Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Texas
Based on 241 articles published since 2008
||||

These are the 241 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Texas during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with biologics. 2019

Menter, Alan / Strober, Bruce E / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kivelevitch, Dario / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Stoff, Benjamin / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Davis, Dawn M R / Elewski, Boni E / Gelfand, Joel M / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Leonardi, Craig L / Lichten, Jason / Lim, Henry W / Mehta, Nehal N / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Rupani, Reena N / Siegel, Michael / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Elmets, Craig A. ·Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, San Francisco. · University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, San Francisco, California. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772098.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations based on the available evidence. The treatment of psoriasis with biologic agents will be reviewed, emphasizing treatment recommendations and the role of the dermatologist in monitoring and educating patients regarding benefits as well as associated risks.

2 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

3 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: goodmans@hss.edu. · Bryan Springer, MD: OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · Gordon Guyatt, MD: McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Matthew P. Abdel, MD: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Vinod Dasa, MD: Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · Michael George, MD: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Ora Gewurz-Singer, MD: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Jon T. Giles, MD, MPH: Columbia University, New York, New York. · Beverly Johnson, MD: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Steve Lee, DO: Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · Michael A. Mont, MD: Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Scott Sporer, MD: Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · Louis Stryker, MD: University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · Marat Turgunbaev, MD, MPH, Amy S. Miller: American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Antonia F. Chen, MD, MBA: Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Jeremy Gililland, MD: University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · Mark Goodman, MD, Adolph Yates, MD: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Arlene Hurley-Rosenblatt, ANP: Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Elena Losina, PhD: Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Kaleb Michaud, PhD: National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Ted Mikuls, MD, MSPH: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Alexander Sah, MD: Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · Jasvinder A. Singh, MBBS, MPH: University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·J Arthroplasty · Pubmed #28629905.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

4 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas, and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #28620948.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

5 Guideline From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation: Recommendations for screening for hepatitis B infection prior to initiating anti-tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitors or other immunosuppressive agents in patients with psoriasis. 2014

Motaparthi, Kiran / Stanisic, Vladimir / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Lebwohl, Mark G / Hsu, Sylvia / Anonymous1850775. ·Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: shsu@bcm.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #24220724.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: No consensus exists regarding the optimal laboratory screening for hepatitis B infection that should be performed before initiating therapy with tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitors or other immunosuppressive agents. OBJECTIVE: We sought to give guidelines on which tests to order for hepatitis B screening. METHODS: We review the pathophysiology and serology of hepatitis B infection and provide recommendations for screening for hepatitis B infection in patients with psoriasis before beginning anti-tumor necrosis factor-alfa therapy or other immunosuppressive agents. RESULTS: We propose the standardized use of triple serology testing: hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B surface antibody, and hepatitis B core antibody in combination with liver function tests as screening. LIMITATIONS: Conclusions based on review of available literature is a limitation. CONCLUSIONS: All patients with psoriasis who are candidates for tumor necrosis factor-alfa inhibitor should undergo screening for hepatitis B virus infection using the triple serology: hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B surface antibody, and hepatitis B core antibody. It is advisable that patients, who are candidates for ustekinumab, cyclosporine, or methotrexate undergo the same screening.

6 Guideline Consensus guidelines for the management of plaque psoriasis. 2012

Hsu, Sylvia / Papp, Kim Alexander / Lebwohl, Mark G / Bagel, Jerry / Blauvelt, Andrew / Duffin, Kristina Callis / Crowley, Jeffrey / Eichenfield, Lawrence F / Feldman, Steven R / Fiorentino, David F / Gelfand, Joel M / Gottlieb, Alice B / Jacobsen, Carmen / Kalb, Robert E / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Korman, Neil J / Krueger, Gerald G / Michelon, Melissa A / Morison, Warwick / Ritchlin, Christopher T / Stein Gold, Linda / Stone, Stephen P / Strober, Bruce E / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Weiss, Stefan C / Wanat, Karolyn / Bebo, Bruce F / Anonymous4210715. ·Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. shsu@bcm.edu ·Arch Dermatol · Pubmed #22250239.

ABSTRACT: The Canadian Guidelines for the Management of Plaque Psoriasis were reviewed by the entire National Psoriasis Foundation Medical Board and updated to include newly approved agents such as ustekinumab and to reflect practice patterns in the United States, where the excimer laser is approved for psoriasis treatment. Management of psoriasis in special populations is discussed. In the updated guidelines, we include sections on children, pregnant patients or pregnant partners of patients, nursing mothers, the elderly, patients with hepatitis B or C virus infections, human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, and patients with malignant neoplasms, as well as sections on tumor necrosis factor blockers, elective surgery, and vaccinations.

7 Guideline Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Section 3. Guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with topical therapies. 2009

Menter, Alan / Korman, Neil J / Elmets, Craig A / Feldman, Steven R / Gelfand, Joel M / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice / Koo, John Y M / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Beutner, Karl R / Bhushan, Reva / Anonymous150622. ·Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #19217694.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multi-system disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the population. In this third of 6 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we discuss the use of topical medications for the treatment of psoriasis. The majority of patients with psoriasis have limited disease (<5% body surface area involvement) and can be treated with topical agents, which generally provide a high efficacy-to-safety ratio. Topical agents may also be used adjunctively for patients with more extensive psoriasis undergoing therapy with either ultraviolet light, systemic or biologic medications. However, the use of topical agents as monotherapy in the setting of extensive disease or in the setting of limited, but recalcitrant, disease is not routinely recommended. Treatment should be tailored to meet individual patients' needs. We will discuss the efficacy and safety of as well as offer recommendations for the use of topical corticosteroids, vitamin D analogues, tazarotene, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, emollients, salicylic acid, anthralin, coal tar, as well as combination therapy.

8 Guideline National Psoriasis Foundation consensus statement on screening for latent tuberculosis infection in patients with psoriasis treated with systemic and biologic agents. 2008

Doherty, Sean D / Van Voorhees, Abby / Lebwohl, Mark G / Korman, Neil J / Young, Melodie S / Hsu, Sylvia / National Psoriasis Foundation, ?. ·Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #18485527.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Chronic immunosuppression is a known risk factor for allowing latent tuberculosis (TB) infection to transform into active TB. Immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapies, while highly efficacious in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, may be associated with an increased rate of active TB in patients receiving some of these therapies. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to arrive at a consensus on screening for latent TB infection in psoriasis patient treated with systemic and biologic agents. METHODS: Reports in the literature were reviewed regarding immunosuppressive therapies and risk of TB. RESULTS: Screening patients for latent TB infection before commencement of treatment is of utmost importance when beginning treatment with the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors, T-cell blockers, cyclosporine, or methotrexate. The currently recommended method for screening is the tuberculin skin test. It is preferable that positively screened patients be treated with a full course of latent TB infection prophylaxis before immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapy is initiated. However, in the opinion of many experts, patients may be started on the immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory therapy after 1 to 2 months, if their clinical condition requires, as long as they are strictly adhering to and tolerating their prophylactic regimen. LIMITATIONS: There are few evidence-based studies on screening for latent TB infection in psoriasis patients treated with systemic and biologic agents. CONCLUSIONS: The biologic TNF-alpha inhibitors are very promising in the treatment of psoriasis. However, because TNF-alpha is also an important cytokine in preventing TB infection and in keeping latent TB infection from becoming active disease, the use of TNF-alpha inhibitors has been associated with an increased risk of developing active TB. A higher incidence of TB has also been reported with other immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory treatments for psoriasis. It is, therefore, of utmost importance to appropriately screen all patients for latent TB infection prior to initiating any immunologic therapy. Delaying immunologic therapy until latent TB infection prophylaxis is completed is preferable. However, if the patient is adhering to his prophylactic regimen and is appropriately tolerating the regimen, therapy may be started after 1 to 2 months if the clinical condition requires.

9 Guideline Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: Section 1. Overview of psoriasis and guidelines of care for the treatment of psoriasis with biologics. 2008

Menter, Alan / Gottlieb, Alice / Feldman, Steven R / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Leonardi, Craig L / Gordon, Kenneth B / Lebwohl, Mark / Koo, John Y M / Elmets, Craig A / Korman, Neil J / Beutner, Karl R / Bhushan, Reva. ·Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #18423260.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the population. In this first of 5 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we discuss the classification of psoriasis; associated comorbidities including autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular risk, psychiatric/psychologic issues, and cancer risk; along with assessment tools for skin disease and quality-of-life issues. Finally, we will discuss the safety and efficacy of the biologic treatments used to treat patients with psoriasis.

10 Editorial Coronary Plaque Characterization in Psoriasis. 2017

Kivelevitch, Dario / Schussler, Jeffrey M / Menter, Alan. ·From Division of Dermatology (D.K., A.M.) and Department of Cardiology (J.M.S), Baylor Scott & White and Texas A&M College of Medicine, Dallas. · From Division of Dermatology (D.K., A.M.) and Department of Cardiology (J.M.S), Baylor Scott & White and Texas A&M College of Medicine, Dallas. amderm@gmail.com. ·Circulation · Pubmed #28716831.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Phototherapy in dermatology: A call for action. 2015

Lim, Henry W / Silpa-archa, Narumol / Amadi, Ugochukwu / Menter, Alan / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Lebwohl, Mark. ·Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. Electronic address: hlim1@hfhs.org. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan; Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #25981004.

ABSTRACT: Of the wide range of treatment modalities available to dermatologists, few possess the history, efficacy, and safety of phototherapy. It should be emphasized that dermatologists are the only group of physicians optimally trained and qualified to understand the medical indications of phototherapy. Phototherapy, recognized for its cost-effectiveness, should remain a consideration in patient treatment. Continued training and education in residency and thereafter is needed to maintain the proficiency of physicians. In addition, payors need continued education to ensure that insurance coverage of phototherapy is not a barrier for patients to access this therapy. To further improve and optimize the outcome, phototherapy research needs to be supported.

12 Editorial The International Psoriasis Council: advancing knowledge, enhancing care. 2015

Alan Menter, M / Griffiths, Christopher E M. ·Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX, USA. Electronic address: amderm@gmail.com. · Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal Hospital, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester M6 8HD, UK. Electronic address: Christopher.Griffiths@manchester.ac.uk. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #25412791.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Review Dermatologic manifestations in spaceflight: a review. 2018

Dunn, Carly / Boyd, McKenna / Orengo, Ida. ·Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. carlyd@bcm.edu. ·Dermatol Online J · Pubmed #30695973.

ABSTRACT: With manned missions to Mars on the horizon, understanding and preparing for the medical conditions these astronauts might face becomes vital. According to the literature, the most commonly reported medical events in space are dermatological in nature. Dermatologic conditions rarely threaten an astronaut's life or the mission. However, manifestations and management of dermatologic events become an important consideration in anticipation of spaceflights to Mars and beyond. Given the limited number of articles written about dermatological conditions in this specific population, this review summarizes current knowledge related to dermatology in space. Overall, common dermatologic conditions found during spaceflight include viral reactivations, contact dermatitis or eczematous patches, and skin infections. Diagnosis and treatment can be difficult given the lack of resources in space as well as the hazards and side effects of certain treatments. In this review article we aim to summarize common skin changes induced by spaceflight, describe previously reported skin conditions including current treatment options, explore the risk of skin cancer in this unique population, and address the challenge of remote diagnosis.

14 Review Risankizumab: an anti-IL-23 antibody for the treatment of psoriasis. 2018

Haugh, Isabel M / Preston, Allie K / Kivelevitch, Dario N / Menter, Alan M. ·Department of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA, amderm@gmail.com. · Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Bryan, TX, USA. ·Drug Des Devel Ther · Pubmed #30518998.

ABSTRACT: Risankizumab, a fully human IgG monoclonal antibody inhibitor of IL-23, is a therapeutic agent currently in late stage development for use in the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. It is a biologic agent similar to guselkumab and tildrakizumab which targets IL-23 specifically, and has been primarily developed for use in moderate-to-severe psoriasis. USA-based pharmaceutical company Abbvie submitted it for a Biologics License Application to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in April 2018. Risankizumab is the result of a collaboration between the German company Boehringer Ingelheim and Abbvie, which together are leading the future development and commercialization of risankizumab globally. The results from Phase I to Phase III clinical trials of risankizumab show it is highly effective and its FDA-approval in 2018 is likely. In this article we provide an independent expert opinion on the efficacy and safety of risankizumab in psoriasis based on a full review of the literature.

15 Review Investigational drugs in phase II clinical trials for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis - potential new treatments on the horizon. 2018

Guda, Anisha / Feldman, Steven R / Strowd, Lindsay. ·a UT Health San Antonio Long School of Medicine , San Antonio , TX , USA. · b Departments of Dermatology, Pathology and Department of Social Sciences & Health Policy Wake Forest School of Medicine , Center for Dermatology Research , Winston-Salem. · c Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology , Wake Forest School of Medicine , Winston-Salem , North Carolina , USA. ·Expert Opin Investig Drugs · Pubmed #30293437.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis is a common immune disorder for which there are many FDA-approved therapies. Older oral drugs had limited efficacy and considerable side effects. Biologics have been a major advance but require self-administered injections, and many patients prefer oral options. Because many patients fear needles, oral drugs are a welcome option. This review provides an update on oral drugs in Phase II development for psoriasis. AREAS COVERED: A literature review was performed to identify these drugs by using search terms such as 'psoriasis', 'agents', 'drugs', and 'phase 2 development'. Baricitinib and KDO 25 are the oral drugs that appear to hold the most promise due to the balance they maintain between efficacy and adverse effects. If a RORγt inhibitor can be identified that has no hepatotoxicity, then that may be the most promising new oral treatment. EXPERT OPINION: Several new oral psoriasis medications are currently being investigated. One major challenge remains medication cost and insurance coverage. Phase III studies are needed to determine efficacy and safety in large cohorts of psoriasis patients. An increase in the number of approved oral medications for psoriasis would mean more choice for psoriasis patients.

16 Review Pharmacotherapeutic approaches for treating psoriasis in difficult-to-treat areas. 2018

Kivelevitch, Dario / Frieder, Jillian / Watson, Ian / Paek, So Yeon / Menter, M Alan. ·a Division of Dermatology , Baylor Scott and White , Dallas , TX , USA. · b Texas A&M Health Sciences Center College of Medicine , Bryan , TX , USA. ·Expert Opin Pharmacother · Pubmed #29565192.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Despite great therapeutic advancements in psoriasis, four notable difficult-to-treat areas including the scalp, nails, intertriginous (including genitals), and palmoplantar regions, pose a challenge to both physicians and patients. Localized disease of these specific body regions inflicts a significant burden on patients' quality of life and requires an adequate selection of treatments. AREAS COVERED: This manuscript discusses appropriate therapies and important treatment considerations for these difficult-to-treat areas based on the available clinical data from the literature. EXPERT OPINION: Clinical trials assessing therapies for the difficult-to-treat areas have been inadequate. With the first biological clinical trial for genital psoriasis pending publication, it is with hope that other biological agents will be evaluated for region-specific psoriasis. A greater understanding of the genetic and immunologic aspects of regional psoriasis, as well as identification of unique biomarkers, will further guide management decisions. For example, the recent discovery of the IL-36 receptor gene for generalized pustular psoriasis may prove valuable for other forms of psoriasis. Ultimately, identification of the most beneficial treatments for each psoriasis subtype and difficult-to-treat area will provide patients with maximal quality of life.

17 Review Prevalence of genital psoriasis in patients with psoriasis. 2018

Meeuwis, Kim A P / Potts Bleakman, Alison / van de Kerkhof, Peter C M / Dutronc, Yves / Henneges, Carsten / Kornberg, Lori J / Menter, Alan. ·a Department of Dermatology , Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center , Nijmegen , Netherlands. · b Eli Lilly and Company , Indianapolis , IN , USA. · c Lilly France , Neuilly sur Seine , France. · d Lilly Deutschland GmbH , Bad Homburg , Germany. · e Syneos Health , Raleigh , NC , USA. · f Baylor University Medical Center , Dallas , TX , USA. ·J Dermatolog Treat · Pubmed #29565190.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriatic lesions in the genital area (GenPs) can cause considerable physical and emotional distress. To increase physician awareness, we estimated the GenPs prevalence among patients with psoriasis. METHODS: An English language literature search was performed. Articles reporting GenPs prevalence met the search criteria and were included. Because GenPs is rarely reported in demographics of prospective clinical trials, GenPs prevalence and baseline demographics of patients with and without GenPs in two prospective randomized phase 3b trials (NCT02561806 and NCT02634801) involving patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis are reported. RESULTS: Overall, 600 references were screened. Eighteen articles met the search criteria. Patient populations were highly heterogeneous across articles. Broadly, the presence of GenPs was either physician-reported (physical examinations) or patient-reported (questionnaires). In the literature, GenPs prevalence at the time of reporting ranged from 7% to 42% and the prevalence of GenPs at any time during the course of psoriasis ranged from 33% to 63%. In the two prospective clinical trials, the prevalence of GenPs at the time of enrollment was 35-42%. CONCLUSION: A substantial proportion of patients experience genital lesions at some time during the course of psoriasis. Increased awareness of GenPs prevalence may drive improved assessment and treatment.

18 Review Skin and Diet: An Update on the Role of Dietary Change as a Treatment Strategy for Skin Disease. 2018

Katta, Rajani / Kramer, Mary Jo. ·Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. · Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA. ·Skin Therapy Lett · Pubmed #29357214.

ABSTRACT: An increasing body of research indicates that dietary change may serve as a component of therapy for certain skin conditions. This includes conditions such as acne, atopic dermatitis, aging skin, psoriasis, and rosacea. Certain nutrients, foods, or dietary patterns may act as disease "triggers", while others may prove beneficial. Avoidance or elimination diets may be helpful in some conditions, although testing may be recommended first. In terms of beneficial effects, an eating pattern that emphasizes the consumption of whole foods over highly processed foods may help in the treatment of certain skin conditions, and will certainly help in the prevention of associated co-morbidities.

19 Review Management of psoriasis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. 2018

Whitlock, Scott M / Enos, Clinton W / Armstrong, April W / Gottlieb, Alice / Langley, Richard G / Lebwohl, Mark / Merola, Joseph F / Ryan, Caitriona / Siegel, Michael P / Weinberg, Jeffrey M / Wu, Jashin J / Van Voorhees, Abby S. ·Department of Dermatology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. · Department of Dermatology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York. · Division of Clinical Dermatology and Cutaneous Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. Electronic address: vanvooas@evms.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29332708.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is a significant association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Many treatments for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are also used for IBD. OBJECTIVE: To assess therapeutic options for patients with psoriasis and concurrent IBD. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed for clinical studies of biologic and systemic psoriasis medications in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease, for the period from January 1, 1947, to February 14, 2017. Randomized, controlled, double-blinded studies were selected if available. If not, the next highest level of available evidence was selected. RESULTS: Of the 2282 articles identified, 132 were selected. Infliximab and adalimumab have demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative; colitis, and Crohn's disease. Ustekinumab has demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease. Certolizumab has demonstrated efficacy in psoriatic arthritis and Crohn's disease. Etanercept, secukinumab, brodalumab, and ixekizumab have demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis but may exacerbate or induce IBD. Guselkumab has demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis. LIMITATIONS: There are no known clinical trials of treatment specifically for concurrent psoriasis and IBD. CONCLUSIONS: Infliximab and adalimumab have demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease; other agents have demonstrated efficacy for some, but not all, of these indications.

20 Review Pediatric psoriasis: Evolving perspectives. 2018

Eichenfield, Lawrence F / Paller, Amy S / Tom, Wynnis L / Sugarman, Jeffrey / Hebert, Adelaide A / Friedlander, Sheila Fallon / Siegfried, Elaine / Silverberg, Nanette / Cordoro, Kelly M. ·Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Pediatric Dermatology, McGovern School of Medicine and Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USA. ·Pediatr Dermatol · Pubmed #29314219.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Childhood-onset psoriasis is a common skin disorder that has recently received increasing attention, particularly because of its significant medical, social, financial, and psychological burdens and its associated comorbidities. With limited data available and lack of standardized management guidelines for pediatric psoriasis, an expert panel desired to provide an updated critical overview and practical guidance for management of the affected population. METHODS: A panel of pediatric dermatologists with extensive experience in pediatric psoriasis defined and prioritized a core set of topics, performed an English-language literature review, prepared critical evaluations and presentations of topic areas, and carried out a consensus meeting and follow-up consensus manuscript. RESULTS: The summation of evolving perspectives in pediatric psoriasis includes epidemiology and natural history of the disease, precipitating factors and comorbidities, quality of life and burden of disease, clinical features and disease presentation, differential diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment, including topical, photo, and systemic therapies. CONCLUSION: Pediatric psoriasis is an important immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease with potential for significant impact on affected individuals and their caregivers. Current state-of-the-art care is based primarily on experience and expert consensus, but pediatric data are accumulating and therapeutic options are rapidly evolving.

21 Review The impact of biologic agents on health-related quality of life outcomes in patients with psoriasis. 2018

Frieder, Jillian / Kivelevitch, Dario / Fiore, Connie Tran / Saad, Saadeddine / Menter, Alan. ·a Division of Dermatology , Baylor University Medical Center , Dallas , TX , USA. · b Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine , Bryan , TX , USA. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #29110556.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated skin disease often associated with significant physical and psychosocial impairment. Antipsoriatic biologic agents offer patients unparalleled treatment potential in regard to greater skin clearance and overall improved quality of life. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of biologic agents on the full psoriasis disease burden must account for their impact on both physical symptoms, as well as patient-reported, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measurements. Areas covered: Results from numerous clinical trials demonstrate the significant clinical efficacy of biological agents targeting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and the interleukin (IL)-12/23 and IL-17 immune pathways. However, relatively limited data is available evaluating their full effect on quality of life outcomes. This review will discuss the most relevant and up-to-date clinical data on HRQoL measurements related to treatment with these aforementioned biologic agents. Expert commentary: Patient-reported outcomes (i.e. Dermatology Life Quality Index) are being used with increasing frequency in clinical trials, and provide valuable information on the impact of psoriasis on numerous aspects of day-to-day living. These outcomes must also be incorporated in clinical practice, in addition to physical assessment of disease severity, treatment decisions, and therapeutic response in the psoriasis patient population.

22 Review Epidemiology of mental health comorbidity in psoriasis. 2018

Wu, J J / Feldman, S R / Koo, J / Marangell, L B. ·a Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center , Los Angeles , CA , USA. · b Wake Forest University School of Medicine , Winston-Salem , NC , USA. · c University of California San Francisco , San Francisco , CA , USA. · d The University of Texas McGovern School of Medicine , Houston , TX , USA. · e Brain Health Consultants , Houston , TX , USA. ·J Dermatolog Treat · Pubmed #29057684.

ABSTRACT: AIM: The occurrence of mental health comorbidities such as depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation or behavior is not uncommon in the context of psoriasis. The negative influence of psoriatic disease on a patient's physical and mental well-being, in combination with overlapping pathophysiology, increase the risk for clinically significant psychiatric conditions. These psychiatric conditions, in turn, influence the patient's outlook and potentially, prognosis. Although the healthcare community increasingly recognizes the association of mental health comorbidities with psoriasis, the extent of the correlation is not fully appreciated. To better understand the relationship between mental health comorbidities and psoriasis, including prevalence, risk factors, and response of psychiatric comorbidities to psoriasis treatment, a narrative review of the published literature was conducted. METHODS: Data from epidemiologic, observational, and clinical studies demonstrate a substantially greater mental health comorbidity burden in patients with psoriasis compared with those without psoriasis or patients with other dermatologic conditions. RESULT: The influence of contemporary drug therapies on measures of depression and anxiety are predominantly positive, although further data are needed to better understand the effects of long-term therapy. CONCLUSION: Clinicians should consider the heightened potential for mental health comorbidities when determining an optimal management strategy for their patients with psoriasis.

23 Review Psychiatric adverse events during treatment with brodalumab: Analysis of psoriasis clinical trials. 2018

Lebwohl, Mark G / Papp, Kim A / Marangell, Lauren B / Koo, John / Blauvelt, Andrew / Gooderham, Melinda / Wu, Jashin J / Rastogi, Shipra / Harris, Susan / Pillai, Radhakrishnan / Israel, Robert J. ·Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. Electronic address: lebwohl@aol.com. · K. Papp Clinical Research and Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · The McGovern School of Medicine of the University of Texas, Houston, Texas; Brain Health Consultants, Houston, Texas. · University of California San Francisco Psoriasis and Skin Treatment Center, San Francisco, California. · Oregon Medical Research Center, Portland, Oregon. · Skin Centre for Dermatology and Probity Medical Research, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada. · Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC, Bridgewater, New Jersey. · Dow Pharmaceutical (a division of Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC), Petaluma, California. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #28985956.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Individuals with psoriasis are at increased risk for psychiatric comorbidities, including suicidal ideation and behavior (SIB). OBJECTIVE: To distinguish between the underlying risk and potential for treatment-induced psychiatric adverse events in patients with psoriasis being treated with brodalumab, a fully human anti-interleukin 17 receptor A monoclonal antibody. METHODS: Data were evaluated from a placebo-controlled, phase 2 clinical trial; the open-label, long-term extension of the phase 2 clinical trial; and three phase 3, randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trials (AMAGINE-1, AMAGINE-2, and AMAGINE-3) and their open-label, long-term extensions of patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. RESULTS: The analysis included 4464 patients with 9161.8 patient-years of brodalumab exposure. The follow-up time-adjusted incidence rates of SIB events were comparable between the brodalumab and ustekinumab groups throughout the 52-week controlled phases (0.20 vs 0.60 per 100 patient-years). In the brodalumab group, 4 completed suicides were reported, 1 of which was later adjudicated as indeterminate; all patients had underlying psychiatric disorders or stressors. LIMITATIONS: There was no comparator arm past week 52. Controlled study periods were not powered to detect differences in rare events such as suicide. CONCLUSIONS: Comparison with controls and the timing of events do not indicate a causal relationship between SIB and brodalumab treatment.

24 Review A review article on brodalumab in the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. 2017

Roostaeyan, Omid / Kivelevitch, Dario / Menter, Alan. ·University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Oklahoma City, OK 73019, USA. · Division of Dermatology, Baylor Scott & White, Dallas, TX 75246, USA. ·Immunotherapy · Pubmed #28879789.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated skin disorder affecting approximately 2-3% of the worldwide population. Recent advances in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis have resulted in novel therapeutic agents. IL-17, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, plays a pivotal role in psoriasis. Therapeutic agents targeting this cytokine have shown clinical effectiveness in the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Brodalumab, a human antibody against IL-17 receptor A, has been approved by the US FDA in February 2017, by the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency in July 2016 and by the EMA in July 2017 for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. This article reviews the published data relating to brodalumab for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.

25 Review Depression and suicidality in psoriasis: review of the literature including the cytokine theory of depression. 2017

Koo, J / Marangell, L B / Nakamura, M / Armstrong, A / Jeon, C / Bhutani, T / Wu, J J. ·San Francisco Medical Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Brain Health Consultants, Houston, TX, USA. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28681405.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis can be a socially isolating disease due to debilitating physical symptoms and the stigma patients feel because of the appearance of their skin. Mental health comorbidities such as anxiety, depression and suicidal ideation and behaviour (SIB) are prevalent in patients with psoriasis. Patients with mild psoriasis can experience psychiatric comorbidities; however, disorders such as depression and SIB are more common in patients with severe psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Psychiatric disorders can both result from and contribute to progression of psoriasis, suggesting that psoriasis and psychiatric conditions, such as depression, may have overlapping biological mechanisms. Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 are elevated in both psoriasis and depression, indicating that the inflammatory process may be involved in the progression of both diseases. Elevated cytokine levels in the central nervous system cause physiologic and biochemical changes that may contribute to the development of depression. In this review of the literature, we discuss the evidence that supports the association of psoriasis with mental health disorders and the tools used to detect the presence of these comorbidities. Additionally, we review the most prominent hypotheses on the mechanisms by which the inflammatory response and elevated cytokines can cause depression. These results highlight the role that systemic inflammation plays in the various mental health comorbidities associated with psoriasis, including depression and SIB.

Next