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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from New York
Based on 552 articles published since 2008
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These are the 552 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from New York during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with biologics. 2019

Menter, Alan / Strober, Bruce E / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kivelevitch, Dario / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Stoff, Benjamin / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Davis, Dawn M R / Elewski, Boni E / Gelfand, Joel M / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Leonardi, Craig L / Lichten, Jason / Lim, Henry W / Mehta, Nehal N / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Rupani, Reena N / Siegel, Michael / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Elmets, Craig A. ·Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, San Francisco. · University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, San Francisco, California. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772098.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations based on the available evidence. The treatment of psoriasis with biologic agents will be reviewed, emphasizing treatment recommendations and the role of the dermatologist in monitoring and educating patients regarding benefits as well as associated risks.

2 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

3 Guideline Treating axial spondyloarthritis and peripheral spondyloarthritis, especially psoriatic arthritis, to target: 2017 update of recommendations by an international task force. 2018

Smolen, Josef S / Schöls, Monika / Braun, Jürgen / Dougados, Maxime / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Landewé, Robert / Mease, Philip / Sieper, Joachim / Stamm, Tanja / Wit, Maarten de / Aletaha, Daniel / Baraliakos, Xenofon / Betteridge, Neil / Bosch, Filip van den / Coates, Laura C / Emery, Paul / Gensler, Lianne S / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Jongkees, Merryn / Kvien, Tore K / Inman, Robert D / McInnes, Iain B / Maccarone, Mara / Machado, Pedro M / Molto, Anna / Ogdie, Alexis / Poddubnyy, Denis / Ritchlin, Christopher / Rudwaleit, Martin / Tanew, Adrian / Thio, Bing / Veale, Douglas / Vlam, Kurt de / van der Heijde, Désirée. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Health Consult, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Ruhr-University Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Rheumatology, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. · Amsterdam Rheumatology & Immunology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology Research, Swedish-Providence St. Joseph Health System, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section for Outcomes Research, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Medical Humanities, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Neil Betteridge Associates, UK. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Seayn Medical, Voorschoten, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Glasgow, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow, UK. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Centre for Rheumatology & MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, University College London, London, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USA. · German Rheumatism Research Centrer, Berlin, Germany. · Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus Medical Center, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #28684559.

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic targets have been defined for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) in 2012, but the evidence for these recommendations was only of indirect nature. These recommendations were re-evaluated in light of new insights. Based on the results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of rheumatologists, dermatologists, patients and a health professional developed an update of the 2012 recommendations. These underwent intensive discussions, on site voting and subsequent anonymous electronic voting on levels of agreement with each item. A set of 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations were developed and voted on. Some items were present in the previous recommendations, while others were significantly changed or newly formulated. The 2017 task force arrived at a single set of recommendations for axial and peripheral SpA, including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The most exhaustive discussions related to whether PsA should be assessed using unidimensional composite scores for its different domains or multidimensional scores that comprise multiple domains. This question was not resolved and constitutes an important research agenda. There was broad agreement, now better supported by data than in 2012, that remission/inactive disease and, alternatively, low/minimal disease activity are the principal targets for the treatment of PsA. As instruments to assess the patients on the path to the target, the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) for axial SpA and the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and Minimal Disease Activity (MDA) for PsA were recommended, although not supported by all. Shared decision-making between the clinician and the patient was seen as pivotal to the process. The task force defined the treatment target for SpA as remission or low disease activity and developed a large research agenda to further advance the field.

4 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: goodmans@hss.edu. · Bryan Springer, MD: OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · Gordon Guyatt, MD: McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Matthew P. Abdel, MD: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Vinod Dasa, MD: Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · Michael George, MD: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Ora Gewurz-Singer, MD: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Jon T. Giles, MD, MPH: Columbia University, New York, New York. · Beverly Johnson, MD: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Steve Lee, DO: Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · Michael A. Mont, MD: Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Scott Sporer, MD: Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · Louis Stryker, MD: University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · Marat Turgunbaev, MD, MPH, Amy S. Miller: American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Antonia F. Chen, MD, MBA: Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Jeremy Gililland, MD: University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · Mark Goodman, MD, Adolph Yates, MD: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Arlene Hurley-Rosenblatt, ANP: Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Elena Losina, PhD: Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Kaleb Michaud, PhD: National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Ted Mikuls, MD, MSPH: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Alexander Sah, MD: Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · Jasvinder A. Singh, MBBS, MPH: University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·J Arthroplasty · Pubmed #28629905.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

5 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas, and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #28620948.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

6 Guideline Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis 2015 Treatment Recommendations for Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Coates, Laura C / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Mease, Philip J / Soriano, Enrique R / Laura Acosta-Felquer, Maria / Armstrong, April W / Bautista-Molano, Wilson / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Campbell, Willemina / Cauli, Alberto / Espinoza, Luis R / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Gottlieb, Alice / Helliwell, Philip S / Husni, M Elaine / Love, Thorvardur J / Lubrano, Ennio / McHugh, Neil / Nash, Peter / Ogdie, Alexis / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Parkinson, Andrew / O'Sullivan, Denis / Rosen, Cheryl F / Schwartzman, Sergio / Siegel, Evan L / Toloza, Sergio / Tuong, William / Ritchlin, Christopher T. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · University of California at San Diego. · Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles. · Hospital Militar Central and Universidad Militar Nueva Grenada, Bogotá, Colombia. · Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Cagliari, Monserrato Campus, Cagliari, Italy. · Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, The Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, and University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Toronto and Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK. · Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. · University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK. · University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York. · Arthritis and Rheumatism Associates, Rockville, Maryland. · Ministry of Health, San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca, Argentina. · University of California, Davis. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #26749174.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the 2009 Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) treatment recommendations for the spectrum of manifestations affecting patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: GRAPPA rheumatologists, dermatologists, and PsA patients drafted overarching principles for the management of PsA, based on consensus achieved at face-to-face meetings and via online surveys. We conducted literature reviews regarding treatment for the key domains of PsA (arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, and nail disease) and convened a new group to identify pertinent comorbidities and their effect on treatment. Finally, we drafted treatment recommendations for each of the clinical manifestations and assessed the level of agreement for the overarching principles and treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members, using an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Six overarching principles had ≥80% agreement among both health care professionals (n = 135) and patient research partners (n = 10). We developed treatment recommendations and a schema incorporating these principles for arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, nail disease, and comorbidities in the setting of PsA, using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation process. Agreement of >80% was reached for approval of the individual recommendations and the overall schema. CONCLUSION: We present overarching principles and updated treatment recommendations for the key manifestations of PsA, including related comorbidities, based on a literature review and consensus of GRAPPA members (rheumatologists, dermatologists, other health care providers, and patient research partners). Further updates are anticipated as the therapeutic landscape in PsA evolves.

7 Guideline Treatment of nail psoriasis: best practice recommendations from the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. 2015

Crowley, Jeffrey J / Weinberg, Jeffrey M / Wu, Jashin J / Robertson, Andrew D / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Anonymous1700814. ·Bakersfield Dermatology, Bakersfield, California. · Department of Dermatology, Mt Sinai Health System, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Department of Dermatology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #25471223.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Nail psoriasis can be difficult to treat and has a significant effect on quality of life. Relatively few controlled trials evaluating treatments for nail psoriasis have been published. There is an unmet need for treatment recommendations to guide therapeutic decisions. OBJECTIVE: To develop treatment recommendations for nail psoriasis from the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. EVIDENCE REVIEW: A PubMed search for publications on nail psoriasis treatments was performed from January 1, 1947, through May 11, 2014, without language restrictions. FINDINGS: Treatment recommendations for 4 clinical nail psoriasis scenarios were developed based on the evidence reviewed in this study and expert opinion of the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. Treatment of nail psoriasis should balance consideration of the extent of skin disease, psoriatic arthritis, and severity of nail disease with concomitant impairment of quality of life. All patients should be evaluated for onychomycosis because this may complicate psoriatic nail disease. For disease limited to the nails, high-potency topical corticosteroids with or without calcipotriol are initial options. For patients with significant nail disease for whom topical therapy has failed, treatment with adalimumab, etanercept, intralesional corticosteroids, ustekinumab, methotrexate sodium, and acitretin are recommended. For patients with significant skin and nail disease, adalimumab, etanercept, and ustekinumab are strongly recommended, and methotrexate, acitretin, infliximab, and apremilast are recommended. Finally, for a patient with significant nail, skin, and joint disease, adalimumab, etanercept, ustekinumab, infliximab, methotrexate, apremilast, and golimumab are recommended. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Treatment of nail psoriasis poses a clinical challenge. Clinical trial data are limited, and results are reported inconsistently, making comparisons among treatment options difficult. The treatment recommendations from the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation will help guide treatment decisions for clinicians who are treating patients with nail psoriasis.

8 Guideline From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation: Recommendations for screening for hepatitis B infection prior to initiating anti-tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitors or other immunosuppressive agents in patients with psoriasis. 2014

Motaparthi, Kiran / Stanisic, Vladimir / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Lebwohl, Mark G / Hsu, Sylvia / Anonymous1850775. ·Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: shsu@bcm.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #24220724.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: No consensus exists regarding the optimal laboratory screening for hepatitis B infection that should be performed before initiating therapy with tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitors or other immunosuppressive agents. OBJECTIVE: We sought to give guidelines on which tests to order for hepatitis B screening. METHODS: We review the pathophysiology and serology of hepatitis B infection and provide recommendations for screening for hepatitis B infection in patients with psoriasis before beginning anti-tumor necrosis factor-alfa therapy or other immunosuppressive agents. RESULTS: We propose the standardized use of triple serology testing: hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B surface antibody, and hepatitis B core antibody in combination with liver function tests as screening. LIMITATIONS: Conclusions based on review of available literature is a limitation. CONCLUSIONS: All patients with psoriasis who are candidates for tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitor should undergo screening for hepatitis B virus infection using the triple serology: hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B surface antibody, and hepatitis B core antibody. It is advisable that patients, who are candidates for ustekinumab, cyclosporine, or methotrexate undergo the same screening.

9 Guideline Optimizing topical therapies for treating psoriasis: a consensus conference. 2010

Zeichner, Joshua A / Lebwohl, Mark G / Menter, Alan / Bagel, Jerry / Del Rosso, James Q / Elewski, Boni E / Feldman, Steven R / Kircik, Leon H / Koo, John / Gold, Linda Stein / Tanghetti, Emil / Anonymous2630678. ·Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #21049712.

ABSTRACT: In 2010, an expert committee of physicians and researchers in the field of dermatology working together as the Psoriasis Process of Care Consensus Panel developed consensus guidelines for the treatment of psoriasis. As much as possible, the guidelines were evidence based but also included the extensive clinical experience of the dermatologists. Psoriasis is a lifelong disease that requires long-term treatment and 80% of psoriasis patients have mild to moderate disease. Topical therapies play an important role in the treatment of psoriasis, especially in patients with mild to moderate disease. Patients usually start with monotherapy; however, in more severe cases (> 10% body surface area [BSA], severely impaired quality of life [QOL], or recalcitrant psoriatic lesions), multiple treatment modalities may be used as part of combination, sequential, or rotational therapeutic regimens. Main treatment options include topical steroids, systemic therapies, topical vitamin D treatments such as vitamin D3 ointment, retinoids, phototherapy, and biologic therapies. Other topical therapies include the following steroid-sparing agents: coal tar, anthralin, calcineurin inhibitors, keratolytics, and emollients. Therapeutic considerations also should focus on adherence, improving QOL, and promoting a good patient-physician relationship.

10 Guideline Psoriasis in patients with HIV infection: from the medical board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. 2010

Menon, Kavita / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Bebo, Bruce F / Gladman, Dafna D / Hsu, Sylvia / Kalb, Robert E / Lebwohl, Mark G / Strober, Bruce E / Anonymous1050635. ·Department of Dermatology, New York University, New York, New York 10016-6497, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #19646777.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with psoriasis and HIV infection often present with more severe and treatment-refractory cutaneous disease. In addition, many of these patients have significant psoriatic arthritis. Many effective drugs for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are immunosuppressive. Therefore, therapy for the HIV-infected patient is more challenging, requiring both careful consideration of the potential risks and benefits of treatment and more fastidious monitoring for potential adverse events. OBJECTIVE: A task force of the National Psoriasis Foundation Medical Board was convened to evaluate treatment options. Our aim was to arrive at a consensus on therapy for psoriasis in patients with HIV. METHODS: A MEDLINE search of the terms "psoriasis," "psoriatic arthritis," "human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)," and "HIV skin diseases" was performed and literature relevant to HIV-associated psoriasis and the treatment of HIV-associated psoriasis were reviewed. RESULTS: Based on a review of the literature, 29 reports were included as evidence in this review. Topical therapy is the first-line recommended treatment for mild to moderate disease. For moderate to severe disease, phototherapy and antiretrovirals are the recommended first-line therapeutic agents. Oral retinoids may be used as second-line treatment. For more refractory, severe disease, cautious use of cyclosporine, methotrexate, hydroxyurea, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors may also be considered. LIMITATIONS: There are no randomized, placebo-controlled trials evaluating the therapeutic efficacy or safety of treatments for patients with HIV-associated psoriasis; consequently, the evidence supporting this review consists mainly of case reports or case series. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-associated psoriasis is often refractory to traditional treatments. Treatment is challenging and requires careful consideration and should be tailored to patients based on disease severity and the input from an infectious disease specialist. Close monitoring for potential adverse events is necessary.

11 Guideline Treatment recommendations for psoriatic arthritis. 2009

Ritchlin, C T / Kavanaugh, A / Gladman, D D / Mease, P J / Helliwell, P / Boehncke, W-H / de Vlam, K / Fiorentino, D / Fitzgerald, O / Gottlieb, A B / McHugh, N J / Nash, P / Qureshi, A A / Soriano, E R / Taylor, W J / Anonymous6760613. ·Clinical Immunology Research Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 695, Rochester, New York 14642, USA. christopher_ritchlin@urmc.rochester.edu ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #18952643.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop comprehensive recommendations for the treatment of the various clinical manifestations of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) based on evidence obtained from a systematic review of the literature and from consensus opinion. METHODS: Formal literature reviews of treatment for the most significant discrete clinical manifestations of PsA (skin and nails, peripheral arthritis, axial disease, dactylitis and enthesitis) were performed and published by members of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA). Treatment recommendations were drafted for each of the clinical manifestations by rheumatologists, dermatologists and PsA patients based on the literature reviews and consensus opinion. The level of agreement for the individual treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members was assessed with an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Treatment recommendations were developed for peripheral arthritis, axial disease, psoriasis, nail disease, dactylitis and enthesitis in the setting of PsA. In rotal, 19 recommendations were drafted, and over 80% agreement was obtained on 16 of them. In addition, a grid that factors disease severity into each of the different disease manifestations was developed to help the clinician with treatment decisions for the individual patient from an evidenced-based perspective. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment recommendations for the cardinal physical manifestations of PsA were developed based on a literature review and consensus between rheumatologists and dermatologists. In addition, a grid was established to assist in therapeutic reasoning and decision making for individual patients. It is anticipated that periodic updates will take place using this framework as new data become available.

12 Editorial The clock is ticking. 2018

Weinberg, Jeffrey M. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #29529107.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial New GRAPPA and EULAR recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis. 2017

Coates, Laura C / Gossec, Laure / Ramiro, Sofia / Mease, Philip / van der Heijde, Désirée / Smolen, Josef S / Ritchlin, Christopher / Kavanaugh, Arthur. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds UK. · Department of rheumatology, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06; AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Swedish Medical Center Seattle, WA, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Allergy, Immunology & Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY. · Division of Rheumatology, Allergy Immunology, University of California San Diego, USA. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #28077693.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Phototherapy in dermatology: A call for action. 2015

Lim, Henry W / Silpa-archa, Narumol / Amadi, Ugochukwu / Menter, Alan / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Lebwohl, Mark. ·Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. Electronic address: hlim1@hfhs.org. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan; Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #25981004.

ABSTRACT: Of the wide range of treatment modalities available to dermatologists, few possess the history, efficacy, and safety of phototherapy. It should be emphasized that dermatologists are the only group of physicians optimally trained and qualified to understand the medical indications of phototherapy. Phototherapy, recognized for its cost-effectiveness, should remain a consideration in patient treatment. Continued training and education in residency and thereafter is needed to maintain the proficiency of physicians. In addition, payors need continued education to ensure that insurance coverage of phototherapy is not a barrier for patients to access this therapy. To further improve and optimize the outcome, phototherapy research needs to be supported.

15 Editorial Biologics for psoriasis: a translational research success story. 2015

Lebwohl, Mark. ·Department of Dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. Electronic address: Lebwohl@aol.com. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #25882456.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Editorial: Call to screen for NAFLD and NASH in psoriasis. 2015

Verna, E C / Loomba, R. ·Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #25631653.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Under pressure. 2014

Weinberg, Jeffrey M. ·1090 Amsterdam Ave, Ste 11D, New York, NY 10025, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #25279469.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Review Biologics and Psoriasis: The Beat Goes On. 2019

Kim, Hee J / Lebwohl, Mark G. ·Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 5 East 98th Street, 5th Floor, PO Box 1048, New York, NY 10029, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 5 East 98th Street, 5th Floor, PO Box 1048, New York, NY 10029, USA. Electronic address: lebwohl@aol.com. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #30466686.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated, inflammatory skin disease that requires long-term therapy for disease control. This article reviews data presented in clinical trials to evaluate and compare various characteristics of biologics that are currently approved for the treatment of psoriasis. Attributes of biological agents that are examined in this article include efficacy, long-term maintenance, overall safety, median time to onset of efficacy, adjustment for body weight, frequency of injections, indication for psoriatic arthritis, and safety in pregnancy. Here, we evaluate what the ideal choice of biological therapy may be for psoriasis patients with specific needs.

19 Review Psoriasis: Which therapy for which patient: Focus on special populations and chronic infections. 2019

Kaushik, Shivani B / Lebwohl, Mark G. ·Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: docshivanib@gmail.com. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30017706.

ABSTRACT: Despite the availability of several new systemic agents for psoriasis treatment, choosing the right therapy in certain patient populations can be challenging. There are few up-to-date reviews on systemic drugs for moderate to severe psoriasis in pregnant and pediatric patients and in patients with concomitant chronic infections, such as hepatitis, HIV, and latent tuberculosis. These groups are usually excluded from clinical trials, and much of the available evidence is based on anecdotal case reports and case series. As a chronic disease, psoriasis requires long-term treatment, and there are concerns of adverse maternal-fetal outcomes, long-term side effects in children, and the reactivation of latent infections with the use of systemic agents in these patients. The second article in this continuing medical education series provides insights for choosing appropriate systemic agents for treating moderate to severe psoriasis in pregnant and pediatric patients and in the setting of chronic infections, such as hepatitis, HIV, and latent tuberculosis.

20 Review Psoriasis: Which therapy for which patient: Psoriasis comorbidities and preferred systemic agents. 2019

Kaushik, Shivani B / Lebwohl, Mark G. ·Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: docshivanib@gmail.com. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30017705.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a systemic inflammatory disease associated with increased risk of comorbidities, such as psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, malignancy, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases. These factors have a significant impact on the decision to use one therapy over another. The past decade has seen a paradigm shift in our understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis that has led to identification of new therapeutic targets. Several new drugs have gained approval by the US Food and Drug Administration, expanding the psoriasis armamentarium, but still a large number of patients continue to be untreated or undertreated. Treatment regimens for psoriasis patients should be tailored to meet the specific needs based on disease severity, the impact on quality of life, the response to previous therapies, and the presence of comorbidities. The first article in this continuing medical education series focuses on specific comorbidities and provides insights to choose appropriate systemic treatment in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis.

21 Review Erosio interdigitalis blastomycetica: A review of interdigital candidiasis. 2018

Schlager, Emma / Ashack, Kurt / Khachemoune, Amor. ·Veterans Affairs Medical Center Brooklyn, New York SUNY Downstate, Department of Dermatology, Brooklyn, New York. amorkh@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Online J · Pubmed #30677843.

ABSTRACT: Erosio interdigitalis blastomycetica (EIB) is a Candida infection affecting the third web space, between the third and fourth fingers. In 1915, Gougerot and Goncea first described saccharomycetic organisms isolated from the hands and feet. Johannes Fabry later named it in 1917, well before the genus Candida was introduced in 1923. EIB is most common among those who work with their hands frequently in water, such as dishwashers, launderers, bartenders, and homemakers. Clinical presentation most commonly consists of a central erythematous erosion surrounded by a rim of white macerated skin involving at least one interdigital web space. The differential diagnosis is narrow, consisting of irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), erythrasma, inverse psoriasis, and bacterial infection (i.e. impetigo). The diagnosis is made by clinical examination in addition to fungal culture and KOH testing. The prognosis is good and treatment options include avoidance of frequent water immersion and topical or oral antifungal agents. Suspicion for secondary infections such as erysipelas and cellulitis should remain high until lesions have resolved. This review aims to address the history, epidemiology, pathophysiology, histopathology, clinical presentation, differential diagnoses, diagnosis, prognosis, and management of EIB. It also suggests an alternative name in place of the current misnomer.

22 Review Update on the pathophysiology of psoriasis. 2018

Hugh, Jeremy M / Weinberg, Jeffrey M. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #30566550.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a genetically programmed pathologic interaction among skin cells, immunocytes, and numerous biologic signaling molecules that is triggered by environmental stimuli. The immune response is a cellular one; type 1 (TH1) and type 17 (TH17) T cells are activated by IL-12 and IL-23 secreted by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the skin. Through various cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, these cells cause a chronic inflammatory state and alter epidermal hyperproliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and neoangiogenesis that produce the cutaneous findings seen in this disease. The newer biologic therapies target the immunologic signaling pathways and cytokines identified in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and provide notable clinical improvement. Further study in the pathogenesis of psoriasis can help identify targets for future therapies.

23 Review Psoriasis and Respiratory Comorbidities: The Added Value of Fraction of Exhaled Nitric Oxide as a New Method to Detect, Evaluate, and Monitor Psoriatic Systemic Involvement and Therapeutic Efficacy. 2018

Santus, Pierachille / Rizzi, Maurizio / Radovanovic, Dejan / Airoldi, Andrea / Cristiano, Andrea / Conic, Rosalynn / Petrou, Stephen / Pigatto, Paolo Daniele Maria / Bragazzi, Nicola / Colombo, Delia / Goldust, Mohamad / Damiani, Giovanni. ·Department of Biomedical Sciences L. Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Respiratory Unit, Center for Sleep and Respiratory Disorders "Luigi Sacco" University Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Department of Emergency Medicine, Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center, New York, USA. · Clinical Dermatology, Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopaedic Institute, University of Milan, 20126 Milan, Italy. · Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), School of Public Health, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy. · Department of Pharmacology, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran. · Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Medico-Chirurgica e dei Trapianti, Università degli Studi di Milano, Unità Operativa di Dermatologia, IRCCS Fondazione Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Italy. · Young Dermatologists Italian Network (YDIN), GISED, Bergamo, Italy. ·Biomed Res Int · Pubmed #30345297.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory systemic disease characterized by a wide range of comorbidities. Respiratory comorbidities are currently poorly characterized and with discordant results. The systemic state of inflammation caused by psoriasis acts de novo on respiratory tissues and amplifies preexisting inflammation from asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Because the lungs act as a gas exchanger between the internal and external environment, the impact of chronic psoriasis inflammation may be easily assessed through the analysis of exhaled breath. The fraction of exhaled nitric oxide test (FeNO) is a potential noninvasive solution that can provide quantitative and qualitative indices of respiratory airway inflammation. FeNO is routinely used to screen and manage asthmatic patients. Recent pilot studies contain encouraging data that underscore its possible use with systemic inflammatory nonpulmonary diseases, such as psoriasis. FeNO may therefore be a useful tool to evaluate underestimated airway inflammation and at the same time globally evaluate the impact of systemically antipsoriatic therapies.

24 Review Bimekizumab for the treatment of psoriatic disease. 2018

Natsis, Nicola E / Gottlieb, Alice B. ·a UCSD School of Medicine , San Diego , CA , USA. · b Department of Dermatology, New York Medical College , Metropolitan Hospital , New York , NY , USA. ·Expert Opin Biol Ther · Pubmed #30332893.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are common diseases with significant physical and emotional burden. Several biologics are FDA-approved to treat psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, though some patients remain refractory to, or have lost response to, therapy and/or cannot tolerate the associated risks and side effects. Bimekizumab is a new biologic that inhibits both IL-17A and IL-17F. It is currently in phase III clinical trials. To date, phase II studies show promise in its ability to rapidly resolve symptoms while remaining safe and well-tolerated. Areas covered: This review serves to summarize the literature regarding the use of bimekizumab for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Bimekizumab has undergone phase I and phase II clinical trials with results showing significant disease improvement or resolution, as well as safety and tolerability. Phase III studies are now actively enrolling. Expert opinion: Bimekizumab is a burgeoning biologic offering significant promise through its unique bispecific targeting of both IL-17A and IL-17F. Clinical trials have shown the potential of rapid symptom improvement after treatment with bimekizumab, with some patients seeing improvement after only two weeks. To date, bimekizumab has been shown to be safe and well-tolerated by patients, without any associated significant adverse events.

25 Review Enthesitis and Dactylitis in Psoriatic Disease: A Guide for Dermatologists. 2018

Bagel, Jerry / Schwartzman, Sergio. ·Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey, 59 One Mile Road Ext. Suite G, East Windsor, NJ, 08520, USA. dreamacres1@aol.com. · Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA. ·Am J Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #30117018.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis that is estimated to affect approximately 30% of patients with psoriasis. Enthesitis and dactylitis, two hallmarks of PsA, are associated with radiographic peripheral/axial joint damage and severe disease. Clinical symptoms of enthesitis include tenderness, soreness, and pain at entheses on palpation, whereas dactylitis is recognized by swelling of an entire digit that is different from adjacent digits. Both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging can be used to diagnose enthesitis and dactylitis, especially in patients in whom symptoms may be difficult to discern. Delayed treatment of PsA can result in irreversible joint damage and reduced quality of life. Thus, it is recommended that dermatologists monitor patients with psoriasis for these two early and important manifestations of PsA.

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