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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Nottinghamshire
Based on 17 articles published since 2008
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These are the 17 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Nottinghamshire during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline EULAR evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis of hand osteoarthritis: report of a task force of ESCISIT. 2009

Zhang, W / Doherty, M / Leeb, B F / Alekseeva, L / Arden, N K / Bijlsma, J W / Dincer, F / Dziedzic, K / Hauselmann, H J / Kaklamanis, P / Kloppenburg, M / Lohmander, L S / Maheu, E / Martin-Mola, E / Pavelka, K / Punzi, L / Reiter, S / Smolen, J / Verbruggen, G / Watt, I / Zimmermann-Gorska, I / Anonymous6900591. ·Dr W Zhang, Academic Rheumatology, University of Nottingham, Clinical Sciences Building, City Hospital, Nottingham NG5 1PB, UK. weiya.zhang@nottingham.ac.uk ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #18250111.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To develop evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis of hand osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: The multidisciplinary guideline development group, representing 15 European countries, generated 10 key propositions regarding diagnosis using a Delphi consensus approach. For each recommendation, research evidence was searched for systematically. Whenever possible, the sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratio (LR) were calculated; relative risk and odds ratios were estimated for risk factors for hand OA. Quality of evidence was categorised using the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) hierarchy, and strength of recommendation was assessed by the EULAR visual analogue scale. RESULTS: Diagnostic topics included clinical manifestations, radiographic features, subgroups, differential diagnosis, laboratory tests, risk factors and comorbidities. The sensitivity, specificity and LR varied between tests depending upon the cut-off level, gold standard and controls. Overall, no single test could be used to define hand OA on its own (LR <10) but a composite of the tests greatly increased the chance of the diagnosis. The probability of a subject having hand OA was 20% when Heberden nodes alone were present, but this increased to 88% when in addition the subject was over 40 years old, had a family history of nodes and had joint space narrowing in any finger joint. CONCLUSION: Ten key recommendations for diagnosis of hand OA were developed using research evidence and expert consensus. Diagnosis of hand OA should be based on assessment of a composite of features.

2 Review What's new in psoriasis treatment? An analysis of systematic reviews published in 2015. 2018

Foulkes, A C / Ferguson, F / Grindlay, D J C / Williams, H C / Griffiths, C E M / Warren, R B. ·The Dermatology Centre, NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre, Manchester, UK. · Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. ·Clin Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #29806111.

ABSTRACT: This review provides a summary of key findings from 27 systematic reviews of 51 articles first published or indexed during 2015, focusing on the treatment of psoriasis and on precision medicine in psoriasis. The evidence supports weight-loss interventions by dieting and exercise for improvement in disease severity in overweight and obese patients with psoriasis. No significant increased risk of serious infections was reported for the biologic therapies adalimumab, etanercept and ustekinumab compared with appropriate comparators. Evidence could not provide reliable estimates of rare adverse events, emphasizing the need for large prospective registries. Polymorphisms in the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α gene may confer improved responses to TNF inhibitor (TNFI) therapy, but the studies to date lack power to detect a true association. From the limited available evidence, multidisciplinary management is both more effective and more satisfactory for patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis than conventional consultations. This summary of reviews provides a succinct guide for clinicians and patients wishing to remain up to date with high-quality evidence for the treatment of psoriasis.

3 Review The epidemiology of childhood psoriasis: a scoping review. 2016

Burden-Teh, E / Thomas, K S / Ratib, S / Grindlay, D / Adaji, E / Murphy, R. ·Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, U.K. · Division of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, U.K. · Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, U.K. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #26928555.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is an inflammatory noncommunicable skin disease that affects both adults and children. At present, the epidemiology and natural history of psoriasis are not widely understood. This scoping review aimed to map the existing literature on the epidemiology of childhood psoriasis, identify research gaps for future studies and provide a comprehensive, clinically useful review. Search strategies were developed for Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase, Google Scholar and hand searching. In total, 131 articles met the inclusion criteria and were mapped; 107 articles were included for data extraction. Over the last 25 years there has been a dramatic increase in the volume of published observational epidemiological studies on childhood psoriasis. The majority were case series or cross-sectional studies, concentrated in Europe, Asia and North America. The prevalence of childhood psoriasis was found to be higher in European countries, older children and girls. Up to 48·8% of children had a family history of psoriasis in a first-degree relative. The most frequent subtype was plaque psoriasis and the most common initial sites of presentation were the scalp, limbs and trunk. Specific genetic differences have been found between child-onset and adult-onset populations. Case-control and cohort studies investigating risk factors for psoriasis onset, comorbidities and long-term health outcomes were extremely limited. The choice of study design and heterogeneity in methodology limit the validity and generalizability of the information, consistency of the results, and comparability of the studies. Well-designed epidemiological studies are needed to provide precise and consistent information about the frequency and clinical presentation, risk factors, associated diseases and long-term outcomes in childhood psoriasis.

4 Review Psoriasis and uveitis--should we be asking about eye symptoms? 2014

Burden-Teh, E / Murphy, R. ·Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Derby Road, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, U.K. eburden@doctors.org.uk. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #24205953.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review Management of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid disorders. 2013

Sidebottom, A J / Salha, R. ·Maxillofacial Unit, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospital, Derby Road, Nottingham NG7 2UH, United Kingdom. Andrew.sidebottom@nuh.nhs.uk ·Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg · Pubmed #22658606.

ABSTRACT: This article summarises the rheumatoid diseases that particularly affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ): psoriatic arthropathy, ankylosing spondylitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Management is by a joint approach between rheumatologists and maxillofacial surgeons with a specific interest in diseases of the TMJ who give early surgical advice. Steroid injections, whilst useful in the short term, are not useful for long term or repeated treatment, and may lead to collapse of the joint and development of a deformed anterior open bite. These disorders should be managed primarily using standard conservative regimens, and failure to respond should lead to diagnostic or therapeutic arthroscopy and appropriate surgical treatment. When ankylosis develops or the joint collapses, a replacement joint should be considered and patients should be referred to an appropriately trained surgeon.

6 Review Guidance on the diagnosis and clinical management of psoriasis. 2012

Cohen, S N / Baron, S E / Archer, C B / Anonymous540723. ·British Association of Dermatologists, London, UK. stuart.cohen@nuh.nhs.uk ·Clin Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #22486764.

ABSTRACT: This article discusses the effects of psoriasis, how to diagnose it confidently, and the options available for treatment, especially in primary care. We also suggest when referral to dermatology should be considered, and try to anticipate some frequently asked questions.

7 Article Safety of Systemic Agents for the Treatment of Pediatric Psoriasis. 2017

Bronckers, Inge M G J / Seyger, Marieke M B / West, Dennis P / Lara-Corrales, Irene / Tollefson, Megha / Tom, Wynnis L / Hogeling, Marcia / Belazarian, Leah / Zachariae, Claus / Mahé, Emmanuel / Siegfried, Elaine / Philipp, Sandra / Szalai, Zsuzsanna / Vleugels, Ruth Ann / Holland, Kristen / Murphy, Ruth / Baselga, Eulalia / Cordoro, Kelly / Lambert, Jo / Alexopoulos, Alex / Mrowietz, Ulrich / Kievit, Wietske / Paller, Amy S / Anonymous371025. ·Department of Dermatology, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Pediatric Medicine, Dermatology Section, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Dermatology, Rady Children's Hospital San Diego, University of California, San Diego. · Department of Pediatrics, Rady Children's Hospital San Diego, University of California, San Diego. · Department of Dermatology, Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona. · now with the Department of Dermatology, University of California, Los Angeles. · Department of Dermatology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. · Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Herlev-Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Victor Dupouy Argenteuil, Argenteuil, France. · Department of Dermatology, St Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. · Department of Pediatrics, St Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. · Psoriasis Research and Treatment Center, Charité-Universitäts-Medizin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Heim Pál Children's Hospital, Budapest, Hungary. · Department of Dermatology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. · Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. · Paediatric Dermatology Department, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham, England. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital de la Sanat Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco Medical Center, San Francisco. · Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco Medical Center, San Francisco. · Department of Dermatology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · First Department of Pediatrics, Agia Sofia Children's Hospital, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · Psoriasis Center at the Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany. · Department for Health Evidence, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #28903160.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Use of systemic therapies for moderate to severe psoriasis in children is increasing, but comparative data on their use and toxicities are limited. Objective: To assess patterns of use and relative risks of systemic agents for moderate to severe psoriasis in children. Design, Setting, and Participants: A retrospective review was conducted at 20 centers in North America and Europe, and included all consecutive children with moderate to severe psoriasis who used systemic medications or phototherapy for at least 3 months from December 1, 1990, to September 16, 2014. Main Outcomes and Measures: The minimal core data set included age, sex, severity of psoriasis, systemic interventions, monitoring, adverse events (AEs), and reason for discontinuation. Results: For 390 children (203 girls and 187 boys; mean [SD] age at diagnosis, 8.4 [3.7] years) with psoriasis who used 1 or more systemic medications, the mean interval between diagnosis and starting systemic therapy was 3.0 years. Methotrexate was used by 270 patients (69.2%), biologic agents (primarily etanercept) by 106 (27.2%), acitretin by 57 (14.6%), cyclosporine by 30 (7.7%), fumaric acid esters by 19 (4.9%), and more than 1 medication was used by 73 (18.7%). Of 270 children taking methotrexate, 130 (48.1%) reported 1 or more AEs associated with methotrexate, primarily gastrointestinal (67 [24.8%]). Folic acid 6 days per week (odds ratio, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.06-0.41; P < .001) or 7 days per week (OR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.08-0.58; P = .003) protected against gastrointestinal AEs more than once-weekly folic acid, regardless of the total weekly dosage. Methotrexate-associated hepatic transaminase elevations were associated with obesity (35 of 270 patients [13.0%]), but a folic acid regimen was not. Injection site reactions occurred in 20 of 106 patients (18.9%) treated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, but did not lead to discontinuation of treatment. Having 1 or more AEs related to medication, gastrointestinal AE, laboratory abnormality, or AE leading to discontinuation of the drug was more likely with methotrexate than tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, but having 1 or more infections related to medication (predominantly upper airway) was less likely. Six patients developed a serious treatment-related AE (methotrexate, 3; fumaric acid esters, 2; and adalimumab, 1), but methotrexate and biologic agents were taken for a mean duration that was 2-fold greater than the mean duration for cyclosporine or fumaric acid esters. No patient developed tuberculosis or a malignant neoplasm. Conclusions and Relevance: Medication-related AEs occur less often with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors than with methotrexate. Folic acid administration 6 or 7 times per week protected more against methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal AEs than did weekly administration. A prospective registry is needed to track the long-term risks of systemic agents for pediatric psoriasis.

8 Article Early recognition and detection of juvenile psoriatic arthritis: a call for a standardized approach to screening. 2017

Burden-Teh, E / Thomas, K S / Rangaraj, S / Cranwell, J / Murphy, R. ·Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. · Paediatric Dermatology Department, Nottingham Children's Hospital, Nottingham, UK. · Paediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology Department, Nottingham Children's Hospital, Nottingham, UK. · Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. ·Clin Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #28044348.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines recommend annual screening for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in all patients with psoriasis. Currently, no validated assessment tools have been recommended for screening for juvenile PsA (JPsA). AIM: To determine dermatologists' practice when assessing children's joints and explore the challenges dermatologists experience when looking for joint disease, in order to inform future strategies to improve early detection of arthritis. METHODS: Structured telephone interviews were undertaken with dermatologists identified through the British Society of Paediatric Dermatology. Percentages for binary and categorized responses were calculated. Thematic content analysis was used to generate a set of core themes across the interview data. RESULTS: Of the 41 consultant dermatologists contacted, 23 agreed to be interviewed. Of these, 78% (18/23) reported they routinely ask about joint disease. Only 13% (3/23) routinely examine the joints of children with psoriasis. Overall, assessment for JPsA lacked a structured, evidence-based approach. The average confidence rating for assessing joint disease was low (score of 3). The two key barriers described for detecting arthritis were a lack of experience and training, and subtle or difficult to detect signs. The two main suggestions for improving detection were the introduction of an assessment tool/guideline and increased clinical experience and training. CONCLUSION: There is a clear need for dermatologists to use a standardized approach for screening and to increase their confidence in paediatric musculoskeletal examination. In this article, we provide guidance on screening for psoriatic arthritis in children based on our clinical experience.

9 Article Interviews with paediatric rheumatologists about psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in children: how can specialties learn from each other? 2017

Burden-Teh, E / Thomas, K S / Rangaraj, S / Murphy, R. ·Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, U.K. · Department of Paediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology, Nottingham Children's Hospital, Nottingham, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, U.K. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #27680897.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Article Shared decision making and patient decision aids in dermatology. 2016

Tan, J / Linos, E / Sendelweck, M A / van Zuuren, E J / Ersser, S / Dellavalle, R P / Williams, H. ·Western University, London, ON, Canada. jerrytan@bellnet.ca. · Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, U.S.A. · University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, U.S.A. · Department of Dermatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands. · School of Healthcare, University of Leeds, Leeds, U.K. · Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, CO, U.S.A. · Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, U.K. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #27790692.

ABSTRACT: Shared decision making combines individual patient interests and values with clinical best evidence under the guiding principle of patient autonomy. Patient decision aids can support shared decision making and facilitate decisions that have multiple options with varying outcomes for which patients may attribute different values. Given the variable psychosocial impact of skin disease on individuals and relative uncertainty regarding best treatments and their adherence in many dermatological conditions, informed shared decision making, supported by patient decision aids, should constitute a central component of dermatological care.

11 Article Extra-Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease May Be Less Common Than Previously Reported. 2016

Card, Timothy R / Langan, Sinéad M / Chu, Thomas P C. ·Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. tim.card@nottingham.ac.uk. · Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre Biomedical Research Unit, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. tim.card@nottingham.ac.uk. · Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK. · Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. ·Dig Dis Sci · Pubmed #27193564.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Extra-intestinal manifestations are well recognized in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To what extent the commonly recognized extra-intestinal manifestations seen in IBD patients are attributable to IBD is, however, not clear due to the limited number of controlled studies published. METHODS: We have conducted a study of these manifestations using electronic primary care records. We have identified extra-intestinal manifestations in IBD and non-IBD patients and derived odds ratios (ORs) using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 56,097 IBD patients (32.5 % Crohn's disease, 48.3 % ulcerative colitis (UC) and 19.2 % not classified) were matched to 280,382 non-IBD controls. We found records of pyoderma gangrenosum (OR = 29.24), erythema nodosum (OR = 5.95), primary sclerosing cholangitis (OR = 188.25), uveitis (OR = 2.81), ankylosing spondylitis (OR = 7.07), sacroiliitis (OR = 2.79) and non-rheumatoid inflammatory arthritides (OR = 2.66) to be associated with IBD. One or more of these was recorded in 8.1 % of IBD patients and 2.3 % of controls. Non-specific arthritides were present in many more patients, affecting 30 % of IBD patients and 23.8 % of controls overall. We also found weaker associations with a number of conditions not generally considered to be extra-intestinal manifestations including psoriasis, ischemic heart disease, multiple sclerosis and hay fever. CONCLUSION: Although "classical" extra-intestinal manifestations are strongly associated with IBD, most IBD patients remain unaffected. Arthropathies, perceived to be the commonest extra-intestinal manifestation, are not strongly associated with IBD, and the proportion of arthropathies attributable to IBD is likely to be small.

12 Article Prospective outcome analysis of total replacement of the temporomandibular joint with the TMJ Concepts system in patients with inflammatory arthritic diseases. 2016

O'Connor, Rory C / Saleem, Saarah / Sidebottom, Andrew J. ·Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Queen's Medical Centre, Derby Road, NG7 2UH. Electronic address: roaroconnor@gmail.com. · Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Queen's Medical Centre, Derby Road, NG7 2UH. Electronic address: saarah.saleem@nuh.nhs.uk. · Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Queen's Medical Centre, Derby Road, NG7 2UH. Electronic address: andrew.sidebottom@nuh.nhs.uk. ·Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg · Pubmed #27015729.

ABSTRACT: We report the outcomes of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis, who had total replacement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using the TMJ Concepts system between 2005 and 2014. We prospectively measured mouth opening (mm), and pain and dietary function (visual analogue scale (VAS), 1 - 100) before operation, and at 6 weeks, 6 months, one year, and beyond. Forty-six joints were replaced in 26 patients (mean age 40, range 16 - 71), 22 of whom were female. Most had rheumatoid (n=17) or psoriatic arthritis (n=7). At one year the mean (SD) pain scores had fallen from 55 (36) to 2 (7) on the left, and from 62 (31) to 2 (5) on the right (p<0.001). Mean (SD) scores for dietary function had increased from 48(25) to 95(9) (p<0.001), and mouth opening had increased from a mean (SD) of 23(10) mm to 35(5) mm (p<0.001). The joints dislocated during the operation in 5 patients, and 4 had temporary weakness of the facial nerve. Outcomes after replacement of the TMJ with the TMJ Concepts system were good in patients with inflammatory arthritis, which further validates the procedure, as damage to the joint is severe in this group.

13 Article Prolonged outbreak of Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infection traced to a healthcare worker with psoriasis. 2014

Crusz, S A / Yates, C / Holden, S / Kearns, A / Boswell, T. ·Department of Clinical Microbiology, Nottingham University Hospital, Nottingham, UK. · Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infections Reference Unit, Public Health England, Colindale, London, UK. · Department of Clinical Microbiology, Nottingham University Hospital, Nottingham, UK. Electronic address: tim.boswell@nuh.nhs.uk. ·J Hosp Infect · Pubmed #24296162.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Meticillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) is a frequent cause of surgical site infection (SSI), but point-source outbreaks are rarely recognized. AIM: To describe an outbreak of MSSA SSI in a thoracic surgical unit. METHODS: An outbreak investigation was started following two postoperative bacteraemias with MSSA resistant to fusidic acid (MSSA FusR). Patients with MSSA FusR were identified from microbiology records and through prospective case finding. Healthcare workers (HCWs) were screened. Isolates were characterized by phage typing, spa typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and toxin gene profiling. A case-control study examined the association between one HCW with MSSA FusR and the patients involved in the outbreak. FINDINGS: Nineteen patients were identified with MSSA FusR over 16 months. Four isolates were available for typing and all belonged to the same lineage. Seventy-six HCWs were screened. One was a carrier of the outbreak strain (a nurse with psoriasis). All 19 cases were exposed to this HCW compared with only 40/66 controls (P = 0.003) and cases had a greater duration of exposure (P = 0.00001, chi-squared for trend). Direct patient contact was documented in 15 cases. The outbreak was halted by thorough cleaning of the ward and removal of the HCW from clinical duty. CONCLUSION: The HCW with psoriasis was the source of this outbreak. MSSA FusR may be a marker for strains associated with skin conditions. HCWs with significant skin conditions may pose an infection risk in surgical settings. Recommendations are made for occupational health teams regarding screening of HCWs with dermatitis.

14 Article Association of β-defensin copy number and psoriasis in three cohorts of European origin. 2012

Stuart, Philip E / Hüffmeier, Ulrike / Nair, Rajan P / Palla, Raquel / Tejasvi, Trilokraj / Schalkwijk, Joost / Elder, James T / Reis, Andre / Armour, John A L. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Institute of Human Genetics, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. · School of Biology, University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · School of Biology, University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK. Electronic address: John.Armour@nottingham.ac.uk. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #22739795.

ABSTRACT: A single previous study has demonstrated significant association of psoriasis with copy number of β-defensin genes, using DNA from psoriasis cases and controls from Nijmegen and Erlangen. In this study, we attempted to replicate that finding in larger new cohorts from Erlangen (N=2,017) and Michigan (N=5,412), using improved methods for β-defensin copy number determination based on the paralog ratio test, and enhanced methods of analysis and association testing implemented in the CNVtools resource. We demonstrate that the association with psoriasis found in the discovery sample is maintained after applying improved typing and analysis methods (P=5.5 × 10(-4), odds ratio (OR)=1.25). We also find that the association is replicated in 2,616 cases and 2,526 controls from Michigan, although at reduced significance (P=0.014), but not in new samples from Erlangen (1,396 cases and 621 controls, P=0.38). Meta-analysis across all cohorts suggests a nominally significant association (P=6.6 × 10(-3)/2 × 10(-4)) with an effect size (OR=1.081) much lower than found in the discovery study (OR=1.32). This reduced effect size and significance on replication is consistent with a genuine but weak association.

15 Minor How are we using systemic drugs to treat psoriasis in children? An insight into current clinical U.K. practice. 2015

Burden-Teh, E / Lam, M L / Taibjee, S M / Taylor, A / Webster, S / Dolman, S / Jury, C / Caruana, D / Darne, S / Carmichael, A / Natarajan, S / McPherson, T / Moore, A / Katugampola, R / Kalavala, M / Al-Ismail, D / Richards, L / Jones, V / Batul Syed, S / Glover, M / Hughes, J / Anderson, E / Hughes, B / Helbling, I / Murphy, R. ·Department of Dermatology, Nottingham University Hospitals Trust, Nottingham, U.K. esther.burden-teh@nottingham.ac.uk. · Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, U.K. esther.burden-teh@nottingham.ac.uk. · Department of Dermatology, Nottingham University Hospitals Trust, Nottingham, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Dorset County Hospital, Dorset, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, The Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Alder Hey Children's Hospital, West Derby, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Glasgow, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Churchill Hospital, Oxford, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Wales, Cardiff, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Royal Cornwall Hospital NHS Trust, Cornwall, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Princess of Wales Hospital, Bridgend, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Portsmouth, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, St Richards Hospital, Chichester, U.K. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester, UK. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #25601323.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Minor The quest for an evidence-based approach to surveillance for methotrexate-related hepatotoxicity: promise and perils. 2015

Dawwas, M F / Aithal, G P. ·Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY, 40503, U.S.A. · National Institute for Health Research, Nottingham Digestive Diseases Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, U.K. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #25523838.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Unspecified Updates from the British Association of Dermatologists 87 th annual meeting, 10-13 July 2007, Birmingham, U.K. 2008

Birnie, A / Langan, S / English, J S C. ·Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #18410413.

ABSTRACT: This is a synopsis of the main research and clinical findings presented at the British Association of Dermatologists meeting held during 10-13 July 2007 in Birmingham, U.K. The conference highlighted the recent biological, epidemiological and therapeutic advances that have been made recently in the field of dermatology. The authors focus on the more important advances or summaries of findings, but this is not meant as a substitute for reading the conference proceedings and related references quoted in this article.