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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from New England
Based on 609 articles published since 2008
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These are the 609 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from New England during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with biologics. 2019

Menter, Alan / Strober, Bruce E / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kivelevitch, Dario / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Stoff, Benjamin / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Davis, Dawn M R / Elewski, Boni E / Gelfand, Joel M / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Leonardi, Craig L / Lichten, Jason / Lim, Henry W / Mehta, Nehal N / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Rupani, Reena N / Siegel, Michael / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Elmets, Craig A. ·Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, San Francisco. · University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, San Francisco, California. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772098.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations based on the available evidence. The treatment of psoriasis with biologic agents will be reviewed, emphasizing treatment recommendations and the role of the dermatologist in monitoring and educating patients regarding benefits as well as associated risks.

2 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

3 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: goodmans@hss.edu. · Bryan Springer, MD: OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · Gordon Guyatt, MD: McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Matthew P. Abdel, MD: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Vinod Dasa, MD: Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · Michael George, MD: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Ora Gewurz-Singer, MD: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Jon T. Giles, MD, MPH: Columbia University, New York, New York. · Beverly Johnson, MD: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Steve Lee, DO: Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · Michael A. Mont, MD: Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Scott Sporer, MD: Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · Louis Stryker, MD: University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · Marat Turgunbaev, MD, MPH, Amy S. Miller: American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Antonia F. Chen, MD, MBA: Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Jeremy Gililland, MD: University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · Mark Goodman, MD, Adolph Yates, MD: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Arlene Hurley-Rosenblatt, ANP: Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Elena Losina, PhD: Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Kaleb Michaud, PhD: National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Ted Mikuls, MD, MSPH: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Alexander Sah, MD: Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · Jasvinder A. Singh, MBBS, MPH: University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·J Arthroplasty · Pubmed #28629905.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

4 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas, and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #28620948.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

5 Guideline Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis 2015 Treatment Recommendations for Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Coates, Laura C / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Mease, Philip J / Soriano, Enrique R / Laura Acosta-Felquer, Maria / Armstrong, April W / Bautista-Molano, Wilson / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Campbell, Willemina / Cauli, Alberto / Espinoza, Luis R / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Gottlieb, Alice / Helliwell, Philip S / Husni, M Elaine / Love, Thorvardur J / Lubrano, Ennio / McHugh, Neil / Nash, Peter / Ogdie, Alexis / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Parkinson, Andrew / O'Sullivan, Denis / Rosen, Cheryl F / Schwartzman, Sergio / Siegel, Evan L / Toloza, Sergio / Tuong, William / Ritchlin, Christopher T. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · University of California at San Diego. · Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles. · Hospital Militar Central and Universidad Militar Nueva Grenada, Bogotá, Colombia. · Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Cagliari, Monserrato Campus, Cagliari, Italy. · Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, The Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, and University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Toronto and Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK. · Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. · University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK. · University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York. · Arthritis and Rheumatism Associates, Rockville, Maryland. · Ministry of Health, San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca, Argentina. · University of California, Davis. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #26749174.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the 2009 Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) treatment recommendations for the spectrum of manifestations affecting patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: GRAPPA rheumatologists, dermatologists, and PsA patients drafted overarching principles for the management of PsA, based on consensus achieved at face-to-face meetings and via online surveys. We conducted literature reviews regarding treatment for the key domains of PsA (arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, and nail disease) and convened a new group to identify pertinent comorbidities and their effect on treatment. Finally, we drafted treatment recommendations for each of the clinical manifestations and assessed the level of agreement for the overarching principles and treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members, using an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Six overarching principles had ≥80% agreement among both health care professionals (n = 135) and patient research partners (n = 10). We developed treatment recommendations and a schema incorporating these principles for arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, nail disease, and comorbidities in the setting of PsA, using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation process. Agreement of >80% was reached for approval of the individual recommendations and the overall schema. CONCLUSION: We present overarching principles and updated treatment recommendations for the key manifestations of PsA, including related comorbidities, based on a literature review and consensus of GRAPPA members (rheumatologists, dermatologists, other health care providers, and patient research partners). Further updates are anticipated as the therapeutic landscape in PsA evolves.

6 Guideline Cyclosporine and psoriasis: 2008 National Psoriasis Foundation Consensus Conference. 2010

Rosmarin, David M / Lebwohl, Mark / Elewski, Boni E / Gottlieb, Alice B / Anonymous5570643. ·Department of Dermatology at Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #19932926.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cyclosporine is a valuable option for the treatment of psoriasis. This report summarizes studies regarding the use of cyclosporine since the last guidelines were published in 1998. OBJECTIVE: A task force of the National Psoriasis Foundation Medical Board was convened to evaluate treatment options. Our aim was to achieve a consensus on new updated guidelines for the use of cyclosporine in the treatment of psoriasis. METHODS: Reports in the literature were reviewed regarding cyclosporine therapy. LIMITATIONS: There are few evidence-based studies on the treatment of psoriasis with cyclosporine. RESULTS: A consensus was achieved on the use of cyclosporine in psoriasis including specific recommendations on dosing, monitoring, and use of cyclosporine in special situations. The consensus received approval from members of the National Psoriasis Foundation Medical Board. CONCLUSIONS: Cyclosporine is a safe and effective drug for the treatment of psoriasis. It has a particularly useful role in managing psoriatic crises, treating psoriasis unresponsive to other modalities, bridging to other therapies, and treating psoriasis within a rotational scheme of other medications. Appropriate patient selection and monitoring will significantly decrease the risks of side effects.

7 Guideline Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: Section 2. Psoriatic arthritis: overview and guidelines of care for treatment with an emphasis on the biologics. 2008

Gottlieb, Alice / Korman, Neil J / Gordon, Kenneth B / Feldman, Steven R / Lebwohl, Mark / Koo, John Y M / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Beutner, Karl R / Bhushan, Reva / Menter, Alan. ·Department of Dermatology, Tufts-New England Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #18423261.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the population. In this second of 5 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we give an overview of psoriatic arthritis including its cardinal clinical features, pathogenesis, prognosis, classification, assessment tools used to evaluate psoriatic arthritis, and the approach to treatment. Although patients with mild to moderate psoriatic arthritis may be treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or intra-articular steroid injections, the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, particularly methotrexate, along with the biologic agents, are considered the standard of care in patients with more significant psoriatic arthritis. We will discuss the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and the biologic therapies in the treatment of patients with moderate to severe psoriatic arthritis.

8 Guideline National Psoriasis Foundation clinical consensus on psoriasis comorbidities and recommendations for screening. 2008

Kimball, Alexa B / Gladman, Dafna / Gelfand, Joel M / Gordon, Kenneth / Horn, Elizabeth J / Korman, Neil J / Korver, Gretchen / Krueger, Gerald G / Strober, Bruce E / Lebwohl, Mark G / Anonymous5660593. ·Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. harvardskinstudies@partners.org ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #18313171.

ABSTRACT: There have been several articles and reports in recent months about comorbidities and risks that affect psoriasis patients in addition to their underlying disease. This piece reviews the current literature and begins to address what should be done with this new information by updating the clinician about what health screening tests, preventative exams, and referrals should be considered in this population.

9 Editorial Commentary: The Corrona-National Psoriasis Foundation Psoriasis Registry: A new collaborative approach for postapproval registries. 2018

Strober, Bruce. ·University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. Electronic address: strober@uchc.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29042231.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Introduction to JID's Landmarks in the Molecular Revolution. 2017

Tsao, Hensin. ·Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Electronic address: HTSAO@mgh.harvard.edu. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #28411838.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Glycosylation Signatures of Inflammation Identify Cardiovascular Risk: Some Glyc It Hot. 2016

Lawler, Patrick R / Mora, Samia. ·From the Center for Lipid Metabolomics, Cardiovascular Division, and Preventive Medicine Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · From the Center for Lipid Metabolomics, Cardiovascular Division, and Preventive Medicine Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. smora@partners.org. ·Circ Res · Pubmed #28051777.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Brodalumab and suicidal ideation in the context of a recent economic crisis in the United States. 2016

Danesh, Melissa J / Kimball, Alexa B. ·University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, California. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: harvardskinstudies@partners.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #26702804.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Biopharmaceuticals and biosimilars in psoriasis: what the dermatologist needs to know. 2012

Strober, Bruce E / Armour, Katherine / Romiti, Ricardo / Smith, Catherine / Tebbey, Paul W / Menter, Alan / Leonardi, Craig. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut 06032, USA. strober@uchc.edu ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #22243723.

ABSTRACT: The entry of biosimilar forms of biopharmaceutical therapies for the treatment of psoriasis and other immune-mediated disorders has provoked considerable interest. Although dermatologists are accustomed to the use of a wide range of generic topical agents, recognition of key differences between original agent (ie, the name brand) and the generic or biosimilar agent is necessary to support optimal therapy management and patient care. In this review we have summarized the current state of the art related to the impending introduction of biosimilars into dermatology. Biosimilars represent important interventions that are less expensive and hence offer the potential to deliver benefit to large numbers of patients who may not currently be able to access these therapies. But the development of biosimilars is not equivalent to that of small molecule generic therapies because of differences in molecular structure and processes of manufacture. The planned regulatory guidelines and path to approval may not encompass all of these potentially important differences and this may have clinical relevance to the prescriber and patient. Consequently, we have identified a series of key issues that should be considered to support the full potential of biosimilars for the treatment of psoriasis; ie, that of increased access to appropriate therapy for the psoriasis population worldwide.

14 Editorial Time for a change? Updated guidelines using interferon gamma release assays for detection of latent tuberculosis infection in the office setting. 2012

Kardos, Marisa / Kimball, Alexa Boer. ·Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #22177633.

ABSTRACT: Treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitors and other systemic medications increases the risk of reactivating a latent tuberculosis (TB) infection. Therefore, screening for latent TB infection is important in dermatology patients eligible for treatment with these medications. Although the tuberculin skin test (TST) has its limitations, it has been the standard choice for diagnosis of latent TB infection. Since the development of interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs), the role of the TST has been re-evaluated and IGRAs have increasingly been incorporated into national guidelines. Although there are situations when either test may be performed, in individuals who have received a BCG vaccination and in those who are unlikely to return for a TST reading, IGRAs may be particularly helpful in distinguishing patients at risk for TB. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of both the TST and the IGRA and presents a summary of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2010 guidelines for using IGRAs.

15 Review Psoriasis risk factors and triggers. 2018

Lee, Erica B / Wu, Kevin K / Lee, Michael P / Bhutani, Tina / Wu, Jashin J. ·University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University, North Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #30566552.

ABSTRACT: Numerous factors contribute to the onset and exacerbation of psoriasis. Genetic risk factors include HLA-Cw6 and mutations in the caspase recruitment domain family member 14 gene,

16 Review Anti-HCV for treatment of HCV-positive psoriatic patients: A promising therapy. 2018

Abdelmaksoud, Ayman / Vestita, Michelangelo. ·Mansoura Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology Hospital, Mansoura, Egypt. · Unit of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Dermatol Ther · Pubmed #30398009.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease that has been associated to liver disease, includinghepatitis C virus infection. TNF-α is a key cytokine for both hepatitis C progression and psoriasis. HCV high-prevalence countries are likely to show clear association of the two conditions. We reviewed the current literature on the effect of anti-HCV therapy on the course of psoriasis in patient affected with both diseases.

17 Review Interleukin-17-producing γδ T (γδ17) cells in inflammatory diseases. 2018

Akitsu, Aoi / Iwakura, Yoichiro. ·Laboratory of Immunobiology, Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Centre for Animal Disease Models, Research Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, Chiba, Japan. ·Immunology · Pubmed #30133701.

ABSTRACT: Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine and is involved in the development of many diseases. Recent studies have revealed that IL-17-producing γδ T cells (γδ17 cells) in addition to IL-17-producing CD4

18 Review Psoriatic arthritis and the dermatologist: An approach to screening and clinical evaluation. 2018

Zhang, Arianna / Kurtzman, Drew J B / Perez-Chada, Lourdes M / Merola, Joseph F. ·Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Dermatology, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona, USA; Division of Dermatology, St. Elizabeth Physicians, Florence, Kentucky, USA. Electronic address: drewkurtzman@gmail.com. · Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Division of Rheumatology, and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #30047437.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis is a common form of inflammatory arthritis that frequently accompanies psoriasis of the skin-up to 30% of patients with psoriasis are affected. Recognition of the clinical features of psoriatic arthritis is critical, as delayed detection and untreated disease may result in irreparable joint injury, impaired physical function, and a significantly reduced quality of life. Recent epidemiologic studies have also supported that psoriatic arthritis is associated with cardiometabolic and cerebrovascular comorbidities, including coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and cerebrovascular accidents, further highlighting the importance of identifying affected patients. Dermatologists are poised for the early detection of psoriatic arthritis, as psoriasis predates its development in as many as 80% of patients. In an effort to further acquaint dermatologists and other clinicians with psoriatic arthritis, this review provides a detailed overview, emphasizing its salient clinical features, and discusses classification criteria, validated screening tools, and simple musculoskeletal examination maneuvers that may facilitate earlier detection and treatment of the disorder.

19 Review The Seronegative Spondyloarthropathies. 2018

Duba, Ayyappa S / Mathew, Stephanie D. ·Department of Rheumatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, 1 Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, 1 Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA. Electronic address: Smathew7@gmail.com. ·Prim Care · Pubmed #29759124.

ABSTRACT: The seronegative spondyloarthropathies are a group of five diseases characterized by inflammatory oligoarticular arthritis, enthesitis, and axial involvement. They have an increased incidence of the HLA-B27 gene. They are commonly associated with extra-articular features including involvement of the skin, eyes, and gastrointestinal tract. Early recognition and referral are key to limit disability, and comanagement with primary care and rheumatology offers the best outcomes.

20 Review Current guidelines for psoriasis treatment: a work in progress. 2018

Golbari, Nicole M / Porter, Martina L / Kimball, Alexa B. ·School of Medicine, Stony Brook University, New York, USA. · Clinical Laboratory for Epidemiology and Applied Research in Skin, Department of Dermatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #29718028.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a complex chronic autoimmune skin disease with multiple comorbidities that can have a considerable impact on quality of life (QoL). As therapeutic options evolve, physicians should look to treatment guidelines and consensus statements to keep their practice and management of psoriasis patients current with worldwide standards. This article reviews the most up-to-date general guidelines available for the management of psoriasis.

21 Review Underdiagnosed and undertreated psoriasis: Nuances of treating psoriasis affecting the scalp, face, intertriginous areas, genitals, hands, feet, and nails. 2018

Merola, Joseph F / Qureshi, Abrar / Husni, M Elaine. ·Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · Department of Rheumatic and Immunologic Diseases, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. ·Dermatol Ther · Pubmed #29512290.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis of the scalp, face, intertriginous areas, genitals, hands, feet, and nails is often underdiagnosed, and disease management can be challenging. Despite the small surface area commonly affected by psoriasis in these locations, patients have disproportionate levels of physical impairment and emotional distress. Limitations in current disease severity indices do not fully capture the impact of disease on a patient's quality of life, and, combined with limitations in current therapies, many patients do not receive proper or adequate care. In this review, we discuss the clinical manifestations of psoriasis in these less commonly diagnosed areas and its impact on patient quality of life. We also examine clinical studies evaluating the effectiveness of therapies on psoriasis in these regions. This article highlights the need to individualize treatment strategies for psoriasis based on the area of the body that is affected and the emerging role of biologic therapy in this regard.

22 Review Neurological and psychiatric disorders in psoriasis. 2018

Amanat, Man / Salehi, Mona / Rezaei, Nima. ·NeuroImmunology Research Association (NIRA), Universal Scientific Education and Research Network (USERN), Tehran 14194, Iran. · Students' Scientific Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1417755331, Iran. · Research Center for Immunodeficiencies, Children's Medical Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Dr. Gharib St, Keshavarz Blvd, Tehran 14194, Iran. · Department of Immunology and Biology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 14155-6447, Iran. · Network of Immunity in Infection, Malignancy and Autoimmunity (NIIMA), Universal Scientific Education and Research Network (USERN), Boston, MA 1419733151, USA. ·Rev Neurosci · Pubmed #29509545.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis used to be known as a skin disorder; however, it can now be considered as a systemic disease with the involvement of multiple organs. Neurological and psychiatric disorders are some of the associated problems that can be observed in patients with psoriasis. Stroke, multiple sclerosis, seizure, migraine, restless leg syndrome, Parkinson's disease, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and myasthenia gravis are the reported neurological diseases, while depression, bipolar mood disorder, anxiety, psychosis, cognitive impairment, personality disorders, sexual disorders, sleep disturbance, and eating disorders are the recognized psychiatric presentations in patients with psoriasis. Herein, the neurological and psychiatric disorders of psoriasis are described.

23 Review Interleukin 17, inflammation, and cardiovascular risk in patients with psoriasis. 2018

Lockshin, Benjamin / Balagula, Yevgeniy / Merola, Joseph F. ·DermAssociates, Silver Spring, Maryland; Georgetown University, Washington, DC; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: blockshin@dermassociates.com. · Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York. · Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29477740.

ABSTRACT: In addition to being recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease that manifests in the skin, psoriasis is increasingly understood to be a systemic disease that causes immune dysregulation throughout the body. The systemic nature of psoriasis is evidenced by the higher burden of comorbidities and shorter life expectancies of patients with psoriasis, particularly those with early-onset and severe disease. Notably, psoriasis is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, which is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with psoriasis. In this review, we examine the association between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease and specifically focus on the role of interleukin 17-mediated inflammation as a potential mechanistic link between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease. Moreover, we describe potential treatment approaches to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in patients with psoriasis and discuss the clinical importance of the association of these 2 diseases with respect to patient management and education.

24 Review Treatment preferences and treatment satisfaction among psoriasis patients: a systematic review. 2018

Florek, Aleksandra G / Wang, Catherine J / Armstrong, April W. ·University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Denver, CO, USA. · Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. aprilarmstrong@post.harvard.edu. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. aprilarmstrong@post.harvard.edu. ·Arch Dermatol Res · Pubmed #29442137.

ABSTRACT: A critical gap exists in determining treatment preferences and treatment satisfaction from patient perspectives, which is paramount to achieving therapeutic success. The objective of this systematic review is to determine factors influencing treatment preferences and treatment satisfaction among psoriasis patients. PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases were searched between November 1, 2010, and December 1, 2017. Observational and interventional research studies published in the English language that discussed patient preferences and patient satisfaction in the treatment of psoriasis were reviewed and synthesized. We utilized data on treatment preferences and treatment satisfaction from 35,388 psoriasis patients based on 60 articles from the years 2010 to 2017. Treatment preferences were heterogeneous and changed over time among psoriasis patients. Across all treatment modalities, the most important treatment attributes were treatment location, probability of improvement, and delivery method. For biologics specifically, the most important attributes were risk of adverse events and probability of treatment benefit. Factors that influenced patients' preferences for certain treatments included age, sex, comorbidities, disease duration, and prior treatments. Notably, some psoriasis patients placed higher importance on a treatment's process attributes (e.g., access and delivery) over its outcome attributes (e.g., efficacy). Overall, patient satisfaction with existing therapies remains modest; however, those treated with biologic agents exhibited highest treatment satisfaction over oral therapy, phototherapy, and topical therapy.

25 Review Management of psoriasis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. 2018

Whitlock, Scott M / Enos, Clinton W / Armstrong, April W / Gottlieb, Alice / Langley, Richard G / Lebwohl, Mark / Merola, Joseph F / Ryan, Caitriona / Siegel, Michael P / Weinberg, Jeffrey M / Wu, Jashin J / Van Voorhees, Abby S. ·Department of Dermatology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. · Department of Dermatology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York. · Division of Clinical Dermatology and Cutaneous Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. Electronic address: vanvooas@evms.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29332708.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is a significant association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Many treatments for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are also used for IBD. OBJECTIVE: To assess therapeutic options for patients with psoriasis and concurrent IBD. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed for clinical studies of biologic and systemic psoriasis medications in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease, for the period from January 1, 1947, to February 14, 2017. Randomized, controlled, double-blinded studies were selected if available. If not, the next highest level of available evidence was selected. RESULTS: Of the 2282 articles identified, 132 were selected. Infliximab and adalimumab have demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative; colitis, and Crohn's disease. Ustekinumab has demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease. Certolizumab has demonstrated efficacy in psoriatic arthritis and Crohn's disease. Etanercept, secukinumab, brodalumab, and ixekizumab have demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis but may exacerbate or induce IBD. Guselkumab has demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis. LIMITATIONS: There are no known clinical trials of treatment specifically for concurrent psoriasis and IBD. CONCLUSIONS: Infliximab and adalimumab have demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease; other agents have demonstrated efficacy for some, but not all, of these indications.

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