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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from University of Copenhagen
Based on 200 articles published since 2008
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These are the 200 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from University of Copenhagen during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8
1 Review Comorbidities in vitiligo: comprehensive review. 2018

Dahir, Aisha M / Thomsen, Simon F. ·Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Int J Dermatol · Pubmed #29808541.

ABSTRACT: Vitiligo is a common skin disorder characterized by idiopathic, progressive cutaneous hypomelanosis. Vitiligo is associated with several comorbid autoimmune, systemic, and dermatological diseases, primarily thyroid disease, alopecia areata, diabetes mellitus, pernicious anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Addison's disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Sjögren's syndrome, dermatomyositis, scleroderma, ocular and audiological abnormalities, psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis. It is essential to increase awareness of these comorbidities in order to improve the disease burden and quality of life of patients with vitiligo. Herein, we review the association with the most frequent comorbidities associated with vitiligo.

2 Review The Use and Safety of TNF Inhibitors during Pregnancy in Women with Psoriasis: A Review. 2018

Johansen, Cæcilie Bachdal / Jimenez-Solem, Espen / Haerskjold, Ann / Sand, Freja Lærke / Thomsen, Simon Francis. ·Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. cillebachdal@gmail.com. · Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. Espen.Jimenez.Solem@regionh.dk. · Department of Dermato-Venereology, Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. annhaerskjold@gmail.com. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. Frk.Sand@hotmail.com. · Department of Dermato-Venereology, Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. simon.francis.thomsen.02@regionh.dk. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. simon.francis.thomsen.02@regionh.dk. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #29751529.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disease affecting women of childbearing potential. Biologic agents, notably Tumor Necrosis Factor inhibitors (TNFi), are the only current non-contraindicated systemic treatment option during pregnancy. TNFi comprised of complete immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies antibodies (adalimumab, golimumab, and infliximab) actively cross the placenta from the second trimester and are detectable in the child up to one year postpartum. Data on safety of TNFi are conflicting; however a trend towards drug-specific harm has been reported, with increased risk of congenital malformations and preterm birth. TNFi exposure may alter the immune system of the infant towards hypersensitivity and reduced response to intracellular infections. Confounding by indication should be considered, as chronic inflammatory disease itself may pose a risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The quality of the current evidence is very low and no studies specifically address TNFi safety in women with psoriasis. Nonetheless, risks associated with TNFi treatment must be balanced against the as-yet uncertain risk of adverse outcomes in infants born to women with severe psoriasis. We searched PubMed using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms and identified relevant studies and guidelines. Herein, we present the current knowledge of the use and safety of TNFi during pregnancy in women with psoriasis.

3 Review A systematic review of measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures in psoriatic arthritis: A GRAPPA-OMERACT initiative. 2018

Højgaard, Pil / Klokker, Louise / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Holmsted, Kim / Bartels, Else M / Leung, Ying Ying / Goel, Niti / de Wit, Maarten / Gladman, Dafna D / Mease, Philip / Dreyer, Lene / Kristensen, Lars E / FitzGerald, Oliver / Tillett, William / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Strand, Vibeke / Ogdie, Alexis / Terwee, Caroline B / Christensen, Robin. ·The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, Gentofte Hospital, Kildegaardsvej 28, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. · The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, 20 College Rd, the Academia, S169856, Singapore. · Division of Rheumatology, Duke University School of Medicine, Advisory Services, QuintilesIMS, Durham, NC. · VU University Amsterdam, Department of Medical Humanities, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology and Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, 399 Bathurst St, 1E-410B, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 2S8. · Division of Rheumatology Clinical Research, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Rheumatology, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath, UK. · Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-08, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, Paris, France; Pitie-Salpétrière Hospital, AP-HP, Rheumatology Department, 47-83 Bd de l'Hopital, Paris 75013, France. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Harehills Lane, Leeds LS7 4SA, UK. · Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: Robin.christensen@regionh.dk. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #29037523.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An updated psoriatic arthritis (PsA) core outcome set (COS) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was endorsed at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) meeting in 2016. OBJECTIVES: To synthesize the evidence on measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for PsA and thereby contribute to development of a PsA core outcome measurement set (COMS) as described by the OMERACT Filter 2.0. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO on Jan 1, 2017 to identify full-text articles with an aim of assessing the measurement properties of PROMs in PsA. Two independent reviewers rated the quality of studies using the COnsensus based standards for the Selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist, and performed a qualitative evidence synthesis. RESULTS: Fifty-five studies were included in the systematic review. Forty-four instruments and a total of 89 scales were analyzed. PROMs measuring COS domains with at least fair quality evidence for good validity and reliability (and no evidence for poor properties) included the Stockerau Activity Score for PsA (German), Psoriasis Symptom Inventory, visual analogue scale for Patient Global, 36 Item Short Form Health Survey Physical Function subscale, Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, PsA Impact of Disease questionnaire, PsA Quality of Life questionnaire, VITACORA-19, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue scale and Social Role Participation Questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: At least one PROM with some evidence for aspects of validity and reliability was available for six of the eight mandatory domains of the PsA COS.

4 Review Development of paradoxical inflammatory disorders during treatment of psoriasis with TNF inhibitors: a review of published cases. 2017

Havmose, Martin / Thomsen, Simon Francis. ·Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Int J Dermatol · Pubmed #28737221.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: TNF inhibitors have proven to be effective and relatively safe in the management of psoriasis. While infections and certain malignancies are established as acknowledged side effects, paradoxical inflammatory, non-neoplastic, noninfectious adverse events are being recognized less frequently. We aimed to identify published, peer-reviewed cases of paradoxical inflammatory, non-neoplastic, noninfectious adverse events in psoriasis patients during TNF inhibitor therapy. METHODS: A literature search in MEDLINE was performed for articles published from inception through the 8th of June 2016 that reported suspected incidents fulfilling a predefined search strategy. In addition, articles identified by reference lists were added. RESULTS: A total of 295 cases from various organ systems among 13 269 patients were identified: 91 cases were related to infliximab, 101 cases were related to etanercept, and 102 cases were related to adalimumab. One case report was related to both etanercept and adalimumab. CONCLUSION: Induction of paradoxical non-neoplastic noninflammatory adverse events in psoriasis patients treated with a TNF inhibitor is worth recognizing. The amount of cases identified by this study suggests that continuous surveillance and research into these adverse effects is relevant. Nondermatologic paradoxical inflammatory reactions may be underreported.

5 Review Biosimilars for psoriasis: worldwide overview of regulatory guidelines, uptake and implications for dermatology clinical practice. 2017

Cohen, A D / Wu, J J / Puig, L / Chimenti, S / Vender, R / Rajagopalan, M / Romiti, R / de la Cruz, C / Skov, L / Zachariae, C / Young, H S / Foley, P / van der Walt, J M / Naldi, L / Prens, E P / Blauvelt, A. ·Siaal Research Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. · Department of Quality Measurements and Research, Chief Physician's Office, Clalit Health Services, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. · Dermatrials Research Inc. & Venderm Innovations in Psoriasis, Hamilton, ON, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Apollo Hospitals, Chennai, India. · Department of Dermatology, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. · Clínica Dermacross, Santiago, Chile. · Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, U.K. · Skin & Cancer Foundation Inc., Carlton, Vic., Australia. · Department of Dermatology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., Australia. · St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Vic., Australia. · International Psoriasis Council, St Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Department of Dermatology, Azienda Ospedaliera Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Deptartment of Dermatology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 5201, 3008, AE Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Oregon Medical Research Center, Portland, OR, U.S.A. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #28646580.

ABSTRACT: The introduction of biological drugs for the treatment of patients with psoriasis has revolutionized treatment paradigms and enabled numerous patients to achieve disease control with an acceptable safety profile. However, the high cost of biologics limits access to these medications for the majority of patients worldwide. In recent years, the introduction of biosimilars for inflammatory diseases has become a fast evolving field. The future use of biosimilars offers the potential for decreased cost and increased access to biologics for patients with psoriasis. For approval of biosimilars, different regulatory agencies use highly variable methods for definition, production, approval, marketing and postmarketing surveillance. Due to potential interchangeability between biologics and biosimilars, traceability and pharmacovigilance are required to collect accurate data about adverse events in patients with psoriasis; spontaneous reporting, registries and use of 'big data' should facilitate this process on a global basis. The current article describes biosimilar regulatory guidelines and examples of biosimilar uptake in clinical practice in several countries around the world. As it is apparent that biological therapy treatment decisions may become more physician independent, the International Psoriasis Council recommends that dermatologists should take an active role in the development of biosimilar prescribing policies with their respective healthcare settings and government agencies.

6 Review Autoinflammatory syndromes associated with hidradenitis suppurativa and/or acne. 2017

Vinkel, Caroline / Thomsen, Simon F. ·Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Int J Dermatol · Pubmed #28345207.

ABSTRACT: Autoinflammatory syndromes associated with hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) and/or acne are rare but potentially debilitating disorders if not diagnosed and treated correctly. They share a common pathogenesis involving a dysregulated innate immune system with abnormal interleukin (IL)-1 signaling leading to sterile neutrophilic inflammation. The clinical features are recurrent episodes of fever, painful arthritis, and skin lesions consistent with HS, acne, and pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) accompanied by elevated systemic inflammatory markers in blood. So far, several clinically different syndromes have been reported in the literature including pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and pyogenic arthritis (PAPA), pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH), pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and spondyloarthritis (PASS), pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, pyogenic arthritis, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PAPASH), psoriatic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PsAPASH), and pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and ulcerative colitis (PAC). The rarity of the syndromes complicates the establishment of evidence-based treatment guidelines. Furthermore, treatment can be challenging due to lack of response to standard treatment modalities. Therefore, it is important to increase the awareness about these diseases in order to optimize disease management and ultimately improve the quality of life of patients.

7 Review Biosimilars for psoriasis: clinical studies to determine similarity. 2017

Blauvelt, A / Puig, L / Chimenti, S / Vender, R / Rajagopalan, M / Romiti, R / Skov, L / Zachariae, C / Young, H / Prens, E / Cohen, A / van der Walt, J / Wu, J J. ·Oregon Medical Research Center, Portland, OR, U.S.A. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · University of Rome Tor Vergate, Rome, Italy. · Dermatrials Research Inc., Hamilton, ON, Canada. · Venderm Innovations in Psoriasis, Hamilton, ON, Canada. · Apollo Hospitals, Chennai, India. · Department of Dermatology, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. · Herllev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Department of Dermatology, University of Manchester, Salford Royal Hospital, Manchester, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Siaal Research Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. · Department of Quality Measurements and Research, Chief Physician's Office, Clalit Health Services, Tel Aviv, Israel. · International Psoriasis Council, St Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #27639072.

ABSTRACT: Biosimilars are drugs that are similar, but not identical, to originator biologics. Preclinical analytical studies are required to show similarity on a molecular and structural level, but efficacy and safety studies in humans are essential to determining biosimilarity. In this review, written by members of the International Psoriasis Council, we discuss how biosimilars are evaluated in a clinical setting, with emphasis on extrapolation of indication, interchangeability and optimal clinical trial design.

8 Review Candida infections in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis treated with interleukin-17 inhibitors and their practical management. 2017

Saunte, D M / Mrowietz, U / Puig, L / Zachariae, C. ·Department of Dermatology, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark. · Psoriasis Center, Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #27580411.

ABSTRACT: The recognition of the central role of interleukin (IL)-17A in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has led to the development of several monoclonal antibodies targeting this cytokine or its receptors for therapeutic purposes. IL-17A also plays an important role in immunological protection against infections, especially those due to Candida spp., as evidenced by findings in patients with genetic defects in IL-17-related immune responses. To assess the potential of anti-IL-17 treatment to promote Candida infections, here we have systematically reviewed published clinical trials of patients with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Candida infections were reported in 4·0% of patients treated with brodalumab, 1·7% with secukinumab and 3·3% with ixekizumab vs. 0·3%, 2·3% and 0·8% of those assigned to placebo, ustekinumab or etanercept, respectively. Although the incidence of Candida infection was found to be increased by only a small degree during anti-IL-17 therapy, patients undergoing such treatment should be monitored for fungal infection and treated as necessary. We propose adoption of the recently updated recommendations for the practical management of Candida infection in patients administered IL-17 inhibitors.

9 Review Co-morbidity in psoriasis: mechanisms and implications for treatment. 2017

Lønnberg, Ann Sophie / Skov, Lone. ·a Department of Dermato-Allergology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital , University of Copenhagen , Hellerup , Denmark. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #27426230.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disorder. The disease is associated with several co-morbidities including cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and psychiatric disorders. It is important to identify and treat these co-morbidities because they have a strongly negative effect on the overall health of patients with psoriasis. Unfortunately, these co-morbidities are often overlooked and/or left untreated. Therefore, the aim of this review is to discuss the mechanisms of how co-morbidities are associated with psoriasis as well as implications for the clinic to be able to recognize such co-morbidities. Areas covered: This is a review of studies investigating and discussing co-morbidities of psoriasis and screening. Literature was retrieved by searching on the PubMed database using individual and combined search terms related to relevant co-morbidities. Expert commentary: Effective management of psoriasis involves targeting of both psoriasis and co-morbidities.

10 Review Imaging in the diagnosis and management of peripheral psoriatic arthritis-The clinical utility of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography. 2016

Østergaard, Mikkel / Eder, Lihi / Christiansen, Sara Nysom / Kaeley, Gurjit S. ·Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research (COPECARE), Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Nordre Ringvej 57, DK-2600 Glostrup, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: mo@dadlnet.dk. · Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, 76 Grenville Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1B2, Canada; Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research (COPECARE), Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Nordre Ringvej 57, DK-2600 Glostrup, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA. ·Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #27931958.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterised by the presence of arthritis and often enthesitis and/or spondylitis in patients with psoriasis. However, it presents a wide range of disease manifestations in various patterns. Imaging is an important part of management of PsA, and is used for multiple reasons including establishing/confirming a diagnosis of inflammatory joint disease, determining the extent of disease, monitoring activity and damage, assessing therapeutic efficacy, and identifying complications of disease or treatment, in the setting of clinical practice or clinical studies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows detailed assessment of all peripheral and axial joints involved in PsA, and can visualise both inflammation and structural changes. Ultrasonography (US) can visualise many of the peripheral heterogeneous tissue compartments affected by PsA. In contrast to MRI, US is not useful for assessing axial involvement in the spine and sacroiliac joints. In this paper, we will provide an overview of the status, strengths and limitations of MRI and US in peripheral PsA in routine clinical practice and clinical trials.

11 Review Secukinumab for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis. 2016

Baronaite Hansen, Renata / Kavanaugh, Arthur. ·a Department of Medicine , Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte , Copenhagen , Denmark. · b Center for Innovative Therapy , University of California , San Diego , CA , USA. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #27550397.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Secukinumab (Cosentyx) is an interleukin-17A (IL-17A) inhibitor administered subcutaneously. Through 2016, it had received approval in a number of countries, including the USA, Japan and in the EU for the treatment of plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). AREAS COVERED: This review addresses the mechanism of action, efficacy and safety of secukinumab observed in clinical studies of patients with PsA. Data from recent studies of secukinumab in psoriasis, PsA and AS are included. Expert commentary: Secukinumab appears to be effective in improving various aspects of PsA, including improvements in psoriatic skin, enthesitis and dactylitis, as well as inhibition of the radiographic progression of peripheral arthritis. Secukinumab was in general well tolerated; the most common adverse events were nasopharyngitis, headache, and upper respiratory tract infection.

12 Review Management of cardiovascular disease in patients with psoriasis. 2016

Egeberg, Alexander / Skov, Lone. ·a Department of Dermato-Allergology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital , University of Copenhagen , Hellerup , Denmark. ·Expert Opin Pharmacother · Pubmed #27192114.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Patients with psoriasis have an increased incidence and prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, and CV undertreatment in these patients is a well-established problem. The link between psoriasis and CV disease is present on a pathogenic level, as well as due to modifiable lifestyle factors such as smoking and alcohol abuse. AREAS COVERED: In this manuscript we describe the evidence associating psoriasis with CV disease, as well as the pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of CV risk factors including the CV effects of anti-psoriatic therapy and vice versa. EXPERT OPINION: Current guidelines recommend that patients with psoriasis are screened for CV risk factors, and recommend smoking cessation, reduced alcohol consumption, altering of lifestyle to move to a normal-weight body-mass index, exercising 3 times a week for 30 minutes, and monitoring and modifying cholesterol levels, respectively. While the current sum of evidence is not sufficient to recommend specific therapies for psoriasis solely based on their potential CV impact, some guidelines have suggested a 1.5 multiplication factor, in patients with severe psoriasis, to the Framingham risk score. Indeed, the importance of screening for CV risk factors and strict adherence to established primary and secondary preventive measures in these patients should be emphasized.

13 Review Biologics beyond TNF-α inhibitors and the effect of targeting the homologues TL1A-DR3 pathway in chronic inflammatory disorders. 2016

Tougaard, Peter / Zervides, Kristoffer Alexander / Skov, Søren / Hansen, Axel Kornerup / Pedersen, Anders Elm. ·a Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences , University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark and. · b Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences , University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark. ·Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol · Pubmed #26810853.

ABSTRACT: A number of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) biologics have been developed in recent years, such as adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders like rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and psoriasis and several other novel drugs that target TNF-α signaling are still being developed. Indeed, blockade of this pathway seems so important amongst immune-targets that TNF-α targeted therapies will continue to have a significant role in the treatment of chronic inflammation. However, up to 40% of RA and IBD patients do not respond to anti-TNF-α treatment and one possible explanation may be the heterogeneity of chronic inflammatory diseases and a dominance of other significant TNF family members. Indeed, polymorphisms in the TNF family member, TL1A gene, is associated with the development of IBD and increased serum concentrations of TL1A has been demonstrated in patients with various chronic inflammatory disorders. Here, we describe the current knowledge of TL1As immunobiology and present results from human disease, animal models, and pre-clinical intervention studies that point toward development of anti-TL1A therapy as a highly promising strategy for treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders.

14 Review The role of innate lymphoid cells in healthy and inflamed skin. 2016

Bonefeld, Charlotte M / Geisler, Carsten. ·Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: cmenne@sund.ku.dk. · Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Immunol Lett · Pubmed #26794088.

ABSTRACT: The skin constitutes the interface between the organism and the environment, and it protects the body from harmful substances in the environment via physical, chemical and immunological barriers. The immunological barrier of the skin comprises both cells from the innate and the adaptive immune system. During the last years, it has become clear that innate lymphoid cells play a role in homeostasis and inflammation of the skin in humans and mice. In this review, we will discuss the role of innate lymphoid cells in healthy and inflamed skin with special focus on their role in atopic dermatitis.

15 Review In vivo expression of antimicrobial peptides in atopic dermatitis. 2016

Clausen, Maja-Lisa / Slotved, H-C / Krogfelt, Karen A / Andersen, Paal Skytt / Agner, Tove. ·Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Microbiology and Infection Control, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Veterinary Disease Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #26269388.

ABSTRACT: The aim of this review is to present findings on expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in atopic dermatitis (AD) skin, focusing only on in vivo studies, and to discuss differences in results obtained using various skin sampling techniques and different methodology for analysis of AMPs. The review also includes a discussion of the effect of frequently used treatments on AMP expression. Many studies have shown a reduced level of AMPs in lesional AD skin when compared to psoriatic skin, explaining the high frequency of AD-related infections. Interestingly, however, non-lesional AD skin has shown the same upregulation of AMPs after barrier disruption as non-lesional psoriatic skin. Various methods have been used to analyse AMP expression in the skin, and when comparing these methods, differences are revealed in AMP expression depending on the method used for sampling and analysis. Comparisons indicate that analyses of mRNA levels of AMPs may find greater differences in expression than analyses of protein levels. Few studies evaluate the effect of topical treatments on the expression of AMPs, and these indicate an inhibition of AMP expression, particularly after use of corticosteroids. AMPs are important components of the skin as a defense against infections, and despite much research, the clinical importance of the effect of common treatments, including systemic treatments for AD and the interplay between AMPs and the skin microbiome, is still largely unknown.

16 Review Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis. 2015

Poggenborg, René Panduro / Østergaard, Mikkel / Terslev, Lene. ·Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet - Glostrup, Nordre Ringvej 57, Glostrup, Copenhagen DK-2600, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, Copenhagen DK-2200, Denmark. ·Rheum Dis Clin North Am · Pubmed #26476221.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); other modalities such as computed tomography are not used routinely. Imaging is an integral part of management of PsA. In this article, we provide an overview of the status, virtues, and limitations of imaging modalities in PsA, focusing on radiography, US, and MRI.

17 Review Magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing, monitoring and prognostication in psoriatic arthritis. 2015

Poggenborg, René Panduro / Sørensen, Inge Juul / Pedersen, Susanne Juhl / Østergaard, Mikkel. ·Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet - Glostrup, Copenhagen, Denmark. poggenborg@dadlnet.dk. · Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet - Glostrup, Copenhagen; and Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. · Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet - Glostrup, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet - Glostrup, Copenhagen, Denmark and Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #26470678.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic systemic, inflammatory disease associated with skin psoriasis. PsA may be difficult to assess with clinical examination and blood tests because of its complex and multifaceted clinical presentation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can visualise all peripheral and axial joints and entheses involved in PsA, and allow the rheumatologist to assess inflammation and structural damage in detail. In the present paper, we provide a brief overview of MRI to diagnose, monitor and prognosticate in PsA in clinical care.

18 Review Treating Psoriasis During Pregnancy: Safety and Efficacy of Treatments. 2015

Bangsgaard, Nannie / Rørbye, Christina / Skov, Lone. ·Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Kildegårdsvej 28, 2900, Hellerup, Denmark. Nannie.Bangsgaard@regionh.dk. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hvidovre Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2650, Hvidovre, Denmark. · Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Kildegårdsvej 28, 2900, Hellerup, Denmark. ·Am J Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #26149091.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a well-documented negative effect on the quality of life of affected patients. Psoriasis often occurs in the reproductive years, during which the issue of pregnancy needs to be addressed. The course of psoriasis during pregnancy is unpredictable, and many patients face the challenge of needing treatment during pregnancy. In this review we provide an overview of the key considerations for managing psoriasis in pregnant women, covering the potential effects of active psoriasis and co-morbid conditions on the health of the mother and fetus, as well as the effects of psoriasis treatment options on the developing fetus. Although there are no robust data on the safety of systemic treatment of pregnant women, increasing evidence regarding the safety of cyclosporine (ciclosporin) treatment as well as anti-tumor necrosis factor-α is available and should be considered in pregnant women with moderate to severe psoriasis unresponsive to local corticosteroids and UVB light treatment.

19 Review Psoriasis inversa: A separate identity or a variant of psoriasis vulgaris? 2015

Omland, Silje Haukali / Gniadecki, Robert. ·Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: R.gniadecki@gmail.com. ·Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #26051061.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic skin disorder affecting approximately 2% of the European and American population. The most common form of psoriasis is the chronic plaque type. Inverse psoriasis, also named flexural or intertriginous psoriasis, is not considered a separate disease entity but rather a special site of involvement of plaque psoriasis, characterized by its localization to inverse/intertriginous/flexural body sites. We review current evidence and establish whether inverse psoriasis is a separate disease entity based on characteristics in terms of epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical and histologic presentation, microbiology, and treatment.

20 Review Ixekizumab for treatment of psoriasis. 2015

Dyring-Andersen, Beatrice / Skov, Lone / Zachariae, Claus. ·Department of Dermato-Allergology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Kildegaardsvej 28, DK-2900 Hellerup, Denmark. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #25748485.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a prevalent chronic inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology. Recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of psoriasis suggest that IL-17 is a key proinflammatory mediator present in the skin. Several agents targeting IL-17 or its receptor are in clinical trials for the treatment of psoriasis. This review focuses on the biological rationale and the results of clinical trials with ixekizumab, a humanized IgG4 monoclonal antibody. Ixekizumab binds the IL-17A homodimer, thereby blocking the binding of IL-17A to the IL-17 receptor. The currently available Phase I-III data indicate that ixekizumab is a promising drug, although long-term data of efficacy and safety are needed before ixekizumab and other IL-17 targeting therapeutics can find their place in clinical practice.

21 Review miRNAs in inflammatory skin diseases and their clinical implications. 2015

Løvendorf, Marianne B / Skov, Lone. ·Department of Dermato-Allergology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Kildegårdsvej 28, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #25719822.

ABSTRACT: miRNAs are a class of non-coding RNA molecules that modulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They have a major impact on several physiological and pathological cellular processes including modulation of the innate and the adaptive immune system. The role of miRNAs in skin biology is still incomplete; however, it is known that miRNAs are implicated in various cellular processes of both normal and diseased skin. Some miRNAs appear to be consistently deregulated in several different inflammatory skin diseases, including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, indicating a common role in fundamental biological processes. The clinical implications of miRNAs are intriguing, both from a diagnostic and a therapeutic perspective. Accordingly, there is emerging evidence for the clinical potential of miRNAs as both biomarkers and possible therapeutic targets in skin diseases. Future studies will hopefully establish the biological significance of miRNAs in skin biology, paving the way for new miRNA-based diagnostic and therapeutic applications in dermatology.

22 Review The OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group - Update on Status and Future Research Priorities. 2015

Østergaard, Mikkel / Bird, Paul / Gandjbakhch, Frédérique / Eshed, Iris / Haugen, Ida K / Haavardsholm, Espen A / Lillegraven, Siri / Foltz, Violaine / Glinatsi, Daniel / Peterfy, Charles / Ejbjerg, Bo / Bøyesen, Pernille / Mease, Philip J / Hermann, Kay-Geert / Emery, Paul / Genant, Harry K / Conaghan, Philip G. ·From the Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Department of Rheumatology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, APHP, Université Paris 6-UPMC, Paris, France; Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Spire Sciences, Boca Raton, Florida, USA; Department of Rheumatology, Slagelse Hospital, Slagelse, Denmark; Division of Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center, University of Washington School of Medicine; and Seattle Rheumatology Associates, Seattle, Washington, USA; Department of Radiology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin, Germany; Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds, UK; University of California, San Francisco, and Synarc Inc., San Francisco, California, USA. M. Østergaard, MD, PhD, DMSc, Professor of Rheumatology, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Glostrup Hospital and Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen; P. Bird, BMed (Hons), FRACP, PhD, Grad Dip MRI, Senior Lecturer, University of NSW; F. Gandjbakhch, MD, Practicing Rheumatologist, Department of Rheumatology, Pitié-Salpêtrière, APHP, Université Paris 6-UPMC; I. Eshed, MD, Professor of Radiology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv University; I.K. Haugen, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital; E.A. Haavardsholm, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital; S. Lillegraven, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, University of Oslo; V. Foltz, MD, Practicing Rheumatologist, ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25684771.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide an update on the status and future research priorities of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in arthritis working group. METHODS: A summary is provided of the activities of the group within rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and osteoarthritis (OA), and its research priorities. RESULTS: The OMERACT RA MRI score (RAMRIS) evaluating bone erosion, bone edema (osteitis), and synovitis is now the standard method of quantifying articular pathology in RA trials. Cartilage loss is another important part of joint damage, and at the OMERACT 12 conference, we provided longitudinal data demonstrating reliability and sensitivity to change of the RAMRIS JSN component score, supporting its use in future clinical trials. The MRI group has previously developed a PsA MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 12, PsAMRIS was evaluated in a randomized placebo-controlled trial of patients with PsA, demonstrating the responsiveness and discriminatory ability of applying the PsAMRIS to hands and feet. A hand OA MRI score (HOAMRIS) was introduced at OMERACT 11, and has subsequently been further validated. At OMERACT 12, good cross-sectional interreader reliability, but variable reliability of change scores, were reported. Potential future research areas were identified at the MRI session at OMERACT 12 including assessment of tenosynovitis in RA and enthesitis in PsA and focusing on alternative MRI techniques. CONCLUSION: MRI has been further developed and validated as an outcome measure in RA, PsA, and OA. The group will continue its efforts to optimize the value of MRI as a robust biomarker in rheumatology clinical trials.

23 Review Certolizumab pegol for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis. 2015

Hansen, Renata Baronaite / Kavanaugh, Arthur. ·Copenhagen University Hospitals, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #25651776.

ABSTRACT: Certolizumab pegol (CZP) is a TNF-α inhibitor approved for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis in 38 countries, including many European countries and the USA. It is a pegylated humanized anti-TNF-α antigen-binding fragment, administered subcutaneously. As other TNF-α antibodies, CZP binds to and neutralizes both soluble and membrane TNF-α. In contrast to whole antibodies and etanercept, CZP does not activate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity or complement-dependent cytotoxicity, as it does not have an Fc piece. CZP showed efficacy in improving skin scores and patient reported outcomes in a Phase II study of 176 adults with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. In a Phase III study of CZP in 409 psoriatic arthritis patients, CZP treatment resulted in improvements in peripheral arthritis, as well as dactylitis, enthesitis, nail disease and quality of life. The safety profile of CZP appears to be similar to that of other TNF-α inhibitor.

24 Review New drugs and treatment targets in psoriasis. 2015

Kofoed, Kristian / Skov, Lone / Zachariae, Claus. ·Department of Dermatovenereology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg, DK-2400 Copenhagen, Denmark. kkofoed@hotmail.com, kristian.kofoed@regionh.dk. ·Acta Derm Venereol · Pubmed #25111317.

ABSTRACT: In recent years, the increased understanding of the pathophysiology of psoriasis has resulted in several new treatments. The success of ustekinumab proved the importance of the IL-23/T helper cell 17 axis in psoriatic diseases. Several new biologics targeting this axis will reach the clinic in the next years. Biologics are costly, require injections, and some patients experience tacaphylaxis, thus, the development of orally available, small-molecule inhibitors is desirable. Among small-molecules under investigation are A3 adenosine receptor agonists, Janus kinase inhibitors, and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. We review published clinical trials, and conference abstracts presented during the last years, concerned with new drugs under development for the treatment of psoriasis. In conclusion, our psoriasis armamentarium will be filled with several new effective therapeutic options the coming years. We need to be aware of the limitations of drug safety data when selecting new novel treatments. Monitoring and clinical registries are still important tools.

25 Review Novel treatments with small molecules in psoriatic arthritis. 2014

Hansen, Renata Baronaite / Kavanaugh, Arthur. ·Copenhagen University Hospitals, Copenhagen, Denmark, renatabhansen@gmail.com. ·Curr Rheumatol Rep · Pubmed #25027606.

ABSTRACT: Current treatment options for patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) include synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologic agents. Propelled by increased understanding of immunopathogenesis of PsA, new therapeutic agents targeting different biologic pathways have been evaluated. This article discusses novel small-molecule, orally available treatments that are currently in clinical development for the treatment of psoriasis and PsA. This includes the phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor apremilast and Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors. Apremilast has demonstrated significant improvements in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis and PsA in phase II and III clinical trials and has recently been approved for the treatment of PsA. Tofacitinib, an oral inhibitor of JAK3, JAK1, and, to a lesser degree, JAK2, approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in several countries, has demonstrated positive results in psoriasis in phase II studies. Studies in PsA are ongoing. With these new developments, treatment options will continue to improve in the future.

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