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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Amsterdam
Based on 127 articles published since 2008
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These are the 127 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Amsterdam during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6
1 Guideline Treating axial spondyloarthritis and peripheral spondyloarthritis, especially psoriatic arthritis, to target: 2017 update of recommendations by an international task force. 2018

Smolen, Josef S / Schöls, Monika / Braun, Jürgen / Dougados, Maxime / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Landewé, Robert / Mease, Philip / Sieper, Joachim / Stamm, Tanja / Wit, Maarten de / Aletaha, Daniel / Baraliakos, Xenofon / Betteridge, Neil / Bosch, Filip van den / Coates, Laura C / Emery, Paul / Gensler, Lianne S / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Jongkees, Merryn / Kvien, Tore K / Inman, Robert D / McInnes, Iain B / Maccarone, Mara / Machado, Pedro M / Molto, Anna / Ogdie, Alexis / Poddubnyy, Denis / Ritchlin, Christopher / Rudwaleit, Martin / Tanew, Adrian / Thio, Bing / Veale, Douglas / Vlam, Kurt de / van der Heijde, Désirée. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Health Consult, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Ruhr-University Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Rheumatology, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. · Amsterdam Rheumatology & Immunology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology Research, Swedish-Providence St. Joseph Health System, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section for Outcomes Research, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Medical Humanities, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Neil Betteridge Associates, UK. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Seayn Medical, Voorschoten, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Glasgow, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow, UK. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Centre for Rheumatology & MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, University College London, London, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USA. · German Rheumatism Research Centrer, Berlin, Germany. · Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus Medical Center, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #28684559.

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic targets have been defined for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) in 2012, but the evidence for these recommendations was only of indirect nature. These recommendations were re-evaluated in light of new insights. Based on the results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of rheumatologists, dermatologists, patients and a health professional developed an update of the 2012 recommendations. These underwent intensive discussions, on site voting and subsequent anonymous electronic voting on levels of agreement with each item. A set of 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations were developed and voted on. Some items were present in the previous recommendations, while others were significantly changed or newly formulated. The 2017 task force arrived at a single set of recommendations for axial and peripheral SpA, including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The most exhaustive discussions related to whether PsA should be assessed using unidimensional composite scores for its different domains or multidimensional scores that comprise multiple domains. This question was not resolved and constitutes an important research agenda. There was broad agreement, now better supported by data than in 2012, that remission/inactive disease and, alternatively, low/minimal disease activity are the principal targets for the treatment of PsA. As instruments to assess the patients on the path to the target, the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) for axial SpA and the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and Minimal Disease Activity (MDA) for PsA were recommended, although not supported by all. Shared decision-making between the clinician and the patient was seen as pivotal to the process. The task force defined the treatment target for SpA as remission or low disease activity and developed a large research agenda to further advance the field.

2 Guideline European S3-Guideline on the systemic treatment of psoriasis vulgaris - Update Apremilast and Secukinumab - EDF in cooperation with EADV and IPC. 2017

Nast, A / Spuls, P I / van der Kraaij, G / Gisondi, P / Paul, C / Ormerod, A D / Saiag, P / Smith, C H / Dauden, E / de Jong, E M / Feist, E / Jobling, R / Maccarone, M / Mrowietz, U / Papp, K A / Reich, K / Rosumeck, S / Talme, T / Thio, H B / van de Kerkhof, P / Werner, R N / Dressler, C. ·Division of Evidence-Based Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France. · Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, UK. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré Université Paris V, Boulogne, France. · St Johns Institute of Dermatology, Guys and St Thomas' Hospital Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid, Spain. · Radboud University medical center and Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Cambridge, UK. · Roma, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Psoriasis-Center University Medical Center Schleswig Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Waterloo, Canada. · Dermatologikum Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28895202.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders: 2015/2016 update. 2017

Agca, R / Heslinga, S C / Rollefstad, S / Heslinga, M / McInnes, I B / Peters, M J L / Kvien, T K / Dougados, M / Radner, H / Atzeni, F / Primdahl, J / Södergren, A / Wallberg Jonsson, S / van Rompay, J / Zabalan, C / Pedersen, T R / Jacobsson, L / de Vlam, K / Gonzalez-Gay, M A / Semb, A G / Kitas, G D / Smulders, Y M / Szekanecz, Z / Sattar, N / Symmons, D P M / Nurmohamed, M T. ·Departments of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Preventive Cardio-Rheuma Clinic, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Internal and Vascular Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Hôpital Cochin. Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris INSERM (U1153): Clinical epidemiology and biostatistics, PRES Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopedic Institute, Milan, Italy. · Institute for Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. · Sygehus Sønderjylland (Hospital of Southern Jutland), Aabenraa, Denmark. · King Christian 10's Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Graasten, Denmark. · Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Rheumatology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden. · PARE (patient research partners), Sint-Joris-Weert, Belgium. · Romanian League Against Rheumatism (Vice-President) and Board Member (General Secretary) of AGORA, the Platform of S-E organisations for patients with RMDs, Bucharest, Romania. · Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Center for Preventive Medicine and Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology & Inflammation Research, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and Section of Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · University of Cantabria, IDIVAL, Santander, Spain. · Head of Research and Development, Academic Affairs Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, University of Manchester, Russells Hall Hospital, Clinical Research Unit, Dudley, UK. · Faculty of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary. · Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Department of Rheumatology Reade, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27697765.

ABSTRACT: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint disorders (IJD) have increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk compared with the general population. In 2009, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) taskforce recommended screening, identification of CVD risk factors and CVD risk management largely based on expert opinion. In view of substantial new evidence, an update was conducted with the aim of producing CVD risk management recommendations for patients with IJD that now incorporates an increasing evidence base. A multidisciplinary steering committee (representing 13 European countries) comprised 26 members including patient representatives, rheumatologists, cardiologists, internists, epidemiologists, a health professional and fellows. Systematic literature searches were performed and evidence was categorised according to standard guidelines. The evidence was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Three overarching principles were defined. First, there is a higher risk for CVD in patients with RA, and this may also apply to ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Second, the rheumatologist is responsible for CVD risk management in patients with IJD. Third, the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids should be in accordance with treatment-specific recommendations from EULAR and Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society. Ten recommendations were defined, of which one is new and six were changed compared with the 2009 recommendations. Each designated an appropriate evidence support level. The present update extends on the evidence that CVD risk in the whole spectrum of IJD is increased. This underscores the need for CVD risk management in these patients. These recommendations are defined to provide assistance in CVD risk management in IJD, based on expert opinion and scientific evidence.

4 Guideline European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies: 2015 update. 2016

Gossec, L / Smolen, J S / Ramiro, S / de Wit, M / Cutolo, M / Dougados, M / Emery, P / Landewé, R / Oliver, S / Aletaha, D / Betteridge, N / Braun, J / Burmester, G / Cañete, J D / Damjanov, N / FitzGerald, O / Haglund, E / Helliwell, P / Kvien, T K / Lories, R / Luger, T / Maccarone, M / Marzo-Ortega, H / McGonagle, D / McInnes, I B / Olivieri, I / Pavelka, K / Schett, G / Sieper, J / van den Bosch, F / Veale, D J / Wollenhaupt, J / Zink, A / van der Heijde, D. ·Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS), Paris, France Department of rheumatology, AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Second Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · EULAR, representing People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe (PARE), London, UK. · Research Laboratory and Clinical Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto, Italy. · Medicine Faculty, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France Rheumatology B Department, APHP, Cochin Hospital, Paris, France. · Leeds NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, LTHT, Leeds, UK Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands. · North Devon, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne and Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. · Arthritis Unit, Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Clínic and IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain. · Belgrade University School of Medicine, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Section of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Sweden and School of Business, Engineering and Science, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. · Section of Musculoskeletal Disease, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Laboratory of Tissue Homeostasis and Disease, Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, KU Leuven, Belgium Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Potenza, Italy. · Institute and Clinic of Rheumatology Charles University Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Internal Medicine 3, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité, Berlin, Germany. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Centre for Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease, Dublin Academic Medical Centre, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Schoen Klinik Hamburg, Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, German Rheumatism Research Centre Berlin, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26644232.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Since the publication of the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in 2012, new evidence and new therapeutic agents have emerged. The objective was to update these recommendations. METHODS: A systematic literature review was performed regarding pharmacological treatment in PsA. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated based on the evidence and the expert opinion of the 34 Task Force members. Levels of evidence and strengths of recommendations were allocated. RESULTS: The updated recommendations comprise 5 overarching principles and 10 recommendations, covering pharmacological therapies for PsA from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), to conventional synthetic (csDMARD) and biological (bDMARD) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, whatever their mode of action, taking articular and extra-articular manifestations of PsA into account, but focusing on musculoskeletal involvement. The overarching principles address the need for shared decision-making and treatment objectives. The recommendations address csDMARDs as an initial therapy after failure of NSAIDs and local therapy for active disease, followed, if necessary, by a bDMARD or a targeted synthetic DMARD (tsDMARD). The first bDMARD would usually be a tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. bDMARDs targeting interleukin (IL)12/23 (ustekinumab) or IL-17 pathways (secukinumab) may be used in patients for whom TNF inhibitors are inappropriate and a tsDMARD such as a phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor (apremilast) if bDMARDs are inappropriate. If the first bDMARD strategy fails, any other bDMARD or tsDMARD may be used. CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations provide stakeholders with an updated consensus on the pharmacological treatment of PsA and strategies to reach optimal outcomes in PsA, based on a combination of evidence and expert opinion.

5 Guideline European S3-Guidelines on the systemic treatment of psoriasis vulgaris--Update 2015--Short version--EDF in cooperation with EADV and IPC. 2015

Nast, A / Gisondi, P / Ormerod, A D / Saiag, P / Smith, C / Spuls, P I / Arenberger, P / Bachelez, H / Barker, J / Dauden, E / de Jong, E M / Feist, E / Jacobs, A / Jobling, R / Kemény, L / Maccarone, M / Mrowietz, U / Papp, K A / Paul, C / Reich, K / Rosumeck, S / Talme, T / Thio, H B / van de Kerkhof, P / Werner, R N / Yawalkar, N. ·Division of Evidence Based Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, UK. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré Université Paris V, Boulogne, France. · Clinical Lead for Dermatology, St Johns Institute of Dermatology, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Third Faculty of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · St. Johns Institute of Dermatology, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid, Spain. · University Medical Center Nijmegen St Radboud, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Rheumatologie u. klinische Immonologie, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Cambridge, UK. · SZTE Borgyogyaszati Klinika, Szeged, Hungary. · Roma, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Psoriasis-Center University Medical Center Schleswig Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Waterloo, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France. · Dermatologikum Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, Universitätsklinik für Dermatologie, Bern, Switzerland. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #26481193.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline EULAR evidence-based recommendations for cardiovascular risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory arthritis. 2010

Peters, M J L / Symmons, D P M / McCarey, D / Dijkmans, B A C / Nicola, P / Kvien, T K / McInnes, I B / Haentzschel, H / Gonzalez-Gay, M A / Provan, S / Semb, A / Sidiropoulos, P / Kitas, G / Smulders, Y M / Soubrier, M / Szekanecz, Z / Sattar, N / Nurmohamed, M T. ·Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #19773290.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To develop evidence-based EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular (CV) risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: A multidisciplinary expert committee was convened as a task force of the EULAR Standing Committee for Clinical Affairs (ESCCA), comprising 18 members including rheumatologists, cardiologists, internists and epidemiologists, representing nine European countries. Problem areas and related keywords for systematic literature research were identified. A systematic literature research was performed using MedLine, Embase and the Cochrane library through to May 2008. Based on this literature review and in accordance with the EULAR's "standardised operating procedures", the multidisciplinary steering committee formulated evidence-based and expert opinion-based recommendations for CV risk screening and management in patients with inflammatory arthritis. RESULTS: Annual CV risk assessment using national guidelines is recommended for all patients with RA and should be considered for all patients with AS and PsA. Any CV risk factors identified should be managed according to local guidelines. If no local guidelines are available, CV risk management should be carried out according to the SCORE function. In addition to appropriate CV risk management, aggressive suppression of the inflammatory process is recommended to further lower the CV risk. CONCLUSIONS: Ten recommendations were made for CV risk management in patients with RA, AS and PsA. The strength of the recommendations differed between RA on the one hand, and AS and PsA, on the other, as evidence for an increased CV risk is most compelling for RA.

7 Guideline Review and expert opinion on prevention and treatment of infliximab-related infusion reactions. 2008

Lecluse, L L A / Piskin, G / Mekkes, J R / Bos, J D / de Rie, M A. ·Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, PO Box 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands. L.L.Lecluse@amc.uva.nl ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #18627374.

ABSTRACT: Infliximab (Remicade; Schering-Plough, Kenilworth, NJ, U.S.A.) is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that acts as a tumour necrosis factor-alpha inhibitor. Infliximab is registered for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis, ankylosing spondylitis and plaque-type psoriasis. Like other foreign protein-derived agents, infliximab may lead to infusion reactions during and after infusion. Infusion reactions occur in 3-22% of patients with psoriasis treated with infliximab. Most of these reactions are mild or moderate and only few are severe. Nevertheless, they may lead to discontinuation of treatment. As infliximab for psoriasis is prescribed as a last resort and is in most cases very effective, discontinuation of treatment is undesirable. With proper care and prevention of the infusion reactions the need to discontinue treatment with infliximab can be diminished. The objective of this article is to present a guideline for the management of infliximab-related infusion reactions, based on the best available evidence. This guideline can be used in patients with psoriasis as well as in dermatology patients receiving infliximab for off-label indications such as hidradenitis suppurativa or pyoderma gangrenosum.

8 Editorial Doing Good Research Is Difficult, Doing No Research Is More Difficult. 2017

Spuls, Phyllis I. ·Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: ph.i.spuls@amc.uva.nl. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #28411837.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Review A systematic review of measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures in psoriatic arthritis: A GRAPPA-OMERACT initiative. 2018

Højgaard, Pil / Klokker, Louise / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Holmsted, Kim / Bartels, Else M / Leung, Ying Ying / Goel, Niti / de Wit, Maarten / Gladman, Dafna D / Mease, Philip / Dreyer, Lene / Kristensen, Lars E / FitzGerald, Oliver / Tillett, William / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Strand, Vibeke / Ogdie, Alexis / Terwee, Caroline B / Christensen, Robin. ·The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, Gentofte Hospital, Kildegaardsvej 28, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. · The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, 20 College Rd, the Academia, S169856, Singapore. · Division of Rheumatology, Duke University School of Medicine, Advisory Services, QuintilesIMS, Durham, NC. · VU University Amsterdam, Department of Medical Humanities, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology and Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, 399 Bathurst St, 1E-410B, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 2S8. · Division of Rheumatology Clinical Research, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Rheumatology, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath, UK. · Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-08, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, Paris, France; Pitie-Salpétrière Hospital, AP-HP, Rheumatology Department, 47-83 Bd de l'Hopital, Paris 75013, France. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Harehills Lane, Leeds LS7 4SA, UK. · Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: Robin.christensen@regionh.dk. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #29037523.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An updated psoriatic arthritis (PsA) core outcome set (COS) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was endorsed at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) meeting in 2016. OBJECTIVES: To synthesize the evidence on measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for PsA and thereby contribute to development of a PsA core outcome measurement set (COMS) as described by the OMERACT Filter 2.0. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO on Jan 1, 2017 to identify full-text articles with an aim of assessing the measurement properties of PROMs in PsA. Two independent reviewers rated the quality of studies using the COnsensus based standards for the Selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist, and performed a qualitative evidence synthesis. RESULTS: Fifty-five studies were included in the systematic review. Forty-four instruments and a total of 89 scales were analyzed. PROMs measuring COS domains with at least fair quality evidence for good validity and reliability (and no evidence for poor properties) included the Stockerau Activity Score for PsA (German), Psoriasis Symptom Inventory, visual analogue scale for Patient Global, 36 Item Short Form Health Survey Physical Function subscale, Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, PsA Impact of Disease questionnaire, PsA Quality of Life questionnaire, VITACORA-19, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue scale and Social Role Participation Questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: At least one PROM with some evidence for aspects of validity and reliability was available for six of the eight mandatory domains of the PsA COS.

10 Review New treatment paradigms in spondyloarthritis. 2018

van Mens, Leonieke J J / van de Sande, Marleen G H / Baeten, Dominique L P. ·Department of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·Curr Opin Rheumatol · Pubmed #28984648.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review presents the recent rapid expansion of therapeutical options in spondyloarthritis. Additionally, it focuses on the importance of additional questions raised by the growing therapeutic possibilities related to the optimal use of these drugs. RECENT FINDINGS: The emergence of new treatment options opens new avenues and opportunities for treating patients with nonresponse, contraindications, or intolerance for classic drugs. However, it becomes more relevant than ever to define not only drugs and treatment options but also treatment strategies. We address current literature and remaining questions on strategies such as early intervention, combination treatment, personalized medicine, and treat-to-target. SUMMARY: Not only the treatment as such, but also the treatment strategy is crucial to reveal the full therapeutic potential and benefit for patients. Whereas cautious but crucial steps have been taken in the last years to explore these aspects, related to timing and sequence of treatment (including combination treatments), stratified medicine approaches, and treat-to-target strategies, it is now time for full-scale investment in prospective strategy trials.

11 Review Treatment of psoriatic arthritis with traditional DMARD's and novel therapies: approaches and recommendations. 2017

Maharaj, Ajesh B / Chandran, Vinod. ·a Department of Internal Medicine, Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital, Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine , University of KwaZulu-Natal , Durban , South Africa. · b Department of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Academic Medical Center , University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. · c Psoriatic Arthritis Program, Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, Krembil Research Institute , University Health Network , Toronto , Canada. · d Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada. · e Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology , University of Toronto , Toronto , Canada. · f Institute of Medical Science , University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital , Toronto , Canada. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #27826996.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Recent advances in the therapeutics of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) have provided more options to clinicians managing PsA. The purpose of this review is to update the reader on treatment options for PsA using conventional synthetic disease modifying agents (csDMARDs) and novel therapies including tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors, interleukin 12/23 inhibitor (ustekinumab), the interleukin 17 antagonists including secukinumab, brodalumab, ixekizumab, and the phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, apremilast. Areas covered: We reviewed published articles on the treatment of PsA. Our main sources of data included treatment recommendations, registry studies, systematic literature reviews, major randomised controlled trials for more recently approved drugs, and abstracts from the American College of Rheumatology and EULAR meetings. Expert commentary: An overview of the evidence for the use of various pharmacotherapeutic agents for treatment of this heterogeneous disease was compiled. Treatment options for the various domains of PsA are also discussed.

12 Review Lessons to be learned from serum biomarkers in psoriasis and IBD - the potential role in SpA. 2017

Turina, Maureen C / Landewé, Robert / Baeten, Dominique. ·a Department of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and immunology Center , Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #27705027.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Early diagnosis, monitoring of disease activity, prediction of treatment response, and structural outcome remain major challenges in spondyloarthritis (SpA). Biomarkers could play a role in addressing these challenges, but in SpA there is a lack of suitable biomarkers. Areas covered: As SpA is clinically and pathophysiologically closely related to psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), we reviewed in literature, the value of serum biomarkers in these conditions with the aim to find potential candidates for assessing SpA. Expert commentary: Candidates of interest were antimicrobial peptides, including serum human beta defensin-2 (hBD-2) and lipocalin-2 (LCN-2), and class-1 MHC molecule beta2-microglobulin. Since these biomarkers are relevant in psoriasis and/or IBD from a pathophysiological point of view, and may play a role in the pathogenesis of SpA, we recommend further exploration of their value as biomarker in the diagnosis and prognosis of SpA.

13 Review Management of psoriatic arthritis in 2016: a comparison of EULAR and GRAPPA recommendations. 2016

Gossec, Laure / Coates, Laura C / de Wit, Maarten / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Ramiro, Sofia / Mease, Philip J / Ritchlin, Christopher T / van der Heijde, Désirée / Smolen, Josef S. ·Sorbonne Universités, Université Pierre and Marie Curie - Paris 6, 4 Place Jussieu 75005, Paris, France; and at the Service de Rhumatologie, L'Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Pitié Salpêtrière Hôpital, 47-83 Boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013, Paris, France. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds; and at the Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Chapeltown Road, Leeds, LS7 4SA, UK. · Department of Medical Humanities, Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, POBox 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology, Allergy &Immunology, Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0656, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, POBox 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands. · Rheumatology Clinical Research Division, Swedish Medical Center, 601 Broadway, Suite 600, Seattle, Washington 98102, USA. · Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, BOX 695, Rochester, New York 14642, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; and at the 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Wolkersbergenstraße 1, 1130 Vienna, Austria. ·Nat Rev Rheumatol · Pubmed #27829672.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous, potentially severe disease. Many therapeutic agents are now available for PsA, but treatment decisions are not always straightforward. To assist in this decision making, two sets of recommendations for the management of PsA were published in 2016 by international organizations - the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA). In both sets of recommendations, the heterogeneity of PsA is recognized and the place of various drugs in the therapeutic armamentarium is discussed. Such agents include conventional DMARDs, such as methotrexate, and targeted therapies including biologic agents, such as ustekinumab, secukinumab and TNF inhibitors, or the targeted synthetic drug apremilast. The proposed sequential use of these drugs, as well as some other aspects of PsA management, differ between the two sets of recommendations. This disparity is partly the result of a difference in the evaluation process; the focus of EULAR was primarily rheumatological, whereas that of GRAPPA was balanced between the rheumatological and dermatological aspects of disease. In this Perspectives article, we address the similarities and differences between these two sets of recommendations and the implications for patient management.

14 Review Ultraviolet B radiation therapy for psoriasis: Pursuing the optimal regime. 2016

Matos, Tiago R / Ling, Tsui C / Sheth, Vaneeta. ·Newton Wellesley Hospital Department of Dermatology, Newton, MA; Academic Medical Center, Department of Dermatology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, 1105 AZ, Netherlands. Electronic address: tiagoreismatos@gmail.com. · Consultant Dermatologist for Phototherapy and Photobiology Unit, Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal Hospital, Manchester, M6 8 HD, UK. · Newton Wellesley Hospital Department of Dermatology, Newton, MA. ·Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #27638437.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic and common disease mediated by resident memory T cells that negatively affects a broad range of people worldwide. One of the oldest and most commonly used treatments is phototherapy. We reviewed the existing literature on the four main ultraviolet B (UVB) modalities of phototherapy in the management of psoriasis: heliotherapy, broadband UVB, narrowband UVB, and excimer laser and lamp. Despite the many studies done on these therapies, there is significant variation in their prescription and use. Phototherapy remains one of the most effective and safest treatments for psoriasis. We provide an updated comprehensive overview of UVB phototherapy for psoriasis to help physicians optimize their choice of modality and dosing regimen to ensure optimal outcomes for psoriasis patients. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

15 Review Assessing disease activity in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: impact on management and therapy. 2016

Chandran, Vinod / Maharaj, Ajesh B. ·a Department of Medicine, and Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology , University of Toronto , Toronto , Ontario , Canada. · b Institute of Medical Science , University of Toronto , Toronto , Ontario , Canada. · c Krembil Research Institute , University Health Network , Toronto , Ontario , Canada. · d Department of Internal Medicine , Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital, Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of Kwazulu-Natal , Durban , South Africa. · e Department of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Academic Medical Center , University of Amsterdam , Amsterdam , The Netherlands. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #26807494.

ABSTRACT: The management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis has undergone major advancements over the last decade. This has been made possible, in part, due to the introduction of new therapies for their management, as well as global collaboration in the development of outcome measures and "treat- to- target" paradigms. In this review article, we discuss how disease activity is measured and the outcome measures that have been recently developed for the management of PsA. The importance of assessing the individual domains as well as global assessments both from the physician and patient perspective, and the development of composite measures are discussed. The newer PsA specific measures are expected to be more commonly used in clinical trials as well as clinical practice.

16 Review Pharmacological treatment of psoriatic arthritis: a systematic literature review for the 2015 update of the EULAR recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis. 2016

Ramiro, Sofia / Smolen, Josef S / Landewé, Robert / van der Heijde, Désirée / Dougados, Maxime / Emery, Paul / de Wit, Maarten / Cutolo, Maurizio / Oliver, Susan / Gossec, Laure. ·Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology Center, Amsterdam and Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands. · Medicine Faculty, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France Rheumatology B Department, APHP, Cochin Hospital, Paris, France. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, Leeds, UK. · EULAR past Vice President representing People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe (PARE). · Research Laboratory and Clinical Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Italy. · Independent Nurse Consultant, North Devon, UK. · Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS), Paris, France Department of rheumatology, AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26660203.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the evidence on the efficacy and safety of pharmacological agents in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: Systematic literature review of randomised controlled trials comparing pharmacological interventions in PsA: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucocorticoid, synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (sDMARDs) either conventional or targeted, biologicals (bDMARDs), placebo or any combination. Main outcomes were American College of Rheumatology (ACR)20-50, Psoriasis Area Severity Index 75, radiographic progression, and withdrawals due to adverse events (AEs). Multiple studies of the same intervention were meta-analysed using random effects. RESULTS: In total, 25 papers and 12 abstracts were included. The efficacy of tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (including the recently added golimumab and certolizumab pegol) was confirmed and 16 articles/abstracts focused on 3 drugs with new modes of action: ustekinumab (UST), secukinumab (SEC) and apremilast (APR). All were placebo-compared trials and met their primary end point, ACR20. In 2 studies with UST ACR20 was met by 50% and 44% of patients with UST 90 mg, 42% and 44% with UST 45 mg vs 23% and 20% with placebo, respectively. In two studies with SEC ACR20 ranged 54% (SEC 300 mg), 50-51% (SEC 150 mg), 29-51% (SEC 75 mg) and 15-17% (placebo). In four studies with APR, ACR20 ranged 32-43% (APR 30 mg), 29-38% (APR 20 mg) and 17-20% (placebo). For all three drugs, no more withdrawals due to AEs than placebo were seen and, in general, safety appeared satisfactory. A strategy trial, TIght COntrol of Psoriatic Arthritis (TICOPA), showed better ACR responses with treatment adaptations upon tight control compared with standard care. CONCLUSIONS: UST, SEC and APR are new drugs with efficacy demonstrated for the treatment of PsA. No major safety signals arise, but long-term studies are needed. This review informed about the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for management of PsA.

17 Review Methotrexate Dosing Regimen for Plaque-type Psoriasis: A Systematic Review of the Use of Test-dose, Start-dose, Dosing Scheme, Dose Adjustments, Maximum Dose and Folic Acid Supplementation. 2016

Menting, Stef P / Dekker, Paul M / Limpens, Jacqueline / Hooft, Lotty / Spuls, Phyllis I. ·Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. s.p.menting@amc.uva.nl. ·Acta Derm Venereol · Pubmed #25721372.

ABSTRACT: There is a range of methotrexate dosing regimens for psoriasis. This review summarizes the evidence for test-dose, start-dose, dosing scheme, dose adjustments, maximum dose and use of folic acid. A literature search for randomized controlled trials and guidelines was performed. Twenty-three randomized controlled trials (29 treatment groups) and 10 guidelines were included. Two treatment groups used a test-dose, 5 guidelines recommend it. The methotrexate start-dose in randomized controlled trials varied from 5 to 25 mg/week, most commonly being either 7.5 mg or 15 mg. Guidelines vary from 5 to 15 mg/week. Methotrexate was administered as a single dose or in a Weinstein schedule in 15 and 11 treatment-groups, respectively; both recommended equally in guidelines. A fixed dose (n = 18), predefined dose (n = 3), or dose adjusted on clinical improvement (n = 8) was used, the last also being recommended in guidelines. Ten treatment groups used folic acid; in 2 it was allowed, in 14 not mentioned, and in 3 no folic acid was used. Most guidelines recommend the use of folic acid. Authors' suggestions for methotrexate dosing are given.

18 Review Tumour necrosis factor inhibitor monotherapy vs combination with MTX in the treatment of PsA: a systematic review of the literature. 2015

Behrens, Frank / Cañete, Juan D / Olivieri, Ignazio / van Kuijk, Arno W / McHugh, Neil / Combe, Bernard. ·CIRI/Division of Rheumatology and Fraunhofer Institute IME, Translational Medicine and Pharmacology, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany, Arthritis Unit, Rheumatology Department, Hospital Clinic and IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain, Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Italy, Rheumatology Department, Reade/Jan van Breemen Research Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Rheumatology Department, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK and Departement de Rhumatologie Hôpital Lapeyronie-Université Montpellier I, UMR 5535, Montpellier, France behrens@ciri-clinical.de. · CIRI/Division of Rheumatology and Fraunhofer Institute IME, Translational Medicine and Pharmacology, Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany, Arthritis Unit, Rheumatology Department, Hospital Clinic and IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain, Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Italy, Rheumatology Department, Reade/Jan van Breemen Research Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Rheumatology Department, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK and Departement de Rhumatologie Hôpital Lapeyronie-Université Montpellier I, UMR 5535, Montpellier, France. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #25349441.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to review the available evidence on TNF inhibitor monotherapy vs combination therapy with MTX in PsA. METHODS: A literature search was conducted up to and including October 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies comparing TNF inhibitor monotherapy vs combination therapy with MTX in patients with PsA. Key information was extracted from the abstracts and/or full text of the articles retrieved. RESULTS: Eleven published articles and three conference abstracts were retrieved, reporting on six RCTs of four TNF inhibitors. Most RCTs found no differences in efficacy for peripheral arthritis between patients treated with or without MTX. However, the studies were not powered to answer this question. Some data suggest that concomitant MTX may reduce the progression of structural damage. No significant differences in other outcomes have been reported. Data on TNF inhibitor monotherapy vs MTX combination therapy were reported from six registries. Three registries reported that the use of concomitant MTX did not affect the efficacy of TNF inhibitor therapy. Data from three European Union registries suggest that TNF inhibitor (especially mAbs) drug survival is superior in patients taking concomitant MTX, while one Canadian registry reported no difference. CONCLUSION: Available evidence on the efficacy and safety of TNF inhibitor monotherapy vs add-on MTX therapy shows little or no improvement with combination therapy, although the use of concomitant MTX appears to prolong TNF inhibitor drug survival of mAb TNF inhibitors. Registries and observational studies have the potential to fill some of the knowledge gaps in this area.

19 Review Unusual cause of limited elbow movement in a patient with psoriatic arthritis. 2014

Maharaj, Ajesh B / Chandran, Vinod. ·Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South Africa; maharaja30@ukzn.ac.za. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Staff Physician, Division of Rheumatology, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25452180.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Review Non-pharmacological interventions for preventing job loss in workers with inflammatory arthritis. 2014

Hoving, Jan L / Lacaille, Diane / Urquhart, Donna M / Hannu, Timo J / Sluiter, Judith K / Frings-Dresen, Monique H W. ·Coronel Institute of Occupational Health and Research Center for Insurance Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, PO Box 22700, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1100 DE. ·Cochrane Database Syst Rev · Pubmed #25375291.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Work participation of patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) is important not only economically but also for physical and psychological health. There is no Cochrane Review to date on studies of non-pharmacological interventions specifically aimed at preventing job loss in people with IA. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of non-pharmacological interventions that aim to prevent job loss, work absenteeism or improve work functioning for employees with IA (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), other spondylarthritis (SpA) or IA associated with connective tissue diseases, such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)). SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following databases from inception up to 30 April 2014; The Cochrane Library (including Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, i.e. CENTRAL and DARE), MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE (Embase.com), CINAHL (EbSCOhost), ClinicalTrials.gov and PsycINFO (ProQuest). We did not impose language restrictions in the search. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated interventions aimed at preventing job loss in adults of working age (18 to 65 years) diagnosed with IA, including RA, AS, PsA, SpA or other types of IA. Primary outcomes were job loss and sickness absenteeism and the secondary outcome was work functioning. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias in the included RCTs. MAIN RESULTS: We included three RCTs with a total of 414 participants at risk of job loss. The majority of participants had IA, most with RA and to a lesser degree AS. The interventions aimed to prevent job loss and improve work functioning in several ways: firstly by evaluating work changes or adaptations and secondly by providing any person-directed interventions including vocational counselling, advice or education. Interventions directly targeted at the work environment were minimal and included workplace visits (one trial) or any actions by an occupational physician (one trial). The duration or dose of the interventions varied from two 1.5-hour sessions (one RCT) over five months, two consultation and multidisciplinary treatments during three months (one RCT), to six to eight individual or group sessions over six months (also one RCT). All participants were recruited through rheumatology clinics, both in or outside hospitals. Included trials investigated job loss (n = two RCTs; 382 participants), work absenteeism and work functioning (n = one RCT; 32 participants). Overall, we evaluated the two smaller trials as having a high risk of bias and the large trial as having a low risk of bias. Trials showed marked differences in how they performed on risk of bias items, particularly on performance bias.We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach and judged there to be very low quality evidence across the three reported outcomes. Of the two RCTs investigating job loss, the larger one (n = 242 participants) reported a large statistically significant reduction in job loss (relative risk (RR) = 0.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.18 to 0.68) and the other RCT (n = 140) reported similar effects in both groups, although the CI was very wide (RR = 1.05, 95% CI 0.53 to 2.06). The latter one probably suffered from performance bias and we judged it to have a high risk of bias. The one small trial investigating sickness absenteeism found uncertain results at six months' follow-up (MD = -2.42 days, 95% CI -5.03 to 0.19). Finally, in the same small trial investigating work functioning using the Rheumatoid Arthritis-Work Instability Scale (RA-WIS), there was a moderate improvement of intermediate term work functioning (six months; scale range 0 to 23; mean improvement -4.67 points, 95% CI -8.43 to -0.91). We identified no adverse effects in the publications of the three trials. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: This Cochrane review of three RCTs found very low quality evidence overall for job loss prevention interventions having an effect on job loss, work absenteeism and work functioning in workers with inflammatory arthritis. While this review highlights that further high quality RCTs are required, the results suggest that these strategies have potential to be effective.

21 Review Comprehensive treatment of psoriatic arthritis: managing comorbidities and extraarticular manifestations. 2014

Ogdie, Alexis / Schwartzman, Sergio / Eder, Lihi / Maharaj, Ajesh B / Zisman, Devy / Raychaudhuri, Siba P / Reddy, Soumya M / Husni, Elaine. ·From the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York, USA; Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South Africa, and Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Carmel Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa, Israel; Rheumatology, VA Sacramento Medical Center; Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, School of Medicine, UC Davis, Davis, California; Division of Rheumatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York; and the Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.A. Ogdie, MD, MSCE, University of Pennsylvania; S. Schwartzman, MD, Hospital for Special Surgery; L. Eder, MD, PhD, Toronto Western Hospital; A.B. Maharaj, MB, BS, HDipIntMed(SA), FCP(SA), Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu Natal and Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam; D. Zisman, MD, Carmel Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Technion; S.P. Raychaudhuri, MD, Rheumatology, VA Sacramento Medical Center; Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, School of Medicine, UC Davis; S.M. Reddy, MD, Division of Rheumatology, New York University School of Medicine; E. Husni, MD, MPH, Cleveland Clinic. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25362717.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis that can lead to decreased health-related quality of life and permanent joint damage leading to functional decline. In addition to joint and skin manifestations, both psoriasis and PsA are associated with numerous comorbidities and extraarticular/cutaneous manifestations, which may influence the physician's choice of therapy. The objectives of this review are (1) to identify comorbidities in patients with PsA based on the available evidence; (2) to examine the effects of these comorbidities or extraarticular/cutaneous manifestation on the management of patients with PsA as well as the selection of therapy; and (3) to highlight research needs around comorbidities and treatment paradigms. This review is part of a treatment recommendations update initiated by the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA).

22 Review Combined use of systemic agents for psoriasis: a systematic review. 2014

Busard, Celine / Zweegers, Jeffrey / Limpens, Jacqueline / Langendam, Miranda / Spuls, Phyllis I. ·Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. · Medical Library, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Dutch Cochrane Centre, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #25188393.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Combined use of systemic agents may be necessary to achieve disease control in therapy-resistant patients. However, to our knowledge, an overview of evidence, including quality assessments, is not yet available, and no guidance on monitoring, contraindications, and interactions exists. OBJECTIVES: To summarize and critically appraise the evidence on efficacy and safety of combination therapy with systemic agents in plaque-type psoriasis. EVIDENCE REVIEW: Through March 2013, an electronic search limited to randomized clinical trials was performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, and ongoing trial registers. The quality of evidence was evaluated using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. FINDINGS: The initial search retrieved 2583 records, of which 17 met the inclusion criteria. Most studies favored combination therapy, albeit with low significance and low quality of evidence. Etanercept plus methotrexate was the only combination therapy investigated with an adequate sample size (n = 478). In the short term, this combination had superior efficacy with a moderate quality of evidence compared with etanercept monotherapy (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index, 75; relative risk, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.14-1.45). Although this finding coincided with an increase in adverse events (relative risk, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.10-1.42), the overall safety profile remained acceptable. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This systematic review provides a comprehensive overview on the validity of different systemic combination therapies. For most combinations, insufficient evidence is available. Initial results indicate that combined therapy with etanercept plus methotrexate may be beneficial in patients that are therapy resistant under intensive follow-up. Dose reductions should be taken into account to minimize adverse effects.

23 Review Interventions for nail psoriasis. 2013

de Vries, Anna Christa Q / Bogaards, Nathalie A / Hooft, Lotty / Velema, Marieke / Pasch, Marcel / Lebwohl, Mark / Spuls, Phyllis I. ·Department of Dermatology, AcademicMedical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ·Cochrane Database Syst Rev · Pubmed #23440816.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a common skin disease that can also involve the nails. All parts of the nail and surrounding structures can become affected. The incidence of nail involvement increases with duration of psoriasis. Although it is difficult to treat psoriatic nails, the condition may respond to therapy. OBJECTIVES: To assess evidence for the efficacy and safety of the treatments for nail psoriasis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following databases up to March 2012: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), and LILACS (from 1982). We also searched trials databases and checked the reference lists of retrieved studies for further references to relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). SELECTION CRITERIA: All RCTs of any design concerning interventions for nail psoriasis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently assessed trial risk of bias and extracted the data. We collected adverse effects from the included studies.   MAIN RESULTS: We included 18 studies involving 1266 participants. We were not able to pool due to the heterogeneity of many of the studies.Our primary outcomes were 'Global improvement of nail psoriasis as rated by a clinician', 'Improvement of nail psoriasis scores (NAS, NAPSI)', 'Improvement of nail psoriasis in the participant's opinion'. Our secondary outcomes were 'Adverse effects (and serious adverse effects)'; 'Effects on quality of life'; and 'Improvement in nail features, pain score, nail thickness, thickness of subungual hyperkeratosis, number of affected nails, and nail growth'. We assessed short-term (3 to 6 months), medium-term (6 to 12 months), and long-term (> 12 months) treatments separately if possible.Two systemic biologic studies and three radiotherapy studies reported significant results for our first two primary outcomes. Infliximab 5 mg/kg showed 57.2% nail score improvement versus -4.1% for placebo (P < 0.001); golimumab 50 mg and 100 mg showed 33% and 54% improvement, respectively, versus 0% for placebo (P < 0.001), both after medium-term treatment. Infliximab and golimumab also showed significant results after short-term treatment. From the 3 radiotherapy studies, only the superficial radiotherapy (SRT) study showed 20% versus 0% nail score improvement (P = 0.03) after short-term treatment.Studies with ciclosporin, methotrexate, and ustekinumab were not significantly better than their respective comparators: etretinate, ciclosporin, and placebo. Nor were studies with topical interventions (5-fluorouracil 1% in Belanyx® lotion, tazarotene 0.1% cream, calcipotriol 50 ug/g, calcipotriol 0.005%) better than their respective comparators: Belanyx® lotion, clobetasol propionate, betamethasone dipropionate with salicylic acid, or betamethasone dipropionate.Of our secondary outcomes, not all included studies reported adverse events; those that did only reported mild adverse effects, and there were more in studies with systemic interventions. Only one study reported the effect on quality of life, and two studies reported nail improvement only per feature. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Infliximab, golimumab, SRT, grenz rays, and electron beam caused significant nail improvement compared to the comparative treatment. Although the quality of trials was generally poor, this review may have some implications for clinical practice.Although powerful systemic treatments have been shown to be beneficial, they may have serious adverse effects. So they are not a realistic option for people troubled with nail psoriasis, unless the patient is prescribed these systemic treatments because of cutaneous psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis or the nail psoriasis is severe, refractory to other treatments, or has a major impact on the person's quality of life. Because of their design and timescale, RCTs generally do not pick up serious side-effects. This review reported only mild adverse effects, recorded mainly for systemic treatments. Radiotherapy for psoriasis is not used in common practice. The evidence for the use of topical treatments is inconclusive and of poor quality; however, this does not imply that they do not work.Future trials need to be rigorous in design, with adequate reporting. Trials should correctly describe the participants' characteristics and diagnostic features, use standard validated nail scores and participant-reported outcomes, be long enough to report efficacy and safety, and include details of effects on nail features.

24 Review Cardiovascular comorbidities in patients with psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review. 2013

Jamnitski, Anna / Symmons, Deborah / Peters, Mike J L / Sattar, Naveed / McInnes, Iain / Nurmohamed, Michael T. ·Department of Rheumatology, Jan van Breemen Research Institute/READE, Dr Jan van Breemenstraat 2, 1056 AB Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #22532629.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Data regarding cardiovascular comorbidity and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are limited. To evaluate the cardiovascular risk profile, a systematic literature search was performed to provide an extensive summary of all studies available on cardiovascular risk in PsA. METHODS: Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane library were searched from January 1966 to April 2011 for English language articles on data concerning cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular risk factors in PsA. Review articles, case reports and studies on psoriasis alone were excluded. RESULTS: Twenty-eight articles were included in this review. Studies on all-cause mortality revealed mixed results. Available data on cardiovascular disease appeared more consistent, indicating an increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in PsA. Commensurate with this, surrogate markers of subclinical atherosclerosis, arterial stiffness and cardiovascular risk factors, for example hypertension, dyslipidaemia, obesity and metabolic-related factors, were more prominent in PsA compared with controls. Suppression of inflammation was linked with a favourable effect on cardiovascular surrogate markers, for example carotid intima media thickness and endothelial dysfunction, in several (un)controlled studies. CONCLUSION: Most studies point towards an increased cardiovascular risk in PsA, broadly on a par with the risk level in rheumatoid arthritis, emphasising the need for similar cardiovascular risk management in both conditions. Further studies are needed to indicate whether inflammatory suppression or modification of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, or both, will reduce cardiovascular risk.

25 Review Comorbidities in patients with spondyloarthritis. 2012

van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E / Nurmohamed, Michael T / Landewé, Robert B M. ·Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ie.vanderhorst@vumc.nl ·Rheum Dis Clin North Am · Pubmed #23083753.

ABSTRACT: Chronic inflammatory spondyloarthritis involves axial symptoms of the spine and sacroiliac joints, or peripheral arthritis. Many patients suffer from extra-articular manifestations. With acute anterior uveitis, rapid treatment prevents synechiae. Other organs can be involved. Treatment includes exercise, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (if insufficient response, tumor necrosis factor blockers), and (with peripheral arthritis) sulfasalazine. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis have comorbidities and increased cardiovascular risk. For uveitis or inflammatory bowel disease, patients should be referred to an ophthalmologist or gastroenterologist. Cardiovascular risk may originate from atherosclerotic disease and cardiac manifestations. Epidemiological studies should be conducted before echocardiogram screening and cardiovascular risk management.

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