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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from University of Manchester
Based on 219 articles published since 2008
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These are the 219 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from University of Manchester during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9
1 Guideline British Association of Dermatologists guidelines for biologic therapy for psoriasis 2017. 2017

Smith, C H / Jabbar-Lopez, Z K / Yiu, Z Z / Bale, T / Burden, A D / Coates, L C / Cruickshank, M / Hadoke, T / MacMahon, E / Murphy, R / Nelson-Piercy, C / Owen, C M / Parslew, R / Peleva, E / Pottinger, E / Samarasekera, E J / Stoddart, J / Strudwicke, C / Venning, V A / Warren, R B / Exton, L S / Mohd Mustapa, M F. ·St John's Institute of Dermatology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, SE1 9RT, U.K. · The Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, M13 9NT, U.K. · British Dermatology Nursing Group representative, Aneurin Bevan Health Board, Wales, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH3 9HA, U.K. · British Society for Rheumatology, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, LS7 4SA, U.K. · Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7LD, U.K. · National Guideline Centre, Royal College of Physicians, London, NW1 4LE, U.K. · Patient representatives. · Department of Infectious Diseases, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, SE1 9RT, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, S10 2JF, U.K. · Women's Health Academic Centre, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, SE1 9RT, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, Burnley, BB10 2PQ, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, Liverpool, L7 8XP, U.K. · Independent chair, Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership, London, EC2Y 9AE, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, OX3 7LE, U.K. · British Association of Dermatologists, London, W1T 5HQ, U.K. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #28513835.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders: 2015/2016 update. 2017

Agca, R / Heslinga, S C / Rollefstad, S / Heslinga, M / McInnes, I B / Peters, M J L / Kvien, T K / Dougados, M / Radner, H / Atzeni, F / Primdahl, J / Södergren, A / Wallberg Jonsson, S / van Rompay, J / Zabalan, C / Pedersen, T R / Jacobsson, L / de Vlam, K / Gonzalez-Gay, M A / Semb, A G / Kitas, G D / Smulders, Y M / Szekanecz, Z / Sattar, N / Symmons, D P M / Nurmohamed, M T. ·Departments of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Preventive Cardio-Rheuma Clinic, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Internal and Vascular Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Hôpital Cochin. Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris INSERM (U1153): Clinical epidemiology and biostatistics, PRES Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopedic Institute, Milan, Italy. · Institute for Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. · Sygehus Sønderjylland (Hospital of Southern Jutland), Aabenraa, Denmark. · King Christian 10's Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Graasten, Denmark. · Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Rheumatology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden. · PARE (patient research partners), Sint-Joris-Weert, Belgium. · Romanian League Against Rheumatism (Vice-President) and Board Member (General Secretary) of AGORA, the Platform of S-E organisations for patients with RMDs, Bucharest, Romania. · Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Center for Preventive Medicine and Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology & Inflammation Research, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and Section of Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · University of Cantabria, IDIVAL, Santander, Spain. · Head of Research and Development, Academic Affairs Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, University of Manchester, Russells Hall Hospital, Clinical Research Unit, Dudley, UK. · Faculty of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary. · Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Department of Rheumatology Reade, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27697765.

ABSTRACT: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint disorders (IJD) have increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk compared with the general population. In 2009, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) taskforce recommended screening, identification of CVD risk factors and CVD risk management largely based on expert opinion. In view of substantial new evidence, an update was conducted with the aim of producing CVD risk management recommendations for patients with IJD that now incorporates an increasing evidence base. A multidisciplinary steering committee (representing 13 European countries) comprised 26 members including patient representatives, rheumatologists, cardiologists, internists, epidemiologists, a health professional and fellows. Systematic literature searches were performed and evidence was categorised according to standard guidelines. The evidence was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Three overarching principles were defined. First, there is a higher risk for CVD in patients with RA, and this may also apply to ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Second, the rheumatologist is responsible for CVD risk management in patients with IJD. Third, the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids should be in accordance with treatment-specific recommendations from EULAR and Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society. Ten recommendations were defined, of which one is new and six were changed compared with the 2009 recommendations. Each designated an appropriate evidence support level. The present update extends on the evidence that CVD risk in the whole spectrum of IJD is increased. This underscores the need for CVD risk management in these patients. These recommendations are defined to provide assistance in CVD risk management in IJD, based on expert opinion and scientific evidence.

3 Editorial Interleukin 17-A inhibition in the treatment of psoriasis. 2016

Yiu, Zenas Z N / Griffiths, Christopher E M. ·a Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre , The University of Manchester , Manchester , UK. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #26561053.

ABSTRACT: Interleukin (IL) 17-A appears to be integral to the pathogenesis of chronic plaque psoriasis. Recent clinical trials have shown that blockade of this cytokine with the biologic therapies--secukinumab, ixekizumab and brodalumab--have led to unprecedented treatment efficacy for psoriasis. In addition, their dual efficacy towards psoriatic arthritis increases their potential clinical utility and they promise to be an important treatment option for patients who have tumour necrosis factor inhibitor resistant disease. Here, we present the evidence for the high treatment efficacy of the IL-17A inhibitors but also discuss some potential questions and areas of research needed, including the lack of evidence behind the drug survival, immunogenicity and safety profile.

4 Editorial Establishing an Academic-Industrial Stratified Medicine Consortium: Psoriasis Stratification to Optimize Relevant Therapy. 2015

Griffiths, Christopher E M / Barnes, Michael R / Burden, A David / Nestle, Frank O / Reynolds, Nick J / Smith, Catherine H / Warren, Richard B / Barker, Jonathan N W N / On Behalf Of The Psort Consortium, ?. ·Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal Hospital, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom. Electronic address: christopher.griffiths@manchester.ac.uk. · William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Dermatology, Western Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · St. Johns Institute of Dermatology, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom. · Dermatological Sciences, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University Medical School and Department of Dermatology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. · Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal Hospital, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #26569580.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial The International Psoriasis Council: advancing knowledge, enhancing care. 2015

Alan Menter, M / Griffiths, Christopher E M. ·Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX, USA. Electronic address: amderm@gmail.com. · Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal Hospital, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester M6 8HD, UK. Electronic address: Christopher.Griffiths@manchester.ac.uk. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #25412791.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial A quasquicentennial reflection on psoriasis. 2014

Griffiths, C E M. ·The Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal Hospital, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, U.K.. christopher.griffiths@manchester.ac.uk. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #24547714.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Review The problem in differentiation between psoriatic-related polyenthesitis and fibromyalgia. 2018

Marchesoni, Antonio / De Marco, Gabriele / Merashli, Mira / McKenna, Frank / Tinazzi, Ilaria / Marzo-Ortega, Helena / McGonagle, Dennis G. ·UOC Day Hospital of Rheumatology, ASST Gaetano Pini-CTO Hospital, Milano, Italy. · NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon. · Rheumatology Department, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust, Trafford General Hospital, Manchester, UK. · Unit of Rheumatology, Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar, Italy. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #28387854.

ABSTRACT: The recognition of the primacy of enthesitis in animal models of spondyloarthritis and the prevalence of clinically occult enthesopathy in psoriatic subjects and of persistent joint pain in PsA subjects who have ostensibly good reduction of joint swelling under biological therapy has highlighted the potential impact of polyenthesitis in psoriatic disease. In daily practice, the formal demonstration of enthesitis is challenging for the following reasons: the relatively avascular nature of enthesis, often leading to the absence of overt clinical inflammatory signs; the frequent lack of elevation of inflammatory markers; and finally, the limitations of current imaging techniques to provide supportive evidence for inflammation in these areas. Consequently, enthesitis may present as widespread pain indistinguishable from FM or may emerge as the dominant feature after successful biological therapy for suppression of synovitis. The unmet needs in the differentiation between FM and enthesitis in psoriatic disease patients are highlighted and critically evaluated in this article.

8 Review Raising Standards for the Evaluation of Future Psoriasis Therapeutics: A Critical Checklist. 2017

Yiu, Zenas Z N / Warren, Richard B. ·Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre, Manchester, UK. ·Clin Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #28699167.

ABSTRACT: The quality of life for a patient has been transformed in the last 15 years due to innovations that have resulted in better treatments for severe psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory cutaneous disease. Now, novel therapies for psoriasis need to reach a high standard in order to offer patients with psoriasis a genuine alternative. Here we outline a suggested critical checklist that will help industry sponsors, researchers, and clinicians evaluate novel therapeutics for psoriasis.

9 Review Biosimilars for psoriasis: worldwide overview of regulatory guidelines, uptake and implications for dermatology clinical practice. 2017

Cohen, A D / Wu, J J / Puig, L / Chimenti, S / Vender, R / Rajagopalan, M / Romiti, R / de la Cruz, C / Skov, L / Zachariae, C / Young, H S / Foley, P / van der Walt, J M / Naldi, L / Prens, E P / Blauvelt, A. ·Siaal Research Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. · Department of Quality Measurements and Research, Chief Physician's Office, Clalit Health Services, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. · Dermatrials Research Inc. & Venderm Innovations in Psoriasis, Hamilton, ON, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Apollo Hospitals, Chennai, India. · Department of Dermatology, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. · Clínica Dermacross, Santiago, Chile. · Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, U.K. · Skin & Cancer Foundation Inc., Carlton, Vic., Australia. · Department of Dermatology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., Australia. · St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Vic., Australia. · International Psoriasis Council, St Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Department of Dermatology, Azienda Ospedaliera Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Deptartment of Dermatology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 5201, 3008, AE Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Oregon Medical Research Center, Portland, OR, U.S.A. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #28646580.

ABSTRACT: The introduction of biological drugs for the treatment of patients with psoriasis has revolutionized treatment paradigms and enabled numerous patients to achieve disease control with an acceptable safety profile. However, the high cost of biologics limits access to these medications for the majority of patients worldwide. In recent years, the introduction of biosimilars for inflammatory diseases has become a fast evolving field. The future use of biosimilars offers the potential for decreased cost and increased access to biologics for patients with psoriasis. For approval of biosimilars, different regulatory agencies use highly variable methods for definition, production, approval, marketing and postmarketing surveillance. Due to potential interchangeability between biologics and biosimilars, traceability and pharmacovigilance are required to collect accurate data about adverse events in patients with psoriasis; spontaneous reporting, registries and use of 'big data' should facilitate this process on a global basis. The current article describes biosimilar regulatory guidelines and examples of biosimilar uptake in clinical practice in several countries around the world. As it is apparent that biological therapy treatment decisions may become more physician independent, the International Psoriasis Council recommends that dermatologists should take an active role in the development of biosimilar prescribing policies with their respective healthcare settings and government agencies.

10 Review Psychosocial morbidity in skin disease. 2017

Foggin, Emily / Cuddy, Laura / Young, Helen. ·Final Year Medical Student, Department of Dermatology, Salford Royal Hospital, Salford. · Registrar, Department of Dermatology, Salford Royal Hospital, Salford. · Consultant Dermatologist Department of Dermatology, Salford Royal Hospital, Salford M6 8HD and Senior Lecturer in Dermatology, Centre for Dermatology Research, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester. ·Br J Hosp Med (Lond) · Pubmed #28614030.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Review Quantitative Evaluation of Biologic Therapy Options for Psoriasis: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis. 2017

Jabbar-Lopez, Zarif K / Yiu, Zenas Z N / Ward, Victoria / Exton, Lesley S / Mohd Mustapa, M Firouz / Samarasekera, Eleanor / Burden, A David / Murphy, Ruth / Owen, Caroline M / Parslew, Richard / Venning, Vanessa / Warren, Richard B / Smith, Catherine H. ·Unit for Population-Based Dermatology Research, St John's Institute of Dermatology, King's College London and Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK. · University College London Hospital, London, UK. · British Association of Dermatologists, London, UK. · National Guideline Centre, Royal College of Physicians, London, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Sheffield University Teaching Hospitals and Sheffield Children's Hospitals, Sheffield, UK. · Department of Dermatology, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, Royal Blackburn Hospital, Blackburn, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Oxford University Hospitals Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK. · St John's Institute of Dermatology, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. Electronic address: catherine.smith@kcl.ac.uk. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #28457908.

ABSTRACT: Multiple biologic treatments are licensed for psoriasis. The lack of head-to-head randomized controlled trials makes choosing between them difficult for patients, clinicians, and guideline developers. To establish their relative efficacy and tolerability, we searched MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane for randomized controlled trials of licensed biologic treatments for skin psoriasis. We performed a network meta-analysis to identify direct and indirect evidence comparing biologics with one another, methotrexate, or placebo. We combined this with hierarchical cluster analysis to consider multiple outcomes related to efficacy and tolerability in combination for each treatment. Study quality, heterogeneity, and inconsistency were evaluated. Direct comparisons from 41 randomized controlled trials (20,561 participants) were included. All included biologics were efficacious compared with placebo or methotrexate at 3-4 months. Overall, cluster analysis showed adalimumab, secukinumab, and ustekinumab were comparable in terms of high efficacy and tolerability. Ixekizumab and infliximab were differentiated by very high efficacy but poorer tolerability. The lack of longer term controlled data limited our analysis to short-term outcomes. Trial performance may not equate to real-world performance, and so results need to be considered alongside real-world, long-term safety and effectiveness data. These data suggest that it is possible to discriminate between biologics to inform clinical practice and decision making (PROSPERO 2015:CRD42015017538).

12 Review Functional magnetic resonance imaging in dermatology: The skin, the brain and the invisible. 2017

Mueller, Simon M / Hogg, Samuel / Mueller, Jannis M / McKie, Shane / Itin, Peter / Reinhardt, Julia / Griffiths, Christopher E M / Kleyn, Christine Elise. ·Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland. · Dermatology Centre, The Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Department of Neurology, Kantonsspital Muensterlingen, Muensterlingen, Switzerland. · Neuroscience and Psychiatry Unit, The Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Division of Diagnostic & Interventional Neuroradiology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #28109199.

ABSTRACT: The skin and brain have a close bi-directional anatomical and functional connection. Historically, the skin-brain axis and the brain-skin axis have been well described. However, brain function in this context has only recently been demystified with the introduction of functional neuroimaging in dermatology. Functional neuroimaging, especially functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), allows indirect visualisation of brain function. This review looks back to the beginnings of functional neuroimaging in dermatology, summarises the currently available dermatology-related fMRI studies and discusses the potential future role of fMRI as a stratifying tool in clinical dermatology and in the development of novel therapies. According to the main body of research made in this field, the focus is placed on experimental itch studies, which described the brain structures involved in itch processing, the regulation of the scratch response, contagious itch and itch suppression.

13 Review The potential utility of tildrakizumab: an interleukin-23 inhibitor for the treatment of psoriasis. 2017

Yiu, Zenas Z N / Warren, Richard B. ·a Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust , The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre , Manchester , UK. ·Expert Opin Investig Drugs · Pubmed #28042732.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The approved biologic therapies are effective for the treatment of psoriasis, but have limitations. Tildrakizumab has a different mechanism of action and is a humanized immunoglobulin G1κ that binds to the p19 subunit of IL23. Areas covered: Phase I, II and III clinical trials investigated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety and immunogenicity of tildrakizumab for patients with psoriasis. The mean half-life of tildrakizumab is between 20.2 to 28.2 days. Tildrakizumab achieved a PASI 75 of 66% and 74% at week 16 for the doses of 100 mg and 200 mg respectively in a phase IIb randomised clinical trial (RCT), and PASI 75 of 61%/64% and 62%/66% at week 12 for 100 mg and 200 mg respectively in two phase III RCTs. Frequently associated adverse events include headache and upper respiratory tract infection. Expert opinion: By recent standards tildrakizumab has relatively modest efficacy, possibly due to a less intensive dosing regimen. Head-to-head RCTs in comparison with current therapies such as ustekinumab and secukinumab respectively are needed to understand its relative efficacy. In addition, trials in patients who have failed multiple biologics and patients with psoriatic arthritis would be helpful. The low frequency of injections in the tildrakizumab maintenance regimen may encourage adherence and aid persistence.

14 Review Biosimilars for psoriasis: clinical studies to determine similarity. 2017

Blauvelt, A / Puig, L / Chimenti, S / Vender, R / Rajagopalan, M / Romiti, R / Skov, L / Zachariae, C / Young, H / Prens, E / Cohen, A / van der Walt, J / Wu, J J. ·Oregon Medical Research Center, Portland, OR, U.S.A. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · University of Rome Tor Vergate, Rome, Italy. · Dermatrials Research Inc., Hamilton, ON, Canada. · Venderm Innovations in Psoriasis, Hamilton, ON, Canada. · Apollo Hospitals, Chennai, India. · Department of Dermatology, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. · Herllev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Department of Dermatology, University of Manchester, Salford Royal Hospital, Manchester, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Siaal Research Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. · Department of Quality Measurements and Research, Chief Physician's Office, Clalit Health Services, Tel Aviv, Israel. · International Psoriasis Council, St Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #27639072.

ABSTRACT: Biosimilars are drugs that are similar, but not identical, to originator biologics. Preclinical analytical studies are required to show similarity on a molecular and structural level, but efficacy and safety studies in humans are essential to determining biosimilarity. In this review, written by members of the International Psoriasis Council, we discuss how biosimilars are evaluated in a clinical setting, with emphasis on extrapolation of indication, interchangeability and optimal clinical trial design.

15 Review Impact of biologic therapies on risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with psoriasis: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. 2017

Rungapiromnan, W / Yiu, Z Z N / Warren, R B / Griffiths, C E M / Ashcroft, D M. ·Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, Manchester Pharmacy School, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PT, U.K. · Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, U.K. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #27518205.

ABSTRACT: Concerns have been raised regarding an increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) (myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident or cardiovascular death) in patients treated with anti-interleukin (IL)-12/23 agents for moderate-to-severe psoriasis. We aimed to examine the risk of MACEs in adult patients with plaque psoriasis that are exposed to biologic therapies via a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Data were obtained from systematic searches in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and Embase, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, individual pharmaceutical companies online search platforms and five trials registers (up to 31 March 2016). We selected RCTs reporting adverse events in adults with plaque psoriasis receiving at least one licensed dose of biologic therapy, conventional systematic therapy or placebo. We calculated Peto odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and calculated I

16 Review Ultraviolet B radiation therapy for psoriasis: Pursuing the optimal regime. 2016

Matos, Tiago R / Ling, Tsui C / Sheth, Vaneeta. ·Newton Wellesley Hospital Department of Dermatology, Newton, MA; Academic Medical Center, Department of Dermatology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, 1105 AZ, Netherlands. Electronic address: tiagoreismatos@gmail.com. · Consultant Dermatologist for Phototherapy and Photobiology Unit, Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal Hospital, Manchester, M6 8 HD, UK. · Newton Wellesley Hospital Department of Dermatology, Newton, MA. ·Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #27638437.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic and common disease mediated by resident memory T cells that negatively affects a broad range of people worldwide. One of the oldest and most commonly used treatments is phototherapy. We reviewed the existing literature on the four main ultraviolet B (UVB) modalities of phototherapy in the management of psoriasis: heliotherapy, broadband UVB, narrowband UVB, and excimer laser and lamp. Despite the many studies done on these therapies, there is significant variation in their prescription and use. Phototherapy remains one of the most effective and safest treatments for psoriasis. We provide an updated comprehensive overview of UVB phototherapy for psoriasis to help physicians optimize their choice of modality and dosing regimen to ensure optimal outcomes for psoriasis patients. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

17 Review Measurement, Classification and Evaluation of Sleep Disturbance in Psoriasis: A Systematic Review. 2016

Henry, Alasdair L / Kyle, Simon D / Bhandari, Sahil / Chisholm, Anna / Griffiths, Christopher E M / Bundy, Christine. ·Centre for Dermatology Research, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. · Manchester Centre for Health Psychology, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. · Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Manchester Medical School, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. · Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, United Kingdom. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #27327082.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a long-term immune-mediated inflammatory disorder mainly, but not only, affecting skin, and is associated with significant medical and psychological morbidity. Evidence suggests that sleep is disrupted in psoriasis, however high quality empirical evidence is lacking. Given the importance of sleep for health, characterisation of sleep disruption in psoriasis is an important goal. We therefore conducted a systematic review of the sleep-psoriasis literature. METHODS: Searches were conducted in Pubmed, SCOPUS and Web of Science from inception to May 2016. Studies were compared against inclusion/exclusion criteria and underwent a quality evaluation. Given the heterogeneity of studies, we conducted a narrative synthesis of the findings. RESULTS: Searches revealed 32 studies which met our predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Whilst 93.7% of studies reported sleep disruption in this population, ranging from 0.05% to 85.4%, many had important methodological shortcomings. Over half of all quantitative studies (54.8%; 17/31) relied on non-validated measures, contributing to heterogeneity in study findings. In those that employed valid measures, assessing sleep was often not the primary objective. We frequently found the absence of adequate sample size calculations and poor statistical reporting. CONCLUSION: This review showed that in psoriasis, reported sleep rates of sleep disturbance varied substantially. Most studies lacked a hypothesis driven research question and/or failed to use validated measures of sleep. We were unable to draw firm conclusions about the precise prevalence and nature of sleep disturbance within the psoriasis population. We offer suggestions to help advance understanding of sleep disturbance in psoriasis.

18 Review Risk of Serious Infections in Patients with Psoriasis on Biologic Therapies: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 2016

Yiu, Zenas Z N / Exton, Lesley S / Jabbar-Lopez, Zarif / Mohd Mustapa, M Firouz / Samarasekera, Eleanor J / Burden, A David / Murphy, Ruth / Owen, Caroline M / Parslew, Richard / Venning, Vanessa / Ashcroft, Darren M / Griffiths, Christopher E M / Smith, Catherine H / Warren, Richard B. ·Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK; Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, Manchester Pharmacy School, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · British Association of Dermatologists, London, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle, UK. · National Clinical Guideline Centre, Royal College of Physicians of London, London, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Western Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · Sheffield University Teaching Hospitals and Sheffield Children's Hospitals, Sheffield, UK. · Department of Dermatology, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, Royal Blackburn Hospital, Blackburn, Lancashire, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Oxford University Hospitals Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK. · Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, Manchester Pharmacy School, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK. · St John's Institute of Dermatology, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. Electronic address: catherine.smith@kcl.ac.uk. · Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK. Electronic address: richard.warren@manchester.ac.uk. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #27085754.

ABSTRACT: A comprehensive evaluation of the risk of serious infections in biologic therapies for psoriasis is lacking. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective cohort studies reporting serious infections in people taking any licensed biologic therapy for psoriasis compared with those taking placebo, nonbiologic therapy, or other biologic therapies. The quality of the studies was assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation criteria. No significant heterogeneity was detected in data from 32 RCTs (n = 13,359 participants) and one cohort study (n = 4,993 participants). In adults, low- to very-low-quality RCT data showed no significant difference between any biologic therapy and placebo at weeks 12-16 (overall pooled Peto odds ratio = 0.71, 95% confidence interval = 0.36-1.41) and weeks 20-30 (odds ratio = 2.27, 95% confidence interval = 0.45-11.49). No significant differences were found in any of the other comparisons in underpowered RCT data. Prospective cohort study data of low quality suggests that only adalimumab (adjusted hazard ratio [adjHR] = 2.52, 95% confidence interval = 1.47-4.32) was associated with a significantly higher risk of serious infection compared with retinoid and/or phototherapy in adults. No association between biologic therapies and serious infections in patients with psoriasis who were eligible for RCTs was detected. Further observational studies are needed to inform the uncertainty around this risk in the real world.

19 Review Replication of a distinct psoriatic arthritis risk variant at the IL23R locus. 2016

Budu-Aggrey, Ashley / Bowes, John / Loehr, Sabine / Uebe, Steffen / Zervou, Maria I / Helliwell, Philip / Ryan, Anthony W / Kane, David / Korendowych, Eleanor / Giardina, Emiliano / Packham, Jonathan / McManus, Ross / FitzGerald, Oliver / McHugh, Neil / Behrens, Frank / Burkhardt, Harald / Huffmeier, Ulrike / Ho, Pauline / Martin, Javier / Castañeda, Santos / Goulielmos, George / Reis, Andre / Barton, Anne. ·Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, The University of Manchester, UK NIHR Manchester Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Central Manchester Foundation Trust and University of Manchester, Manchester Academy of Health Sciences, Manchester, UK. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, The University of Manchester, UK. · Institute of Human Genetics, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Laboratory of Molecular Medicine and Human Genetics, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece. · NIHR-Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Rheumatology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital and Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases and Department Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath, UK. · Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' and Laboratory of Molecular Genetics UILDM, Fondazione Santa Lucia IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Rheumatology Department, Haywood Hospital, Health Services Research Unit, Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Stoke on Trent, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital, UCD School of Medicine and Medical Sciences and Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Rheumatology and Fraunhofer IME-Project-Group Translational Medicine and Pharmacology, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, The University of Manchester, UK The Kellgren Centre for Rheumatology, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre, Manchester, UK. · CSIC, Instituto de Parasitologia y Biomedicina Lopez-Neyra, Granada, Spain. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital La Princesa, IIS-IPrincesa, Madrid, Spain. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, The University of Manchester, UK NIHR Manchester Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Central Manchester Foundation Trust and University of Manchester, Manchester Academy of Health Sciences, Manchester, UK The Kellgren Centre for Rheumatology, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre, Manchester, UK. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27016051.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Review Novel Oral Therapies for Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Yiu, Zenas Z N / Warren, Richard B. ·Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M6 8HD, UK. zenas.yiu@manchester.ac.uk. · Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M6 8HD, UK. richard.warren@manchester.ac.uk. ·Am J Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #26923915.

ABSTRACT: Several classes of new oral therapy are in use or in development for the treatment of psoriasis. Despite the high efficacy of biologics, new oral therapies remain important as patients generally prefer this mode of administration and they offer an alternative risk-benefit profile. In this review, we discuss the novel modes of action of these drugs, including modulation of cellular pathways involving diverse targets such as Janus kinase, phosphodiesterase 4, sphingosine 1-phosphate, A3 adenosine receptor and rho-associated kinase 2. We review the available evidence around licensed drugs (apremilast) and drugs that are advanced (tofacitinib) or early (ponesimod, baricitinib, peficitinib, INCB039110, CF101, KD025) in the development pipeline. The key limitations of these oral therapies are their modest efficacy profile (apremilast, ponesimod) and the limitations of their safety profile (tofacitinib, ponesimod), while the evidence for the early pipeline drugs are at phase II level only. Potential niches of current unmet needs include apremilast for patients with concomitant psoriatic arthritis, as combination treatments with biologic therapies, and/or for patients in whom multiple biologic therapies have failed due to immunogenicity and secondary inefficacy. The present knowledge gap regarding these novel drugs includes the need for longer clinical trials or observational studies to evaluate safety, and randomised phase III trials for the early pipeline drugs. We conclude that further research and data are necessary to conclusively establish the role of these agents in the current psoriasis treatment paradigm.

21 Review Novel investigational vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor antagonists for psoriasis. 2016

Malecic, N / Young, H S. ·a The Dermatology Research Centre, Salford Royal Hospital, Institute of Inflammation and Repair , University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre , Manchester , UK. ·Expert Opin Investig Drugs · Pubmed #26864055.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Affecting 1 million people in the UK, psoriasis is a commonly diagnosed inflammatory disease arising from autoimmune processes that are triggered by environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals. The pathophysiology of psoriasis has been widely studied and there is evidence that angiogenesis is a key component. AREAS COVERED: In this review the role of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF), as a key angiogenic mediator in psoriasis pathogenesis is discussed. VEGF is found in higher levels in plaques, normal skin and plasma of patients with psoriasis. The level of VEGF also fluctuates in accordance with disease activity and in response to conventional treatments. There are several VEGF inhibitors currently licenced for use; primarily in the fields of oncology and there are case reports of patients being treated with these therapies for metastatic cancer who have demonstrated significant improvement in their psoriasis. VEGF inhibitory agents have suggested promising utility for the treatment of psoriasis following animal studies. EXPERT OPINION: VEGF may represent a novel treatment target in psoriasis. However, VEGF inhibitors can cause significant side effects such as hypertension and left ventricular dysfunction. The risks of treatment must be carefully evaluated before VEGF inhibitors are trialled or advocated for psoriasis.

22 Review One SNP at a Time: Moving beyond GWAS in Psoriasis. 2016

Ray-Jones, Helen / Eyre, Stephen / Barton, Anne / Warren, Richard B. ·Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom; The Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom. Electronic address: helen.ray-jones@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom; NIHR Manchester Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom. · The Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #26811024.

ABSTRACT: Although genome-wide association studies have revealed important insights into the global genetic basis of psoriasis, the findings require further investigation. At present, the known genetic risk loci are largely uncharacterized in terms of the variant or gene responsible for the association, the biological pathway involved, and the main cell type driving the pathology. This review primarily focuses on current approaches toward gaining a complete understanding of how these known genetic loci contribute to an increased disease risk in psoriasis.

23 Review Paradoxical exacerbation of chronic plaque psoriasis by sorafenib. 2016

Yiu, Z Z N / Ali, F R / Griffiths, C E M. ·Centre for Dermatology Research, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK. ·Clin Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #26667599.

ABSTRACT: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antagonists have been investigated as a potential treatment for psoriasis, but there have been reports of VEGF antagonists triggering and/or exacerbating pre-existing psoriasis. We present the case of a 61-year old-man with exacerbation of pre-existing psoriasis after treatment with sorafenib, a small molecule inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase domain of the VEGF receptor, and we review the literature for other published cases of sorafenib-induced or sorafenib-exacerbated psoriasis. Clinicians, including both dermatologists and oncologists, should be aware of this potential side-effect of sorafenib in addition to the other cutaneous side effects reported for this drug.

24 Review Novel systemic therapies for the treatment of psoriasis. 2016

Tan, Ki-Wei / Griffiths, Christopher E M. ·a Dermatology Centre, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Salford Royal Hospital , University of Manchester, Manchester , UK. · b Department of Dermatology , Changi General Hospital , Singapore. ·Expert Opin Pharmacother · Pubmed #26548897.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The immunopathogenesis of psoriasis has led to the discovery and development of several promising treatment options for psoriasis, including those that target the IL-17 and IL-23 pathways as well as small molecules that act on intracellular signaling pathways including the Janus kinase inhibitor and phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Studies have demonstrated efficacy although long-term risks are not fully known. This review looks at novel systemic therapies for psoriasis that have emerged recently. AREAS COVERED: Systemic treatments for psoriasis that are in the late phase of development were reviewed, with the main focus on the efficacy and adverse effects of individual treatments. EXPERT OPINION: The future of psoriasis treatment is likely to be based on clinical, genetic and immune biomarkers that will individualize treatment and may potentially optimize disease outcome.

25 Review Promoting patient-centred care in psoriatic arthritis: a multidisciplinary European perspective on improving the patient experience. 2016

Betteridge, N / Boehncke, W-H / Bundy, C / Gossec, L / Gratacós, J / Augustin, M. ·Neil Betteridge Associates, London, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Pathology and Immunology, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Centre for Dermatology Research, Institute for Inflammation and Repair, University of Manchester and Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester, UK. · Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Paris, France. · Pitie-Salpétrière Hospital AP-HP, Paris, France. · Rheumatology Service, Hospital Universitari Parc Taulí of Sabadell, UAB, Barcelona, Spain. · University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #26377041.

ABSTRACT: Patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) may not be optimally treated. The impact of the disease extends beyond skin and joint symptoms, impairing quality of life. This indicates that the adoption of a patient-focused approach to PsA management is necessary. An expert multidisciplinary working group was convened, with the objective of developing an informed perspective on current best practice and needs for the future management of PsA. Topics of discussion included the barriers to current best practice and calls to action for the improvement of three areas in PsA management: early and accurate diagnosis of PsA, management of disease progression and management of the impact of the condition on the patient. The working group agreed that, to make best use of the available of diagnostic tools, clinical care recommendations and effective treatments, there is a clear need for healthcare professionals from different disciplines to collaborate in the management of PsA. By facilitating appropriate and rapid referral, providing high quality information about PsA and its treatment to patients, and actively involving patients when choosing management plans and setting treatment goals, management of PsA can be improved. The perspective of the working group is presented here, with recommendations for the adoption of a multidisciplinary, patient-focused approach to the management of PsA.

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