study of PsV risk in the MHC region in 9,247 PsV-affected individuals and 13,589 controls of European descent by imputing class I and II human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes from SNP genotype data. In addition, we imputed sequence variants for MICA, an MHC HLA-like gene that has been associated with PsV, to evaluate association at that locus as well. We observed that HLA-C(∗)06:02 demonstrated the lowest p value for overall PsV risk (p = 1.7 × 10(-364)). Stepwise analysis revealed multiple HLA-C(∗)06:02-independent risk variants in both class I and class II HLA genes for PsV susceptibility (HLA-C(∗)12:03, HLA-B amino acid positions 67 and 9, HLA-A amino acid position 95, and HLA-DQα1 amino acid position 53; p < 5.0 × 10(-8)), but no apparent risk conferred by MICA. We further evaluated risk of two major clinical subtypes of PsV, psoriatic arthritis (PsA; n = 3,038) and cutaneous psoriasis (PsC; n = 3,098). We found that risk heterogeneity between PsA and PsC might be driven by HLA-B amino acid position 45 (Pomnibus = 2.2 × 10(-11)), indicating that different genetic factors underlie the overall risk of PsV and the risk of specific PsV subphenotypes. Our study illustrates the value of high-resolution HLA and MICA imputation for fine mapping causal variants in the MHC.

16 Article Development of criteria to distinguish inflammatory from noninflammatory arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis: a report from the GRAPPA 2013 Annual Meeting. 2014

Mease, Philip J / Garg, Amit / Helliwell, Philip S / Park, Jane J / Gladman, Dafna D. ·From Seattle Rheumatology Associates, Swedish Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington; Department of Dermatology, Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York, USA; University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, and Bradford Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK; University of Toronto; Toronto Western Research Institute; Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.P.J. Mease, MD, Seattle Rheumatology Associates, director, Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center, and clinical professor, University of Washington School of Medicine; A. Garg, MD, Department of Dermatology, Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine; P.S. Helliwell, DM, PhD, FRCP, Senior Lecturer in Rheumatology, University of Leeds; and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust; J.J. Park, MD, Seattle Rheumatology Associates, and University of Washington School of Medicine; D.D. Gladman, MD, FRCPC, professor of medicine, University of Toronto, senior scientist, Toronto Western Research Institute, and director, Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #24882864.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To describe a research project to develop simple clinical criteria to aid in the identification of inflammatory arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis and distinguish these from non-inflammatory conditions. The criteria are particularly intended to aid non-rheumatologists, e.g., dermatologists, who need assistance identifying psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis, but may be useful to all clinicians in properly diagnosing rheumatologic conditions. METHODS: The proposed research methodology includes the use of a nominal group exercise among expert clinicians and patient focus groups, Delphi exercises among clinicians and patients, application of criteria test sets to a small group of representative patients with inflammatory and non-inflammatory musculoskeletal conditions, and validation by application of optimal criteria sets to large groups of patients with inflammatory and noninflammatory conditions. RESULTS: Examples of elements to describe inflammatory conditions derived from a nominal group exercise conducted at the 2013 GRAPPA annual meeting are described, along with planned project activities. CONCLUSION: This project will lead to the development of practical criteria to aid in the diagnosis and appropriate clinical care of patients with chronic inflammatory musculoskeletal conditions.

17 Article Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis educational initiatives: an update from the 2013 GRAPPA Annual Meeting. 2014

Duffin, Kristina Callis / Garg, Amit / Armstrong, April W / Helliwell, Philip / Mease, Philip J. ·From the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; Department of Dermatology, Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York; Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, USA; Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK; Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center; University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA.K. Callis Duffin, MD, University of Utah; A. Garg, MD, Associate Professor, Department of Dermatology, Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine; A.W. Armstrong, MD, MPH, Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado; P.S. Helliwell, DM, PhD, Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, Chapel Allerton Hospital; P.J. Mease, MD, Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center; Clinical Professor, University of Washington School of Medicine. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #24882862.

ABSTRACT: At the 2013 annual meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA), members were updated on educational areas in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Discussions included (1) the psoriasis and PsA GRAPPA video project, comprising a set of educational online videos that provide standardized psoriatic disease endpoint training to clinicians and researchers; (2) the GRAPPA Educational Outreach Project, focused on cross-disciplinary education for rheumatologists and dermatologists and including several collaborations to expand educational sessions globally; (3) the Dermatology and Rheumatology Trainee Educational Initiative, that provides psoriatic disease education to medical students, residents, and fellows training in dermatology and/or rheumatology; and (4) the GRAPPA Educational Slide Library, developed as a resource for GRAPPA members for their own educational presentations.

18 Article Outcomes research in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis using large databases and research networks: a report from the GRAPPA 2013 Annual Meeting. 2014

Armstrong, April W / Gelfand, Joel M / Garg, Amit. ·From the Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado; University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Department of Dermatology, Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York, USA.A.W. Armstrong, MD, MPH, Vice Chair for Clinical Research, Associate Professor of Dermatology, Director, Dermatology Clinical Trials and Outcomes, Director, Psoriasis Care and Research, Department of Dermatology, Colorado Health Outcomes Program, University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine; J.M. Gelfand, MD, MSCE, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine; A. Garg, MD, Associate Professor, Department of Dermatology, Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #24882860.

ABSTRACT: Advances in healthcare informatics have increased the ability to address real-world, clinically relevant questions using large databases. When examining data sources, researchers and clinicians need to consider data validity, potential sources of misclassification, whether the source is sufficiently powered to detect clinically relevant differences, ability to obtain longitudinal data, containment of patients within a database, and ability to obtain structured point-of-care data. Population-based databases create opportunities for characterizing natural history of psoriatic diseases, conducting comparative effectiveness research, determining comorbidities, and providing epidemiology-based rational approaches to mechanistic investigations. Herein, we discuss the major data sources for clinical research in psoriasis, including electronic medical records, research networks, disease registries, and others.

19 Article The International Dermatology Outcome Measures initiative as applied to psoriatic disease outcomes: a report from the GRAPPA 2013 meeting. 2014

Gottlieb, Alice B / Armstrong, April W / Christensen, Robin / Garg, Amit / Duffin, Kristina Callis / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Merola, Joseph F / Gladman, Dafna D / Mease, Philip J / Swerlick, Robert A / Rosen, Cheryl F / Abernethy, April. ·From the Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, USA; Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Denmark; Department of Dermatology, Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York; Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA; Department of Dermatology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland; Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; University of Toronto, Toronto Western Research Institute; Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Seattle Rheumatology Associates, Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington; Department of Dermatology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; Division of Dermatology, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon, USA.A.B. Gottlieb, MD, PhD, Tufts Medical Center; A.W. Armstrong, MD, MPH, Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado; R. Christensen, MSc, PhD, Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital; A. Garg, MD, Department of Dermatology, Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine; K. Callis Duffin, MD, MS, Department of Dermatology, University of Utah; W-H. Boehncke, MD, Department of Dermatology, Geneva University Hospital; J.F. Merola, MD, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital; D.D. Gladman, MD, FRCPC, Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto; Senior Scientist, Toronto Western Research Institute; Director, Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network; P.J. Mease, MD, Seattle Rheumatology Associates, Director, Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center, Clinical Professor, Univ ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #24882858.

ABSTRACT: In the United States, access to care is the number one issue facing our patients with dermatological conditions. In part, this is because we do not have outcome measures that are useful in clinical practice and available in databases where payers and governmental agencies can compare the performance of physicians and treatments. There is a growing recognition that insufficient attention has been paid to the outcomes measured in clinical trials and subsequently in clinical practice. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures group includes all willing stakeholders: patients, physicians, payers, and pharmaceutical scientists. As reported herein, the group's goal is to develop outcome measures in dermatology that address the needs of all involved.

20 Unspecified Patient-Reported Outcome Measures for Pediatric Psoriasis: A Systematic Review and Critical Appraisal from International Dermatology Outcome Measures (IDEOM). 2018

Salame, Nicole / Torres, Josefina / Sandhu, Jeena / Callis Duffin, Kristina / Garg, Amit / Gottlieb, Alice B / Latella, John / Merola, Joseph F / Armstrong, April W. ·University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, Missouri, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, New Hyde Park, New York, USA. · Department of Dermatology, New York Medical College, Metropolitan Hospital, New York, New York, USA. · International Dermatology Outcome Measures (IDEOM), Windsor, Connecticut, USA. · Department of Dermatology and Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA, armstrongpublication@gmail.com. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #31112972.

ABSTRACT: Childhood onset psoriasis has a profound impact on the development and quality of life of pediatric patients. Consequently, validated patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for pediatric psoriasis are vital to patient care. We sought to critically appraise the literature on the measurement properties of PROMs used in the pediatric psoriasis population. We performed a 2-stage systematic literature synthesis in MEDLINE (1950-2017) and EMBASE (1947-2017) to identify PROMs and studies evaluating their measurement properties. Analysis of studies followed the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) methodology to inform a best evidence synthesis. From 1,128 articles, we identified 29 PROMs. Subsequently, we identified 8 studies evaluating the measurement properties of 7 instruments. Among these instruments, the Simplified Psoriasis Index (SPI) achieved a positive rating for criterion validity, the Dutch version of the Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) achieved a positive rating for hypothesis testing, and the Swedish version of the CDLQI achieved a negative rating for hypothesis testing. All other assessed measurement properties received indeterminate or unknown ratings due to flaws in study design. PROMs are paramount to the management of pediatric psoriasis. This synthesis emphasizes the critical need for additional studies to further describe the measurement properties of PROMs used in pediatric psoriasis and identify validated, standardized measures for use in clinical practice and research.