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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Dallas
Based on 135 articles published since 2008
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These are the 135 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Dallas during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with biologics. 2019

Menter, Alan / Strober, Bruce E / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kivelevitch, Dario / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Stoff, Benjamin / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Davis, Dawn M R / Elewski, Boni E / Gelfand, Joel M / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Leonardi, Craig L / Lichten, Jason / Lim, Henry W / Mehta, Nehal N / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Rupani, Reena N / Siegel, Michael / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Elmets, Craig A. ·Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, San Francisco. · University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, San Francisco, California. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772098.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations based on the available evidence. The treatment of psoriasis with biologic agents will be reviewed, emphasizing treatment recommendations and the role of the dermatologist in monitoring and educating patients regarding benefits as well as associated risks.

2 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

3 Guideline Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Section 3. Guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with topical therapies. 2009

Menter, Alan / Korman, Neil J / Elmets, Craig A / Feldman, Steven R / Gelfand, Joel M / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice / Koo, John Y M / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Beutner, Karl R / Bhushan, Reva / Anonymous150622. ·Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #19217694.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multi-system disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the population. In this third of 6 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we discuss the use of topical medications for the treatment of psoriasis. The majority of patients with psoriasis have limited disease (<5% body surface area involvement) and can be treated with topical agents, which generally provide a high efficacy-to-safety ratio. Topical agents may also be used adjunctively for patients with more extensive psoriasis undergoing therapy with either ultraviolet light, systemic or biologic medications. However, the use of topical agents as monotherapy in the setting of extensive disease or in the setting of limited, but recalcitrant, disease is not routinely recommended. Treatment should be tailored to meet individual patients' needs. We will discuss the efficacy and safety of as well as offer recommendations for the use of topical corticosteroids, vitamin D analogues, tazarotene, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, emollients, salicylic acid, anthralin, coal tar, as well as combination therapy.

4 Guideline Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: Section 1. Overview of psoriasis and guidelines of care for the treatment of psoriasis with biologics. 2008

Menter, Alan / Gottlieb, Alice / Feldman, Steven R / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Leonardi, Craig L / Gordon, Kenneth B / Lebwohl, Mark / Koo, John Y M / Elmets, Craig A / Korman, Neil J / Beutner, Karl R / Bhushan, Reva. ·Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #18423260.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the population. In this first of 5 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we discuss the classification of psoriasis; associated comorbidities including autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular risk, psychiatric/psychologic issues, and cancer risk; along with assessment tools for skin disease and quality-of-life issues. Finally, we will discuss the safety and efficacy of the biologic treatments used to treat patients with psoriasis.

5 Editorial Coronary Plaque Characterization in Psoriasis. 2017

Kivelevitch, Dario / Schussler, Jeffrey M / Menter, Alan. ·From Division of Dermatology (D.K., A.M.) and Department of Cardiology (J.M.S), Baylor Scott & White and Texas A&M College of Medicine, Dallas. · From Division of Dermatology (D.K., A.M.) and Department of Cardiology (J.M.S), Baylor Scott & White and Texas A&M College of Medicine, Dallas. amderm@gmail.com. ·Circulation · Pubmed #28716831.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Phototherapy in dermatology: A call for action. 2015

Lim, Henry W / Silpa-archa, Narumol / Amadi, Ugochukwu / Menter, Alan / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Lebwohl, Mark. ·Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. Electronic address: hlim1@hfhs.org. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan; Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #25981004.

ABSTRACT: Of the wide range of treatment modalities available to dermatologists, few possess the history, efficacy, and safety of phototherapy. It should be emphasized that dermatologists are the only group of physicians optimally trained and qualified to understand the medical indications of phototherapy. Phototherapy, recognized for its cost-effectiveness, should remain a consideration in patient treatment. Continued training and education in residency and thereafter is needed to maintain the proficiency of physicians. In addition, payors need continued education to ensure that insurance coverage of phototherapy is not a barrier for patients to access this therapy. To further improve and optimize the outcome, phototherapy research needs to be supported.

7 Editorial The International Psoriasis Council: advancing knowledge, enhancing care. 2015

Alan Menter, M / Griffiths, Christopher E M. ·Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX, USA. Electronic address: amderm@gmail.com. · Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal Hospital, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester M6 8HD, UK. Electronic address: Christopher.Griffiths@manchester.ac.uk. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #25412791.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Review Risankizumab: an anti-IL-23 antibody for the treatment of psoriasis. 2018

Haugh, Isabel M / Preston, Allie K / Kivelevitch, Dario N / Menter, Alan M. ·Department of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA, amderm@gmail.com. · Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Bryan, TX, USA. ·Drug Des Devel Ther · Pubmed #30518998.

ABSTRACT: Risankizumab, a fully human IgG monoclonal antibody inhibitor of IL-23, is a therapeutic agent currently in late stage development for use in the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. It is a biologic agent similar to guselkumab and tildrakizumab which targets IL-23 specifically, and has been primarily developed for use in moderate-to-severe psoriasis. USA-based pharmaceutical company Abbvie submitted it for a Biologics License Application to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in April 2018. Risankizumab is the result of a collaboration between the German company Boehringer Ingelheim and Abbvie, which together are leading the future development and commercialization of risankizumab globally. The results from Phase I to Phase III clinical trials of risankizumab show it is highly effective and its FDA-approval in 2018 is likely. In this article we provide an independent expert opinion on the efficacy and safety of risankizumab in psoriasis based on a full review of the literature.

9 Review Pharmacotherapeutic approaches for treating psoriasis in difficult-to-treat areas. 2018

Kivelevitch, Dario / Frieder, Jillian / Watson, Ian / Paek, So Yeon / Menter, M Alan. ·a Division of Dermatology , Baylor Scott and White , Dallas , TX , USA. · b Texas A&M Health Sciences Center College of Medicine , Bryan , TX , USA. ·Expert Opin Pharmacother · Pubmed #29565192.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Despite great therapeutic advancements in psoriasis, four notable difficult-to-treat areas including the scalp, nails, intertriginous (including genitals), and palmoplantar regions, pose a challenge to both physicians and patients. Localized disease of these specific body regions inflicts a significant burden on patients' quality of life and requires an adequate selection of treatments. AREAS COVERED: This manuscript discusses appropriate therapies and important treatment considerations for these difficult-to-treat areas based on the available clinical data from the literature. EXPERT OPINION: Clinical trials assessing therapies for the difficult-to-treat areas have been inadequate. With the first biological clinical trial for genital psoriasis pending publication, it is with hope that other biological agents will be evaluated for region-specific psoriasis. A greater understanding of the genetic and immunologic aspects of regional psoriasis, as well as identification of unique biomarkers, will further guide management decisions. For example, the recent discovery of the IL-36 receptor gene for generalized pustular psoriasis may prove valuable for other forms of psoriasis. Ultimately, identification of the most beneficial treatments for each psoriasis subtype and difficult-to-treat area will provide patients with maximal quality of life.

10 Review Prevalence of genital psoriasis in patients with psoriasis. 2018

Meeuwis, Kim A P / Potts Bleakman, Alison / van de Kerkhof, Peter C M / Dutronc, Yves / Henneges, Carsten / Kornberg, Lori J / Menter, Alan. ·a Department of Dermatology , Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center , Nijmegen , Netherlands. · b Eli Lilly and Company , Indianapolis , IN , USA. · c Lilly France , Neuilly sur Seine , France. · d Lilly Deutschland GmbH , Bad Homburg , Germany. · e Syneos Health , Raleigh , NC , USA. · f Baylor University Medical Center , Dallas , TX , USA. ·J Dermatolog Treat · Pubmed #29565190.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Psoriatic lesions in the genital area (GenPs) can cause considerable physical and emotional distress. To increase physician awareness, we estimated the GenPs prevalence among patients with psoriasis. METHODS: An English language literature search was performed. Articles reporting GenPs prevalence met the search criteria and were included. Because GenPs is rarely reported in demographics of prospective clinical trials, GenPs prevalence and baseline demographics of patients with and without GenPs in two prospective randomized phase 3b trials (NCT02561806 and NCT02634801) involving patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis are reported. RESULTS: Overall, 600 references were screened. Eighteen articles met the search criteria. Patient populations were highly heterogeneous across articles. Broadly, the presence of GenPs was either physician-reported (physical examinations) or patient-reported (questionnaires). In the literature, GenPs prevalence at the time of reporting ranged from 7% to 42% and the prevalence of GenPs at any time during the course of psoriasis ranged from 33% to 63%. In the two prospective clinical trials, the prevalence of GenPs at the time of enrollment was 35-42%. CONCLUSION: A substantial proportion of patients experience genital lesions at some time during the course of psoriasis. Increased awareness of GenPs prevalence may drive improved assessment and treatment.

11 Review Management of psoriasis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. 2018

Whitlock, Scott M / Enos, Clinton W / Armstrong, April W / Gottlieb, Alice / Langley, Richard G / Lebwohl, Mark / Merola, Joseph F / Ryan, Caitriona / Siegel, Michael P / Weinberg, Jeffrey M / Wu, Jashin J / Van Voorhees, Abby S. ·Department of Dermatology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. · Department of Dermatology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York. · Division of Clinical Dermatology and Cutaneous Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. Electronic address: vanvooas@evms.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29332708.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is a significant association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Many treatments for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are also used for IBD. OBJECTIVE: To assess therapeutic options for patients with psoriasis and concurrent IBD. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed for clinical studies of biologic and systemic psoriasis medications in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease, for the period from January 1, 1947, to February 14, 2017. Randomized, controlled, double-blinded studies were selected if available. If not, the next highest level of available evidence was selected. RESULTS: Of the 2282 articles identified, 132 were selected. Infliximab and adalimumab have demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative; colitis, and Crohn's disease. Ustekinumab has demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease. Certolizumab has demonstrated efficacy in psoriatic arthritis and Crohn's disease. Etanercept, secukinumab, brodalumab, and ixekizumab have demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis but may exacerbate or induce IBD. Guselkumab has demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis. LIMITATIONS: There are no known clinical trials of treatment specifically for concurrent psoriasis and IBD. CONCLUSIONS: Infliximab and adalimumab have demonstrated efficacy in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease; other agents have demonstrated efficacy for some, but not all, of these indications.

12 Review The impact of biologic agents on health-related quality of life outcomes in patients with psoriasis. 2018

Frieder, Jillian / Kivelevitch, Dario / Fiore, Connie Tran / Saad, Saadeddine / Menter, Alan. ·a Division of Dermatology , Baylor University Medical Center , Dallas , TX , USA. · b Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine , Bryan , TX , USA. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #29110556.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated skin disease often associated with significant physical and psychosocial impairment. Antipsoriatic biologic agents offer patients unparalleled treatment potential in regard to greater skin clearance and overall improved quality of life. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of biologic agents on the full psoriasis disease burden must account for their impact on both physical symptoms, as well as patient-reported, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measurements. Areas covered: Results from numerous clinical trials demonstrate the significant clinical efficacy of biological agents targeting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and the interleukin (IL)-12/23 and IL-17 immune pathways. However, relatively limited data is available evaluating their full effect on quality of life outcomes. This review will discuss the most relevant and up-to-date clinical data on HRQoL measurements related to treatment with these aforementioned biologic agents. Expert commentary: Patient-reported outcomes (i.e. Dermatology Life Quality Index) are being used with increasing frequency in clinical trials, and provide valuable information on the impact of psoriasis on numerous aspects of day-to-day living. These outcomes must also be incorporated in clinical practice, in addition to physical assessment of disease severity, treatment decisions, and therapeutic response in the psoriasis patient population.

13 Review A review article on brodalumab in the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. 2017

Roostaeyan, Omid / Kivelevitch, Dario / Menter, Alan. ·University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Oklahoma City, OK 73019, USA. · Division of Dermatology, Baylor Scott & White, Dallas, TX 75246, USA. ·Immunotherapy · Pubmed #28879789.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated skin disorder affecting approximately 2-3% of the worldwide population. Recent advances in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis have resulted in novel therapeutic agents. IL-17, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, plays a pivotal role in psoriasis. Therapeutic agents targeting this cytokine have shown clinical effectiveness in the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Brodalumab, a human antibody against IL-17 receptor A, has been approved by the US FDA in February 2017, by the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency in July 2016 and by the EMA in July 2017 for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. This article reviews the published data relating to brodalumab for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.

14 Review Calcipotriene betamethasone dipropionate aerosol foam in the treatment of plaque psoriasis: a review of the literature. 2017

Frieder, Jillian / Kivelevitch, Dario / Menter, Alan. ·Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, 3900 Junius Street, Suite 125, Dallas, TX 75246, USA. ·Ther Deliv · Pubmed #28659016.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common chronic immune-mediated skin disease which has a significant impact on patients' quality of life, and is associated with numerous comorbidities (i.e., psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease and cardiovascular disease). A greater understanding of its immunopathogenesis has guided the development of novel, more targeted therapies. Nonetheless, traditional treatment with topical agents, phototherapy and systemic medications is used in the management of the majority of psoriasis patients. Mainstay topical treatments include corticosteroids and vitamin D derivatives. Calcipotriene/betamethasone dipropionate aerosol foam is a novel single product combination, which seeks to provide superior therapeutic efficacy in addition to enhanced cosmetic properties. This article reviews the literature on the pharmacology and clinical data in terms of safety, efficacy and patient satisfaction of this topical medication.

15 Review Psoriasis for the primary care practitioner. 2017

Young, Melodie / Aldredge, Lakshi / Parker, Patti. ·Modern Dermatology, Baylor-Health Texas Affiliate, Dallas, Texas. · Dermatology Service, Operative Care Division, VA Portland Health Care System, Portland, Oregon. · College of Nursing and Health Innovation, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas. ·J Am Assoc Nurse Pract · Pubmed #28233460.

ABSTRACT: Primary care practitioners (PCPs) are playing an increasingly important role in the management and care of psoriasis. Thus, it is important for PCPs to be knowledgeable about the disease and to be able to differentiate between common myths and facts related to diagnosis and treatment. By building relationships with their patients and working collaboratively with dermatology health professionals and other specialists, PCPs can facilitate communication about the patient's treatment preferences and expectations for symptom relief, and they may be better able to work with the patient to optimize treatment adherence. This review aims to provide PCPs with a primer on psoriasis, its associated comorbidities, and its impact on patients' quality of life. Discussion topics include psoriasis epidemiology, triggering factors, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, comorbidities, and approaches to treatment. This review also highlights the importance of staying abreast of advances in the understanding of psoriasis pathogenesis as well as emerging therapeutic treatment options, because these advances may change the treatment landscape and increase patients' expectations for skin clearance.

16 Review Treatment modifying factors of biologics for psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review and Bayesian meta-regression. 2017

Druyts, Eric / Palmer, Jacqueline B / Balijepalli, Chakrapani / Chan, Keith / Fazeli, Mir Sohail / Herrera, Vivian / Jansen, Jeroen P / Park, Jay J H / Kanters, Steve / Reimold, Andreas. ·Precision Health Economics, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. edruyts@redwoodoutcomes.com. · Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, New Jersey, USA. · Precision Health Economics, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Rheumatology Section, Dallas VA Medical Center, Dallas; and Division of Rheumatic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #28094756.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore factors that modify treatment effects of non-conventional biologics versus placebo in patients with psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: A systematic literature review and meta-regression was conducted. The biologics included etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, certolizumab, ustekinumab, tocilizumab, anakinra, abatacept, rituximab, and secukinumab. Outcomes included American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 and 50, Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) 75, and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) Physical and Mental Component Summaries (PCS and MCS). RESULTS: Twelve RCTs were eligible for meta-regression. Treatment effects for ACR-20 at 12 weeks were higher in trials with longer disease durations (OR=2.94), and lower in trials enrolling older patients (OR=0.48), and those recently published (OR=0.49). Treatment effects for ACR-50 at 12 weeks were higher in trials with more males (OR=2.27), but lower in trials with high prior anti-TNF use (OR=0.28) and recently published trials (OR=0.37). For PASI-75, trials with more male patients (24 weeks: OR=2.56), and with higher swollen and tender joint counts (12 weeks: OR=8.33; 24 weeks: OR=14.44) showed higher treatment effects, and trials with high prior anti-TNF use had lower effects (OR=0.41). Treatment effects for SF-36 PCS at 24 weeks were higher in trials with longer psoriasis disease durations (OR=2.95) and PsA disease durations (OR=4.76), and those published earlier (OR=4.19). CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses show that differences in baseline characteristics may explain some of the differences in response to biologics versus placebo across different trials. Accounting for these factors in future studies will likely be important.

17 Review From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation: Treatment targets for plaque psoriasis. 2017

Armstrong, April W / Siegel, Michael P / Bagel, Jerry / Boh, Erin E / Buell, Megan / Cooper, Kevin D / Callis Duffin, Kristina / Eichenfield, Lawrence F / Garg, Amit / Gelfand, Joel M / Gottlieb, Alice B / Koo, John Y M / Korman, Neil J / Krueger, Gerald G / Lebwohl, Mark G / Leonardi, Craig L / Mandelin, Arthur M / Menter, M Alan / Merola, Joseph F / Pariser, David M / Prussick, Ronald B / Ryan, Caitriona / Shah, Kara N / Weinberg, Jeffrey M / Williams, MaryJane O U / Wu, Jashin J / Yamauchi, Paul S / Van Voorhees, Abby S. ·Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: aprilarmstrong@post.harvard.edu. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Windsor Dermatology, East Windsor, New Jersey; University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro, Plainsboro, New Jersey. · Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana. · University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah. · University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California. · Northwell Health and Hofstra North Shore University Hospital, Long Island Jewish Medical Center School of Medicine, Manhasset, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California San Francisco Medical Center, San Francisco, California. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · St Louis University Medical School, St Louis, Missouri. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Baylor University Medical Center and Texas A&M Health Science Center, Dallas, Texas. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia; Virginia Clinical Research Inc, Norfolk, Virginia. · George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia. · Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Division of Dermatology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #27908543.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An urgent need exists in the United States to establish treatment goals in psoriasis. OBJECTIVE: We aim to establish defined treatment targets toward which clinicians and patients with psoriasis can strive to inform treatment decisions, reduce disease burden, and improve outcomes in practice. METHODS: The National Psoriasis Foundation conducted a consensus-building study among psoriasis experts using the Delphi method. The process consisted of: (1) literature review, (2) pre-Delphi question selection and input from general dermatologists and patients, and (3) 4 Delphi rounds. RESULTS: A total of 25 psoriasis experts participated in the Delphi process. The most preferred instrument was body surface area (BSA). The most preferred time for evaluating patient response after starting new therapies was at 3 months. The acceptable response at 3 months postinitiation was either BSA 3% or less or BSA improvement 75% or more from baseline. The target response at 3 months postinitiation was BSA 1% or less. During the maintenance period, evaluation every 6 months was most preferred. The target response at every 6 months maintenance evaluation is BSA 1% or less. LIMITATIONS: Although BSA is feasible in practice, it does not encompass health-related quality of life, costs, and risks of side effects. CONCLUSION: With defined treatment targets, clinicians and patients can regularly evaluate treatment responses and perform benefit-risk assessments of therapeutic options individualized to the patient.

18 Review A review of emerging IL-17 inhibitors in the treatment of psoriasis focusing on preclinical through phase II studies. 2016

Campa, Molly / Menter, Alan. ·a Division of Dermatology , Baylor University Medical Center , Dallas , TX , USA. ·Expert Opin Investig Drugs · Pubmed #27687859.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Interleukin-17 has recently been identified as a key player in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. As such, several drugs targeting IL-17 are in various stages of clinical development. Areas covered: In this review, the authors describe several emerging therapies and drug candidates targeting IL-17. The authors detail many biologic injectable drug candidates as well as numerous potential oral and topical small molecule drug candidates. Expert opinion: Approval of IL-17 inhibitors has significantly improved the treatment options for psoriasis patients. Secukinumab and ixekizumab are approved in both Europe and the USA, and brodalumab is likely facing approval by the end of 2016. Numerous additional biologic and small molecule drug candidates are in the pipeline, and once deemed safe and effective will likely offer significant benefit to our psoriasis population.

19 Review Psoriasis and cardiovascular disorders. 2016

Frieder, Jillian / Ryan, Caitriona. ·Department of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA - jhfrieder@gmail.com. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #27627099.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and related comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, and obesity. The precise mechanistic links underlying the association between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease remain unknown, however, multiple pathologic mechanisms have been proposed. Shared inflammatory pathways between psoriasis and atherosclerosis are likely involved. Other possible mechanisms include endothelial dysfunction, cytokine dysregulation, platelet upregulation, and dyslipidemia. Additional studies are needed to more clearly define the association between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease. Current, but limited, data suggests that psoriasis treatments targeting inflammation may be able to reduce the cardiovascular risks in this patient population. As new therapies become available, long-term prospective studies will be required to determine their potential effects on cardiovascular risk. This review summarizes the current literature on proposed pathogenic links between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease, the epidemiology of psoriasis and associated cardiovascular and cardiometabolic diseases, and the impact of anti-psoriatic treatments on cardiovascular risk profile. In addition, we provide a brief discussion of risk factor management strategies in patients with psoriasis.

20 Review An overview of developing TNF-α targeted therapy for the treatment of psoriasis. 2015

Campa, Molly / Ryan, Caitriona / Menter, Alan. ·a Baylor University Medical Center, Division of Dermatology , Dallas, TX, USA amderm@gmail.com. ·Expert Opin Investig Drugs · Pubmed #26289788.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Three biologic drugs targeting TNF-α are approved to treat moderate-to-severe cutaneous psoriasis. These are adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab. These drugs are given by subcutaneous injection or intravenous infusion, and while generally safe and effective, they are expensive with potential for side effects. Thus, numerous new drug candidates are under development that also target TNF-α. AREAS COVERED: In this review, the authors detail several drugs under development that target TNF-α, focusing on those drugs in preclinical, Phase I and II trials. The authors describe emerging biologic psoriasis therapies, including biosimilars and novel biologics, in addition to several synthetic and naturally derived small-molecule drug candidates. EXPERT OPINION: The currently approved TNF-α antagonists benefit from over 10 years of safety and efficacy data. The expense and method of administration of these biologics, however, can be cumbersome, and less expensive alternatives have the potential to benefit patients with psoriasis. It is inevitable, despite the introduction of new anti-IL-17 therapies, that established TNF-α targeted therapies, as well as newcomers targeting TNF-α, will continue to play an important role in the lifelong management of psoriasis.

21 Review Atypical Infections versus Inflammatory Conditions of the Hand: The Role of Imaging in Diagnosis. 2015

Soldatos, Theodoros / Omar, Hythem / Sammer, Douglas / Chhabra, Avneesh. ·Kirkcaldy, United Kingdom; and Dallas, Texas From the Department of Radiology, Victoria Hospital, NHS Fife; and the Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. ·Plast Reconstr Surg · Pubmed #26218379.

ABSTRACT: Atypical infections may manifest in the setting of low clinical suspicion and, because of some similarity to other inflammatory conditions regarding their clinical and imaging findings, misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis is not infrequent. The latter may lead to elevated risk of severe bone and joint destruction, and higher morbidity. This review addresses the challenging subject of discussing the imaging characteristics of atypical infections and a variety of inflammatory conditions of the hand, and emphasizes the key points that assist in the differentiation of the two broad clinical categories of infections versus inflammatory causes.

22 Review Use of brodalumab for the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. 2015

Kivelevitch, Dario N / Menter, Alan. ·Baylor University Medical Center, 3900 Junius Street, Suite 125, Dallas, TX 75246, USA. ·Immunotherapy · Pubmed #25917624.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated disease that affects 2-3% of the population worldwide. Over the past two decades new data on the physiopathology of psoriasis have opened the door for novel therapeutic options. The IL-23-Th17 axis has been shown to play a key role in the inflammatory cascade central to this disease. IL-17 inhibitors are a new group of drugs that have shown excellent clinical effectiveness for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis in current clinical trials. Brodalumab is an antibody against IL-17 receptor subunit A (IL-17RA). This article reviews the available published data on brodalumab for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

23 Review The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity. 2015

Plikus, Maksim V / Van Spyk, Elyse N / Pham, Kim / Geyfman, Mikhail / Kumar, Vivek / Takahashi, Joseph S / Andersen, Bogi. ·Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA Center for Complex Biological Systems, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA. · Center for Complex Biological Systems, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA Department of Biological Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA. · Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA. · Kythera Biopharmaceuticals, Westlake Village, CA. · Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX. · Center for Complex Biological Systems, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA Department of Biological Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA bogi@uci.edu. ·J Biol Rhythms · Pubmed #25589491.

ABSTRACT: Historically, work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as the liver, fat, and muscle. In recent years, skin has emerged as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging, and carcinogenesis. Morphologically, skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable, and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration: the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell type-specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it also represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. Skin also provides opportunities to interrogate the clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model for investigating the role of the clock in seasonal organismal behaviors.

24 Review Psoriasis: the future. 2015

Menter, M Alan / Griffiths, Christopher E M. ·Division of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX, USA. · Dermatology Centre, Salford Royal Hospital, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester M6 8HD, UK. Electronic address: Christopher.Griffiths@manchester.ac.uk. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #25412790.

ABSTRACT: The umbrella term psoriasis is now understood to incorporate several distinct phenotypes or endotypes along the disease spectrum that in turn will dictate different therapies. A stratified medicine approach to psoriasis using this clinical information coupled with pharmacogenomic and immunologic data will become more widely acceptable in the future. Comorbidities associated with psoriasis, such as diabetes, depression, and Crohn disease, and the debate about the interdependence of psoriasis and cardiovascular disease will also dictate future research and holistic and management plans for this complex disease.

25 Review Psoriasis is a systemic disease with multiple cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities. 2015

Ryan, Caitriona / Kirby, Brian. ·Department of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center Dallas, 3900 Junius Street, Suite 145, Dallas, TX 75246, USA. Electronic address: caitrionaryan80@gmail.com. · St Vincent's University Hospital, University College Dublin, Elm Park, Dublin 4, Ireland. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #25412782.

ABSTRACT: There is evidence that patients with moderate to severe psoriasis have an increased risk of conditions such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome. The precise mechanisms underlying the observed increase in cardiovascular disease in psoriasis remain to be defined but inflammatory pathways mutual to both conditions are probably involved. Suppression of systemic inflammation in psoriasis could help reduce cardiovascular inflammation but robust evidence is still lacking evidence is lacking. This article summarizes the current literature on cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities in psoriasis, identifies research gaps, and suggests management strategies to reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis.

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