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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from San Diego
Based on 211 articles published since 2009
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These are the 211 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from San Diego during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with biologics. 2019

Menter, Alan / Strober, Bruce E / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kivelevitch, Dario / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Stoff, Benjamin / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Davis, Dawn M R / Elewski, Boni E / Gelfand, Joel M / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Leonardi, Craig L / Lichten, Jason / Lim, Henry W / Mehta, Nehal N / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Rupani, Reena N / Siegel, Michael / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Elmets, Craig A. ·Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, San Francisco. · University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, San Francisco, California. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772098.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations based on the available evidence. The treatment of psoriasis with biologic agents will be reviewed, emphasizing treatment recommendations and the role of the dermatologist in monitoring and educating patients regarding benefits as well as associated risks.

2 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

3 Guideline Treating axial spondyloarthritis and peripheral spondyloarthritis, especially psoriatic arthritis, to target: 2017 update of recommendations by an international task force. 2018

Smolen, Josef S / Schöls, Monika / Braun, Jürgen / Dougados, Maxime / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Landewé, Robert / Mease, Philip / Sieper, Joachim / Stamm, Tanja / Wit, Maarten de / Aletaha, Daniel / Baraliakos, Xenofon / Betteridge, Neil / Bosch, Filip van den / Coates, Laura C / Emery, Paul / Gensler, Lianne S / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Jongkees, Merryn / Kvien, Tore K / Inman, Robert D / McInnes, Iain B / Maccarone, Mara / Machado, Pedro M / Molto, Anna / Ogdie, Alexis / Poddubnyy, Denis / Ritchlin, Christopher / Rudwaleit, Martin / Tanew, Adrian / Thio, Bing / Veale, Douglas / Vlam, Kurt de / van der Heijde, Désirée. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Health Consult, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Ruhr-University Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Rheumatology, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. · Amsterdam Rheumatology & Immunology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology Research, Swedish-Providence St. Joseph Health System, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section for Outcomes Research, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Medical Humanities, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Neil Betteridge Associates, UK. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Seayn Medical, Voorschoten, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Glasgow, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow, UK. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Centre for Rheumatology & MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, University College London, London, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USA. · German Rheumatism Research Centrer, Berlin, Germany. · Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus Medical Center, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #28684559.

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic targets have been defined for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) in 2012, but the evidence for these recommendations was only of indirect nature. These recommendations were re-evaluated in light of new insights. Based on the results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of rheumatologists, dermatologists, patients and a health professional developed an update of the 2012 recommendations. These underwent intensive discussions, on site voting and subsequent anonymous electronic voting on levels of agreement with each item. A set of 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations were developed and voted on. Some items were present in the previous recommendations, while others were significantly changed or newly formulated. The 2017 task force arrived at a single set of recommendations for axial and peripheral SpA, including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The most exhaustive discussions related to whether PsA should be assessed using unidimensional composite scores for its different domains or multidimensional scores that comprise multiple domains. This question was not resolved and constitutes an important research agenda. There was broad agreement, now better supported by data than in 2012, that remission/inactive disease and, alternatively, low/minimal disease activity are the principal targets for the treatment of PsA. As instruments to assess the patients on the path to the target, the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) for axial SpA and the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and Minimal Disease Activity (MDA) for PsA were recommended, although not supported by all. Shared decision-making between the clinician and the patient was seen as pivotal to the process. The task force defined the treatment target for SpA as remission or low disease activity and developed a large research agenda to further advance the field.

4 Guideline Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis 2015 Treatment Recommendations for Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Coates, Laura C / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Mease, Philip J / Soriano, Enrique R / Laura Acosta-Felquer, Maria / Armstrong, April W / Bautista-Molano, Wilson / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Campbell, Willemina / Cauli, Alberto / Espinoza, Luis R / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Gottlieb, Alice / Helliwell, Philip S / Husni, M Elaine / Love, Thorvardur J / Lubrano, Ennio / McHugh, Neil / Nash, Peter / Ogdie, Alexis / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Parkinson, Andrew / O'Sullivan, Denis / Rosen, Cheryl F / Schwartzman, Sergio / Siegel, Evan L / Toloza, Sergio / Tuong, William / Ritchlin, Christopher T. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · University of California at San Diego. · Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles. · Hospital Militar Central and Universidad Militar Nueva Grenada, Bogotá, Colombia. · Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Cagliari, Monserrato Campus, Cagliari, Italy. · Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, The Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, and University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Toronto and Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK. · Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. · University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK. · University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York. · Arthritis and Rheumatism Associates, Rockville, Maryland. · Ministry of Health, San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca, Argentina. · University of California, Davis. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #26749174.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the 2009 Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) treatment recommendations for the spectrum of manifestations affecting patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: GRAPPA rheumatologists, dermatologists, and PsA patients drafted overarching principles for the management of PsA, based on consensus achieved at face-to-face meetings and via online surveys. We conducted literature reviews regarding treatment for the key domains of PsA (arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, and nail disease) and convened a new group to identify pertinent comorbidities and their effect on treatment. Finally, we drafted treatment recommendations for each of the clinical manifestations and assessed the level of agreement for the overarching principles and treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members, using an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Six overarching principles had ≥80% agreement among both health care professionals (n = 135) and patient research partners (n = 10). We developed treatment recommendations and a schema incorporating these principles for arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, nail disease, and comorbidities in the setting of PsA, using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation process. Agreement of >80% was reached for approval of the individual recommendations and the overall schema. CONCLUSION: We present overarching principles and updated treatment recommendations for the key manifestations of PsA, including related comorbidities, based on a literature review and consensus of GRAPPA members (rheumatologists, dermatologists, other health care providers, and patient research partners). Further updates are anticipated as the therapeutic landscape in PsA evolves.

5 Editorial New GRAPPA and EULAR recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis. 2017

Coates, Laura C / Gossec, Laure / Ramiro, Sofia / Mease, Philip / van der Heijde, Désirée / Smolen, Josef S / Ritchlin, Christopher / Kavanaugh, Arthur. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds and Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds UK. · Department of rheumatology, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06; AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Swedish Medical Center Seattle, WA, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Allergy, Immunology & Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY. · Division of Rheumatology, Allergy Immunology, University of California San Diego, USA. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #28077693.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial High Anti-Tumour Necrosis Factor Trough Concentrations--Only a Cost Issue or Also Hidden Dangers Ahead? 2015

Vande Casteele, Niels / Vermeire, Séverine. ·KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Therapeutic and Diagnostic Antibodies, Leuven, Belgium University of California San Diego, Division of Gastroenterology, La Jolla, CA, USA niels.vandecasteele@kuleuven.be. · University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Gastroenterology, Leuven, Belgium. ·J Crohns Colitis · Pubmed #26351380.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Review Bedside to bench: defining the immunopathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis. 2019

Bravo, Arlene / Kavanaugh, Arthur. ·Division of Rheumatology, Allergy & Immunology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Allergy & Immunology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA. akavanaugh@ucsd.edu. ·Nat Rev Rheumatol · Pubmed #31485004.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an immune-mediated, systemic inflammatory disorder. PsA can present with heterogeneous clinical features. Advances in understanding the immunopathogenesis of PsA have helped to facilitate the development of agents targeting specific components of the dysregulated inflammatory and immune responses relevant to PsA. Interestingly, agents with distinct mechanisms of action have shown differential responses across the various disease domains of PsA, counter to what might have been expected from basic science investigations. Here, we review data utilizing various novel targeted therapies for PsA, focusing on biologic and targeted synthetic therapies. These data might support the idea of a 'bedside to bench' concept, whereby results from clinical trials of specific targeted therapies inform our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of PsA. For example, TNF inhibition confers substantial and comparable benefit for all domains of PsA, supporting the view that TNF is a central pro-inflammatory cytokine across diverse areas of disease involvement. On the other hand, inhibition of IL-12-IL-23, as compared with inhibition of TNF, has greater efficacy for psoriasis, comparable efficacy for peripheral arthritis, but was ineffective in studies of axial spondyloarthritis. Data from studies of agents with distinct mechanisms of action will help to further refine our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of PsA.

8 Review Keratin 6, 16 and 17-Critical Barrier Alarmin Molecules in Skin Wounds and Psoriasis. 2019

Zhang, Xiaowei / Yin, Meimei / Zhang, Ling-Juan. ·School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102, China. · School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102, China. lingjuan.zhang@xmu.edu.cn. · Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. lingjuan.zhang@xmu.edu.cn. ·Cells · Pubmed #31374826.

ABSTRACT: Located at the skin surface, keratinocytes (KCs) are constantly exposed to external stimuli and are the first responders to invading pathogens and injury. Upon skin injury, activated KCs secrete an array of alarmin molecules, providing a rapid and specific innate immune response against danger signals. However, dysregulation of the innate immune response of KCs may lead to uncontrolled inflammation and psoriasis pathogenesis. Keratins (KRT) are the major structural intermediate filament proteins in KCs and are expressed in a highly specific pattern at different differentiation stages of KCs. While KRT14-KRT5 is restricted to basal proliferative KCs, and KRT10-KRT1 is restricted to suprabasal differentiated KCs in normal skin epidermis, the wound proximal KCs downregulate KRT10-K1 and upregulate KRT16/KRT17-KRT6 upon skin injury. Recent studies have recognized KRT6/16/17 as key early barrier alarmins and upregulation of these keratins alters proliferation, cell adhesion, migration and inflammatory features of KCs, contributing to hyperproliferation and innate immune activation of KCs in response to an epidermal barrier breach, followed by the autoimmune activation of T cells that drives psoriasis. Here, we have reviewed how keratins are dysregulated during skin injury, their roles in wound repairs and in initiating the innate immune system and the subsequent autoimmune amplification that arises in psoriasis.

9 Review Type1 Interferons Potential Initiating Factors Linking Skin Wounds With Psoriasis Pathogenesis. 2019

Zhang, Ling-Juan. ·School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China. · Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States. ·Front Immunol · Pubmed #31293591.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune skin disease that can often be triggered upon skin injury, known as Koebner phenomenon. Type 1 interferons (IFNα and IFNβ), key cytokines that activate autoimmunity during viral infection, have been suggested to play an indispensable role in initiating psoriasis during skin injury. Type 1 IFN-inducible gene signature has been identified as one of the major upregulated gene signatures in psoriatic skin. Type 1 IFNs treatments often directly induce or exacerbate psoriasis, whereas blocking type 1 IFNs signaling pathway in animal models effectively inhibits the development of T cell-mediated skin inflammation and psoriasis-like inflammatory diseases. Epidermal keratinocytes (KCs) occupy the outermost position in the skin and are the first responder to skin injury. Skin injury rapidly induces IFNβ from KCs and IFNα from dermal plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) through distinct mechanisms. Host antimicrobial peptide LL37 potentiates double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) immune pathways in keratinocytes and single-stranded RNA or DNA pathways in pDCs, leading to production of distinct type 1 IFN genes. IFNβ from KC promotes dendritic cell maturation and the subsequent T cell proliferation, contributing to autoimmune activation during skin injury and psoriasis pathogenesis. Accumulating evidences have indicated an important role of this dsRNA immune pathway in psoriasis pathogenesis. Together, this review describes how skin injury induces type 1 IFNs from skin cells and how this may initiate autoimmune cascades that trigger psoriasis. Targeting keratinocytes or type 1 IFNs in combination with T cell therapy may result in more sustainable effect to treat auto-inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis.

10 Review Applications of molecular engineering in T-cell-based immunotherapies. 2019

McBride, David A / Kerr, Matthew D / Wai, Shinya L / Shah, Nisarg J. ·Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, California. · Program in Chemical Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California. · Center for Nano-Immuno Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California. · Graduate Program in Immunology, University of California, San Diego, California. · San Diego Center for Precision Immunotherapy, University of California, San Diego, California. ·Wiley Interdiscip Rev Nanomed Nanobiotechnol · Pubmed #30972976.

ABSTRACT: Harnessing an individual's immune cells to mediate antitumor and antiviral responses is a life-saving option for some patients with otherwise intractable forms of cancer and infectious disease. In particular, T-cell-based engineered immune cells are a powerful new class of therapeutics with remarkable efficacy. Clinical experience has helped to define some of the major challenges for reliable, safe, and effective deployment of T-cells against a broad range of diseases. While poised to revolutionize immunotherapy, scalable manufacturing, safety, specificity, and the development of resistance are potential roadblocks in their widespread usage. The development of molecular engineering tools to allow for the direct or indirect engineering of T-cells to enable one to troubleshoot delivery issues, amplify immunomodulatory effects, integrate the synergistic effects of different molecules, and home to the target cells in vivo. In this review, we will analyze thus-far developed cell- and material-based tools for enhancing T-cell therapies, including methods to improve safety and specificity, enhancing efficacy, and overcoming limitations in scalable manufacturing. We summarize the potential of T-cells as immune modulating therapies and the potential future directions for enabling their adoption for a broad range of diseases. This article is categorized under: Nanotechnology Approaches to Biology > Nanoscale Systems in Biology Therapeutic Approaches and Drug Discovery > Nanomedicine for Oncologic Disease Nanotechnology Approaches to Biology > Cells at the Nanoscale.

11 Review Bimekizumab for the treatment of psoriatic disease. 2018

Natsis, Nicola E / Gottlieb, Alice B. ·a UCSD School of Medicine , San Diego , CA , USA. · b Department of Dermatology, New York Medical College , Metropolitan Hospital , New York , NY , USA. ·Expert Opin Biol Ther · Pubmed #30332893.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are common diseases with significant physical and emotional burden. Several biologics are FDA-approved to treat psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, though some patients remain refractory to, or have lost response to, therapy and/or cannot tolerate the associated risks and side effects. Bimekizumab is a new biologic that inhibits both IL-17A and IL-17F. It is currently in phase III clinical trials. To date, phase II studies show promise in its ability to rapidly resolve symptoms while remaining safe and well-tolerated. Areas covered: This review serves to summarize the literature regarding the use of bimekizumab for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Bimekizumab has undergone phase I and phase II clinical trials with results showing significant disease improvement or resolution, as well as safety and tolerability. Phase III studies are now actively enrolling. Expert opinion: Bimekizumab is a burgeoning biologic offering significant promise through its unique bispecific targeting of both IL-17A and IL-17F. Clinical trials have shown the potential of rapid symptom improvement after treatment with bimekizumab, with some patients seeing improvement after only two weeks. To date, bimekizumab has been shown to be safe and well-tolerated by patients, without any associated significant adverse events.

12 Review Golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Love, Thorvardur Jon / Kavanaugh, Arthur. ·a Faculty of Medicine , University of Iceland , Reykjavik , Iceland. · b Department of Research , Landspitali University Hospital , Reykjavik , Iceland. · c Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, Immunology , The University of California , San Diego , CA , USA. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #30221556.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis that can be aggressive and destructive, resulting in significant morbidity. While many new agents have been approved for the treatment of PsA over the past decade, TNF inhibitors (TNFi)remain an anchor treatment, in part based on extensive clinical experience. Recently, the TNFi golimumab was approved for intravenous use in PsA. Areas covered: This expert review presents an overview of the currently available treatment options for PsA with a focus on the evidence from clinical trials supporting the use of golimumab in PsA. This information is placed in context with recent advances in the understanding of PsA pathogenesis and treatment. Expert commentary: The rapid growth of treatment options available for PsA has brought the prospect of personalized treatment selection closer to reality but improved understanding of the domains of PsA and new biomarkers may be needed before such changes reach the clinic. Until patients who are most likely to benefit from a given agent can be identified and then treated accordingly, TNFi will likely remain a central option and their further development, such as the introduction of an intravenous form of golimumab, remains an important part of treatment improvement.

13 Review The endocannabinoid system of the skin. A potential approach for the treatment of skin disorders. 2018

Río, Carmen Del / Millán, Estrella / García, Víctor / Appendino, Giovanni / DeMesa, Jim / Muñoz, Eduardo. ·Instituto Maimónides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba (IMIBIC), Córdoba, Spain; Departamento de Biología Celular, Fisiología e Inmunología, Universidad de Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain; Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Córdoba, Spain. · Innohealth Group, Madrid, Spain. · Instituto Maimónides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba (IMIBIC), Córdoba, Spain; Departamento de Biología Celular, Fisiología e Inmunología, Universidad de Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain; Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Córdoba, Spain; Innohealth Group, Madrid, Spain. · Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy. · Emerald Health Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, USA. · Instituto Maimónides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba (IMIBIC), Córdoba, Spain; Departamento de Biología Celular, Fisiología e Inmunología, Universidad de Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain; Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Córdoba, Spain. Electronic address: fi1muble@uco.es. ·Biochem Pharmacol · Pubmed #30138623.

ABSTRACT: The skin is the largest organ of the body and has a complex and very active structure that contributes to homeostasis and provides the first line defense against injury and infection. In the past few years it has become evident that the endocannabinoid system (ECS) plays a relevant role in healthy and diseased skin. Specifically, we review how the dysregulation of ECS has been associated to dermatological disorders such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, scleroderma and skin cancer. Therefore, the druggability of the ECS could open new research avenues for the treatment of the pathologies mentioned. Numerous studies have reported that phytocannabinoids and their biological analogues modulate a complex network pharmacology involved in the modulation of ECS, focusing on classical cannabinoid receptors, transient receptor potential channels (TRPs), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). The combined targeting of several end-points seems critical to provide better chances of therapeutically success, in sharp contrast to the one-disease-one-target dogma that permeates current drug discovery campaigns.

14 Review Pro-inflammatory Cytokines, Biomarkers, Genetics and the Immune System: A Mechanistic Approach of Depression and Psoriasis. 2018

Aleem, Daniyal / Tohid, Hassaan. ·Center for Mind & Brain, Department of Neurology University of California Davis Fairfield, California, United States. · Department of Neurology, University of California San Diego, California, United States. Electronic address: hassaantohid@hotmail.com. ·Rev Colomb Psiquiatr · Pubmed #30017041.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To highlight the inflammatory and immunological mechanisms involved in depression and psoriasis. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was performed in various databases, in total 145 studies were selected. RESULTS: Depression and psoriasis have an association. Immune mechanisms -the actions of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-2, IL-10, IL-22, IL-17, interferon-γ, IL-1β, prostaglandin E2, C-reactive protein, IL-6, and IL-8 etc.-, and some genetic changes are involved. CONCLUSIONS: A possible bidirectional relationship of psoriasis and major depression exists; i.e. the depression leads to psoriasis, and psoriasis leads to depression. We recommend more studies in the future to get a deeper and better understanding about this relationship.

15 Review Obesity and response to anti-tumor necrosis factor-α agents in patients with select immune-mediated inflammatory diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2018

Singh, Siddharth / Facciorusso, Antonio / Singh, Abha G / Vande Casteele, Niels / Zarrinpar, Amir / Prokop, Larry J / Grunvald, Eduardo L / Curtis, Jeffrey R / Sandborn, William J. ·Division of Gastroenterology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America. · Division of Biomedical Informatics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America. · Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy. · Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America. · Institute for Diabetes and Metabolic Health, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America. · VA San Diego Health Systems, La Jolla, California, United States of America. · Department of Library Services, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States of America. · Weight Management Program, Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America. · Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #29771924.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We sought to evaluate the association between obesity and response to anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) agents, through a systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: Through a systematic search through January 24, 2017, we identified randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or observational studies in adults with select immune-mediated inflammatory diseases-inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthropathies (SpA), psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA)-treated with anti-TNF agents, and reporting outcomes, stratified by body mass index (BMI) categories or weight. Primary outcome was failure to achieve clinical remission or response or treatment modification. We performed random effects meta-analysis and estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS: Based on 54 cohorts including 19,372 patients (23% obese), patients with obesity had 60% higher odds of failing therapy (OR,1.60; 95% CI,1.39-1.83;I2 = 71%). Dose-response relationship was observed (obese vs. normal BMI: OR,1.87 [1.39-2.52]; overweight vs. normal BMI: OR,1.38 [1.11-1.74],p = 0.11); a 1kg/m2 increase in BMI was associated with 6.5% higher odds of failure (OR,1.065 [1.043-1.087]). These effects were observed across patients with rheumatic diseases, but not observed in patients with IBD. Effect was consistent based on dosing regimen/route, study design, exposure definition, and outcome measures. Less than 10% eligible RCTs reported outcomes stratified by BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity is an under-reported predictor of inferior response to anti-TNF agents in patients with select immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. A thorough evaluation of obesity as an effect modifier in clinical trials is warranted, and intentional weight loss may serve as adjunctive treatment in patients with obesity failing anti-TNF therapy.

16 Review Skin neurogenic inflammation. 2018

Choi, Jae Eun / Di Nardo, Anna. ·Department of Dermatology, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive #0869, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive #0869, La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. adinardo@ucsd.edu. ·Semin Immunopathol · Pubmed #29713744.

ABSTRACT: The epidermis closely interacts with nerve endings, and both epidermis and nerves produce substances for mutual sustenance. Neuropeptides, like substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related protein (CGRP), are produced by sensory nerves in the dermis; they induce mast cells to release vasoactive amines that facilitate infiltration of neutrophils and T cells. Some receptors are more important than others in the generation of itch. The Mas-related G protein-coupled receptors (Mrgpr) family as well as transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and protease activated receptor 2(Par2) have important roles in itch and inflammation. The activation of MrgprX1 degranulates mast cells to communicate with sensory nerve and cutaneous cells for developing neurogenic inflammation. Mrgprs and transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) are crucial for the generation of skin diseases like rosacea, while SP, CGRP, somatostatin, β-endorphin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) can modulate the immune system during psoriasis development. The increased level of SP, in atopic dermatitis, induces the release of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-10 from the peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes. We are finally starting to understand the intricate connections between the skin neurons and resident skin cells and how their interaction can be key to controlling inflammation and from there the pathogenesis of diseases like atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and rosacea.

17 Review Psoriasis therapy by Chinese medicine and modern agents. 2018

Meng, Shikang / Lin, Zibei / Wang, Yan / Wang, Zhenping / Li, Ping / Zheng, Ying. ·State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Science, University of Macau, Macau, China. · 2Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Affiliated with Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. · 0000 0004 0369 153X · grid.24696.3f · 3Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA USA. · 0000 0001 2107 4242 · grid.266100.3 · 4Department of Pathophysiology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Clinic and Basic Research with Traditional Chinese Medicine on Psoriasis, Beijing Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 23 Meishuguan Back Street, Dongcheng, Beijing, 100010 People's Republic of China. · 0000 0001 1431 9176 · grid.24695.3c ·Chin Med · Pubmed #29588654.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, painful, disfiguring and non-contagious skin disease that has globally affected at least 200 million patients. In general, mild to moderate psoriasis patients will be treated by chemical drugs or Chinese medicine, while targeting systemic biological drugs have been successfully developed with good efficacy but high cost burden to patients with severe psoriasis. Since the underlying mechanisms of psoriasis are not well understood, in this review, psoriasis pathogenesis and clinical therapeutic principles by modern medicine and Chinese medicine are extensively described. Based on the data from the China Food and Drug Administration, the majority of chemical drugs are utilized as the topical formulations, while Chinese medicines are mainly delivered by an oral route, suggesting that the market for topical preparations of Chinese medicine to treat psoriasis is worth to exploration. Moreover, considering the unique clinical therapeutic theory and successful clinical application of Chinese medicine in the treatment of psoriasis, we believe that development of new small molecule drugs based on Chinese medicine will be a promising strategy to reduce therapeutic costs and improve safety for psoriatic patients.

18 Review Pediatric psoriasis: Evolving perspectives. 2018

Eichenfield, Lawrence F / Paller, Amy S / Tom, Wynnis L / Sugarman, Jeffrey / Hebert, Adelaide A / Friedlander, Sheila Fallon / Siegfried, Elaine / Silverberg, Nanette / Cordoro, Kelly M. ·Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Pediatric Dermatology, McGovern School of Medicine and Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USA. ·Pediatr Dermatol · Pubmed #29314219.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Childhood-onset psoriasis is a common skin disorder that has recently received increasing attention, particularly because of its significant medical, social, financial, and psychological burdens and its associated comorbidities. With limited data available and lack of standardized management guidelines for pediatric psoriasis, an expert panel desired to provide an updated critical overview and practical guidance for management of the affected population. METHODS: A panel of pediatric dermatologists with extensive experience in pediatric psoriasis defined and prioritized a core set of topics, performed an English-language literature review, prepared critical evaluations and presentations of topic areas, and carried out a consensus meeting and follow-up consensus manuscript. RESULTS: The summation of evolving perspectives in pediatric psoriasis includes epidemiology and natural history of the disease, precipitating factors and comorbidities, quality of life and burden of disease, clinical features and disease presentation, differential diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment, including topical, photo, and systemic therapies. CONCLUSION: Pediatric psoriasis is an important immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease with potential for significant impact on affected individuals and their caregivers. Current state-of-the-art care is based primarily on experience and expert consensus, but pediatric data are accumulating and therapeutic options are rapidly evolving.

19 Review Regulation and function of interleukin-36 cytokines. 2018

Bassoy, Esen Yonca / Towne, Jennifer E / Gabay, Cem. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine Specialties & Department of Pathology-Immunology, University Hospitals of Geneva and University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Immunology Discovery, Janssen Research and Development, San Diego, CA, USA. ·Immunol Rev · Pubmed #29247994.

ABSTRACT: The interleukin (IL)-36 cytokines include 3 agonists, IL-36α, IL-36β, and IL-36γ that bind to a common receptor composed of IL-36R and IL-1RAcP to stimulate inflammatory responses. IL-36Ra is a natural antagonist that binds to IL-36R, but does not recruit the co-receptor IL-1RAcP and does not stimulate any intracellular responses. The IL-36 cytokines are expressed predominantly by epithelial cells and act on a number of cells including immune cells, epithelial cells, and fibroblasts. Processing of the N-terminus is required for full agonist or antagonist activity for all IL-36 members. The role of IL-36 has been extensively demonstrated in the skin where it can act on keratinocytes and immune cells to induce a robust inflammatory response that has been implicated in psoriatic disorders. Emerging data also suggest a role for this cytokine family in pulmonary and intestinal physiology and pathology.

20 Review Ustekinumab and Anti-Interleukin-23 Agents in Crohn's Disease. 2017

Deepak, Parakkal / Sandborn, William J. ·Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Center, Division of Gastroenterology, John T. Milliken Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, 600 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8124 Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA. · Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Center, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0956, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Electronic address: wsandborn@ucsd.edu. ·Gastroenterol Clin North Am · Pubmed #28838418.

ABSTRACT: This article reviews the available data regarding the efficacy of ustekinumab across published randomized clinical trials and open-label experience from tertiary medical centers, safety data, including in pregnancy, and its use in patients who have failed tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists as well as patients who have not failed TNF antagonists. We have proposed an algorithm for positioning the use of ustekinumab among other agents (TNF antagonists, vedolizumab) in moderate-severe Crohn's disease. The article also enumerates drugs that are specific interleukin-23 blockers, including brazikumab (MEDI2070), risankizumab, LY3074828, tildrakizumab, and guselkumab, and the current status of their clinical trials.

21 Review A Review of Guselkumab, an IL-23 Inhibitor, for Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis. 2017

Nawas, Z / Hatch, M / Ramos, E / Liu, M / Tong, Y / Peranteau, A / Tyring, S. ·Center For Clinical Studies, Houston, TX, USA. · Texas Tech School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX, USA. · Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. · Center For Clinical Studies, Houston, TX, USA; Department of Dermatology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USA. ·Skin Therapy Lett · Pubmed #28329405.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that affects 2% of the population. Evidence suggests that interleukin (IL)-23 plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Guselkumab is a subcutaneously administered, humanized anti-IL23 monoclonal antibody indicated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Data from Phase I-III trials in this patient population reveal that guselkumab has proven to be superior to placebo or adalimumab based on achieving a Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) 90% reduction, or a static Physician Global Assessment (sPGA) score of 0 or 1 from baseline. This article reviews the current status of guselkumab as a therapy for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.

22 Review Clinical Development of Histamine H 2017

Thurmond, Robin L / Venable, Jennifer / Savall, Brad / La, David / Snook, Sandra / Dunford, Paul J / Edwards, James P. ·Janssen Research & Development, LLC, San Diego, CA, 92121, USA. RTHURMON@its.jnj.com. · Janssen Research & Development, LLC, San Diego, CA, 92121, USA. ·Handb Exp Pharmacol · Pubmed #28233185.

ABSTRACT: The discovery of the histamine H

23 Review A Review of Brodalumab, an IL-17 Receptor Antagonist, for Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis. 2017

Tong, Y / Peranteau, A J / Nawas, Z / Tyring, S K. ·Center for Clinical Studies, Houston, TX, USA; Department of Dermatology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. · Center for Clinical Studies, Houston, TX, USA. · Center for Clinical Studies, Houston, TX, USA; Department of Dermatology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA. ·Skin Therapy Lett · Pubmed #28122092.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disease with epidermal hyperplasia that affects 2-3% of the population. Interleukin (IL)-17 signaling has a central role in its pathogenesis. Brodalumab is a monoclonal antibody that neutralizes IL-17 receptor type A. Brodalumab is highly effective in the reversal of psoriatic phenotype and gene expression patterns.

24 Review From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation: Treatment targets for plaque psoriasis. 2017

Armstrong, April W / Siegel, Michael P / Bagel, Jerry / Boh, Erin E / Buell, Megan / Cooper, Kevin D / Callis Duffin, Kristina / Eichenfield, Lawrence F / Garg, Amit / Gelfand, Joel M / Gottlieb, Alice B / Koo, John Y M / Korman, Neil J / Krueger, Gerald G / Lebwohl, Mark G / Leonardi, Craig L / Mandelin, Arthur M / Menter, M Alan / Merola, Joseph F / Pariser, David M / Prussick, Ronald B / Ryan, Caitriona / Shah, Kara N / Weinberg, Jeffrey M / Williams, MaryJane O U / Wu, Jashin J / Yamauchi, Paul S / Van Voorhees, Abby S. ·Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: aprilarmstrong@post.harvard.edu. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Windsor Dermatology, East Windsor, New Jersey; University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro, Plainsboro, New Jersey. · Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana. · University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah. · University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California. · Northwell Health and Hofstra North Shore University Hospital, Long Island Jewish Medical Center School of Medicine, Manhasset, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California San Francisco Medical Center, San Francisco, California. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · St Louis University Medical School, St Louis, Missouri. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Baylor University Medical Center and Texas A&M Health Science Center, Dallas, Texas. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia; Virginia Clinical Research Inc, Norfolk, Virginia. · George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia. · Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Division of Dermatology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #27908543.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An urgent need exists in the United States to establish treatment goals in psoriasis. OBJECTIVE: We aim to establish defined treatment targets toward which clinicians and patients with psoriasis can strive to inform treatment decisions, reduce disease burden, and improve outcomes in practice. METHODS: The National Psoriasis Foundation conducted a consensus-building study among psoriasis experts using the Delphi method. The process consisted of: (1) literature review, (2) pre-Delphi question selection and input from general dermatologists and patients, and (3) 4 Delphi rounds. RESULTS: A total of 25 psoriasis experts participated in the Delphi process. The most preferred instrument was body surface area (BSA). The most preferred time for evaluating patient response after starting new therapies was at 3 months. The acceptable response at 3 months postinitiation was either BSA 3% or less or BSA improvement 75% or more from baseline. The target response at 3 months postinitiation was BSA 1% or less. During the maintenance period, evaluation every 6 months was most preferred. The target response at every 6 months maintenance evaluation is BSA 1% or less. LIMITATIONS: Although BSA is feasible in practice, it does not encompass health-related quality of life, costs, and risks of side effects. CONCLUSION: With defined treatment targets, clinicians and patients can regularly evaluate treatment responses and perform benefit-risk assessments of therapeutic options individualized to the patient.

25 Review The Critical and Multifunctional Roles of Antimicrobial Peptides in Dermatology. 2017

Takahashi, Toshiya / Gallo, Richard L. ·Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Electronic address: rgallo@ucsd.edu. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #27890236.

ABSTRACT: Antimicrobial peptides are central effector molecules in skin immunology. The functions of antimicrobial peptides in skin diseases include the ability to act as cytokines or growth factors, driving disorders such as psoriasis and rosacea, as well as their action as natural antibiotics to control bacteria that influence diseases such as atopic dermatitis and acne.

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