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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Rome, IT
Based on 503 articles published since 2010
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These are the 503 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Rome, IT during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Treating axial spondyloarthritis and peripheral spondyloarthritis, especially psoriatic arthritis, to target: 2017 update of recommendations by an international task force. 2018

Smolen, Josef S / Schöls, Monika / Braun, Jürgen / Dougados, Maxime / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Landewé, Robert / Mease, Philip / Sieper, Joachim / Stamm, Tanja / Wit, Maarten de / Aletaha, Daniel / Baraliakos, Xenofon / Betteridge, Neil / Bosch, Filip van den / Coates, Laura C / Emery, Paul / Gensler, Lianne S / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Jongkees, Merryn / Kvien, Tore K / Inman, Robert D / McInnes, Iain B / Maccarone, Mara / Machado, Pedro M / Molto, Anna / Ogdie, Alexis / Poddubnyy, Denis / Ritchlin, Christopher / Rudwaleit, Martin / Tanew, Adrian / Thio, Bing / Veale, Douglas / Vlam, Kurt de / van der Heijde, Désirée. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Health Consult, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Ruhr-University Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Rheumatology, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. · Amsterdam Rheumatology & Immunology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology Research, Swedish-Providence St. Joseph Health System, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section for Outcomes Research, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Medical Humanities, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Neil Betteridge Associates, UK. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Seayn Medical, Voorschoten, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Glasgow, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow, UK. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Centre for Rheumatology & MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, University College London, London, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USA. · German Rheumatism Research Centrer, Berlin, Germany. · Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus Medical Center, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #28684559.

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic targets have been defined for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) in 2012, but the evidence for these recommendations was only of indirect nature. These recommendations were re-evaluated in light of new insights. Based on the results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of rheumatologists, dermatologists, patients and a health professional developed an update of the 2012 recommendations. These underwent intensive discussions, on site voting and subsequent anonymous electronic voting on levels of agreement with each item. A set of 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations were developed and voted on. Some items were present in the previous recommendations, while others were significantly changed or newly formulated. The 2017 task force arrived at a single set of recommendations for axial and peripheral SpA, including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The most exhaustive discussions related to whether PsA should be assessed using unidimensional composite scores for its different domains or multidimensional scores that comprise multiple domains. This question was not resolved and constitutes an important research agenda. There was broad agreement, now better supported by data than in 2012, that remission/inactive disease and, alternatively, low/minimal disease activity are the principal targets for the treatment of PsA. As instruments to assess the patients on the path to the target, the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) for axial SpA and the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and Minimal Disease Activity (MDA) for PsA were recommended, although not supported by all. Shared decision-making between the clinician and the patient was seen as pivotal to the process. The task force defined the treatment target for SpA as remission or low disease activity and developed a large research agenda to further advance the field.

2 Guideline European S3-Guideline on the systemic treatment of psoriasis vulgaris - Update Apremilast and Secukinumab - EDF in cooperation with EADV and IPC. 2017

Nast, A / Spuls, P I / van der Kraaij, G / Gisondi, P / Paul, C / Ormerod, A D / Saiag, P / Smith, C H / Dauden, E / de Jong, E M / Feist, E / Jobling, R / Maccarone, M / Mrowietz, U / Papp, K A / Reich, K / Rosumeck, S / Talme, T / Thio, H B / van de Kerkhof, P / Werner, R N / Dressler, C. ·Division of Evidence-Based Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France. · Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, UK. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré Université Paris V, Boulogne, France. · St Johns Institute of Dermatology, Guys and St Thomas' Hospital Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid, Spain. · Radboud University medical center and Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Cambridge, UK. · Roma, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Psoriasis-Center University Medical Center Schleswig Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Waterloo, Canada. · Dermatologikum Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28895202.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline Treatment of severe psoriasis in children: recommendations of an Italian expert group. 2017

Fortina, Anna Belloni / Bardazzi, Federico / Berti, Samantha / Carnevale, Claudia / Di Lernia, Vito / El Hachem, Maya / Neri, Iria / Gelmetti, Carlo Mario / Lora, Viviana / Mazzatenta, Carlo / Milioto, Mirella / Moretta, Gaia / Patrizi, Annalisa / Peris, Ketty / Villani, Alberto. ·Pediatric Dermatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Via Gallucci, 4, 35128, Padova, Italy. anna.bellonifortina@gmail.com. · Dermatology Unit, Department of Specialistic, Diagnostic and Experimental Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital-IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Pediatric Dermatology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda "Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico", Milan Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milano, Italy. · Center for the Study and Treatment of Psoriasis, San Gallicano Dermatologic Institute, IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, "Campo di Marte" Hospital, Azienda USL 2, Lucca, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Ospedale Civico di Cristina Benfratelli, Palermo, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · General Pediatrics and Infectious Disease, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital-IRCCS, Rome, Italy. ·Eur J Pediatr · Pubmed #28836064.

ABSTRACT: This article provides comprehensive recommendations for the systemic treatment of severe pediatric psoriasis based on evidence obtained from a systematic review of the literature and the consensus opinion of expert dermatologists and pediatricians. For each systemic treatment, the grade of recommendation (A, B, C) based on the treatment's approval by the European Medicines Agency for childhood psoriasis and the experts' opinions is discussed. The grade of recommendation for narrow-band-ultraviolet B phototherapy, cyclosporine, and retinoids is C, while that for methotrexate is C/B. The use of adalimumab, etanercept, and ustekinumab has a grade A recommendation. No conventional systemic treatments are approved for pediatric psoriasis. Adalimumab is approved by the European Medicines Agency as a first-line treatment for severe chronic plaque psoriasis in children (≥ 4 years old) and adolescents. Etanercept and ustekinumab are approved as second-line therapy in children ≥ 6 and ≥ 12 years, respectively. CONCLUSION: A treatment algorithm as well as practical tools (i.e., tabular summaries of differential diagnoses, treatment mechanism of actions, dosing regimens, control parameters) are provided to assist in therapeutic reasoning and decision-making for individual patients. These treatment recommendations are endorsed by major Italian Pediatric and Dermatology Societies. What is Known: • Guidelines for the treatment of severe pediatric psoriasis are lacking and most traditional systemic treatments are not approved for use in young patients. Although there has been decades of experience with some of the traditional agents such as phototherapy, acitretin, and cyclosporine in children, there are no RCTs on their pediatric use while RCTs investigating new biologic agents have been performed. What is New: • In this manuscript, an Italian multidisciplinary team of experts focused on treatment recommendations for severe forms of psoriasis in children based on an up-to-date review of the literature and experts' opinions.

4 Guideline European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies: 2015 update. 2016

Gossec, L / Smolen, J S / Ramiro, S / de Wit, M / Cutolo, M / Dougados, M / Emery, P / Landewé, R / Oliver, S / Aletaha, D / Betteridge, N / Braun, J / Burmester, G / Cañete, J D / Damjanov, N / FitzGerald, O / Haglund, E / Helliwell, P / Kvien, T K / Lories, R / Luger, T / Maccarone, M / Marzo-Ortega, H / McGonagle, D / McInnes, I B / Olivieri, I / Pavelka, K / Schett, G / Sieper, J / van den Bosch, F / Veale, D J / Wollenhaupt, J / Zink, A / van der Heijde, D. ·Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS), Paris, France Department of rheumatology, AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Second Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · EULAR, representing People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe (PARE), London, UK. · Research Laboratory and Clinical Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto, Italy. · Medicine Faculty, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France Rheumatology B Department, APHP, Cochin Hospital, Paris, France. · Leeds NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, LTHT, Leeds, UK Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands. · North Devon, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne and Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. · Arthritis Unit, Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Clínic and IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain. · Belgrade University School of Medicine, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Section of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Sweden and School of Business, Engineering and Science, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. · Section of Musculoskeletal Disease, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Laboratory of Tissue Homeostasis and Disease, Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, KU Leuven, Belgium Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Potenza, Italy. · Institute and Clinic of Rheumatology Charles University Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Internal Medicine 3, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité, Berlin, Germany. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Centre for Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease, Dublin Academic Medical Centre, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Schoen Klinik Hamburg, Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, German Rheumatism Research Centre Berlin, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26644232.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Since the publication of the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in 2012, new evidence and new therapeutic agents have emerged. The objective was to update these recommendations. METHODS: A systematic literature review was performed regarding pharmacological treatment in PsA. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated based on the evidence and the expert opinion of the 34 Task Force members. Levels of evidence and strengths of recommendations were allocated. RESULTS: The updated recommendations comprise 5 overarching principles and 10 recommendations, covering pharmacological therapies for PsA from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), to conventional synthetic (csDMARD) and biological (bDMARD) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, whatever their mode of action, taking articular and extra-articular manifestations of PsA into account, but focusing on musculoskeletal involvement. The overarching principles address the need for shared decision-making and treatment objectives. The recommendations address csDMARDs as an initial therapy after failure of NSAIDs and local therapy for active disease, followed, if necessary, by a bDMARD or a targeted synthetic DMARD (tsDMARD). The first bDMARD would usually be a tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. bDMARDs targeting interleukin (IL)12/23 (ustekinumab) or IL-17 pathways (secukinumab) may be used in patients for whom TNF inhibitors are inappropriate and a tsDMARD such as a phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor (apremilast) if bDMARDs are inappropriate. If the first bDMARD strategy fails, any other bDMARD or tsDMARD may be used. CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations provide stakeholders with an updated consensus on the pharmacological treatment of PsA and strategies to reach optimal outcomes in PsA, based on a combination of evidence and expert opinion.

5 Guideline European S3-Guidelines on the systemic treatment of psoriasis vulgaris--Update 2015--Short version--EDF in cooperation with EADV and IPC. 2015

Nast, A / Gisondi, P / Ormerod, A D / Saiag, P / Smith, C / Spuls, P I / Arenberger, P / Bachelez, H / Barker, J / Dauden, E / de Jong, E M / Feist, E / Jacobs, A / Jobling, R / Kemény, L / Maccarone, M / Mrowietz, U / Papp, K A / Paul, C / Reich, K / Rosumeck, S / Talme, T / Thio, H B / van de Kerkhof, P / Werner, R N / Yawalkar, N. ·Division of Evidence Based Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, UK. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré Université Paris V, Boulogne, France. · Clinical Lead for Dermatology, St Johns Institute of Dermatology, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Third Faculty of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · St. Johns Institute of Dermatology, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid, Spain. · University Medical Center Nijmegen St Radboud, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Rheumatologie u. klinische Immonologie, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Cambridge, UK. · SZTE Borgyogyaszati Klinika, Szeged, Hungary. · Roma, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Psoriasis-Center University Medical Center Schleswig Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Waterloo, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France. · Dermatologikum Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, Universitätsklinik für Dermatologie, Bern, Switzerland. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #26481193.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial What do scores mean? Informed interpretation and clinical judgement are needed. 2018

Finlay, A Y / Sampogna, F. ·Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine, College of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Cardiff, U.K. · Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Istituto Dermopatico dell'Immacolata (IDI)-IRCCS FLMM, Rome, Italy. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #30387517.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial MANAGEMENT OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: SHOULD THE INTERACTION BETWEEN DERMATOLOGISTS AND RHEUMATOLOGISTS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE BE INTENSIFIED? 2015

Migliore, A / Cusano, F / Bianchi, G / Malara, G / Epis, O / De Pità, O. ·U.O. Reumatologia, Ospedale San Pietro, Roma, Italy. · U. O. C. Dermatologia, Azienda Ospedaliera “G. Rummo”, Benevento, Italy. · U.O. Reumatologia, ASL3, Azienda Sanitaria Genovese, Genova, Italy. · U.O. Dermatologia Ospedale Papardo, Messina Italy. · U.O. Reumatologia, Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Milano Italy. · Istituto Dermopatico dell’Immacolata, Roma, Italy. ·J Biol Regul Homeost Agents · Pubmed #26403393.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory seronegative spondyloarthropathy that occurs in approximately 25% of patients with psoriasis and is a progressive and severely disabling disease. Most patients have had psoriasis for several years before the development of arthritis or develop the joint and skin condition simultaneously. Given the absence of specific diagnostic test for psoriatic arthritis, clinical findings remain the standard criteria for the diagnosis. Patients with psoriasis presenting to the dermatologist for management of their skin disease may have joint symptoms related or not to psoriatic arthritis and similarly arthritic patients presenting to a rheumatologist for the management of psoriatic arthritis may have skin lesions related or not to psoriasis. In this paper an expert panel of specialist belonging to the “Associazione Dermatologi Ospedalieri Italiani” (ADOI) and “Collegio dei Reumatologi Ospedalieri Italiani” (CROI) analysed the international literature and scientific recommendations and also investigated the Italian setting. It has been demonstrated in the literature that a multidisciplinary clinical setting may benefit patients with psoriatic arthritis from both diagnostic and therapeutic points of view. The comparative analysis of the Italian clinical records used by ADOI and CROI have highlighted some substantial differences. Collaboration between the dermatologist and rheumatologist allows for a more complete appreciation of the overall skin and musculoskeletal disease burden, and subsequently leads to a more comprehensive treatment approach.

8 Editorial Pharmacoeconomic burden in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis: from systematic reviews to real clinical practice studies. 2014

Lubrano, Ennio / Spadaro, Antonio. ·Dipartimento di Medicina Interna e Specialità Mediche - UOC di Reumatologia, "Sapienza" - Università di Roma, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, Viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome, Italy. antonio.spadaro@uniroma1.it. ·BMC Musculoskelet Disord · Pubmed #24444003.

ABSTRACT: The economic assessment of treatment options in a chronic and severe disease like Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) is crucial to estimate the burden of costs. In particular, the impact of new costly medications such as biologic agents have been studied to figure this important aspect of a multifaceted disease. In a previous observational, longitudinal multicentre cost evaluation study, the results showed that biologic agents are cost-effective. This study was obtained from the real clinical practice and encompassed PsA patients refractory to traditional treatments. Similar data were also obtained from reviews analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs). Recently, Cawson et al. performed a systematic review, network meta-analysis and economic evaluation of biological therapy for the management of active PsA. The review was conducted to identify relevant, recently published studies and the new trial data were synthesized, via a Bayesian network meta-analysis (NMA), to estimate the relative efficacy of the TNF-α inhibitors in terms of Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC) response, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). In particular the analysis showed that, on average, etanercept was the most cost-effective treatment and, at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence willingness-to-pay threshold of between £20,000 to £30,000, etanercept is the preferred option. This study, as a systematic review, has been focused on main RCTs on active PsA treated by biological DMARDs and limitations to this analysis arise from a paucity of data on long-term follow up, as well as radiological progression and long-term safety. These interesting results reflected the important role of biologic agents in the management of PsA, highlighting their efficacy and cost-effectiveness. However, there are some unmet needs for pharmacoeconomic considerations based on prospective and/or on real clinical practice studies, as well as considering all the intriguing aspects of this challenging disease.

9 Review Treatment of Psoriasis: Novel Approaches to Topical Delivery. 2019

Wollina, Uwe / Tirant, Michael / Vojvodic, Aleksandra / Lotti, Torello. ·Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Städtisches Klinikum Dresden, Academic Teaching Hospital, Dresden, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, University of Rome "G. Marconi", Rome, Italy. · Military Medical Academy of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. ·Open Access Maced J Med Sci · Pubmed #31850114.

ABSTRACT: Topical treatment is the cornerstone for the management of mild to moderate psoriasis. Despite efforts in drug development, patient's satisfaction with the available topical treatments is limited. A strategy to improve safety, efficacy and comfort of topical treatment provides the development of new drug delivery and drug carrier systems. This review provides an overview of recent advances in this field with a focus on psoriasis. Laser-assisted drug delivery, foam formulations, nanoparticles, ethosomes, and niomes are considered. Hopefully, these new developments will improve topical drug therapy and patient satisfaction.

10 Review Nanodermatology-based solutions for psoriasis: State-of-the art and future prospects. 2019

Damiani, Giovanni / Pacifico, Alessia / Linder, Dennis M / Pigatto, Paolo D M / Conic, Rosalynn / Grada, Ayman / Bragazzi, Nicola L. ·Young Dermatologists Italian Network (YDIN), Centro Studi GISED, Bergamo, Italy. · Clinical Dermatology, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milan, Italy. · Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. · San Gallicano Dermatological Institute, IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University Clinic, Padua, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Laboratory of Cutaneous Wound Healing, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · Postgraduate School of Public Health, Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. ·Dermatol Ther · Pubmed #31600849.

ABSTRACT: Nanodermatology is an emerging, multidisciplinary science, arising from the convergence of nanotechnology, pharmacology, physics/biophysics, chemistry/biochemistry, chemical engineering, material science, and clinical medicine. Nanodermatology deals with (a) skin biology, anatomy, and physiology at the nanoscale ("skin nanobiology"), (b) diagnosis performed by means of novel diagnostic devices, assisted by nanobiotechnologies ("nanodiagnosis"), and (c) treatment through innovative therapeutic agents, including phototherapy ("photonanotherapy"/"photonanodermatology") and systemic/topical drug administration ("nanotherapy") at the nanoscale, and drug delivery-such as transdermal or dermal drug delivery (TDDD/DDD)-enhanced and improved by nanostructures and nanodrugs ("nanodrug delivery"). Nanodermatology, as a super-specialized branch of dermatology, is a quite recent specialty: the "Nanodermatology Society" founded by the eminent dermatologist Dr. Adnan Nasir, was established in 2010, with the aim of bringing together different stakeholders, including dermatologists, nanotechnology scientists, policy-makers and regulators, as well as students and medical residents. Psoriasis has a prevalence of 2-3% worldwide and imposes a severe clinical and societal burden. Nanodermatology-based solutions appear promising for the proper treatment and management of psoriasis, assisting and enhancing different steps of the process of health-care delivery: from the diagnosis to the therapeutics, paving the way for a personalized approach, based on the specific dysregulated biomarkers.

11 Review Potential of Curcumin in Skin Disorders. 2019

Vollono, Laura / Falconi, Mattia / Gaziano, Roberta / Iacovelli, Federico / Dika, Emi / Terracciano, Chiara / Bianchi, Luca / Campione, Elena. ·Dermatology Unit, Department of "Medicina dei Sistemi", University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier, 1-00133 Rome, Italy. · Department of Biology, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1-00133 Rome, Italy. · Microbiology Section, Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier, 1-00133 Rome, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine-DIMES, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti, 1-40138 Bologna, Italy. · Neurology Unit, Guglielmo de Saliceto Hospital, 29121-29122 Piacenza, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Department of "Medicina dei Sistemi", University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier, 1-00133 Rome, Italy. campioneelena@hotmail.com. ·Nutrients · Pubmed #31509968.

ABSTRACT: Curcumin is a compound isolated from turmeric, a plant known for its medicinal use. Recently, there is a growing interest in the medical community in identifying novel, low-cost, safe molecules that may be used in the treatment of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that curcumin may represent an effective agent in the treatment of several skin conditions. We examined the most relevant in vitro and in vivo studies published to date regarding the use of curcumin in inflammatory, neoplastic, and infectious skin diseases, providing information on its bioavailability and safety profile. Moreover, we performed a computational analysis about curcumin's interaction towards the major enzymatic targets identified in the literature. Our results suggest that curcumin may represent a low-cost, well-tolerated, effective agent in the treatment of skin diseases. However, bypass of limitations of its in vivo use (low oral bioavailability, metabolism) is essential in order to conduct larger clinical trials that could confirm these observations. The possible use of curcumin in combination with traditional drugs and the formulations of novel delivery systems represent a very promising field for future applicative research.

12 Review The safety of anti-interleukins monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of psoriasis. 2019

D'Adamio, S / Silvaggio, D / Lombardo, P / Bianchi, L / Talamonti, M / Galluzzo, M. ·Dermatology Unit, University of Rome "Tor Vergata" , Rome , Italy. ·Expert Opin Drug Saf · Pubmed #31479282.

ABSTRACT:

13 Review Dietary compounds as potential modulators of microRNA expression in psoriasis. 2019

Kocic, Hristina / Damiani, Giovanni / Stamenkovic, Bojana / Tirant, Michael / Jovic, Andrija / Tiodorovic, Danica / Peris, Ketty. ·Clinic for Dermatology Clinical Center University Nis, Klinicki Centar Nis, Bul Dr Zorana Djindjica 48, Nis, 18000, Serbia. · Unita Operativa di Dermatologia, IRCCS Fondazione Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Medico-Chirurgica e dei Trapianti, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano, Italy. · Department of Rheumatology, Institut za Kardiovaskularne Bolesti Niska Banja University Nis, Nis, Serbia. · Psoriasis Eczema Clinic Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Dermatology, Clinic for Dermatology University Clinical Center Nis, Nis, Serbia. · Dermatology, Clinic for Dermatology, Medical Faculty University Nis, Nis, Serbia. · Dermatology, Institute of Dermatology, Catholic University, Roma, Italy. ·Ther Adv Chronic Dis · Pubmed #31431821.

ABSTRACT: Nutrigenomic DNA reprogramming in different chronic diseases and cancer has been assessed through the stimulation of gene expression and mRNA synthesis

14 Review The Significance of IL-36 Hyperactivation and IL-36R Targeting in Psoriasis. 2019

Madonna, Stefania / Girolomoni, Giampiero / Dinarello, Charles A / Albanesi, Cristina. ·Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, IDI-IRCCS, via Monti di Creta, 104, 00167 Rome, Italy. s.madonna@idi.it. · Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, P.zza Stefani, 1, 37126 Verona, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, 6525 HP Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver 80045, Anschutz Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. · Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, IDI-IRCCS, via Monti di Creta, 104, 00167 Rome, Italy. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #31284527.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is an immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease that involves mainly T helper (Th)17, Th1 and Th22 lymphocytes, which cause hyper-proliferation of the epidermis with aberrant differentiation of keratinocytes, and local production of chemokines and cytokines. These fuel a self-amplifying loop where these products act on T cells to perpetuate cutaneous inflammatory processes. Among the various inflammatory mediators involved, interleukin (IL)-36 cytokines are important for the recruitment and activation of neutrophils and Th17 cells in psoriatic skin. In particular, IL-36s induce chemokines and cytokines interfere with differentiation/cornification programs in the epidermis, as well as promote pathological angiogenesis and endothelial cell activation. IL-36 cytokines belong to the IL-1 family, and comprise IL-36α, IL-36β, and IL-36γ agonists as well as IL-36 receptor antagonist and IL-38 antagonists. IL-36 cytokines are up-regulated in psoriatic epidermis, and their expression is strongly induced by TNF-α and IL-17. Contrarily, IL-38 antagonist is downregulated, and its impaired expression may be relevant to the dysregulated inflammatory processes induced by IL-36. Here, we discuss on the pathogenic mechanisms leading to the altered balance of IL-36 agonists/antagonists and the significance of this dysregulation in psoriasis. Collection of the information will provide a theoretical basis for the development of novel therapeutic strategies based on IL-36 agonist/antagonist manipulation in psoriasis.

15 Review Coagulation and Skin Autoimmunity. 2019

Cugno, Massimo / Borghi, Alessandro / Garcovich, Simone / Marzano, Angelo Valerio. ·Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Medico-Chirurgica e dei Trapianti, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. · Medicina Interna, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy. · Sezione di Dermatologia e Malattie Infettive, Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. · Istituto di Dermatologia, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Fondazione Policlinico A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · UOC Dermatologia, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy. ·Front Immunol · Pubmed #31281319.

ABSTRACT: Several lines of evidence indicate that the immune system, inflammation, and coagulation are simultaneously activated in autoimmune and immune-mediated skin diseases. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha induce the expression of the main initiator of coagulation, i.e., tissue factor. The proteases of coagulation in turn act on protease-activated receptors inducing the expression of various pro-inflammatory cytokines triggering inflammation. The cross-talk among immune system, inflammation, and coagulation amplifies and maintains the activation of all three pathways. This review focuses on three skin disorders as chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), angioedema, and bullous pemphigoid (BP), in which the relationships among the three systems have been investigated or their clinical consequences are relevant. Markers of thrombin generation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation have been reported to be increased in the plasma during flares of CSU and angioedema, as well as in the active phase of BP, with the marker levels reverting to normal during remission. The coagulation activation seems to be important only at local level in CSU and angioedema while both at local and systemic levels in BP which is the only condition associated with an increased thrombotic risk. The prothrombotic state in autoimmune skin diseases raises the question of the indication of anticoagulant treatment, particularly in the presence of other cardiovascular risk factors.

16 Review Pharmacotherapeutic management of psoriasis in adolescents and children. 2019

D'Adamio, S / Silvaggio, D / Massaro, A / Lombardo, P / Bianchi, L / Talamonti, M / Galluzzo, M. ·Dermatology Unit, University of Rome "Tor Vergata" , Rome , Italy. ·Expert Opin Pharmacother · Pubmed #31271541.

ABSTRACT:

17 Review Activation of mast cells mediates inflammatory response in psoriasis: Potential new therapeutic approach with IL-37. 2019

Conti, Pio / Gallenga, Carla Enrica / Ronconi, Gianpaolo / Caraffa, Alessandro / Kritas, Spyros K. ·Immunology Division, Postgraduate Medical School, University of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy. · Department of Biomedical Sciences and Specialist Surgery, Section of Ophthalmology, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. · UOS Clinica dei Pazienti del Territorio, Policlinico Gemelli, Rome, Italy. · Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of Camerino, Camerino, Italy. · Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. ·Dermatol Ther · Pubmed #31012218.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis (PS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by chronic inflammatory skin immune-mediated disease which occurs in 2-4% of the worldwide population. PS is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and depression, and 30% of PS patients are affected with psoriatic arthritis. PS presents excessive keratinocyte proliferation, abnormal differentiation, and elevated mast cell (MC) number. In PS, there are enhanced type I interferon (IFN), angiogenesis, and over-expression of several proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor and interleukin (IL)-1 family members generated by several immune cells including MCs. MCs are hematopoietic cells that reside in vascularized tissues, which, upon appropriate activation, release proinflammatory cytokines, an effect worsened by acute stress and PS. In recent years, IL-37 emerged as an anti-inflammatory cytokine which binds to alpha chain of the IL-18 receptor alpha (IL-18Rα) and downregulates MyD88. This effect leads to the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen activation protein kinase, with the suppression of inflammatory response. These observations candidate IL-37 as a potential new therapeutic cytokine for inflammatory disorders including PS.

18 Review Moderate-to-severe psoriasis and pregnancy: impact on fertility, pregnancy outcome and treatment perspectives. 2019

De Simone, Clara / Caldarola, Giacomo / Moretta, Gaia / Piscitelli, Leonardo / Ricceri, Federica / Prignano, Francesca. ·Department of Dermatology, A. Gemelli University Hospital and Institute for Research and Cancer, IRCCS, Sacred Heart Catholic University, Rome, Italy - clara.desimone@unicatt.it. · Department of Dermatology, A. Gemelli University Hospital and Institute for Research and Cancer, IRCCS, Sacred Heart Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Unit of Dermatology, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #31001966.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis affects 2-4% of the world's population, with no difference between men and women and 70% of patients experiencing disease onset before the age of 40, which coincides with the reproductive years. Few data are available from literature on impact of psoriasis on fertility, course and outcome of pregnancy and risk associated with treatments. Recent studies on other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, among which psoriasis is also included, indicate that rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel diseases can impact female fertility and pregnancy outcomes especially during active disease episodes. In psoriasis hormonal and metabolic comorbidities, unhealthy lifestyles and systemic inflammation could also influence the ability to conceive, pregnancy course and birth outcomes. In this article we review current knowledge on reproductive function, course and outcome of pregnancy in women affected by moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Systemic treatments are also considered with a special focus on TNF-alpha blocking agents and implication of molecular structure on placental transportation and fetal exposure.

19 Review Amplifying the concept of psoriatic arthritis: The role of autoimmunity in systemic psoriatic disease. 2019

Chimenti, Maria Sole / Caso, Francesco / Alivernini, Stefano / De Martino, Erica / Costa, Luisa / Tolusso, Barbara / Triggianese, Paola / Conigliaro, Paola / Gremese, Elisa / Scarpa, Raffaele / Perricone, Roberto. ·Rheumatology, Allergology and Clinical Immunology, Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: maria.sole.chimenti@unroma2.it. · Rheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, School of Medicine and Surgery, University Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Division of Rheumatology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, IRCCS, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · Rheumatology, Allergology and Clinical Immunology, Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. ·Autoimmun Rev · Pubmed #30959209.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis that may be present in near 30% of patients affected by psoriasis (PsO), clinically characterized by inflammation of periarticular (e.g., enthesis) and articular structures. Recently, an autoimmune footprint of PsA pathogenesis has been demonstrated with the presence of autoantigens and related autoantibodies in PsA patients' sera. In this context, histological features of PsA synovitis supports the relevance of an autoimmune pathogenesis of the disease. Since there is no currently validated test for PsA, the analysis of PsA synovial tissue revealed pathognomonic characteristics of PsA that may support the clinician in the clinical practice. PsA synovitis is characterized by a sublining infiltrate with T and B cells, vascular proliferation and a relative thin lining layer of proliferating intimal synoviocytes. PsA synovial histopathology shows that ectopic lymphoid-neogenesis with an increase of IL-23 expression. These new pathogenetics features and the systemic nature of the disease raised the concept of a Systemic Psoriatic Disease (SysPsD), characterized by multiple extra-cutaneous and -articular manifestations, highlightening the great heterogeneity of this condition. SyPsD represents a heterogeneous chronic inflammatory condition with a wide spectrum of phenotypical manifestations. The purpose of this review is to describe the new pathogenetic mechanisms and the different clinical pictures of SysPsD, with the ultimate goal of improving the knowledge of this heterogeneous chronic inflammatory condition.

20 Review The pharmacological management of patients with comorbid psoriasis and obesity. 2019

Chiricozzi, Andrea / Gisondi, Paolo / Girolomoni, Giampiero. ·a Institute of Dermatology , Catholic University - Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS , Rome , Italy. · b Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine , University of Verona , Verona , Italy. ·Expert Opin Pharmacother · Pubmed #30794469.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that is increasingly being recognized as a complex disorder affecting multiple systems. Systemic inflammation is considered the pathogenic link between psoriasis and its comorbid conditions that include arthritis, metabolic disorders, depression, and cardiovascular diseases. The presence of comorbid conditions modifies both its clinical management and the therapeutic approach in psoriatic patients. AREAS COVERED: This review describes the clinical, epidemiological, and pathogenic link between psoriasis and obesity. Furthermore, data related to the effects of synthetic antipsoriatic drugs on obesity are collated. EXPERT OPINION: Obesity is one of the most common comorbid conditions that is relevant both for a patient's overall health and the clinical outcomes of antipsoriatic therapies. Indeed, some treatments of psoriasis might be impaired by adiposity. Moreover, obesity's association with dyslipidemia, hypertension, and increased liver enzymes could further be worsened by acitretin, cyclosporine and methotrexate, respectively. Therefore, the identification of therapeutic targets whose blockade could have positive effects on both psoriasis and mechanisms regulating body weight homeostasis may be of great relevance to the treatment of patients with psoriasis.

21 Review Performance and calibration of the algorithm ASSIGN in predicting cardiovascular disease in Italian patients with psoriatic arthritis. 2019

Navarini, Luca / Margiotta, Domenico Paolo Emanuele / Costa, Luisa / Currado, Damiano / Tasso, Marco / Angeletti, Silvia / Ciccozzi, Massimo / Scarpa, Raffaele / Afeltra, Antonella / Caso, Francesco. ·Unit of Allergology, Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome, Italy. · Unit of Allergology, Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome, Italy. d.margiotta@unicampus.it. · Rheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Unit of Clinical Laboratory Science, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome, Italy. ·Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #30680532.

ABSTRACT: The increased cardiovascular (CV) risk is one of the major challenges in the management of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Recently, EULAR suggested to adapt the already available CV risk algorithms with a 1.5 multiplication factor in all the patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but it is still uncertain if this adaptation could also be applied to patients with PsA. This study aims to evaluate the performance and calibration of the CV risk algorithm ASSIGN and its adaptations for RA (ASSIGN-RA) and according to EULAR recommendations in a cohort of patients with PsA (ASSIGN*1.5). Prospectively, collected data from two Italian cohorts has been analyzed. The discriminatory ability for CV risk prediction was assessed using the areas under the ROC curves. Calibration between predicted and observed events was assessed by Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL) test and calibration plots. For each algorithm, sensitivity and specificity were calculated for low- to high-risk cut-off (20%). One hundred fifty-five patients were enrolled with an observation of 1550 patient/years. Area under the ROC were 0.8179 (95% CI 0.72014 to 0.91558) for ASSIGN, 0.8160 (95% CI 0.71661 to 0.91529) for ASSIGN-RA, and 0.8179 (95% CI 0.72014 to 0.91558) for ASSIGN*1.5. HL tests did not demonstrate poor model fit for none of the algorithms. Discriminative ability and calibration were not improved by adaptation of the algorithms according to EULAR recommendations. Up to 20% of CV events occurred in patients at "low risk". No difference in performance has been observed between ASSIGN, Progetto CUORE, and QRISK2. ASSIGN could represent a useful tool in predicting CV risk in patients with PsA. Adaptation for RA or according to EULAR recommendations did not show any further improvement in performance and calibration.

22 Review Psoriasis in pregnancy: case series and literature review of data concerning exposure during pregnancy to ustekinumab. 2019

Galluzzo, Marco / D'Adamio, Simone / Bianchi, Luca / Talamonti, Marina. ·a Division of Dermatology, Department of "Medicina dei Sistemi" , University of Rome "Tor Vergata" , Rome , Italy. ·J Dermatolog Treat · Pubmed #29676599.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis tends to improve for approximately half of patients during pregnancy, but an equal number of patients report no change or worsening during this period, when lots of medications, like biologics, are not indicated. The aim of our study was to review data of patient that had been pregnant during ustekinumab treatment, analyzing data of our data set between September 2010 and February 2018. We found data of three patients that had been pregnant during ustekinumab treatment. All three patients successfully completed the pregnancy without complications. One of the three patients was pregnant even twice during treatment with ustekinumab, with also a successful birth of two perfectly healthy twins. Biologic agents approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis are currently classified as pregnancy category B, even if, particularly for ustekinumab, there are several case reports regarding exposure during pregnancy in humans related to a healthy pregnancy, both for women and children. Although further studies are required to find real indication of biological treatment in pregnant patients, according to our and to the reviewed experience, ustekinumab does not interfere with gestation.

23 Review Potential Role of Cytochrome c and Tryptase in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Pathogenesis: Focus on Resistance to Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress. 2018

Chimenti, Maria Sole / Sunzini, Flavia / Fiorucci, Laura / Botti, Elisabetta / Fonti, Giulia Lavinia / Conigliaro, Paola / Triggianese, Paola / Costa, Luisa / Caso, Francesco / Giunta, Alessandro / Esposito, Maria / Bianchi, Luca / Santucci, Roberto / Perricone, Roberto. ·Rheumatology, Allergology and Clinical Immunology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. · Dermatology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. · Rheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy. ·Front Immunol · Pubmed #30429845.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis (PsO) is an autoimmune disease characterized by keratinocyte proliferation, chronic inflammation and mast cell activation. Up to 42% of patients with PsO may present psoriatic arthritis (PsA). PsO and PsA share common pathophysiological mechanisms: keratinocytes and fibroblast-like synoviocytes are resistant to apoptosis: this is one of the mechanism facilitating their hyperplasic growth, and at joint level, the destruction of articular cartilage, and bone erosion and/or proliferation. Several clinical studies regarding diseases characterized by impairment of cell death, either due to apoptosis or necrosis, reported cytochrome c release from the mitochondria into the extracellular space and finally into the circulation. The presence of elevated cytochrome c levels in serum has been demonstrated in diseases as inflammatory arthritis, myocardial infarction and stroke, and liver diseases. Cytochrome c is a signaling molecule essential for apoptotic cell death released from mitochondria to the cytosol allowing the interaction with protease, as the apoptosis protease activation factor, which lead to the activation of factor-1 and procaspase 9. It has been demonstrated that this efflux from the mitochondria is crucial to start the intracellular signaling responsible for apoptosis, then to the activation of the inflammatory process. Another inflammatory marker, the tryptase, a trypsin-like serine protease produced by mast cells, is released during inflammation, leading to the activation of several immune cells through proteinase-activated receptor-2. In this review, we aimed at discussing the role played by cytochrome c and tryptase in PsO and PsA pathogenesis. To this purpose, we searched pathogenetic mechanisms in PUBMED database and review on oxidative stress, cytochrome c and tryptase and their potential role during inflammation in PsO and PsA. To this regard, the cytochrome c release into the extracellular space and tryptase may have a role in skin and joint inflammation.

24 Review Topical urea in skincare: A review. 2018

Celleno, Leonardo. ·Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. ·Dermatol Ther · Pubmed #30378232.

ABSTRACT: Alterations in barrier function are associated with a number of skin diseases, including xerosis, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. Urea, a component of the natural moisturizing factor of the skin, plays an important role in the preservation of skin hydration and integrity. Several studies have investigated the effects of urea in the clinical setting. Here, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the effects of urea in the maintenance of healthy skin and management of skin disorders. At lower doses (≤10%), urea-containing topical formulations act as a skin moisturizer, while at higher concentrations (>10% urea), urea-based preparations exert a keratolytic action. Urea is also useful in combination therapies with anti-inflammatory and anti-fungal drugs, due to its activity as a penetration enhancer.

25 Review Histopathology of the skin in rheumatic diseases. 2018

Chimenti, M S / Di Stefani, A / Conigliaro, P / Saggini, A / Urbani, S / Giunta, A / Esposito, M / Bianchi, L / Peris, K / Perricone, R. ·Rheumatology, Allergology and Clinical Immunology, Department of Medicina dei Sistemi, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome. maria.sole.chimenti@uniroma2.it. ·Reumatismo · Pubmed #30282444.

ABSTRACT: Rheumatological systemic autoimmune diseases, such as connective tissue diseases, rheumatoid arthritis or spondyloarthritis, are characterized by the presence of joint involvement associated with extra-articular manifestations. Among them, cutaneous diseases are often the most relevant and representative clinical manifestation, as in psoriatic arthritis, scleroderma or systemic lupus erythematosus. In this context, it is useful for rheumatologists to understand better skin diseases and their histopathological features. Evaluation of skin biopsy specimens can be helpful not only to confirm the diagnosis in both classic and clinically atypical variants, but also to improve further our knowledge of the pathogenetic mechanisms and the close link between skin and articular diseases. In this review, we discuss the clinical features, diagnostic evaluation and the histopathological features of skin manifestation of the most relevant rheumatological autoimmune diseases.

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