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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from US Mid-Atlantic
Based on 795 articles published since 2008
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These are the 795 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from US Mid-Atlantic during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with biologics. 2019

Menter, Alan / Strober, Bruce E / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kivelevitch, Dario / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Stoff, Benjamin / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Davis, Dawn M R / Elewski, Boni E / Gelfand, Joel M / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Leonardi, Craig L / Lichten, Jason / Lim, Henry W / Mehta, Nehal N / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Rupani, Reena N / Siegel, Michael / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Elmets, Craig A. ·Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, San Francisco. · University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, San Francisco, California. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772098.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations based on the available evidence. The treatment of psoriasis with biologic agents will be reviewed, emphasizing treatment recommendations and the role of the dermatologist in monitoring and educating patients regarding benefits as well as associated risks.

2 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

3 Guideline Psoriasis in solid organ transplant patients: best practice recommendations from The Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. 2018

Prussick, Ronald / Wu, Jashin J / Armstrong, April W / Siegel, Michael P / Van Voorhees, Abby S. ·a Department of Dermatology , George Washington University , Washington D.C. , USA. · b Department of Dermatology , Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center , Los Angeles , CA , USA. · c Department of Dermatology , University of Southern California , Los Angeles , CA , USA. · d National Psoriasis Foundation , Portland , OR , USA. · e Department of Dermatology , Eastern Virginia Medical School , Norfolk , VA , USA. ·J Dermatolog Treat · Pubmed #28884635.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Treatment of solid organ transplant patients who have psoriasis can be a therapeutic challenge. Biologic and systemic drugs used to treat psoriasis can result in an increase in infections or malignancies. OBJECTIVE: We sought to develop a treatment algorithm for organ transplant recipients (OTR) diagnosed with psoriasis vulgaris. METHODS: A systematic literature search for psoriasis treatment in organ transplant patients was performed using MEDLINE and GOOGLE. RESULTS: In mild-to-moderate disease, topical therapy should be a first-line treatment. In moderate-to-severe disease, first-line treatment is acitretin with narrow band ultraviolet light (NBUVB), NBUVB, or acitretin. Second-line treatment is increasing the current antirejection drug dose. Other systemic or biologic therapies should be reserved for more severe or refractory cases. CONCLUSION: No systematic clinical studies have been done to explore psoriasis treatments among affected solid organ transplant patients who have psoriasis, and only a few case reports are available. The algorithm for best practices was developed based on these reports and on the clinical experience and judgment of the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. There remains a need for further research on the management of psoriasis in the organ transplant patient population.

4 Guideline Treating axial spondyloarthritis and peripheral spondyloarthritis, especially psoriatic arthritis, to target: 2017 update of recommendations by an international task force. 2018

Smolen, Josef S / Schöls, Monika / Braun, Jürgen / Dougados, Maxime / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Landewé, Robert / Mease, Philip / Sieper, Joachim / Stamm, Tanja / Wit, Maarten de / Aletaha, Daniel / Baraliakos, Xenofon / Betteridge, Neil / Bosch, Filip van den / Coates, Laura C / Emery, Paul / Gensler, Lianne S / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Jongkees, Merryn / Kvien, Tore K / Inman, Robert D / McInnes, Iain B / Maccarone, Mara / Machado, Pedro M / Molto, Anna / Ogdie, Alexis / Poddubnyy, Denis / Ritchlin, Christopher / Rudwaleit, Martin / Tanew, Adrian / Thio, Bing / Veale, Douglas / Vlam, Kurt de / van der Heijde, Désirée. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Health Consult, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Ruhr-University Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Rheumatology, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. · Amsterdam Rheumatology & Immunology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology Research, Swedish-Providence St. Joseph Health System, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section for Outcomes Research, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Medical Humanities, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Neil Betteridge Associates, UK. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Seayn Medical, Voorschoten, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Glasgow, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow, UK. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Centre for Rheumatology & MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, University College London, London, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USA. · German Rheumatism Research Centrer, Berlin, Germany. · Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus Medical Center, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #28684559.

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic targets have been defined for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) in 2012, but the evidence for these recommendations was only of indirect nature. These recommendations were re-evaluated in light of new insights. Based on the results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of rheumatologists, dermatologists, patients and a health professional developed an update of the 2012 recommendations. These underwent intensive discussions, on site voting and subsequent anonymous electronic voting on levels of agreement with each item. A set of 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations were developed and voted on. Some items were present in the previous recommendations, while others were significantly changed or newly formulated. The 2017 task force arrived at a single set of recommendations for axial and peripheral SpA, including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The most exhaustive discussions related to whether PsA should be assessed using unidimensional composite scores for its different domains or multidimensional scores that comprise multiple domains. This question was not resolved and constitutes an important research agenda. There was broad agreement, now better supported by data than in 2012, that remission/inactive disease and, alternatively, low/minimal disease activity are the principal targets for the treatment of PsA. As instruments to assess the patients on the path to the target, the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) for axial SpA and the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and Minimal Disease Activity (MDA) for PsA were recommended, although not supported by all. Shared decision-making between the clinician and the patient was seen as pivotal to the process. The task force defined the treatment target for SpA as remission or low disease activity and developed a large research agenda to further advance the field.

5 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: goodmans@hss.edu. · Bryan Springer, MD: OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · Gordon Guyatt, MD: McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Matthew P. Abdel, MD: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Vinod Dasa, MD: Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · Michael George, MD: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Ora Gewurz-Singer, MD: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Jon T. Giles, MD, MPH: Columbia University, New York, New York. · Beverly Johnson, MD: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Steve Lee, DO: Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · Michael A. Mont, MD: Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Scott Sporer, MD: Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · Louis Stryker, MD: University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · Marat Turgunbaev, MD, MPH, Amy S. Miller: American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Antonia F. Chen, MD, MBA: Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Jeremy Gililland, MD: University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · Mark Goodman, MD, Adolph Yates, MD: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Arlene Hurley-Rosenblatt, ANP: Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Elena Losina, PhD: Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Kaleb Michaud, PhD: National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Ted Mikuls, MD, MSPH: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Alexander Sah, MD: Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · Jasvinder A. Singh, MBBS, MPH: University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·J Arthroplasty · Pubmed #28629905.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

6 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas, and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #28620948.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

7 Guideline Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis 2015 Treatment Recommendations for Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Coates, Laura C / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Mease, Philip J / Soriano, Enrique R / Laura Acosta-Felquer, Maria / Armstrong, April W / Bautista-Molano, Wilson / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Campbell, Willemina / Cauli, Alberto / Espinoza, Luis R / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Gottlieb, Alice / Helliwell, Philip S / Husni, M Elaine / Love, Thorvardur J / Lubrano, Ennio / McHugh, Neil / Nash, Peter / Ogdie, Alexis / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Parkinson, Andrew / O'Sullivan, Denis / Rosen, Cheryl F / Schwartzman, Sergio / Siegel, Evan L / Toloza, Sergio / Tuong, William / Ritchlin, Christopher T. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · University of California at San Diego. · Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles. · Hospital Militar Central and Universidad Militar Nueva Grenada, Bogotá, Colombia. · Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Cagliari, Monserrato Campus, Cagliari, Italy. · Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, The Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, and University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Toronto and Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK. · Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. · University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK. · University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York. · Arthritis and Rheumatism Associates, Rockville, Maryland. · Ministry of Health, San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca, Argentina. · University of California, Davis. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #26749174.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the 2009 Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) treatment recommendations for the spectrum of manifestations affecting patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: GRAPPA rheumatologists, dermatologists, and PsA patients drafted overarching principles for the management of PsA, based on consensus achieved at face-to-face meetings and via online surveys. We conducted literature reviews regarding treatment for the key domains of PsA (arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, and nail disease) and convened a new group to identify pertinent comorbidities and their effect on treatment. Finally, we drafted treatment recommendations for each of the clinical manifestations and assessed the level of agreement for the overarching principles and treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members, using an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Six overarching principles had ≥80% agreement among both health care professionals (n = 135) and patient research partners (n = 10). We developed treatment recommendations and a schema incorporating these principles for arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, nail disease, and comorbidities in the setting of PsA, using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation process. Agreement of >80% was reached for approval of the individual recommendations and the overall schema. CONCLUSION: We present overarching principles and updated treatment recommendations for the key manifestations of PsA, including related comorbidities, based on a literature review and consensus of GRAPPA members (rheumatologists, dermatologists, other health care providers, and patient research partners). Further updates are anticipated as the therapeutic landscape in PsA evolves.

8 Guideline Treatment of nail psoriasis: best practice recommendations from the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. 2015

Crowley, Jeffrey J / Weinberg, Jeffrey M / Wu, Jashin J / Robertson, Andrew D / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Anonymous1700814. ·Bakersfield Dermatology, Bakersfield, California. · Department of Dermatology, Mt Sinai Health System, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Department of Dermatology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #25471223.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Nail psoriasis can be difficult to treat and has a significant effect on quality of life. Relatively few controlled trials evaluating treatments for nail psoriasis have been published. There is an unmet need for treatment recommendations to guide therapeutic decisions. OBJECTIVE: To develop treatment recommendations for nail psoriasis from the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. EVIDENCE REVIEW: A PubMed search for publications on nail psoriasis treatments was performed from January 1, 1947, through May 11, 2014, without language restrictions. FINDINGS: Treatment recommendations for 4 clinical nail psoriasis scenarios were developed based on the evidence reviewed in this study and expert opinion of the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. Treatment of nail psoriasis should balance consideration of the extent of skin disease, psoriatic arthritis, and severity of nail disease with concomitant impairment of quality of life. All patients should be evaluated for onychomycosis because this may complicate psoriatic nail disease. For disease limited to the nails, high-potency topical corticosteroids with or without calcipotriol are initial options. For patients with significant nail disease for whom topical therapy has failed, treatment with adalimumab, etanercept, intralesional corticosteroids, ustekinumab, methotrexate sodium, and acitretin are recommended. For patients with significant skin and nail disease, adalimumab, etanercept, and ustekinumab are strongly recommended, and methotrexate, acitretin, infliximab, and apremilast are recommended. Finally, for a patient with significant nail, skin, and joint disease, adalimumab, etanercept, ustekinumab, infliximab, methotrexate, apremilast, and golimumab are recommended. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Treatment of nail psoriasis poses a clinical challenge. Clinical trial data are limited, and results are reported inconsistently, making comparisons among treatment options difficult. The treatment recommendations from the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation will help guide treatment decisions for clinicians who are treating patients with nail psoriasis.

9 Guideline From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation: Recommendations for screening for hepatitis B infection prior to initiating anti-tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitors or other immunosuppressive agents in patients with psoriasis. 2014

Motaparthi, Kiran / Stanisic, Vladimir / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Lebwohl, Mark G / Hsu, Sylvia / Anonymous1850775. ·Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: shsu@bcm.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #24220724.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: No consensus exists regarding the optimal laboratory screening for hepatitis B infection that should be performed before initiating therapy with tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitors or other immunosuppressive agents. OBJECTIVE: We sought to give guidelines on which tests to order for hepatitis B screening. METHODS: We review the pathophysiology and serology of hepatitis B infection and provide recommendations for screening for hepatitis B infection in patients with psoriasis before beginning anti-tumor necrosis factor-alfa therapy or other immunosuppressive agents. RESULTS: We propose the standardized use of triple serology testing: hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B surface antibody, and hepatitis B core antibody in combination with liver function tests as screening. LIMITATIONS: Conclusions based on review of available literature is a limitation. CONCLUSIONS: All patients with psoriasis who are candidates for tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitor should undergo screening for hepatitis B virus infection using the triple serology: hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B surface antibody, and hepatitis B core antibody. It is advisable that patients, who are candidates for ustekinumab, cyclosporine, or methotrexate undergo the same screening.

10 Guideline Treatment of erythrodermic psoriasis: from the medical board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. 2010

Rosenbach, Misha / Hsu, Sylvia / Korman, Neil J / Lebwohl, Mark G / Young, Melodie / Bebo, Bruce F / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Anonymous5160635. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #19665821.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Erythrodermic psoriasis is a severe form of psoriasis that can arise acutely or follow a chronic course. There are a number of treatment options, but overall there are few evidence-based data to guide clinicians in managing these challenging cases. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to create treatment recommendations to help dermatologists treat patients with erythrodermic psoriasis. METHODS: A task force of the National Psoriasis Foundation Medical Board was convened to evaluate treatment options for erythrodermic or exfoliative psoriasis. Meetings were held by teleconference and were coordinated and funded by the National Psoriasis Foundation. Consensus on treatment of erythrodermic psoriasis was achieved. A literature review was conducted to examine treatment options for erythrodermic psoriasis and the strength of the evidence for each option. RESULTS: There is no high-quality scientific evidence on which to base treatment recommendations. Treatment should be dictated by the severity of disease at time of presentation and the patient's comorbidities. Cyclosporine and infliximab appear to be the most rapidly acting agents for the treatment of erythrodermic psoriasis. Acitretin and methotrexate are also appropriate first-line choices, although they usually work more slowly. Treating physicians can consider a number of second-line agents, including etanercept or combination therapy, in the treatment of patients with erythrodermic psoriasis. Combination therapy may be more effective than a single-agent approach; there is a paucity of scientific data in this area. All patients should be evaluated for underlying infection. Supportive care can help control disease and patient symptoms if instituted appropriately. Physicians should avoid potential exacerbating agents when managing this challenging disease. LIMITATIONS: There are few high-quality studies examining treatment options for erythrodermic psoriasis. CONCLUSION: Treatment of patients with erythrodermic psoriasis demands a thorough understanding of the treatment options available. Therapy should be based on acuity of disease and the patient's underlying comorbidities. There are limited data available to compare treatment options for erythrodermic psoriasis. Further studies are necessary to explore the optimal treatment algorithm for these patients.

11 Editorial "Tar smarts" may have a new meaning for atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. 2019

Heymann, Warren R. ·Division of Dermatology, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Marlton, New Jersey. Electronic address: wrheymann@gmail.com. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30395913.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Choosing the right biologic for psoriatic patients may be in the cards. 2018

Heymann, Warren R. ·Division of Dermatology, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Marlton, New Jersey. Electronic address: wrheymann@gmail.com. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29969699.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Commentary: Does biologic treatment of psoriasis lower the risk of cardiovascular events and mortality?: A critical question that we are only just beginning to answer. 2018

Gelfand, Joel M. ·Departments of Dermatology and Epidemiology, the Dermatology Clinical Studies Unit, and Psoriasis and Phototherapy Treatment Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: Joel.Gelfand@uphs.upenn.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29625133.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Psoriasis and Cardiovascular Disease: Two Sides of the Same Coin? 2018

Doumas, Michael / Katsiki, Niki / Papademetriou, Vasilios. ·1 Second Department of Propaedeutic Internal Medicine, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Hippocration Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece. · 2 VAMC and George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. · 3 VAMC and Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA. ·Angiology · Pubmed #28401789.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial JAK Inhibitors Taking on Psoriatic Arthritis. 2017

Colbert, Robert A / Ward, Michael M. ·From the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #29045217.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Psoriasis, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, and Obesity: Weighing the Evidence. 2016

Gelfand, Joel M. ·Department of Dermatology and Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #27120484.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Aortic valve stenosis: a new cardiovascular comorbidity of psoriasis? 2015

Gelfand, Joel M / Mehta, Nehal N. ·University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Joel.Gelfand@uphs.upenn.edu. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #26074463.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Phototherapy in dermatology: A call for action. 2015

Lim, Henry W / Silpa-archa, Narumol / Amadi, Ugochukwu / Menter, Alan / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Lebwohl, Mark. ·Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. Electronic address: hlim1@hfhs.org. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan; Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #25981004.

ABSTRACT: Of the wide range of treatment modalities available to dermatologists, few possess the history, efficacy, and safety of phototherapy. It should be emphasized that dermatologists are the only group of physicians optimally trained and qualified to understand the medical indications of phototherapy. Phototherapy, recognized for its cost-effectiveness, should remain a consideration in patient treatment. Continued training and education in residency and thereafter is needed to maintain the proficiency of physicians. In addition, payors need continued education to ensure that insurance coverage of phototherapy is not a barrier for patients to access this therapy. To further improve and optimize the outcome, phototherapy research needs to be supported.

19 Editorial The skinny on psoriasis and weight loss. 2014

Pfingstler, Lisa F / Hossler, Eric W. ·Department of Dermatology, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pennsylvania. · Departments of Dermatology and Pathology, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: ewhossler@geisinger.edu. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #25443052.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Psoriasis and lasting implications. 2014

Raju, Sudesh S. ·Department of Chemistry, School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, 231 S. 34th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6323, USA. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #24377863.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic immunological disorder that affects the joints and skin. The disease is strongly correlated with genetic predisposition and environmental factors that can act as triggers of the innate and adaptive immune response. Once this immune response has begun many different signaling factors lead to inflammation and plaques which are visible throughout the body. As psoriasis progresses, it strongly affects the mental and physical health of the individual. This article reviews the different types of psoriasis, genetic and environmental triggers of psoriasis, the molecular progression of psoriasis, and current and future therapies.

21 Editorial Editorial: are regulatory B10 cells a viable target for autoimmune diseases? 2013

Barnes, Betsy J. ·1.205 South Orange Ave., NJMS-UH Cancer Center, Newark, NJ 07960, USA. barnesbe@umdnj.edu. ·J Leukoc Biol · Pubmed #24082049.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Review Psoriasis therapy and aortic inflammation - translating statistical to clinical significance. 2018

Kazemi, Abrahem / Cline, Abigail / Cardwell, Leah A / Feldman, Steven R. ·Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, DC. kazemiabrahem@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Online J · Pubmed #30677825.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis patients are known to have comorbid aortic vascular inflammation, which is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in this population. Many studies report statistically significant improvements in aortic vascular inflammation after use of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors or interleukin-12/23 antagonists. However, the clinical significance in reduction of adverse cardiovascular events in psoriatic patients owing to biologic therapy has not been examined. Regardless of clinically significant cardiovascular benefits, dermatologists should continue to treat psoriasis patients optimally to mitigate the unfavorable effect this disease has on quality of life.

23 Review Psoriasis risk factors and triggers. 2018

Lee, Erica B / Wu, Kevin K / Lee, Michael P / Bhutani, Tina / Wu, Jashin J. ·University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University, North Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #30566552.

ABSTRACT: Numerous factors contribute to the onset and exacerbation of psoriasis. Genetic risk factors include HLA-Cw6 and mutations in the caspase recruitment domain family member 14 gene,

24 Review The epithelial immune microenvironment (EIME) in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. 2018

Dainichi, Teruki / Kitoh, Akihiko / Otsuka, Atsushi / Nakajima, Saeko / Nomura, Takashi / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kabashima, Kenji. ·Department of Dermatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. dainichi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp. · Department of Dermatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. · Department of Dermatology and Department of Immunology, Cutaneous Biology Research Core, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. kaba@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp. · Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN) and Institute of Medical Biology, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Biopolis, Singapore, Singapore. kaba@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp. ·Nat Immunol · Pubmed #30446754.

ABSTRACT: The skin provides both a physical barrier and an immunologic barrier to external threats. The protective machinery of the skin has evolved to provide situation-specific responses to eliminate pathogens and to provide protection against physical dangers. Dysregulation of this machinery can give rise to the initiation and propagation of inflammatory loops in the epithelial microenvironment that result in inflammatory skin diseases in susceptible people. A defective barrier and microbial dysbiosis drive an interleukin 4 (IL-4) loop that underlies atopic dermatitis, while in psoriasis, disordered keratinocyte signaling and predisposition to type 17 responses drive a pathogenic IL-17 loop. Here we discuss the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis in terms of the epithelial immune microenvironment-the microbiota, keratinocytes and sensory nerves-and the resulting inflammatory loops.

25 Review Pemphigus Associated with Psoriasis Vulgaris: A Retrospective Study of Seven Patients and a Review of the Literature. 2018

Zhang, Xian / Mao, Xuming / Theresia, Calvina / Xu, Renchao / Dong, Juan / Pan, Meng / Yuan, Huijie. ·Huijie Yuan, MD, Department of Dermatology Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong , University School of Medicine, 197 Ruijin Er Road, Shanghai 200025, China: renchaoxucn@126.com. ·Acta Dermatovenerol Croat · Pubmed #30390724.

ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics and the treatment for patients with psoriasis who presented with subsequent pemphigus after their treatment. A retrospective study of seven patients with psoriasis associated with pemphigus was performed, including the clinical assessment and treatments. The patients with a median age of 74 (range from 54 to 85) were significantly older than those in previously reported cases, where the median age was 58 (range from 15 to 77) (P<0.05). Six out of seven patients were male, which represents a higher ratio than that reported in literature (10/20). The duration between the diagnosis of psoriasis and onset of pemphigus ranged from 4 to 30 years, and previous studies reported a much wider range that, from a few months to 52 years. Patients developed pemphigus after the treatments for psoriasis with ultraviolet light, steroids, or immunosuppressant. Our study represents a distinct subset of patients with psoriasis accompanied with pemphigus who share typical clinical characteristics. Among these patients, most are elderly men and the dominant subtype is pemphigus foliaceus. Our data suggests that no treatment for psoriasis specifically correlated with the development of pemphigus. The combination treatment of steroids with immunosuppressant lead to an improvement of the disease.

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