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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from New England
Based on 929 articles published since 2009
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These are the 929 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from New England during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with biologics. 2019

Menter, Alan / Strober, Bruce E / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kivelevitch, Dario / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Stoff, Benjamin / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Davis, Dawn M R / Elewski, Boni E / Gelfand, Joel M / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Leonardi, Craig L / Lichten, Jason / Lim, Henry W / Mehta, Nehal N / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Rupani, Reena N / Siegel, Michael / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Elmets, Craig A. ·Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, San Francisco. · University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, San Francisco, California. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772098.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations based on the available evidence. The treatment of psoriasis with biologic agents will be reviewed, emphasizing treatment recommendations and the role of the dermatologist in monitoring and educating patients regarding benefits as well as associated risks.

2 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

3 Guideline Special Article: 2018 American College of Rheumatology/National Psoriasis Foundation Guideline for the Treatment of Psoriatic Arthritis. 2019

Singh, Jasvinder A / Guyatt, Gordon / Ogdie, Alexis / Gladman, Dafna D / Deal, Chad / Deodhar, Atul / Dubreuil, Maureen / Dunham, Jonathan / Husni, M Elaine / Kenny, Sarah / Kwan-Morley, Jennifer / Lin, Janice / Marchetta, Paula / Mease, Philip J / Merola, Joseph F / Miner, Julie / Ritchlin, Christopher T / Siaton, Bernadette / Smith, Benjamin J / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Jonsson, Anna Helena / Shah, Amit Aakash / Sullivan, Nancy / Turgunbaev, Marat / Coates, Laura C / Gottlieb, Alice / Magrey, Marina / Nowell, W Benjamin / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Reddy, Soumya M / Scher, Jose U / Siegel, Evan / Siegel, Michael / Walsh, Jessica A / Turner, Amy S / Reston, James. ·University of Alabama at Birmingham and Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Toronto and Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · New York, New York. · Premier Orthopaedics, Malvern, Pennsylvania. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Concorde Medical Group, New York, New York. · Swedish-Providence Health Systems and University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Comprehensive Therapy Consultants and Therapy Steps, Roswell, Georgia. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. · University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore. · Florida State University College of Medicine School of Physician Assistant Practice, Tallahassee. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · ECRI Institute, Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania. · University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · New York Medical College at Metropolitan Hospital, New York, New York. · Case Western/MetroHealth, Cleveland, Ohio. · Global Healthy Living Foundation, Nyack, New York. · Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. · Arthritis & Rheumatism Associates, Rockville, Maryland. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · University of Utah and George E. Wahlen VeteranS Affairs Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #30499246.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop an evidence-based guideline for the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), as a collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF). METHODS: We identified critical outcomes in PsA and clinically relevant PICO (population/intervention/comparator/outcomes) questions. A Literature Review Team performed a systematic literature review to summarize evidence supporting the benefits and harms of available pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies for PsA. GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology was used to rate the quality of the evidence. A voting panel, including rheumatologists, dermatologists, other health professionals, and patients, achieved consensus on the direction and the strength of the recommendations. RESULTS: The guideline covers the management of active PsA in patients who are treatment-naive and those who continue to have active PsA despite treatment, and addresses the use of oral small molecules, tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, interleukin-12/23 inhibitors (IL-12/23i), IL-17 inhibitors, CTLA4-Ig (abatacept), and a JAK inhibitor (tofacitinib). We also developed recommendations for psoriatic spondylitis, predominant enthesitis, and treatment in the presence of concomitant inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, or serious infections. We formulated recommendations for a treat-to-target strategy, vaccinations, and nonpharmacologic therapies. Six percent of the recommendations were strong and 94% conditional, indicating the importance of active discussion between the health care provider and the patient to choose the optimal treatment. CONCLUSION: The 2018 ACR/NPF PsA guideline serves as a tool for health care providers and patients in the selection of appropriate therapy in common clinical scenarios. Best treatment decisions consider each individual patient situation. The guideline is not meant to be proscriptive and should not be used to limit treatment options for patients with PsA.

4 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: goodmans@hss.edu. · Bryan Springer, MD: OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · Gordon Guyatt, MD: McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Matthew P. Abdel, MD: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Vinod Dasa, MD: Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · Michael George, MD: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Ora Gewurz-Singer, MD: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Jon T. Giles, MD, MPH: Columbia University, New York, New York. · Beverly Johnson, MD: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Steve Lee, DO: Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · Michael A. Mont, MD: Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Scott Sporer, MD: Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · Louis Stryker, MD: University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · Marat Turgunbaev, MD, MPH, Amy S. Miller: American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Antonia F. Chen, MD, MBA: Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Jeremy Gililland, MD: University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · Mark Goodman, MD, Adolph Yates, MD: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Arlene Hurley-Rosenblatt, ANP: Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Elena Losina, PhD: Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Kaleb Michaud, PhD: National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Ted Mikuls, MD, MSPH: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Alexander Sah, MD: Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · Jasvinder A. Singh, MBBS, MPH: University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·J Arthroplasty · Pubmed #28629905.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

5 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas, and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #28620948.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

6 Guideline Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis 2015 Treatment Recommendations for Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Coates, Laura C / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Mease, Philip J / Soriano, Enrique R / Laura Acosta-Felquer, Maria / Armstrong, April W / Bautista-Molano, Wilson / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Campbell, Willemina / Cauli, Alberto / Espinoza, Luis R / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Gottlieb, Alice / Helliwell, Philip S / Husni, M Elaine / Love, Thorvardur J / Lubrano, Ennio / McHugh, Neil / Nash, Peter / Ogdie, Alexis / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Parkinson, Andrew / O'Sullivan, Denis / Rosen, Cheryl F / Schwartzman, Sergio / Siegel, Evan L / Toloza, Sergio / Tuong, William / Ritchlin, Christopher T. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · University of California at San Diego. · Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles. · Hospital Militar Central and Universidad Militar Nueva Grenada, Bogotá, Colombia. · Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Cagliari, Monserrato Campus, Cagliari, Italy. · Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, The Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, and University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Toronto and Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK. · Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. · University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK. · University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York. · Arthritis and Rheumatism Associates, Rockville, Maryland. · Ministry of Health, San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca, Argentina. · University of California, Davis. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #26749174.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the 2009 Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) treatment recommendations for the spectrum of manifestations affecting patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: GRAPPA rheumatologists, dermatologists, and PsA patients drafted overarching principles for the management of PsA, based on consensus achieved at face-to-face meetings and via online surveys. We conducted literature reviews regarding treatment for the key domains of PsA (arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, and nail disease) and convened a new group to identify pertinent comorbidities and their effect on treatment. Finally, we drafted treatment recommendations for each of the clinical manifestations and assessed the level of agreement for the overarching principles and treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members, using an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Six overarching principles had ≥80% agreement among both health care professionals (n = 135) and patient research partners (n = 10). We developed treatment recommendations and a schema incorporating these principles for arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, nail disease, and comorbidities in the setting of PsA, using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation process. Agreement of >80% was reached for approval of the individual recommendations and the overall schema. CONCLUSION: We present overarching principles and updated treatment recommendations for the key manifestations of PsA, including related comorbidities, based on a literature review and consensus of GRAPPA members (rheumatologists, dermatologists, other health care providers, and patient research partners). Further updates are anticipated as the therapeutic landscape in PsA evolves.

7 Guideline Cyclosporine and psoriasis: 2008 National Psoriasis Foundation Consensus Conference. 2010

Rosmarin, David M / Lebwohl, Mark / Elewski, Boni E / Gottlieb, Alice B / Anonymous5570643. ·Department of Dermatology at Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #19932926.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cyclosporine is a valuable option for the treatment of psoriasis. This report summarizes studies regarding the use of cyclosporine since the last guidelines were published in 1998. OBJECTIVE: A task force of the National Psoriasis Foundation Medical Board was convened to evaluate treatment options. Our aim was to achieve a consensus on new updated guidelines for the use of cyclosporine in the treatment of psoriasis. METHODS: Reports in the literature were reviewed regarding cyclosporine therapy. LIMITATIONS: There are few evidence-based studies on the treatment of psoriasis with cyclosporine. RESULTS: A consensus was achieved on the use of cyclosporine in psoriasis including specific recommendations on dosing, monitoring, and use of cyclosporine in special situations. The consensus received approval from members of the National Psoriasis Foundation Medical Board. CONCLUSIONS: Cyclosporine is a safe and effective drug for the treatment of psoriasis. It has a particularly useful role in managing psoriatic crises, treating psoriasis unresponsive to other modalities, bridging to other therapies, and treating psoriasis within a rotational scheme of other medications. Appropriate patient selection and monitoring will significantly decrease the risks of side effects.

8 Editorial Psoriasis and Atherosclerosis. 2018

Siddiqi, Hasan K / Ridker, Paul M. ·From the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. ·Circ Res · Pubmed #30571473.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Multiorgan Imaging of Comorbidity and Cardiovascular Risk. 2018

Nahrendorf, Matthias. ·Center for Systems Biology, Department of Imaging, and Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: mnahrendorf@mgh.harvard.edu. ·JACC Cardiovasc Imaging · Pubmed #30448129.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Core Outcome Sets for Psoriasis Clinical Trials: Definition, Consensus, and Acceptance. 2018

Strober, Bruce E / Gordon, Kenneth B. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington. · Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #29874363.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Commentary: The Corrona-National Psoriasis Foundation Psoriasis Registry: A new collaborative approach for postapproval registries. 2018

Strober, Bruce. ·University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. Electronic address: strober@uchc.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29042231.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Skin and Vascular Disease-Inside-Out/Outside-In. 2017

MacRae, Calum A. ·Cardiovascular Medicine Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·JAMA Cardiol · Pubmed #28564684.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Introduction to JID's Landmarks in the Molecular Revolution. 2017

Tsao, Hensin. ·Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Electronic address: HTSAO@mgh.harvard.edu. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #28411838.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Glycosylation Signatures of Inflammation Identify Cardiovascular Risk: Some Glyc It Hot. 2016

Lawler, Patrick R / Mora, Samia. ·From the Center for Lipid Metabolomics, Cardiovascular Division, and Preventive Medicine Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · From the Center for Lipid Metabolomics, Cardiovascular Division, and Preventive Medicine Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. smora@partners.org. ·Circ Res · Pubmed #28051777.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Brodalumab and suicidal ideation in the context of a recent economic crisis in the United States. 2016

Danesh, Melissa J / Kimball, Alexa B. ·University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: harvardskinstudies@partners.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #26702804.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Impact of mast cells on the skin. 2013

Kritas, S K / Saggini, A / Varvara, G / Murmura, G / Caraffa, A / Antinolfi, P / Toniato, E / Pantalone, A / Neri, G / Frydas, S / Rosati, M / Tei, M / Speziali, A / Saggini, R / Pandolfi, F / Cerulli, G / Theoharides, T C / Conti, P. ·Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, School of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Macedonia, Greece. · Department of Dermatology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. · Dental School, University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy. · Orthopedic Division, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy. · Immunology Division, Medical School, University of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy. · Orthopedic Division, University of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy. · Department of Neurosciences and Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, G. d’Annunzio University Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy. · Department of Parasitology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Uni-versity of Thessaloniki, Macedonia, Greece. · Gynecology Clinic, Pescara Hospital, Pescara, Italy. · Nicola’s Foundation, Onlus, Arezzo, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Biochemistry and Internal Medicine Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. ·Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol · Pubmed #24355220.

ABSTRACT: When through the skin a foreign antigen enters it provokes an immune response and inflammatory reaction. Mast cells are located around small vessels that are involved in vasaldilation. They mature under the influence of local tissue to various cytokines. Human skin mast cells play an essential role in diverse physiological and pathological processes and mediate immediate hypersensitive reaction and allergic diseases. Injection of anti-IgE in the skin or other agents that directly activate mast cells may cause the decrease in vascular tone, leakage of plasma and may lead to a fall in blood pressure with fatal anaphylactic shock. Skin mast cells are also implicated as effector cells in response to multiple parasites such as Leishmania which is primarily characterized by its tissue cutaneous tropism. Activated macrophages by IFNgamma, cytotoxic T cells, activated mast cells and several cytokines are involved in the elimination of the parasites and immunoprotection. IL-33 is one of the latest cytokines involved in IgE-induced anaphylaxis and in the pathogenesis of allergic skin disorders. IL-33 has been shown in epidermis of patients with psoriasis and its skin expression causes atopic dermatitis and it is crucial for the development of this disease. Here we review the impact of mast cells on the skin.

17 Editorial Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), mast cells and inflammation. 2013

Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Y B / Varvara, G / Murmura, G / Saggini, A / Potalivo, G / Caraffa, A / Antinolfi, P / Tete', S / Tripodi, D / Conti, F / Cianchetti, E / Toniato, E / Rosati, M / Conti, P / Speranza, L / Pantalone, A / Saggini, R / Theoharides, T C / Pandolfi, F. ·Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. ·Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol · Pubmed #23755748.

ABSTRACT: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the most important inducers of angiogenesis, therefore blocking angiogenesis has led to great promise in the treatment of various cancers and inflammatory diseases. VEGF, expressed in response to soluble mediators such as cytokines and growth factors, is important in the physiological development of blood vessels as well as development of vessels in tumors. In cancer patients VEGF levels are increased, and the expression of VEGF is associated with poor prognosis in diseases. VEGF is a mediator of angiogenesis and inflammation which are closely integrated processes in a number of physiological and pathological conditions including obesity, psoriasis, autoimmune diseases and tumor. Mast cells can be activated by anti-IgE to release potent mediators of inflammation and can also respond to bacterial or viral antigens, cytokines, growth factors and hormones, leading to differential release of distinct mediators without degranulation. Substance P strongly induces VEGF in mast cells, and IL-33 contributes to the stimulation and release of VEGF in human mast cells in a dose-dependent manner and acts synergistically in combination with Substance P. Here we report a strong link between VEGF and mast cells and we depict their role in inflammation and immunity.

18 Editorial Biopharmaceuticals and biosimilars in psoriasis: what the dermatologist needs to know. 2012

Strober, Bruce E / Armour, Katherine / Romiti, Ricardo / Smith, Catherine / Tebbey, Paul W / Menter, Alan / Leonardi, Craig. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut 06032, USA. strober@uchc.edu ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #22243723.

ABSTRACT: The entry of biosimilar forms of biopharmaceutical therapies for the treatment of psoriasis and other immune-mediated disorders has provoked considerable interest. Although dermatologists are accustomed to the use of a wide range of generic topical agents, recognition of key differences between original agent (ie, the name brand) and the generic or biosimilar agent is necessary to support optimal therapy management and patient care. In this review we have summarized the current state of the art related to the impending introduction of biosimilars into dermatology. Biosimilars represent important interventions that are less expensive and hence offer the potential to deliver benefit to large numbers of patients who may not currently be able to access these therapies. But the development of biosimilars is not equivalent to that of small molecule generic therapies because of differences in molecular structure and processes of manufacture. The planned regulatory guidelines and path to approval may not encompass all of these potentially important differences and this may have clinical relevance to the prescriber and patient. Consequently, we have identified a series of key issues that should be considered to support the full potential of biosimilars for the treatment of psoriasis; ie, that of increased access to appropriate therapy for the psoriasis population worldwide.

19 Editorial Time for a change? Updated guidelines using interferon gamma release assays for detection of latent tuberculosis infection in the office setting. 2012

Kardos, Marisa / Kimball, Alexa Boer. ·Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #22177633.

ABSTRACT: Treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitors and other systemic medications increases the risk of reactivating a latent tuberculosis (TB) infection. Therefore, screening for latent TB infection is important in dermatology patients eligible for treatment with these medications. Although the tuberculin skin test (TST) has its limitations, it has been the standard choice for diagnosis of latent TB infection. Since the development of interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs), the role of the TST has been re-evaluated and IGRAs have increasingly been incorporated into national guidelines. Although there are situations when either test may be performed, in individuals who have received a BCG vaccination and in those who are unlikely to return for a TST reading, IGRAs may be particularly helpful in distinguishing patients at risk for TB. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of both the TST and the IGRA and presents a summary of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2010 guidelines for using IGRAs.

20 Review Immunogenicity of Biosimilars for Rheumatic Diseases, Plaque Psoriasis, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review from Clinical Trials and Regulatory Documents. 2019

Strand, Vibeke / Gonçalves, Joao / Hickling, Timothy P / Jones, Heather E / Marshall, Lisa / Isaacs, John D. ·Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 306 Ramona Road, Portola Valley, Palo Alto, CA, 94028, USA. vibekestrand@me.com. · iMed-Research Institute for Medicines, Faculdade de Farmácia da, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal. · Biomedicine Design, Pfizer, Andover, MA, USA. · Inflammation and Immunology, Pfizer, Collegeville, PA, USA. · Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University and Musculoskeletal Unit, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. ·BioDrugs · Pubmed #31721107.

ABSTRACT: The goal of this narrative review was to summarize immunogenicity data of biosimilars or biosimilar candidates for rheumatic diseases, plaque psoriasis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), available in peer-reviewed publications or regulatory documents. PubMed records and regulatory documents were searched for immunogenicity data of TNFα or CD20 inhibitor biosimilars or biosimilar candidates. Data collected included the proportion of patients positive for anti-drug antibodies (ADAbs), proportion with neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) among ADAb-positive patients, ADAb/nAb assay characteristics, cross-reactivity, and the effects of ADAbs on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety. We identified eight biosimilars or biosimilar candidates for adalimumab (BI 695501, SB5, ABP 501, GP2017, PF-06410293, MSB-11022, FKB-327, ZRC-3197) four for etanercept (SB4, GP2015, CHS-0214, LBEC0101), and three each for infliximab (SB2, CT-P13, GP1111) and rituximab (CT-P10, GP2013, PF-05280586) with immunogenicity data. Randomized, head-to-head trials with reference products varied in design and methodology of ADAb/nAb detection. The lowest proportions of ADAb-positive (0-13%) and nAb-positive patients (0-3%) were observed in the trials of etanercept and its biosimilars, and the highest with adalimumab, infliximab, and their biosimilars (ADAbs: ≤ 64%; nAbs: ≤ 100%). The most common method of ADAb detection was electrochemiluminescence, and ADAb positivity was associated with nominally inferior efficacy and safety. Overall, there were no significant immunogenicity differences between biosimilars and reference products. However, there are many discrepancies in assessing and reporting clinical immunogenicity. In conclusion, immunogenicity data of biosimilars or biosimilar candidates for TNFα or CD20 inhibitors were collected in trials that varied in design and procedures for ADAb/nAb detection. In general, immunogenicity parameters of biosimilars are similar to those of their reference products.

21 Review Coronary artery calcium scoring for individualized cardiovascular risk estimation in important patient subpopulations after the 2019 AHA/ACC primary prevention guidelines. 2019

Dzaye, Omar / Dudum, Ramzi / Reiter-Brennan, Cara / Kianoush, Sina / Tota-Maharaj, Rajesh / Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel / Blaha, Michael J. ·Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Baltimore, MD, United States; Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States; Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Charité, Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: odzaye@gmail.com. · Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Baltimore, MD, United States. · Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Baltimore, MD, United States; Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Charité, Berlin, Germany. · Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Baltimore, MD, United States; Yale University, Department of Internal Medicine, New Haven, CT, United States. · Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Baltimore, MD, United States; Advent Health Medical Group, Orlando, FL, United States. ·Prog Cardiovasc Dis · Pubmed #31715194.

ABSTRACT: The 2018 and 2019 American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) guidelines for primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) recommend consideration of so-called "risk-enhancing factors" in borderline to intermediate risk individuals. These include high-risk race/ethnicity (e.g. South Asian origin), chronic kidney disease, a family history of premature ASCVD, the metabolic syndrome, chronic inflammatory disorders (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis [RA], psoriasis, or chronic human immunodeficiency virus [HIV]), and conditions specific to women, among others. Studies suggest, however, that risk may be highly heterogeneous within these subgroups. The AHA/ACC guidelines also recommend consideration of coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring for further risk assessment in borderline to intermediate risk individuals in whom management is uncertain. Although the combination of risk enhancing factors and CAC burden (together with Pooled Cohort estimates) may lead to more accurate ASCVD risk assessment, few publications have closely examined the interplay between risk enhancing factors and CAC scoring for personalized risk estimation. Our aim is to review the relevant literature in this area. Although further research is clearly needed, CAC assessment seems a highly valuable option to inform individualized ASCVD risk management in these important, often highly heterogeneous patient subgroups.

22 Review Skin disease related to metabolic syndrome in women. 2019

Misitzis, Angelica / Cunha, Paulo R / Kroumpouzos, George. ·Department of Dermatology, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · Department of Dermatology, Medical School of Jundiaí, Jundiaí, São Paulo, Brazil. · GK Dermatology, PC, South Weymouth, Massachusetts. ·Int J Womens Dermatol · Pubmed #31700973.

ABSTRACT: Sex hormones are involved in pathways of metabolic syndrome (MetS), an observation supported by animal studies. The relationships of sex hormones with components of MetS, such as insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, have been studied in pre- and postmenopausal women. High testosterone, low sex hormone-binding globulin, and low estrogen levels increase the risks of MetS and type 2 diabetes in women. Cutaneous diseases that are sex hormone mediated, such as polycystic ovary syndrome, acanthosis nigricans, acne vulgaris, and pattern alopecia, have been associated with insulin resistance and increased risk for MetS. Furthermore, inflammatory skin conditions, such as hidradenitis suppurativa and psoriasis, increase the risk for MetS. Patients with such skin conditions should be followed for metabolic complications, and early lifestyle interventions toward these populations may be warranted.

23 Review DNA methylation and inflammatory skin diseases. 2019

Mervis, Joshua S / McGee, Jean S. ·Department of Dermatology, Boston University School of Medicine, 609 Albany Street, J-505, Boston, MA, 02118, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Boston University School of Medicine, 609 Albany Street, J-505, Boston, MA, 02118, USA. jmcgee2@bidmc.harvard.edu. ·Arch Dermatol Res · Pubmed #31696298.

ABSTRACT: Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression that do not originate from alternations in the DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications include DNA methylation, histone modification, and gene silencing via the action of microRNAs. Epigenetic dysregulation has been implicated in many disease processes. In the field of dermatology, epigenetic regulation has been extensively explored as a pathologic mechanism in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), which has led to the successful development of epigenetic therapies for CTCL. In recent years, the potential role of epigenetic regulation in the pathogeneses of inflammatory skin diseases has gained greater appreciation. In particular, epigenetic changes in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis have been increasingly studied, with DNA methylation the most rigorously investigated to date. In this review, we provide an overview of DNA methylation in inflammatory skin diseases with an emphasis on psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

24 Review Structural Insights into the Interleukin-17 Family Cytokines and Their Receptors. 2019

Liu, Shenping. ·Discovery Sciences, Pfizer Inc., Eastern Point Road, Groton, CT, 06340, USA. Shenping.liu@pfizer.com. ·Adv Exp Med Biol · Pubmed #31628653.

ABSTRACT: The IL-17 family in humans consists of six distinct cytokines (IL-17A-F) that can interact with five IL-17 receptors (IL-17RA-E). The interaction between these cytokines and their receptors are critical in mediating host defenses while also making major contributions to inflammatory and autoimmune responses as demonstrated through both in vitro and in vivo experiments as well as human clinical trials. Inhibition of the IL-17A/IL-17RA interaction by monoclonal antibodies has also displayed remarkable efficacies in clinical trials against psoriasis and other autoimmune diseases. Recently, we and others reported the identification and characterization of both small-molecule and peptide IL-17A antagonists. These non-antibody IL-17A antagonists can effectively and selectively disrupt the IL-17A/IL-17RA complex and may provide alternative modalities to treat IL-17-related autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. This chapter summarizes the reported crystal structures of the IL-17 cytokines, their complexes with IL-17RA, and their complexes with both monoclonal antibodies as well as small-molecule and peptide antagonists.

25 Review Nanodermatology-based solutions for psoriasis: State-of-the art and future prospects. 2019

Damiani, Giovanni / Pacifico, Alessia / Linder, Dennis M / Pigatto, Paolo D M / Conic, Rosalynn / Grada, Ayman / Bragazzi, Nicola L. ·Young Dermatologists Italian Network (YDIN), Centro Studi GISED, Bergamo, Italy. · Clinical Dermatology, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milan, Italy. · Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. · San Gallicano Dermatological Institute, IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University Clinic, Padua, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Laboratory of Cutaneous Wound Healing, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · Postgraduate School of Public Health, Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. ·Dermatol Ther · Pubmed #31600849.

ABSTRACT: Nanodermatology is an emerging, multidisciplinary science, arising from the convergence of nanotechnology, pharmacology, physics/biophysics, chemistry/biochemistry, chemical engineering, material science, and clinical medicine. Nanodermatology deals with (a) skin biology, anatomy, and physiology at the nanoscale ("skin nanobiology"), (b) diagnosis performed by means of novel diagnostic devices, assisted by nanobiotechnologies ("nanodiagnosis"), and (c) treatment through innovative therapeutic agents, including phototherapy ("photonanotherapy"/"photonanodermatology") and systemic/topical drug administration ("nanotherapy") at the nanoscale, and drug delivery-such as transdermal or dermal drug delivery (TDDD/DDD)-enhanced and improved by nanostructures and nanodrugs ("nanodrug delivery"). Nanodermatology, as a super-specialized branch of dermatology, is a quite recent specialty: the "Nanodermatology Society" founded by the eminent dermatologist Dr. Adnan Nasir, was established in 2010, with the aim of bringing together different stakeholders, including dermatologists, nanotechnology scientists, policy-makers and regulators, as well as students and medical residents. Psoriasis has a prevalence of 2-3% worldwide and imposes a severe clinical and societal burden. Nanodermatology-based solutions appear promising for the proper treatment and management of psoriasis, assisting and enhancing different steps of the process of health-care delivery: from the diagnosis to the therapeutics, paving the way for a personalized approach, based on the specific dysregulated biomarkers.

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