Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from US Mountain Zone
Based on 176 articles published since 2008
||||

These are the 176 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from US Mountain Zone during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with biologics. 2019

Menter, Alan / Strober, Bruce E / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kivelevitch, Dario / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Stoff, Benjamin / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Davis, Dawn M R / Elewski, Boni E / Gelfand, Joel M / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Leonardi, Craig L / Lichten, Jason / Lim, Henry W / Mehta, Nehal N / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Rupani, Reena N / Siegel, Michael / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Elmets, Craig A. ·Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, San Francisco. · University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, San Francisco, California. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772098.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations based on the available evidence. The treatment of psoriasis with biologic agents will be reviewed, emphasizing treatment recommendations and the role of the dermatologist in monitoring and educating patients regarding benefits as well as associated risks.

2 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

3 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: goodmans@hss.edu. · Bryan Springer, MD: OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · Gordon Guyatt, MD: McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Matthew P. Abdel, MD: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Vinod Dasa, MD: Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · Michael George, MD: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Ora Gewurz-Singer, MD: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Jon T. Giles, MD, MPH: Columbia University, New York, New York. · Beverly Johnson, MD: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Steve Lee, DO: Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · Michael A. Mont, MD: Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Scott Sporer, MD: Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · Louis Stryker, MD: University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · Marat Turgunbaev, MD, MPH, Amy S. Miller: American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Antonia F. Chen, MD, MBA: Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Jeremy Gililland, MD: University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · Mark Goodman, MD, Adolph Yates, MD: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Arlene Hurley-Rosenblatt, ANP: Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Elena Losina, PhD: Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Kaleb Michaud, PhD: National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Ted Mikuls, MD, MSPH: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Alexander Sah, MD: Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · Jasvinder A. Singh, MBBS, MPH: University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·J Arthroplasty · Pubmed #28629905.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

4 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas, and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #28620948.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

5 Editorial Atopic dermatitis: Age and race do matter! 2015

Leung, Donald Y M. ·Department of Pediatrics, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colo. Electronic address: leungd@njhealth.org. ·J Allergy Clin Immunol · Pubmed #26549637.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Review Biologic therapy in psoriasis: navigating the options. 2018

McKay, Cather / Kondratuk, Katherine E / Miller, John P / Stumpf, Brittany / Boh, Erin. ·Department of Dermatology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. · University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine, Vermillion, South Dakota. USA. · Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #30566551.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a T cell-mediated inflammatory disease associated with comorbidities impacting the overall health and quality of life of those affected. This article offers a brief overview of treatment classes available and an approach to choosing biologic treatments based on individual patient characteristics, including disease severity, comorbidities, and ultimate treatment goals.

7 Review Update on the pathophysiology of psoriasis. 2018

Hugh, Jeremy M / Weinberg, Jeffrey M. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #30566550.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a genetically programmed pathologic interaction among skin cells, immunocytes, and numerous biologic signaling molecules that is triggered by environmental stimuli. The immune response is a cellular one; type 1 (TH1) and type 17 (TH17) T cells are activated by IL-12 and IL-23 secreted by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the skin. Through various cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, these cells cause a chronic inflammatory state and alter epidermal hyperproliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and neoangiogenesis that produce the cutaneous findings seen in this disease. The newer biologic therapies target the immunologic signaling pathways and cytokines identified in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and provide notable clinical improvement. Further study in the pathogenesis of psoriasis can help identify targets for future therapies.

8 Review Psoriatic arthritis and the dermatologist: An approach to screening and clinical evaluation. 2018

Zhang, Arianna / Kurtzman, Drew J B / Perez-Chada, Lourdes M / Merola, Joseph F. ·Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Dermatology, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona, USA; Division of Dermatology, St. Elizabeth Physicians, Florence, Kentucky, USA. Electronic address: drewkurtzman@gmail.com. · Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Division of Rheumatology, and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #30047437.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis is a common form of inflammatory arthritis that frequently accompanies psoriasis of the skin-up to 30% of patients with psoriasis are affected. Recognition of the clinical features of psoriatic arthritis is critical, as delayed detection and untreated disease may result in irreparable joint injury, impaired physical function, and a significantly reduced quality of life. Recent epidemiologic studies have also supported that psoriatic arthritis is associated with cardiometabolic and cerebrovascular comorbidities, including coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and cerebrovascular accidents, further highlighting the importance of identifying affected patients. Dermatologists are poised for the early detection of psoriatic arthritis, as psoriasis predates its development in as many as 80% of patients. In an effort to further acquaint dermatologists and other clinicians with psoriatic arthritis, this review provides a detailed overview, emphasizing its salient clinical features, and discusses classification criteria, validated screening tools, and simple musculoskeletal examination maneuvers that may facilitate earlier detection and treatment of the disorder.

9 Review Dactylitis: A hallmark of psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Kaeley, Gurjit S / Eder, Lihi / Aydin, Sibel Z / Gutierrez, Marwin / Bakewell, Catherine. ·University of Florida College of Medicine, 653-1 West 8th St., LRC 2nd Floor L-14, Jacksonville, FL 32209. Electronic address: Gurjit.Kaeley@jax.ufl.edu. · Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · University of Ottawa, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Musculoskeletal and Rheumatic Diseases, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Mexico City, Mexico. · Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, UT. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #29573849.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Dactylitis-long considered a hallmark clinical feature of psoriatic arthritis (PsA)-occurs in 16-49% of patients with PsA. In this review, we discuss the pathology of dactylitis in PsA and clinical and imaging tools used to diagnose and monitor dactylitis. METHODS: PubMed literature searches were conducted using the terms psoriatic arthritis, dactylitis, pathology, imaging, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, clinical, and indices. Articles were deemed relevant if they provided insight into the pathology, diagnosis, and/or monitoring of dactylitis in PsA, or if they discussed clinical or imaging indices used to assess dactylitis. RESULTS: Dactylitis in PsA often occurs asymmetrically, involves the feet more than the hands, and affects multiple digits simultaneously. Although dactylitis can be assessed clinically, imaging (radiography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and bone scintigraphy) has provided key insights by documenting the various anatomic targets affected. Although inflammation can occur in most of the digital compartments, the nail has not been as well studied in dactylitic digits. Outcome measures for dactylitis range from dichotomous documentation to the Leeds dactylometer. Imaging outcome tools utilizing magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound are under development. CONCLUSION: Dactylitis, which is associated with more erosive forms of PsA, is often the inaugural feature of PsA and may be the only feature for months to years. Early diagnosis and treatment of PsA favors better outcomes, possibly mitigating radiographic progression and destructive changes. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are useful tools that have not only shed light on the diverse tissues affected in dactylitis but can also be used to document ongoing inflammation. Ultrasound imaging dactylitis scores are being developed that will assist in diagnosing and documenting which compartments optimally respond to various treatment modalities.

10 Review A systematic review and meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of the interleukin (IL)-12/23 and IL-17 inhibitors ustekinumab, secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab, guselkumab and tildrakizumab for the treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. 2018

Bilal, Jawad / Berlinberg, Adam / Bhattacharjee, Sandipan / Trost, Jaren / Riaz, Irbaz Bin / Kurtzman, Drew J B. ·a Department of Medicine , University of Arizona , Tucson , AZ , USA. · b Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science , College of Pharmacy, University of Arizona , Tucson , AZ , USA. · c Department of General Internal Medicine , University of Arizona , Tucson , AZ , USA. · d Division of Dermatology , University of Arizona , Tucson , AZ , USA. ·J Dermatolog Treat · Pubmed #29532693.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To systematically analyze the efficacy and safety of interleukin (IL)-12/23, IL-17, and selective IL-23 inhibitors in moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-four randomized placebo-controlled trials were included. Compared to placebo, risk ratios (RR) of achieving PASI-75 and PGA/IGA 0/1 respectively were 20.20 (95% CI 13.82-29.54, p < .00001) and 14.55 (10.42-20.31, p < .00001) for ustekinumab 90 mg, 13.75 (8.49-22.28, p < .00001) and 9.81 (5.70-16.89, p < .00001) for ustekinumab 45 mg, 17.65 (12.38-25.17, p < .00001) and 26.13 (16.05-42.53, p < .00001) for secukinumab 300 mg, 15.36 (10.76-21.94, p < .00001) and 20.91 (12.82-34.13, p < .00001) for secukinumab 150 mg, 18.22 (10.63-31.23, p < .000001) and 18.82 (10.36-34.16, p < .00001) for ixekizumab 80 mg every 4 weeks, 19.83 (11.07-35.52, p < .00001) and 20.41 (11.01-37.81, p < .00001) for ixekizumab 80 mg every 2 weeks, 14.79 (9.86-22.16, p < .00001) and 21.93 (15.52-31.01, p < .00001) for brodalumab 210 mg, 11.55 (7.77-17.18, p < .00001) and 16.59 (11.72-23.49, p < .00001) for brodalumab 140 mg, 12.40 (8.87-17.34, p < .00001) and 10.84 (7.91-14.85, p < .00001) for guselkumab 100 mg, 11.45 (7.45-17.58, p < .00001) and 10.97 (6.44-18.69, p < .00001) for tildrakizumab 200 mg, 11.02 (7.17-16.93, p < .00001) and 10.03 (6.45-15.59, p < .00001) for tildrakizumab 100 mg. Similar outcomes were seen for PASI-90. Safety was satisfactory for each therapy at any dose, but a slightly increased risk of withdrawal due to toxicity was observed in individuals receiving ixekizumab compared to placebo. CONCLUSION: Ustekinumab, secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab, guselkumab, and tildrakizumab were highly efficacious and generally well-tolerated when used as treatments for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

11 Review Treatment preferences and treatment satisfaction among psoriasis patients: a systematic review. 2018

Florek, Aleksandra G / Wang, Catherine J / Armstrong, April W. ·University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Denver, CO, USA. · Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. aprilarmstrong@post.harvard.edu. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. aprilarmstrong@post.harvard.edu. ·Arch Dermatol Res · Pubmed #29442137.

ABSTRACT: A critical gap exists in determining treatment preferences and treatment satisfaction from patient perspectives, which is paramount to achieving therapeutic success. The objective of this systematic review is to determine factors influencing treatment preferences and treatment satisfaction among psoriasis patients. PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases were searched between November 1, 2010, and December 1, 2017. Observational and interventional research studies published in the English language that discussed patient preferences and patient satisfaction in the treatment of psoriasis were reviewed and synthesized. We utilized data on treatment preferences and treatment satisfaction from 35,388 psoriasis patients based on 60 articles from the years 2010 to 2017. Treatment preferences were heterogeneous and changed over time among psoriasis patients. Across all treatment modalities, the most important treatment attributes were treatment location, probability of improvement, and delivery method. For biologics specifically, the most important attributes were risk of adverse events and probability of treatment benefit. Factors that influenced patients' preferences for certain treatments included age, sex, comorbidities, disease duration, and prior treatments. Notably, some psoriasis patients placed higher importance on a treatment's process attributes (e.g., access and delivery) over its outcome attributes (e.g., efficacy). Overall, patient satisfaction with existing therapies remains modest; however, those treated with biologic agents exhibited highest treatment satisfaction over oral therapy, phototherapy, and topical therapy.

12 Review Enthesitis: A hallmark of psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Kaeley, Gurjit S / Eder, Lihi / Aydin, Sibel Z / Gutierrez, Marwin / Bakewell, Catherine. ·Division of Rheumatology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, 653-1 West 8th St., LRC 2nd Floor L-14, Jacksonville, FL, 32209. Electronic address: Gurjit.Kaeley@jax.ufl.edu. · Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · University of Ottawa, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Musculoskeletal and Rheumatic Diseases, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Mexico City, Mexico. · Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, UT. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #29429762.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To describe the growing importance of enthesitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of clinical and imaging methods currently used to assess enthesitis. METHODS: PubMed literature searches were conducted using the terms psoriatic arthritis, entheses, enthesitis, pathology, imaging, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, clinical, and indices. Articles were deemed relevant if they provided insight into the pathology, monitoring, and/or diagnosis of enthesitis in PsA, or if they discussed clinical or imaging indices used to assess enthesitis. RESULTS: Enthesitis is an early manifestation of PsA that is associated with increased disease activity and reduced quality of life. A variety of clinical indices exist to assess enthesitis in PsA; however, the Leeds Enthesitis Index and Maastricht Ankylosing Spondylitis Enthesitis Score index have been the most frequently used indices in recent clinical trials. Limitations of these indices include an inability to discern structural involvement, risk of missing subclinical enthesitis, and lack of sensitivity in detecting enthesitis, especially in patients with central sensitization and/or pain amplification. Such limitations have led to the emergent importance of imaging techniques in the assessment of enthesitis. Although there have been recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound (US) appears to be the preferred method for detecting enthesitis because it allows for accurate assessment of the soft-tissue components of entheses and also for new bone formation. Hypoechogenicity, increased thickness of tendon insertion, calcifications, enthesophytes, erosions, and Doppler activity have been identified as important US characteristics of enthesitis. CONCLUSION: Enthesitis is thought to be integrally involved in the pathogenesis of PsA and is associated with worse prognostic outcomes in patients with PsA. A validated US index with entheses that are less confounded by mechanical factors and obesity would be the most effective measure of enthesitis in PsA. As imaging techniques continue to advance, our understanding of enthesitis and its involvement in PsA will also improve.

13 Review New Uses of AbobotulinumtoxinA in Aesthetics. 2017

Schlessinger, Joel / Gilbert, Erin / Cohen, Joel L / Kaufman, Joely. ·Dermatologist and cosmetic surgeon in private practice in Omaha, NE, USA. · Dermatologist in private practice in Brooklyn, NY, USA. · Dermatologist in private practice in Greenwood Village, CO, USA. · Dermatologist in private practice in Miami, FL, USA. ·Aesthet Surg J · Pubmed #28388720.

ABSTRACT: BotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A) is now widely established for the main approved indication of reducing glabellar lines, and is also widely used off-label to improve the appearance of wrinkles and lines in other parts of the face. The number of aesthetic procedures continues to increase as the patient population becomes more diverse, in particular with increasing numbers of people of color and men. Further developments in treatment may continue to expand the audience for BoNT-A by making procedures more comfortable and by delivering a more natural, less static appearance. These may be achieved through use of combinations of BoNT-A with other aesthetic procedures, tailoring the dose of toxin to the patient's muscle mass or by using novel injection and application techniques. Beyond amelioration of facial lines, encouraging results have been seen with the use of BoNT-A to improve the appearance of hypertrophic and keloid scars and even to prevent them. Studies have been conducted with scars in various parts of the body and further research is ongoing. Dermatological and other medical uses for BoNT-A are also active areas of research. Injections of BoNT-A have been shown to reduce signs and symptoms of acne, rosacea, and psoriasis, to reduce neuromuscular pain, and to bring about significant improvements in a number of rare diseases that are caused or exacerbated by hyperhidrosis. This paper reviews these new uses for BoNT-A, looking at the rationale for their use and discussing the results of published case studies and clinical trials. These areas have shown great promise to date, but more and larger clinical studies will be required before these treatments become a clinical reality. To this end details are also provided of clinical trials currently listed in the main clinical trials database to highlight research areas of particular interest.

14 Review From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation: Treatment targets for plaque psoriasis. 2017

Armstrong, April W / Siegel, Michael P / Bagel, Jerry / Boh, Erin E / Buell, Megan / Cooper, Kevin D / Callis Duffin, Kristina / Eichenfield, Lawrence F / Garg, Amit / Gelfand, Joel M / Gottlieb, Alice B / Koo, John Y M / Korman, Neil J / Krueger, Gerald G / Lebwohl, Mark G / Leonardi, Craig L / Mandelin, Arthur M / Menter, M Alan / Merola, Joseph F / Pariser, David M / Prussick, Ronald B / Ryan, Caitriona / Shah, Kara N / Weinberg, Jeffrey M / Williams, MaryJane O U / Wu, Jashin J / Yamauchi, Paul S / Van Voorhees, Abby S. ·Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: aprilarmstrong@post.harvard.edu. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Windsor Dermatology, East Windsor, New Jersey; University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro, Plainsboro, New Jersey. · Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana. · University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah. · University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California. · Northwell Health and Hofstra North Shore University Hospital, Long Island Jewish Medical Center School of Medicine, Manhasset, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California San Francisco Medical Center, San Francisco, California. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · St Louis University Medical School, St Louis, Missouri. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Baylor University Medical Center and Texas A&M Health Science Center, Dallas, Texas. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia; Virginia Clinical Research Inc, Norfolk, Virginia. · George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia. · Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Division of Dermatology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #27908543.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An urgent need exists in the United States to establish treatment goals in psoriasis. OBJECTIVE: We aim to establish defined treatment targets toward which clinicians and patients with psoriasis can strive to inform treatment decisions, reduce disease burden, and improve outcomes in practice. METHODS: The National Psoriasis Foundation conducted a consensus-building study among psoriasis experts using the Delphi method. The process consisted of: (1) literature review, (2) pre-Delphi question selection and input from general dermatologists and patients, and (3) 4 Delphi rounds. RESULTS: A total of 25 psoriasis experts participated in the Delphi process. The most preferred instrument was body surface area (BSA). The most preferred time for evaluating patient response after starting new therapies was at 3 months. The acceptable response at 3 months postinitiation was either BSA 3% or less or BSA improvement 75% or more from baseline. The target response at 3 months postinitiation was BSA 1% or less. During the maintenance period, evaluation every 6 months was most preferred. The target response at every 6 months maintenance evaluation is BSA 1% or less. LIMITATIONS: Although BSA is feasible in practice, it does not encompass health-related quality of life, costs, and risks of side effects. CONCLUSION: With defined treatment targets, clinicians and patients can regularly evaluate treatment responses and perform benefit-risk assessments of therapeutic options individualized to the patient.

15 Review Lipoprotein Metabolism and Inflammation in Patients With Psoriasis. 2016

Armstrong, Ehrin J / Krueger, James G. ·Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado. Electronic address: ehrin.armstrong@gmail.com. · Laboratory of Investigative Dermatology, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York. ·Am J Cardiol · Pubmed #27392508.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with a variety of co-morbid conditions, including cardiovascular disease. Advancements in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of psoriasis have led to a better understanding regarding its pathogenesis, which in turn has stimulated ongoing research to identify the underlying pathophysiology responsible for the increased risk of cardiovascular events associated with psoriasis. Although not yet fully elucidated, emerging evidence points to immune-mediated inflammation as a process that contributes to endothelial cell dysfunction, dyslipidemia, and atherosclerosis as key processes influencing cardiovascular disease in psoriasis. In particular, the dyslipidemia present in psoriasis may be associated with altered lipoprotein function and increased atherogenicity. Here, we review how the cytokine networks involved in lipoprotein metabolism and inflammation could impact on the cardiovascular disease risk for patients with psoriasis.

16 Review Laser and light therapies for the treatment of nail psoriasis. 2016

Maranda, Eric L / Nguyen, Austin H / Lim, Victoria M / Hafeez, Farhaan / Jimenez, Joaquin J. ·Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA. · Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE, USA. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #27226341.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic involvement of the nail is notoriously refractory to conventional therapy. Nail psoriasis has a high incidence amongst patients with psoriasis. It remains a significant cosmetic problem and thus, has a significant impact on quality of life. More recently, light and laser therapies have emerged as modalities for treatment of nail psoriasis. In this study, the efficacies of light and laser therapies are systematically reviewed. Light therapies involve ultraviolet light (with or without photosensitizers) or intense pulsed light. Alternatively, laser therapy in nail psoriasis is primarily administered using a 595-nm pulsed dye laser. These modalities have demonstrated significant improvement in psoriatic nail lesions, and even complete resolution in some cases. Both laser and light modalities have also been tested in combination with other systemic or topical therapeutics, with variable improvement in efficacy. Both laser and light therapies are generally well tolerated. Side-effects of light therapies include hyperpigmentation, itching and erythema; whereas, side-effects of laser therapy are more frequent and include pain, purpura/petechiae and hyperpigmentation. Patterns of response to therapy were also seen based on presenting characteristics of the nail lesions: subungual hyperkeratosis and onycholysis appeared to be the most responsive to therapy, while nail pitting was the most resistant. Light or laser therapies have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective in-office based treatment for nail psoriasis. However, more large-scale clinical trials are needed to assess their efficacy, particularly in combination with other therapeutic modalities.

17 Review microRNAs in Psoriasis. 2016

Hawkes, Jason E / Nguyen, Giang Huong / Fujita, Mayumi / Florell, Scott R / Callis Duffin, Kristina / Krueger, Gerald G / O'Connell, Ryan M. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, USA. · Department of Pathology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Electronic address: ryan.oconnell@path.utah.edu. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #26802234.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition resulting from a complex interplay among the immune system, keratinocytes, susceptibility genes, and environmental factors. However, the pathogenesis of psoriasis is not completely elucidated. microRNAs represent a promising class of small, noncoding RNA molecules that function to regulate gene expression. Although microRNA research in psoriasis and dermatology is still relatively new, evidence is rapidly accumulating for the role of microRNAs in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and other chronic inflammatory conditions. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of what is known about microRNAs and their role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

18 Review Apremilast: A Novel Drug for Treatment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Haber, Stacy L / Hamilton, Sarah / Bank, Mark / Leong, Shi Yun / Pierce, Evelyn. ·Midwestern University College of Pharmacy-Glendale, AZ, USA shaber@midwestern.edu. · Midwestern University College of Pharmacy-Glendale, AZ, USA. ·Ann Pharmacother · Pubmed #26783350.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To review the pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of apremilast and determine its role relative to other agents in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. DATA SOURCES: A PubMed search (1946 to December 2015) using the terms apremilast and CC-10004 was conducted to identify relevant articles. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: In vitro or in vivo evaluations of apremilast published in the English language were eligible for inclusion. Controlled clinical trials that involved psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis were selected for review. DATA SYNTHESIS: Four trials were identified on the treatment of psoriasis. In those that involved doses of 30 mg twice daily, a significantly greater percentage of patients receiving apremilast (28.8% to 40.9%) compared with placebo (5.3% to 5.8%) achieved at least 75% improvement from baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score at 16 weeks. Two trials were identified on the treatment of psoriatic arthritis. In the one that involved a dose of 30 mg twice daily, a significantly greater percentage of patients receiving apremilast (38.1%) compared with placebo (19.0%) achieved the American College of Rheumatology criteria for 20% improvement at 16 weeks. In all trials, the drug had an acceptable safety profile, with the most common adverse effects of diarrhea, nausea, and headache. CONCLUSIONS: Apremilast has a novel mechanism of action and is safe and effective for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. At this time, apremilast should be reserved for patients unable to take disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

19 Review Managing Patients With Psoriasis in the Busy Clinic: Practical Tips for Health Care Practitioners. 2016

Armstrong, April W / Aldredge, Lakshi / Yamauchi, Paul S. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA aprilarmstrong@post.harvard.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, OR, USA. · Dermatology Institute and Skin Care Center, Santa Monica, CA, USA Division of Dermatology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·J Cutan Med Surg · Pubmed #26712930.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory disease with significant comorbidities, whose management can be challenging given the variety of treatment options. It is critical for nurse practitioners, physician assistants, general practitioners, and dermatology trainees to have useful information about the treatment and monitoring of patients with psoriasis. Although certain aspects of care apply to all patients, each therapeutic agent has its own nuances in terms of assessments, dosing, and monitoring. The most appropriate treatment is based not only on disease severity but also on comorbid conditions and concomitant medications. These practitioners are vital in facilitating patient care by thorough understanding of systemic agents, selection criteria, dosing, and recommended monitoring. This article provides high-yield practical pearls on managing patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. It includes case-based discussions illustrating considerations for special populations, such as pregnant women, children, and patients with comorbidities (eg, human immunodeficiency virus infection, hepatitis C, hepatitis B, and history of malignancy).

20 Review High-Resolution US of Rheumatologic Diseases. 2015

Taljanovic, Mihra S / Melville, David M / Gimber, Lana H / Scalcione, Luke R / Miller, Margaret D / Kwoh, C Kent / Klauser, Andrea S. ·From the Department of Medical Imaging (M.S.T., D.M.M., L.H.G., L.R.S.), Department of Medicine (M.D.M.), and Division of Rheumatology (C.K.K.), University of Arizona, Banner-University Medical Center, 1501 N Campbell Ave, PO Box 245067, Tucson, AZ 85724 · and Department of Radiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria (A.S.K.). ·Radiographics · Pubmed #26562235.

ABSTRACT: For the past 15 years, high-resolution ultrasonography (US) is being routinely and increasingly used for initial evaluation and treatment follow-up of rheumatologic diseases. This imaging technique is performed by using high-frequency linear transducers and has proved to be a powerful diagnostic tool in evaluation of articular erosions, simple and complex joint and bursal effusions, tendon sheath effusions, and synovitis, with results comparable to those of magnetic resonance imaging, excluding detection of bone marrow edema. Crystal deposition diseases including gouty arthropathy and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) have characteristic appearances at US, enabling differentiation between these two diseases and from inflammatory arthropathies. Enthesopathy, which frequently accompanies psoriatic and reactive arthritis, also has a characteristic appearance at high-resolution US, distinguishing these two entities from other inflammatory and metabolic arthropathies. The presence of Doppler signal in examined joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths indicates active synovitis. Microbubble echo contrast agents augment detection of tissue vascularity and may act in the future as a drug delivery vehicle. Frequently, joint, tendon sheath, and bursal fluid aspirations and therapeutic injections are performed under US guidance. The authors describe the high-resolution US technique including gray-scale, color or power Doppler, and contrast agent-enhanced US that is used in evaluation of rheumatologic diseases of the wrist and hand and the ankle and foot in their routine clinical practice. This article demonstrates imaging findings of normal joints, rheumatoid arthritis, gouty arthritis, CPPD, psoriatic and reactive arthritis, and osteoarthritis.

21 Review First review on psoriasis severity risk stratification: An engineering perspective. 2015

Shrivastava, Vimal K / Londhe, Narendra D / Sonawane, Rajendra S / Suri, Jasjit S. ·Electrical Engineering Department, National Institute of Technology, Raipur, India. Electronic address: lky.vml@gmail.com. · Electrical Engineering Department, National Institute of Technology, Raipur, India; Point of Care Devices, Global Biomedical Technologies, Inc., Roseville, CA, USA. Electronic address: nlondhe.ele@nitrr.ac.in. · Psoriasis Clinic and Research Centre, Psoriatreat, Pune, Maharashtra, India. Electronic address: drrajss@gmail.com. · Point of Care Devices, Global Biomedical Technologies, Inc., Roseville, CA, USA; Electrical Engineering Department, Idaho State University (Aff.), Pocatello, ID, USA. Electronic address: jsuri@comcast.net. ·Comput Biol Med · Pubmed #26005793.

ABSTRACT: Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems have been used for characterization of several dermatologic diseases in the last few years. Psoriasis is a potentially life-threatening skin disease which affects 125 million people worldwide. The paper presents the first state-of-the-art review of technology solicitation in psoriasis along with its current practices, challenges and assessment techniques. The paper also conducts in-depth examination of the existing literature for all clinical parameters of Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) i.e., area, erythema, scaliness and thickness. We suggest a role of risk assessment using a decision support system for stratification of psoriasis in large populations. A balanced insight has been presented in all the components of the design, namely: feature extraction, feature selection, disease stratification and overall CAD performance evaluation. We conclude that CAD systems are promising for risk stratification and assessment of psoriasis.

22 Review An evidence-based review of the mechanism of action, efficacy, and safety of biologic therapies in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. 2015

Brezinski, Elizabeth A / Armstrong, April W. ·University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Mail Stop F443, 13199 E Montview Blvd, Suite 300, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. aprilarmstrong@post.harvard.edu. ·Curr Med Chem · Pubmed #25921645.

ABSTRACT: Biologic agents have expanded the repertoire of efficacious and safe systemic therapies for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis and active psoriatic arthritis. The biologics act to inhibit key inflammatory molecules that are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of these chronic inflammatory disorders as well as physiologic immune responses. In this paper, we discuss the proposed molecular mechanisms of action, efficacy, and safety of the two FDA-approved classes of biologics, the tumor necrosis factor inhibitors and the interleukin-12/23 inhibitor. The tumor necrosis factor inhibitors that are reviewed include etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, and certolizumab pegol. The interleukin- 12/23 inhibitor that is discussed is ustekinumab. Specifically, we review the mechanism of action for each biologic agent and the FDA-approved indications and dosing for these therapeutics. We provide up-to-date evidence for the efficacy of these systemic medications using key phase 3 clinical trial data, we highlight important safety information for each biologic based on long-term open-label extension trials and safety registries, and we discuss studies that investigate off-label dosing with the biologics. Each biologic is reviewed in these specific areas of focus for their indicated treatment of psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis.

23 Review Extracorporeal photopheresis for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. 2015

Adamski, Jill / Kinard, Theresa / Ipe, Tina / Cooling, Laura. ·Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Electronic address: Adamski.Jill@mayo.edu. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, USA. · Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. ·Transfus Apher Sci · Pubmed #25886694.

ABSTRACT: The immune system is tasked with the unique challenge of recognizing foreign pathogens and damaged cells while at the same time preserving and protecting the integrity of "self". When this process fails, severe consequences including cancer and autoimmunity are the end result. Current therapies aimed at treating autoimmune disorders result in generalized immunosuppression and place the patient at increased risk for infection and malignancy. ECP is a potential therapeutic intervention that recapitulates natural physiologic processes of tolerance induction to restore immune homeostasis. Several clinical trials suggest that ECP may be used to treat a broad spectrum of autoimmune diseases.

24 Review Dermal γδ T cells--What have we learned? 2015

O'Brien, Rebecca L / Born, Willi K. ·Dept. of Biomedical Research, National Jewish Health, 1400 Jackson St., Denver, CO 80206, United States; Dept. of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, 13001 E. 17th Place, Aurora, CO 80045, United States. ·Cell Immunol · Pubmed #25649119.

ABSTRACT: Over the last several years, a number of papers have called attention to a distinct population of γδ T cells preferentially found in the dermis of the skin of normal mice. These cells appear to play an important role in promoting the development of psoriasis, but also are critical for host resistance to particular pathogens. They are characterized by the expression of a limited subset of γδ T cell receptors and a strong propensity to secrete IL-17. Perhaps most importantly, humans appear to carry an equivalent dermal γδ T cell population, likewise biased to secrete IL-17 and also implicated as playing a pathogenic role in psoriasis. This review will attempt to summarize and reconcile recent findings concerning the dermal γδ T cells.

25 Review Economic Burden of Psoriasis in the United States: A Systematic Review. 2015

Brezinski, Elizabeth A / Dhillon, Jaskaran S / Armstrong, April W. ·Department of Dermatology, University of California Davis, Sacramento. · Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado Denver. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #25565304.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: The total cost of psoriasis in the United States is unknown. Defining the US economic burden of psoriasis is needed because it provides the foundation for research, advocacy, and educational efforts. OBJECTIVE: To determine the US economic burden of psoriasis from a societal perspective. EVIDENCE REVIEW: PubMed and MEDLINE databases were searched between January 1, 2008, and September 20, 2013, for economic investigations on the direct, indirect, intangible, and comorbidity costs of adult psoriasis in the United States. The base year costs were adjusted to 2013 US dollars using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers and multiplied by the estimated number of US patients with psoriasis in 2013 to determine the 2013 psoriasis cost burden. FINDINGS: Among 100 identified articles, 22 studies were included in the systematic review. The direct psoriasis costs ranged from $51.7 billion to $63.2 billion, the indirect costs ranged from $23.9 billion to $35.4 billion, and medical comorbidities were estimated to contribute $36.4 billion annually in 2013 US dollars. Patients with psoriasis would pay a lifetime cost of $11,498 for relief of physical symptoms and emotional health; however, intangible cost data are limited. The annual US cost of psoriasis amounted to approximately $112 billion in 2013. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: The economic burden of psoriasis is substantial and significant in the United States.

Next