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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Universite Paris 5 Descartes
Based on 68 articles published since 2009
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These are the 68 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Universite Paris 5 Descartes during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3
1 Guideline Treating axial spondyloarthritis and peripheral spondyloarthritis, especially psoriatic arthritis, to target: 2017 update of recommendations by an international task force. 2018

Smolen, Josef S / Schöls, Monika / Braun, Jürgen / Dougados, Maxime / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Landewé, Robert / Mease, Philip / Sieper, Joachim / Stamm, Tanja / Wit, Maarten de / Aletaha, Daniel / Baraliakos, Xenofon / Betteridge, Neil / Bosch, Filip van den / Coates, Laura C / Emery, Paul / Gensler, Lianne S / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Jongkees, Merryn / Kvien, Tore K / Inman, Robert D / McInnes, Iain B / Maccarone, Mara / Machado, Pedro M / Molto, Anna / Ogdie, Alexis / Poddubnyy, Denis / Ritchlin, Christopher / Rudwaleit, Martin / Tanew, Adrian / Thio, Bing / Veale, Douglas / Vlam, Kurt de / van der Heijde, Désirée. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Health Consult, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Ruhr-University Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Rheumatology, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. · Amsterdam Rheumatology & Immunology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology Research, Swedish-Providence St. Joseph Health System, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section for Outcomes Research, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Medical Humanities, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Neil Betteridge Associates, UK. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Seayn Medical, Voorschoten, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Glasgow, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow, UK. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Centre for Rheumatology & MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, University College London, London, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USA. · German Rheumatism Research Centrer, Berlin, Germany. · Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus Medical Center, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #28684559.

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic targets have been defined for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) in 2012, but the evidence for these recommendations was only of indirect nature. These recommendations were re-evaluated in light of new insights. Based on the results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of rheumatologists, dermatologists, patients and a health professional developed an update of the 2012 recommendations. These underwent intensive discussions, on site voting and subsequent anonymous electronic voting on levels of agreement with each item. A set of 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations were developed and voted on. Some items were present in the previous recommendations, while others were significantly changed or newly formulated. The 2017 task force arrived at a single set of recommendations for axial and peripheral SpA, including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The most exhaustive discussions related to whether PsA should be assessed using unidimensional composite scores for its different domains or multidimensional scores that comprise multiple domains. This question was not resolved and constitutes an important research agenda. There was broad agreement, now better supported by data than in 2012, that remission/inactive disease and, alternatively, low/minimal disease activity are the principal targets for the treatment of PsA. As instruments to assess the patients on the path to the target, the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) for axial SpA and the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and Minimal Disease Activity (MDA) for PsA were recommended, although not supported by all. Shared decision-making between the clinician and the patient was seen as pivotal to the process. The task force defined the treatment target for SpA as remission or low disease activity and developed a large research agenda to further advance the field.

2 Guideline European S3-Guideline on the systemic treatment of psoriasis vulgaris - Update Apremilast and Secukinumab - EDF in cooperation with EADV and IPC. 2017

Nast, A / Spuls, P I / van der Kraaij, G / Gisondi, P / Paul, C / Ormerod, A D / Saiag, P / Smith, C H / Dauden, E / de Jong, E M / Feist, E / Jobling, R / Maccarone, M / Mrowietz, U / Papp, K A / Reich, K / Rosumeck, S / Talme, T / Thio, H B / van de Kerkhof, P / Werner, R N / Dressler, C. ·Division of Evidence-Based Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France. · Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, UK. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré Université Paris V, Boulogne, France. · St Johns Institute of Dermatology, Guys and St Thomas' Hospital Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid, Spain. · Radboud University medical center and Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Cambridge, UK. · Roma, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Psoriasis-Center University Medical Center Schleswig Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Waterloo, Canada. · Dermatologikum Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28895202.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders: 2015/2016 update. 2017

Agca, R / Heslinga, S C / Rollefstad, S / Heslinga, M / McInnes, I B / Peters, M J L / Kvien, T K / Dougados, M / Radner, H / Atzeni, F / Primdahl, J / Södergren, A / Wallberg Jonsson, S / van Rompay, J / Zabalan, C / Pedersen, T R / Jacobsson, L / de Vlam, K / Gonzalez-Gay, M A / Semb, A G / Kitas, G D / Smulders, Y M / Szekanecz, Z / Sattar, N / Symmons, D P M / Nurmohamed, M T. ·Departments of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Preventive Cardio-Rheuma Clinic, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Internal and Vascular Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Hôpital Cochin. Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris INSERM (U1153): Clinical epidemiology and biostatistics, PRES Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopedic Institute, Milan, Italy. · Institute for Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. · Sygehus Sønderjylland (Hospital of Southern Jutland), Aabenraa, Denmark. · King Christian 10's Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Graasten, Denmark. · Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Rheumatology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden. · PARE (patient research partners), Sint-Joris-Weert, Belgium. · Romanian League Against Rheumatism (Vice-President) and Board Member (General Secretary) of AGORA, the Platform of S-E organisations for patients with RMDs, Bucharest, Romania. · Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Center for Preventive Medicine and Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology & Inflammation Research, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and Section of Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · University of Cantabria, IDIVAL, Santander, Spain. · Head of Research and Development, Academic Affairs Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, University of Manchester, Russells Hall Hospital, Clinical Research Unit, Dudley, UK. · Faculty of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary. · Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Department of Rheumatology Reade, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27697765.

ABSTRACT: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint disorders (IJD) have increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk compared with the general population. In 2009, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) taskforce recommended screening, identification of CVD risk factors and CVD risk management largely based on expert opinion. In view of substantial new evidence, an update was conducted with the aim of producing CVD risk management recommendations for patients with IJD that now incorporates an increasing evidence base. A multidisciplinary steering committee (representing 13 European countries) comprised 26 members including patient representatives, rheumatologists, cardiologists, internists, epidemiologists, a health professional and fellows. Systematic literature searches were performed and evidence was categorised according to standard guidelines. The evidence was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Three overarching principles were defined. First, there is a higher risk for CVD in patients with RA, and this may also apply to ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Second, the rheumatologist is responsible for CVD risk management in patients with IJD. Third, the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids should be in accordance with treatment-specific recommendations from EULAR and Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society. Ten recommendations were defined, of which one is new and six were changed compared with the 2009 recommendations. Each designated an appropriate evidence support level. The present update extends on the evidence that CVD risk in the whole spectrum of IJD is increased. This underscores the need for CVD risk management in these patients. These recommendations are defined to provide assistance in CVD risk management in IJD, based on expert opinion and scientific evidence.

4 Guideline European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies: 2015 update. 2016

Gossec, L / Smolen, J S / Ramiro, S / de Wit, M / Cutolo, M / Dougados, M / Emery, P / Landewé, R / Oliver, S / Aletaha, D / Betteridge, N / Braun, J / Burmester, G / Cañete, J D / Damjanov, N / FitzGerald, O / Haglund, E / Helliwell, P / Kvien, T K / Lories, R / Luger, T / Maccarone, M / Marzo-Ortega, H / McGonagle, D / McInnes, I B / Olivieri, I / Pavelka, K / Schett, G / Sieper, J / van den Bosch, F / Veale, D J / Wollenhaupt, J / Zink, A / van der Heijde, D. ·Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS), Paris, France Department of rheumatology, AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Second Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · EULAR, representing People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe (PARE), London, UK. · Research Laboratory and Clinical Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto, Italy. · Medicine Faculty, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France Rheumatology B Department, APHP, Cochin Hospital, Paris, France. · Leeds NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, LTHT, Leeds, UK Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands. · North Devon, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne and Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. · Arthritis Unit, Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Clínic and IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain. · Belgrade University School of Medicine, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Section of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Sweden and School of Business, Engineering and Science, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. · Section of Musculoskeletal Disease, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Laboratory of Tissue Homeostasis and Disease, Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, KU Leuven, Belgium Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Potenza, Italy. · Institute and Clinic of Rheumatology Charles University Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Internal Medicine 3, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité, Berlin, Germany. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Centre for Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease, Dublin Academic Medical Centre, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Schoen Klinik Hamburg, Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, German Rheumatism Research Centre Berlin, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26644232.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Since the publication of the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in 2012, new evidence and new therapeutic agents have emerged. The objective was to update these recommendations. METHODS: A systematic literature review was performed regarding pharmacological treatment in PsA. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated based on the evidence and the expert opinion of the 34 Task Force members. Levels of evidence and strengths of recommendations were allocated. RESULTS: The updated recommendations comprise 5 overarching principles and 10 recommendations, covering pharmacological therapies for PsA from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), to conventional synthetic (csDMARD) and biological (bDMARD) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, whatever their mode of action, taking articular and extra-articular manifestations of PsA into account, but focusing on musculoskeletal involvement. The overarching principles address the need for shared decision-making and treatment objectives. The recommendations address csDMARDs as an initial therapy after failure of NSAIDs and local therapy for active disease, followed, if necessary, by a bDMARD or a targeted synthetic DMARD (tsDMARD). The first bDMARD would usually be a tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. bDMARDs targeting interleukin (IL)12/23 (ustekinumab) or IL-17 pathways (secukinumab) may be used in patients for whom TNF inhibitors are inappropriate and a tsDMARD such as a phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor (apremilast) if bDMARDs are inappropriate. If the first bDMARD strategy fails, any other bDMARD or tsDMARD may be used. CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations provide stakeholders with an updated consensus on the pharmacological treatment of PsA and strategies to reach optimal outcomes in PsA, based on a combination of evidence and expert opinion.

5 Guideline European S3-Guidelines on the systemic treatment of psoriasis vulgaris--Update 2015--Short version--EDF in cooperation with EADV and IPC. 2015

Nast, A / Gisondi, P / Ormerod, A D / Saiag, P / Smith, C / Spuls, P I / Arenberger, P / Bachelez, H / Barker, J / Dauden, E / de Jong, E M / Feist, E / Jacobs, A / Jobling, R / Kemény, L / Maccarone, M / Mrowietz, U / Papp, K A / Paul, C / Reich, K / Rosumeck, S / Talme, T / Thio, H B / van de Kerkhof, P / Werner, R N / Yawalkar, N. ·Division of Evidence Based Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, UK. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré Université Paris V, Boulogne, France. · Clinical Lead for Dermatology, St Johns Institute of Dermatology, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Third Faculty of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · St. Johns Institute of Dermatology, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid, Spain. · University Medical Center Nijmegen St Radboud, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Rheumatologie u. klinische Immonologie, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Cambridge, UK. · SZTE Borgyogyaszati Klinika, Szeged, Hungary. · Roma, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Psoriasis-Center University Medical Center Schleswig Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Waterloo, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France. · Dermatologikum Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, Universitätsklinik für Dermatologie, Bern, Switzerland. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #26481193.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline Recommendations of the French Society for Rheumatology (SFR) on the everyday management of patients with spondyloarthritis. 2014

Wendling, Daniel / Lukas, Cédric / Paccou, Julien / Claudepierre, Pascal / Carton, Laurence / Combe, Bernard / Goupille, Philippe / Guillemin, Francis / Hudry, Christophe / Miceli-Richard, Corinne / Dougados, Maxime / Anonymous2320781. ·Service de rhumatologie, université de Franche-Comté (EA 4266), CHRU de Besançon, boulevard Fleming, 25030 Besançon, France. Electronic address: dwendling@chu-besancon.fr. · Hôpital Lapeyronie, Montpellier, Institut Universitaire de Recherche Clinique (EA2415), 34000 Montpellier, France. · Département de rhumatologie, CHU d'Amiens, 80000 Amiens, France; Inserm U1088, UFR Médecine/Pharmacie, Université de Picardie Jules-Verne, 80000 Amiens, France. · Université Paris Est Créteil, Laboratoire d'Investigation Clinique (LIC) EA4393, 94010 Créteil, France; AP-HP, Hôpital Henri-Mondor, Service de Rhumatologie, 94000 Créteil, France. · Association France Spondylarthrites, 19000 Tulle, France. · Departement de Rhumatologie, CHU Lapeyronie,Université Montpellier 1, 34000 Montpellier, France. · CHRU de Tours, service de rhumatologie, UMR CNRS 7292, Université François-Rabelais de Tours, 37000 Tours, France. · Inserm CIC-EC, CHU de Nancy, Service épidémiologie et évaluation cliniques, 54505 Nancy, France. · Cabinet de Rhumatologie, 75008 Paris, France. · Université Paris-Sud, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris-Sud, AP-HP, 94270 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Paris-Descartes University, Medicine Faculty, AP-HP, Cochin hospital, Rheumatology B Department, 75014 Paris, France. ·Joint Bone Spine · Pubmed #24412120.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop practice guidelines for the everyday management of patients with spondyloarthritis (including psoriatic arthritis), by updating previous national and international recommendations, based on a review of recently published data. METHODS: A task force and a multidisciplinary literature review group were established. The task force identified the issues that remained unresolved. Based on existing recommendations and recent publications, the task force developed practice guidelines, which were revised by the literature review group and graded according to AGREE. RESULTS: Practice guidelines for the management of spondyloarthritis are reported. After a review of the general diagnostic principles, 30 practice guidelines are given: 5 on general principles, 4 on the management strategy, 5 on non-pharmacological treatments, 7 on conventional pharmacological treatments, 6 on biotherapies, and 3 on surgical treatments and follow-up. CONCLUSION: The updated practice guidelines reported here constitute a global framework that can guide physicians in the everyday management of spondyloarthritis.

7 Guideline European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies. 2012

Gossec, L / Smolen, J S / Gaujoux-Viala, C / Ash, Z / Marzo-Ortega, H / van der Heijde, D / FitzGerald, O / Aletaha, D / Balint, P / Boumpas, D / Braun, J / Breedveld, F C / Burmester, G / Cañete, J D / de Wit, M / Dagfinrud, H / de Vlam, K / Dougados, M / Helliwell, P / Kavanaugh, A / Kvien, T K / Landewé, R / Luger, T / Maccarone, M / McGonagle, D / McHugh, N / McInnes, I B / Ritchlin, C / Sieper, J / Tak, P P / Valesini, G / Vencovsky, J / Winthrop, K L / Zink, A / Emery, P / Anonymous2420706. ·Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. laure.gossec@cch.aphp.fr ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #21953336.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a clinically heterogeneous disease. Clear consensual treatment guidance focused on the musculoskeletal manifestations of PsA would be advantageous. The authors present European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the treatment of PsA with systemic or local (non-topical) symptomatic and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD). METHODS: The recommendations are based on evidence from systematic literature reviews performed for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), glucocorticoids, synthetic DMARD and biological DMARD. This evidence was discussed, summarised and recommendations were formulated by a task force comprising 35 representatives, and providing levels of evidence, strength of recommendations and levels of agreement. RESULTS: Ten recommendations were developed for treatment from NSAID through synthetic DMARD to biological agents, accounting for articular and extra-articular manifestations of PsA. Five overarching principles and a research agenda were defined. CONCLUSION: These recommendations are intended to provide rheumatologists, patients and other stakeholders with a consensus on the pharmacological treatment of PsA and strategies to reach optimal outcomes, based on combining evidence and expert opinion. The research agenda informs directions within EULAR and other communities interested in PsA.

8 Review Pustular psoriasis and related pustular skin diseases. 2018

Bachelez, H. ·Department of Dermatology, AP-HP Hôpital Saint-Louis, 1 Avenue Claude Vellefaux, Paris CEDEX 10, 75475, France. · Sorbonne Paris Cité Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Institut Imagine, UMR INSERM U1163, Necker Hospital, Paris, France. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #29333670.

ABSTRACT: Patients with pustular psoriasis or related pustular diseases may have genetic abnormalities impairing the function of key players of the innate skin immune system. Recently, identification of these abnormalities has changed the paradigm of several of these diseases. These include generalized pustular psoriasis, palmoplantar pustular psoriasis and acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau, and also drug-induced acute exanthematous generalized pustular eruption. Identified mutations in IL36RN, CARD14 and AP1S3 in different groups of patients lead to enhanced inflammatory cascade in several cellular subtypes including keratinocytes, and to the recruitment and activation of neutrophils and macrophages. These insights have unveiled pathophysiological features that shift the existing paradigms and emphasize the autoinflammatory nature of skin pustular disorders. They also highlight the crucial role of the innate immune system across entities belonging to the psoriasis disease spectrum, allowing identification of new appealing therapeutic targets.

9 Review IL36RN Mutations Affect Protein Expression and Function: A Basis for Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in Pustular Diseases. 2016

Tauber, Marie / Bal, Elodie / Pei, Xue-Yuan / Madrange, Marine / Khelil, Amel / Sahel, Houria / Zenati, Akila / Makrelouf, Mohamed / Boubridaa, Khaled / Chiali, Amel / Smahi, Naima / Otsmane, Farida / Bouajar, Bakar / Marrakchi, Slaheddine / Turki, Hamida / Bourrat, Emmanuelle / Viguier, Manuelle / Hamel, Yamina / Bachelez, Hervé / Smahi, Asma. ·INSERM unit U1163, Imagine Institute, Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, Paris, France. · Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Department of Dermatology, CHU Oran, Oran, Algeria. · Department of Dermatology, CHU Bab El Oued, Bab el Oued, Alger, Algeria. · Central laboratory of Biology, CHU Bab El Oued, Bab el Oued, Alger, Algeria. · Department of Dermatology and the Laboratory of Immunology, Hedi Chaker Hospital, Sfax University, Sfax, Tunisia. · Department of Dermatology, AP-HP, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris, France. · Department of Dermatology, AP-HP, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris, France; University Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · INSERM unit U1163, Imagine Institute, Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, Paris, France; Department of Dermatology, AP-HP, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris, France; University Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · INSERM unit U1163, Imagine Institute, Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, Paris, France. Electronic address: asma.smahi@inserm.fr. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #27220475.

ABSTRACT: Homozygous or compound heterozygous IL36RN gene mutations underlie the pathogenesis of psoriasis-related pustular eruptions including generalized pustular psoriasis, palmoplantar pustular psoriasis, acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau, and acute generalized exanthematous pustular eruption. We identified two unreported IL36RN homozygous mutations (c.41C>A/p.Ser14X and c.420_426del/p.Gly141MetfsX29) in patients with familial generalized pustular psoriasis. We analyzed the impact of a spectrum of IL36RN mutations on IL-36 receptor antagonist protein by using site-directed mutagenesis and expression in HEK293T cells. This enabled us to differentiate null mutations with complete absence of IL-36 receptor antagonist (the two previously unreported mutations, c.80T>C/p.Leu27Pro, c.28C>T/p.Arg10X, c.280G>T/p.Glu94X, c.368C>G/p.Thr123Arg, c.368C>T/p.Thr123Met, and c.227C>T/p.Pro76Leu) from mutations with decreased (c.95A>G/p.His32Arg, c.142C>T/p.Arg48Trp, and c.308C>T/p.Ser113Leu) or unchanged (c.304C>T/p.Arg102Trp and c.104A>G/p.Lys35Arg) protein expression. Functional assays measuring the impact of mutations on the capacity to repress IL-36-dependent activation of the NF-κB pathway showed complete functional impairment for null mutations, whereas partial or no impairment was observed for other mutations considered as hypomorphic. Finally, null mutations were associated with severe clinical phenotypes (generalized pustular psoriasis, acute generalized exanthematous pustular eruption), whereas hypomorphic mutations were identified in both localized (palmoplantar pustular psoriasis, acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau) and generalized variants. These results provide a preliminary basis for genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with deficiency of the IL-36Ra (DITRA), and suggest the involvement of other factors in the modulation of clinical expression.

10 Review Pharmacological treatment of psoriatic arthritis: a systematic literature review for the 2015 update of the EULAR recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis. 2016

Ramiro, Sofia / Smolen, Josef S / Landewé, Robert / van der Heijde, Désirée / Dougados, Maxime / Emery, Paul / de Wit, Maarten / Cutolo, Maurizio / Oliver, Susan / Gossec, Laure. ·Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology Center, Amsterdam and Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands. · Medicine Faculty, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France Rheumatology B Department, APHP, Cochin Hospital, Paris, France. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, Leeds, UK. · EULAR past Vice President representing People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe (PARE). · Research Laboratory and Clinical Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Italy. · Independent Nurse Consultant, North Devon, UK. · Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS), Paris, France Department of rheumatology, AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26660203.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the evidence on the efficacy and safety of pharmacological agents in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: Systematic literature review of randomised controlled trials comparing pharmacological interventions in PsA: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucocorticoid, synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (sDMARDs) either conventional or targeted, biologicals (bDMARDs), placebo or any combination. Main outcomes were American College of Rheumatology (ACR)20-50, Psoriasis Area Severity Index 75, radiographic progression, and withdrawals due to adverse events (AEs). Multiple studies of the same intervention were meta-analysed using random effects. RESULTS: In total, 25 papers and 12 abstracts were included. The efficacy of tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (including the recently added golimumab and certolizumab pegol) was confirmed and 16 articles/abstracts focused on 3 drugs with new modes of action: ustekinumab (UST), secukinumab (SEC) and apremilast (APR). All were placebo-compared trials and met their primary end point, ACR20. In 2 studies with UST ACR20 was met by 50% and 44% of patients with UST 90 mg, 42% and 44% with UST 45 mg vs 23% and 20% with placebo, respectively. In two studies with SEC ACR20 ranged 54% (SEC 300 mg), 50-51% (SEC 150 mg), 29-51% (SEC 75 mg) and 15-17% (placebo). In four studies with APR, ACR20 ranged 32-43% (APR 30 mg), 29-38% (APR 20 mg) and 17-20% (placebo). For all three drugs, no more withdrawals due to AEs than placebo were seen and, in general, safety appeared satisfactory. A strategy trial, TIght COntrol of Psoriatic Arthritis (TICOPA), showed better ACR responses with treatment adaptations upon tight control compared with standard care. CONCLUSIONS: UST, SEC and APR are new drugs with efficacy demonstrated for the treatment of PsA. No major safety signals arise, but long-term studies are needed. This review informed about the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for management of PsA.

11 Review Prevalence of undiagnosed psoriatic arthritis among psoriasis patients: Systematic review and meta-analysis. 2015

Villani, Axel Patrice / Rouzaud, Marie / Sevrain, Morgane / Barnetche, Thomas / Paul, Carle / Richard, Marie-Aleth / Beylot-Barry, Marie / Misery, Laurent / Joly, Pascal / Le Maitre, Michel / Aractingi, Selim / Aubin, François / Cantagrel, Alain / Ortonne, Jean-Paul / Jullien, Denis. ·Department of Dermatology at Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France. Electronic address: axel.villani@chu-lyon.fr. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Morvan, Université de Bretagne, Brest, France. · Méthodomics, Mortagne-sur-Sèvre, France. · Department of Dermatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital de la Timone, Université de la Méditerranée Aix Marseille II, Marseille, France. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Charles-Nicolle, Université de Rouen, Rouen, France. · private practice, Caen, France. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Université René Descartes, Paris, France. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Saint-Jacques, Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon, France. · Department of Rheumatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Archet, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice, Nice, France. · Department of Dermatology at Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #26054432.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Skin psoriasis precedes the onset of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in 84% of patients with psoriasis. Dermatologists have an important role to screen psoriasis patients for PsA. The efficiency of PsA screening remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the point prevalence of undiagnosed PsA in patients with psoriasis using a systematic search of the literature and meta-analysis. METHODS: PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase database searches yielded 394 studies for review. No study aimed to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed PsA in patients with psoriasis. We assumed that the prevalence of newly diagnosed PsA in patients with psoriasis at the time they seek medical care could be a sound estimate of this value. Seven epidemiological studies and 5 studies on PsA screening questionnaires allowed us to clearly identify patients with newly diagnosed PsA and were selected for review. RESULTS: The prevalence of undiagnosed PsA was 15.5% when all studies were considered and 10.1% when only epidemiological studies were considered. LIMITATIONS: Data were obtained from studies not designed to address the question at hand. Heterogeneity was high (I(2) = 96.86%), and therefore a random effects model was used. CONCLUSION: The high prevalence of undiagnosed PsA in patients with psoriasis adds to the recommendation that dermatologists need to screen all patients with psoriasis for PsA.

12 Review The OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group - Update on Status and Future Research Priorities. 2015

Østergaard, Mikkel / Bird, Paul / Gandjbakhch, Frédérique / Eshed, Iris / Haugen, Ida K / Haavardsholm, Espen A / Lillegraven, Siri / Foltz, Violaine / Glinatsi, Daniel / Peterfy, Charles / Ejbjerg, Bo / Bøyesen, Pernille / Mease, Philip J / Hermann, Kay-Geert / Emery, Paul / Genant, Harry K / Conaghan, Philip G. ·From the Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Department of Rheumatology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, APHP, Université Paris 6-UPMC, Paris, France; Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Spire Sciences, Boca Raton, Florida, USA; Department of Rheumatology, Slagelse Hospital, Slagelse, Denmark; Division of Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine; and Seattle Rheumatology Associates, Seattle, Washington, USA; Department of Radiology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin, Germany; Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds, UK; University of California, San Francisco, and Synarc Inc., San Francisco, California, USA. M. Østergaard, MD, PhD, DMSc, Professor of Rheumatology, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Glostrup Hospital and Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen; P. Bird, BMed (Hons), FRACP, PhD, Grad Dip MRI, Senior Lecturer, University of NSW; F. Gandjbakhch, MD, Practicing Rheumatologist, Department of Rheumatology, Pitié-Salpêtrière, APHP, Université Paris 6-UPMC; I. Eshed, MD, Professor of Radiology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv University; I.K. Haugen, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital; E.A. Haavardsholm, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital; S. Lillegraven, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, University of Oslo; V. Foltz, MD, Practicing Rheumatologist, ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25684771.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide an update on the status and future research priorities of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in arthritis working group. METHODS: A summary is provided of the activities of the group within rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and osteoarthritis (OA), and its research priorities. RESULTS: The OMERACT RA MRI score (RAMRIS) evaluating bone erosion, bone edema (osteitis), and synovitis is now the standard method of quantifying articular pathology in RA trials. Cartilage loss is another important part of joint damage, and at the OMERACT 12 conference, we provided longitudinal data demonstrating reliability and sensitivity to change of the RAMRIS JSN component score, supporting its use in future clinical trials. The MRI group has previously developed a PsA MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 12, PsAMRIS was evaluated in a randomized placebo-controlled trial of patients with PsA, demonstrating the responsiveness and discriminatory ability of applying the PsAMRIS to hands and feet. A hand OA MRI score (HOAMRIS) was introduced at OMERACT 11, and has subsequently been further validated. At OMERACT 12, good cross-sectional interreader reliability, but variable reliability of change scores, were reported. Potential future research areas were identified at the MRI session at OMERACT 12 including assessment of tenosynovitis in RA and enthesitis in PsA and focusing on alternative MRI techniques. CONCLUSION: MRI has been further developed and validated as an outcome measure in RA, PsA, and OA. The group will continue its efforts to optimize the value of MRI as a robust biomarker in rheumatology clinical trials.

13 Review IL-17 and infections. 2014

Ling, Y / Puel, A. ·Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Necker Branch, INSERM 1163, Paris, France; Imagine Institute, University Paris Descartes, Paris, France. · Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Necker Branch, INSERM 1163, Paris, France; Imagine Institute, University Paris Descartes, Paris, France; St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Rockefeller Branch, the Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: anne.puel@inserm.fr. ·Actas Dermosifiliogr · Pubmed #25398490.

ABSTRACT: IL-17 immunity has been shown to be essential for mucocutaneous protection against Candida albicans in mice and humans. However, mice with defective IL-17 immunity display broader susceptibility, as they are also prone to infections with diverse infectious agents at various sites. Humans with genetic defects affecting their IL-17 immunity usually suffer from chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC): recurrent or persistent infections of the skin, nails, and mucosae with C. albicans, with or without other clinical signs. Most patients with autosomal dominant (AD) hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) due to STAT3 deficiency or AD STAT1 gain-of-function display impaired IL-17-producing T-cell development, and CMC is one of their principal clinical manifestations. Similarly, patients with autosomal recessive (AR) autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) caused by AIRE deficiency have high levels of neutralizing autoantibodies against IL-17A, IL-17F and/or IL-22 and present CMC as their only infectious disease. Finally, CMC is the main clinical phenotype observed in patients with inborn errors specifically affecting IL-17 immunity. Indeed, patients with AD IL-17F deficiency or AR IL-17RA or ACT1 deficiency display CMC and, to a lesser extent, superficial staphylococcal diseases. Candida infection was recently reported in psoriasis patients treated with anti-IL-17A antibodies. Careful monitoring for CMC is thus important during anti-IL-17 treatment.

14 Review Therapeutic manipulation of natural killer (NK) T cells in autoimmunity: are we close to reality? 2013

Simoni, Y / Diana, J / Ghazarian, L / Beaudoin, L / Lehuen, A. ·INSERM, U986, Hospital Cochin/St Vincent de Paul, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France. ·Clin Exp Immunol · Pubmed #23199318.

ABSTRACT: T cells reactive to lipids and restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like molecules represent more than 15% of all lymphocytes in human blood. This heterogeneous population of innate cells includes the invariant natural killer T cells (iNK T), type II NK T cells, CD1a,b,c-restricted T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. These populations are implicated in cancer, infection and autoimmunity. In this review, we focus on the role of these cells in autoimmunity. We summarize data obtained in humans and preclinical models of autoimmune diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and atherosclerosis. We also discuss the promise of NK T cell manipulations: restoration of function, specific activation, depletion and the relevance of these treatments to human autoimmune diseases.

15 Review [What's new in dermatological therapy?]. 2012

Aractingi, S. ·Service de dermatologie, Hôpital Cochin, 89 rue d'Assas, Paris, France. selim.aractingi@cch.aphp.fr ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #23522709.

ABSTRACT: Therapeutics is our daily tool to advance patient care. Although some may perceive a certain stagnation, the goal of this review was to choose among the hundreds of articles published between January and September 2012 those that seemed to contribute the greatest innovation. It is certainly valuable to observe that all include antibodies, cytokines, or conversely chemokine inhibitors, small regulatory molecules or even cells. This diversity illustrates the vitality of the research in dermatology, which covers fields from inflammatory and autoimmune diseases to vascular and infectious diseases. Beyond these established data, many of the results open useful and original leads for future research.

16 Review Clinical outcomes in psoriatic arthritis: A systematic literature review. 2012

Palominos, Penélope Esther / Gaujoux-Viala, Cécile / Fautrel, Bruno / Dougados, Maxime / Gossec, Laure. ·Paris Descartes University, UPRES EA-4058, AP-HP, Cochin Hospital, Paris, France. penelopepalominos@yahoo.com.br ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #22147535.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Many outcomes have been proposed in the assessment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) core set for PsA evaluation comprises 6 domains: joints, skin, function, pain, patient's global assessment, and quality of life. The objective of this work was to assess reporting of outcomes in PsA, including patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in recent publications. METHODS: A systematic literature search of clinical trials related to PsA and reporting at least 1 clinical outcome between 2006 and 2010 was performed in PubMed, i.e., just before to just after publication of the OMERACT core set. All clinical outcomes were noted and subdivided into domains of health. Data analysis was descriptive. RESULTS: Fifty-eight articles (12,405 patients) were included in the analysis: 17 (29%) were randomized clinical trials; the patients' mean ± SD age was 48.2 ± 5.4 years and the mean ± SD disease duration was 9.0 ± 3.1 years. Eighty-four different outcomes were reported, with a mean ± SD of 6.9 ± 4.3 per study. Patients were mainly assessed using the 6 core set domains, reported in 37.9% (quality of life) to 55.2% (skin) of articles; however, the core set was rarely completely reported since only 10.3% of the studies reported all 6 core domains. PROs were heterogeneous and in particular there was no consensus regarding the number of joints to assess and instruments for dactylitis and enthesitis. PROs were assessed in more than 75% of publications using 28 different instruments. CONCLUSION: There is great heterogeneity in PsA assessment, even since publication of the OMERACT core set. Better consensus on instruments to assess each domain of health and better insight into which outcomes are important for patients is needed.

17 Review [Tolerance of biological agents in children]. 2010

Bader-Meunier, B. ·Service d'Immunologie, Hématologie et Rhumatologie Pédiatriques, Centre de Référence Arthrites Juvéniles, AP-HP, Hôpital Necker, Paris, France. brigitte.bader-meunier@nck.aphp.fr ·Arch Pediatr · Pubmed #20654981.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Clinical Trial Evaluation of Children with Psoriasis from the BiPe Cohort: Are Patients Using Biotherapies in Real Life Eligible for Phase III Clinical Studies? 2019

Phan, Céline / Beauchet, Alain / Burztejn, Anne-Claire / Severino-Freire, Maëlla / Mazereeuw-Hautier, Juliette / Barbarot, Sébastien / Girard, Céline / Lasek, Audrey / Reguiai, Ziad / Abasq, Claire / Sassolas, Bruno / Droitcourt, Catherine / Perrussel, Marc / Hadj-Rabia, Smail / Mallet, Stéphanie / Phan, Alice / Lacour, Jean-Philippe / Bourrat, Emmanuelle / Aubin, François / Mahé, Emmanuel / Anonymous2031511. ·Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Victor Dupouy, 69 rue du Lieutenant-Colonel Prud'hon, 95100, Argenteuil, France. celine.phan@ch-argenteuil.fr. · Département de Santé Publique, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Ambroise Paré, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Brabois, 54000, Vandoeuvre Les Nancy, France. · Service de Dermatologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse, France. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôtel Dieu, Nantes, France. · Service de Dermatologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montpellier, Montpellier, France. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Saint Vincent de Paul, Université Catholique de Lille, Lille, France. · Service de Dermatologie, Polyclinique Courlancy, Hôpital Robert Debré, Reims, France. · Service de Dermatologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Brest, Brest, France. · Service de Dermatologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pontchaillou, Université de Rennes, Rennes, France. · Service de Dermatologie, INSERM U1163 & Institut Imagine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Necker-Enfants Malades, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Paris Descartes-Sorbonne, Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Service de Dermatologie, Vénéréologie et Cancérologie Cutanée, Hôpital de la Timone, Assistance-publique-Hôpitaux de Marseille, Marseille, France. · Service de Pédiatrie, Hôpital Femme-Mère-Enfant, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Bron, France. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Archet 2, ESPIC CHU-Lenval, Nice, France. · Service de Pédiatrie Générale, Hôpital Robert Debré, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. · Service de Dermatologie, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Besançon, Université de Franche Comté, Besançon, France. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Victor Dupouy, 69 rue du Lieutenant-Colonel Prud'hon, 95100, Argenteuil, France. ·Paediatr Drugs · Pubmed #31155692.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Phase III clinical trials of biotherapies for childhood psoriasis are designed for a selected population, which can differ from real-life patients. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to assess the proportion of children with psoriasis that received biotherapy in the biological treatments for pediatric psoriasis (BiPe) cohort that would be excluded from phase III clinical trials of these treatments. METHODS: Data concerning initiation of the first biotherapy from all patients included in the BiPe cohort were analyzed. Ineligibility was assessed after applying the exclusion criteria used in the principal phase III trials of etanercept, adalimumab, and ustekinumab for childhood psoriasis. RESULTS: Of the 134 patients included, 73 (54.5%) were ineligible for at least one randomized controlled trial based on one or more exclusion criteria. Amongst the 63 children treated with etanercept, 35 (55.5%) were ineligible: 22 because of the type of psoriasis, 12 because of concomitant treatment, and six because of psoriasis severity based on psoriasis assessment severity index (PASI) and physician global assessment (PGA) scores (PASI < 12 and PGA < 3). Amongst the 44 children treated with adalimumab, 32 (72.7%) were ineligible: 17 because of the clinical type of psoriasis, 12 because of psoriasis severity (PASI < 20 and PGA < 4), and seven because of concomitant treatment. Amongst the 27 children patients treated with ustekinumab, 12 (44.4%) were ineligible: eight because of psoriasis severity (PASI < 12 and PGA < 3), five because of the clinical type of psoriasis, and one because of concomitant treatment. Drug survival and the frequency of serious adverse events did not differ between eligible and ineligible patients. CONCLUSION: The majority of children treated with biotherapies in real-life practice differ from those in phase III trials, most commonly because of the clinical type of their psoriasis, the disease severity being lower than required and the use of prior or concomitant psoriasis treatment. Efficacy and safety results from phase III clinical trials in selected populations may not sufficiently reflect what is seen in real life, thus results from real-life cohort studies are necessary.

19 Article Comorbidities in spondyloarthritis including psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Moltó, Anna / Dougados, Maxime. ·Paris Descartes University, Department of Rheumatology, Hôpital Cochin, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris, France; INSERM (U1153), Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, PRES Sorbonne Paris, Cité. Paris, France. ·Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #31171310.

ABSTRACT: Comorbidities in spondyloarthritis (SpA) including psoriatic arthritis have to be differentiated to the concept of clinical features of SpA (e.g., uveitis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease). In addition to atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular diseases, the most frequent comorbidities in SpA are osteoporosis, fibromyalgia, and depression. Moreover, the current available drug therapies (e.g., NSAIDs, corticosteroids, and biologics) might increase the risk of some comorbidities such as infections and gastrointestinal disorders. Awareness about these comorbidities is crucial to improve their screening and management. For this purpose, any systematic periodical review should integrate a program (ideally internationally standardized) focused on comorbidities.

20 Article [Phototherapy for psoriasis]. 2018

Régnier-Rosencher, Élodie. ·Service de dermatologie, hôpital Cochin, Paris, France. ·Rev Prat · Pubmed #30869352.

ABSTRACT:

21 Article [Clinical evaluation of a psoriatic patient]. 2018

Kemula, Mathilde. ·Service de dermatologie, hôpital Tarnier-Cochin, Paris, France. ·Rev Prat · Pubmed #30869350.

ABSTRACT: Clinical evaluation of a psoriatic patient. Psoriasis is a frequent and burdening inflammatory dermatosis. It affects the quality of life of patients in a deep and sustained way, even if the disease is not very extensive. As we now have an array of very effective treatments, it is important to be able to evaluate the objective and subjective severity of the dermatosis, in order to choose the optimal therapeutic goal for each patient. Of course, an associated psoriasis arthritis must be sought because it will influence the choice of treatment. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting a link between psoriasis and a number of comorbidities such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, increased cardiovascular risk, depression, etc. In order for the patient to be fully taken care of, these risks must be detected and prevented.

22 Article Ustekinumab: a promising new drug for SLE? 2018

Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie / Houssiau, Frédéric A. ·AP-HP, Cochin Hospital, Internal Medicine Department, Centre de référence maladies auto-immunes et systémiques rares, 75014 Paris, France; Université Paris Descartes-Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; INSERM U 1153, Center for Epidemiology and Statistics Sorbonne Paris Cité (CRESS), Paris, France. Electronic address: nathalie.costedoat@aphp.fr. · Service de Rhumatologie, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels, Belgium; Pôle de Pathologies Rhumatismales Inflammatoires et Systémiques, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium. ·Lancet · Pubmed #30249508.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Article Aromatic-turmerone ameliorates imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like inflammation of BALB/c mice. 2018

Li, Yong-Liang / Du, Zhi-Yun / Li, Peng-Hui / Yan, Longjia / Zhou, Wei / Tang, Ya-Dong / Liu, Guang-Rong / Fang, Yan-Xiong / Zhang, Kun / Dong, Chang-Zhi / Chen, Hui-Xiong. ·Faculty of Light Industry and Chemical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangdong 510006, China. · Faculty of Light Industry and Chemical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangdong 510006, China. Electronic address: zhiyundu@gdut.edu.cn. · Infinitus Company Ltd., 11 Sicheng Road, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510000, China. · Faculty of Light Industry and Chemical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangdong 510006, China; Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS, UMR 7086 CNRS, 75013 Paris, France. · Faculty of Light Industry and Chemical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangdong 510006, China; CNRS, UMR8601, Laboratoire de Chimie et Biochimie Pharmacologiques et Toxicologiques, CBNIT, Université Paris Descartes, PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, UFR Biomédicale, 75006 Paris, France. Electronic address: huixiong.chen@parisdescartes.fr. ·Int Immunopharmacol · Pubmed #30243067.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a usual immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease with undefined pathogenesis. Aromatic-turmerone (ATM) is a mainly constituent of essential oil from Curcuma longa L. It has been shown to exhibit strong anti-oxidant, anti-tumor activities and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of ATM on imiquimod (IMQ)-induced psoriasis-like BALB/c mice and its molecular mechanisms for anti-inflammatory effect. ATM showed inhibition of the transfer of CD8

24 Article Tongue psoriasis: Clinical aspects and analysis of epidemiological associations in 313 children, with a systematic literature review. 2018

Pourchot, D / Chiaverini, C / Bourrat, E / Barbarot, S / Vabres, P / Hubiche, T / Droicourt, C / Piram, M / Kupfer-Bessaguet, I / Ferneiny, M / Puzenat, E / Balguérie, X / Beauchet, A / Bursztejn, A-C / Mahé, E / Anonymous1081117. ·Dermatology department, hôpital Victor-Dupouy, 69, rue du Lieutenant-Colonel-Prud'hon, 95107 Argenteuil, France. · Dermatology department, hôpital Archet 2, ESPIC CHU-Lenval, 06000 Nice, France. · General paediatrics department, hôpital Robert-Debré, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 75019 Paris, France. · Dermatology department, Hôtel-Dieu, 44000 Nantes, France. · Dermatology department, centre hospitalier universitaire hôpital du Bocage, 21000 Dijon, France. · Dermatology and infectious diseases unit, centre hospitalier intercommunal de Fréjus/Saint-Raphaël, 240, avenue de Saint-Lambert, 83600 Fréjus, France. · Dermatology department, centre hospitalier universitaire Pontchaillou, 35000 Rennes, France. · Paediatric rheumatology department, CeRéMAI, université Paris Sud, centre hospitalier universitaire de Bicêtre, 94270 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Dermatology department, centre hospitalier de Cornouaille, 29000 Quimper, France; Dermatology department, centre hospitalier de Niort, 79000 Niort, France. · Dermatology department, université Paris-Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cité, hôpital Necker-Enfants-Malades, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 75015 Paris, France. · Dermatology department, centre hospitalier universitaire Saint-Jacques, 3, boulevard Alexandre-Fleming, 25030 Besançon, France. · Dermatology department, centre hospitalier universitaire, Charles-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen, France. · Public health department, université Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, centre hospitalier universitaire Ambroise-Paré, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 92100 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · Dermatology department, hôpital Brabois, 54500 Vandœuvre-Lès-Nancy, France. · Dermatology department, hôpital Victor-Dupouy, 69, rue du Lieutenant-Colonel-Prud'hon, 95107 Argenteuil, France. Electronic address: emmanuel.mahe@ch-argenteuil.fr. ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #29773283.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Little information is available on the prevalence and clinical aspects of tongue involvement in children with psoriasis. The aim was to evaluate the prevalence, clinical aspects and risk factors concerning tongue involvement in children with psoriasis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study was carried out in two stages. We performed a multicentre, cross-sectional study in 23 French dermatology centers. All children seen for psoriasis during the one-year study were systematically included. The clinical features of the tongue and of psoriasis were recorded. Association with clinical aspects of psoriasis and comorbidities was evaluated. We then carried out a literature review to evaluate the prevalence of tongue involvement in children with psoriasis and its positive predictive value for psoriasis. A search was conducted in the PUBMED database using the following keywords: "child" and "psoriasis" and ("tongue" or "glossitis" or "migratory glossitis" or "benign migratory glossitis" or "geographic tongue" or "fissured tongue"). RESULTS: 7.7% of the 313 children with psoriasis had tongue involvement. The clinical aspects were geographic tongue (4.2%), fissured tongue (2.8%) and both (0.64%). There was no association between tongue involvement and the clinical characteristics of the children. Two hundred and ninety-five articles were referenced and 3 were analysed. Psoriasis is very rare in cases of tongue abnormalities. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of tongue involvement was 7.7% in children with psoriasis. No clinical or epidemiological association was shown. Tongue involvement does not modify the management of psoriasis. In the literature review it was not possible to evaluate either the prevalence of tongue involvement in psoriasis or the positive predictive value thereof.

25 Article Trends in hospitalization rates for psoriasis flares since the introduction of biologics: a time series in France between 2005 and 2015. 2018

Polivka, L / Oubaya, N / Bachelez, H / Paul, C / Richard, M A / Beylot-Barry, M / Schmutz, J L / Beneton, N / Mahé, E / Viguier, M / Chosidow, O / Canoui-Poitrine, F / Sbidian, E / Anonymous7221055. ·Department of Dermatology, Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital (AP-HP), Paris Descartes-Sorbonne Paris Cité University, Paris, France. · Department of Clinical Research and Public Health, Mondor Hospital (AP-HP), Paris Est Créteil University, Créteil, France. · IMRB-EA 7376 CEpiA (Clinical Epidemiology And Ageing Unit), UPEC, DHU A-TVB, Paris-Est University, Créteil, France. · Department of Dermatology, Saint Louis Hospital (AP-HP), Sorbonne Paris Cité University Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Department of Dermatology, Larrey Hospital, Toulouse University, Toulouse, France. · Dermatology Department, Centre de recherche en oncologie biologique et oncophamacologie', UMR 911, INSERM CRO2, Timone Hospital, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Marseille, Aix-Marseille Univ, Marseille, France. · Department of Dermatology, INSERM 1053, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux University, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Dermato-Allergology, Brabois Hospital, Nancy University, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France. · Department of Dermatology, Le Mans General Hospital, Le Mans, France. · Department of Dermatology, Victor Dupouy Hospital, Argenteuil, France. · Department of Dermatology, Robert Debré Hospital, University of Reims-Champagne Ardennes, Reims, France. · Department of Dermatology, Mondor Hospital (AP-HP), Paris Est Créteil University, Créteil, France. · Centre d'Investigation Clinique 1430, INSERM, Créteil, France. · UPEC, DHU VIC, EA 7379 EpiDermE (Epidemiologie En Dermatologie et Evaluation des Thérapeutiques), Paris-Est University, Créteil, France. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #29729123.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In the late 2000s, the introduction of biologics transformed the prognosis for patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. We hypothesized that treatment with biologics may associate with a reduction in the hospitalization rate for psoriasis flares. OBJECTIVE: To analyse changes over time in the hospitalization rate for psoriasis flares. METHODS: We included inpatient stays in any of nine French hospitals between 2005 and 2015 for a psoriasis flare, as documented in the national inpatient database. In two centres, we also analysed data from the individual patients' electronic medical records. RESULTS: A total of 3572 stays were included. The introduction of biologics was not associated with a decrease in the number of hospitalizations for a psoriasis flare; on the contrary, we observed a non-significant increase in the number of hospitalizations (13 hospitalizations for psoriasis flares per quarter per 10 000 beds). In the two-centre study, the introduction of biologics was associated with a significant increase in the hospitalization of patients receiving topical treatments only (520 hospitalizations per year per 10 000 beds) and those with a first psoriasis flare. CONCLUSION: The number of hospitalizations for a psoriasis flare tended to increase between 2005 and 2015. The availability of additional treatment options might have increased patient demand and/or broadened the indications in clinical practice.

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