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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Verona-Negrar
Based on 112 articles published since 2008
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These are the 112 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Verona-Negrar during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5
1 Guideline European S3-Guideline on the systemic treatment of psoriasis vulgaris - Update Apremilast and Secukinumab - EDF in cooperation with EADV and IPC. 2017

Nast, A / Spuls, P I / van der Kraaij, G / Gisondi, P / Paul, C / Ormerod, A D / Saiag, P / Smith, C H / Dauden, E / de Jong, E M / Feist, E / Jobling, R / Maccarone, M / Mrowietz, U / Papp, K A / Reich, K / Rosumeck, S / Talme, T / Thio, H B / van de Kerkhof, P / Werner, R N / Dressler, C. ·Division of Evidence-Based Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France. · Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, UK. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré Université Paris V, Boulogne, France. · St Johns Institute of Dermatology, Guys and St Thomas' Hospital Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid, Spain. · Radboud University medical center and Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Cambridge, UK. · Roma, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Psoriasis-Center University Medical Center Schleswig Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Waterloo, Canada. · Dermatologikum Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28895202.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline European S3-Guidelines on the systemic treatment of psoriasis vulgaris--Update 2015--Short version--EDF in cooperation with EADV and IPC. 2015

Nast, A / Gisondi, P / Ormerod, A D / Saiag, P / Smith, C / Spuls, P I / Arenberger, P / Bachelez, H / Barker, J / Dauden, E / de Jong, E M / Feist, E / Jacobs, A / Jobling, R / Kemény, L / Maccarone, M / Mrowietz, U / Papp, K A / Paul, C / Reich, K / Rosumeck, S / Talme, T / Thio, H B / van de Kerkhof, P / Werner, R N / Yawalkar, N. ·Division of Evidence Based Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, UK. · Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré Université Paris V, Boulogne, France. · Clinical Lead for Dermatology, St Johns Institute of Dermatology, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Third Faculty of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · St. Johns Institute of Dermatology, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid, Spain. · University Medical Center Nijmegen St Radboud, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Rheumatologie u. klinische Immonologie, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Cambridge, UK. · SZTE Borgyogyaszati Klinika, Szeged, Hungary. · Roma, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Psoriasis-Center University Medical Center Schleswig Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Waterloo, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France. · Dermatologikum Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, Universitätsklinik für Dermatologie, Bern, Switzerland. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #26481193.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline Consensus on the use of cyclosporine in dermatological practice. Italian Consensus Conference. 2014

Altomare, G / Ayala, F / Bardazzi, F / Bellia, G / Chimenti, S / Colombo, D / Flori, M L / Girolomoni, G / Micali, G / Parodi, A / Peris, K / Vena, G A / Anonymous1420806. ·IRCCS Galeazzi, University of Milan, Milan, Italy - giampiero.girolomoni@univr.it. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #25213388.

ABSTRACT: Cyclosporine A (CsA) efficacy and safety have been proven in various dermatoses both in adults and in children even as long-term treatment. Over the last 25 years, Italian dermatologists have gathered relevant experience about CsA treatment for psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. This paper has been developed by an Italian Consensus Conference and it is aimed at providing recommendations based on real-world clinical experience in adult patients, consistent with efficacy and safety data arising from the scientific literature. The paper is mainly focused on the analysis of the optimal therapeutic schemes for psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, in terms of doses and treatment duration, according to individual characteristics and to the severity of the disease. Moreover, it overviews ideal management, taking into account pharmacological interactions, influence of comorbidities, and the most common adverse events related to CsA treatment.

4 Editorial Could nail and joint alterations make the difference between psoriatic arthritis and osteoarthritis during the ultrasonographic evaluation of the distal interphalangeal joints? 2017

Batticciotto, Alberto / Idolazzi, Luca / De Lucia, Orazio / Tinazzi, Ilaria / Iagnocco, Annamaria. ·Rheumatology Unit, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Unit of Rheumatology, Ospedale Civile Maggiore, University of Verona, Italy. luca.idolazzi@univr.it. · Department of Rheumatology, ASST Centro traumatologico ortopedico G. Pini - CTO, Milan,Italy. · Unit of Rheumatology, Ospedale Sacro Cuore, Negrar, Verona, Italy. · Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche e Biologiche, Università degli Studi di Torino, Turin, Italy. ·Med Ultrason · Pubmed #29197909.

ABSTRACT: .

5 Editorial High prevalence of alcohol use disorders in patients with inflammatory skin diseases applies to both psoriasis and eczema. 2017

Gisondi, P. ·Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, University of Verona, Verona, 37126, Italy. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #28940274.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Review Psoriasis and the metabolic syndrome. 2018

Gisondi, Paolo / Fostini, Anna Chiara / Fossà, Irene / Girolomoni, Giampiero / Targher, Giovanni. ·Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: paolo.gisondi@univr.it. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #29241748.

ABSTRACT: Chronic plaque psoriasis is an immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease that is strongly associated with the clinical features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), including abdominal obesity, hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The strength of these associations has been repeatedly confirmed by several observational studies. In particular, the prevalence of MetS in patients with psoriasis ranges from 20% to 50%, with a risk of having MetS is at least double in psoriatic patients compared with nonpsoriatic control individuals. MetS is also more common in patients with severe psoriasis than in those with mild skin disease. Emerging evidence now suggests that psoriasis and MetS share multiple metabolic risk factors, genetic background, and pathogenic pathways. The association between psoriasis and MetS has important clinical implications. Systemic conventional treatments should be used with caution in psoriatic patients with MetS, because they could adversely affect the coexisting metabolic disorders, especially in the case of their chronic use. Biologics appear to have a different safety profile compared with conventional treatments, and so they are usually tolerated. Collectively, dermatologists should pay close attention to the early recognition of coexisting metabolic disorders and give appropriate pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic (hypocaloric diet and regular exercise) recommendations to their patients.

7 Review How to improve adherence to treatment in patients with mild-to-moderate psoriasis. 2018

Piaserico, Stefano / Manfredini, Stefano / Borghi, Alessandro / Gisondi, Paolo / Pazzaglia, Massimiliano / Stinco, Giuseppe / Venturini, Marina / Conti, Andrea. ·Unit of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, Italy - stefano.piaserico@unipd.it. · Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Medicine Pharmacy and Prevention, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. · Section of Dermatology and Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. · Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Dermatology, Department of Specialist, Experimental, and Diagnostic Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Institute of Dermatology, University of Udine, Udine, Italy. · Unit of Dermatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Science, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Unit of Dermatology, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Modena University Hospital, Modena, Italy. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28704994.

ABSTRACT: Topical treatments are frequently used for the therapy of psoriasis. However, they may be associated with poor adherence in clinical practice. Therapeutic adherence is affected by patient's characteristics, as well as disease- and treatment-related factors; moreover, satisfaction with therapy, cosmetic acceptability, and complexity of the treatment regimen do also play a role. Since low adherence could lead to treatment failure, it is crucial to elaborate effective strategies aimed at improving patient adherence and thus clinical outcomes in psoriasis. To this purpose, here we have addressed several aspects of dermatological treatment that impact on adherence such as selection of therapy, selection of vehicle, and physician-patient communication. In addition, possible practical measures to improve adherence have also been discussed. In this light, we report that the use of calcipotriol and betamethasone dipropionate (Cal/BD) fixed-combination gel may be associated with improved patients' preference and better outcomes compared to similar formulations.

8 Review The problem in differentiation between psoriatic-related polyenthesitis and fibromyalgia. 2018

Marchesoni, Antonio / De Marco, Gabriele / Merashli, Mira / McKenna, Frank / Tinazzi, Ilaria / Marzo-Ortega, Helena / McGonagle, Dennis G. ·UOC Day Hospital of Rheumatology, ASST Gaetano Pini-CTO Hospital, Milano, Italy. · NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon. · Rheumatology Department, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust, Trafford General Hospital, Manchester, UK. · Unit of Rheumatology, Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar, Italy. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #28387854.

ABSTRACT: The recognition of the primacy of enthesitis in animal models of spondyloarthritis and the prevalence of clinically occult enthesopathy in psoriatic subjects and of persistent joint pain in PsA subjects who have ostensibly good reduction of joint swelling under biological therapy has highlighted the potential impact of polyenthesitis in psoriatic disease. In daily practice, the formal demonstration of enthesitis is challenging for the following reasons: the relatively avascular nature of enthesis, often leading to the absence of overt clinical inflammatory signs; the frequent lack of elevation of inflammatory markers; and finally, the limitations of current imaging techniques to provide supportive evidence for inflammation in these areas. Consequently, enthesitis may present as widespread pain indistinguishable from FM or may emerge as the dominant feature after successful biological therapy for suppression of synovitis. The unmet needs in the differentiation between FM and enthesitis in psoriatic disease patients are highlighted and critically evaluated in this article.

9 Review Back to the future: a new topical approach for mild-to-moderate psoriasis. 2018

Girolomoni, Giampiero / Calzavara Pinton, Piergiacomo / Cristaudo, Antonio / Cicchetti, Americo. ·Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy - giampiero.girolomoni@univr.it. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Section of Dermatology, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · San Gallicano Dermatological Institute, IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Postgraduate School of Health Economics and Management, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #27982547.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic-relapsing skin disorder which requires long-term treatments. Therapeutic options for psoriasis include topical treatments, phototherapy and systemic therapy. However, those treatments, and particularly the topical drug therapies, may present some limitations, including poor efficacy/tolerability ratio and lack of adherence. Recently, the supersaturated aerosol foam formulation of the fixed combination calcipotriene plus betamethasone dipropionate (Cal/BD) has gained major attention because it overcomes some of the limitations associated with other topical treatments. This fixed-combination has increased efficacy compared with its individual components. Moreover, the alcohol-free aerosol foam formulation allows a higher penetration of the active ingredients into the skin, resulting in enhanced bioavailability and, consequently, in better clinical outcomes than other products with the same components. Given the short duration of therapy course and the fast onset of action, a reduced amount of Cal/BD foam formulation would be required for the treatment of psoriasis patients, resulting also in cost saving. Therefore this novel formulation could represent an alternative to other topical agents and a first-line therapy in the treatment of mild and mild-to-moderate psoriasis.

10 Review Enthesitis of the hands in psoriatic arthritis: an ultrasonographic perspective. 2017

Zabotti, Alen / Idolazzi, Luca / Batticciotto, Alberto / De Lucia, Orazio / Scirè, Carlo Alberto / Tinazzi, Ilaria / Iagnocco, Annamaria. ·Rheumatology Clinic, University of Udine, Italy. zabottialen@gmail.com. · Rheumatology Unit, University of Verona, Ospedale Civile Maggiore, Verona, Italy. luca.idolazzi@univr.it. · Rheumatology Unit, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy. battic@tiscali.it. · Department of Rheumatology, ASST Centro traumatologico ortopedico G. Pini - CTO, Milan. oraziodelucia@alice.it. · Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Rheumatology, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. c.scire@reumatologia.it. · Unit of Rheumatology, Ospedale Sacro Cuore, Negrar, Verona, Italy. ilariatinazzi@yahoo.it. · Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche e Biologiche, Università degli Studi di Torino, Turin, Italy. annamaria.iagnocco1@gmail.com. ·Med Ultrason · Pubmed #29197921.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis is a systemic inflammatory disease in which enthesitis and dactylitis are two of the main hallmarks of the disease. In the last years, ultrasonography is increasingly playing a key role in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis and ultrasonography of the entheses, particularly of the lower limbs, is commonly used to assess patients with that disease. New advancements in ultrasound equipment using high frequencies probes allowed us also to identify and characterize the involvementof the entheses of the hand in psoriatic arthritis, confirming the results of the experimental models of the disease and the theory of the sinovial-entheseal complex, even in small joints.

11 Review Advanced Glycation End Products in the Pathogenesis of Psoriasis. 2017

Papagrigoraki, Anastasia / Maurelli, Martina / Del Giglio, Micol / Gisondi, Paolo / Girolomoni, Giampiero. ·Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, 37126 Verona, Italy. papanastassia78@gmail.com. · Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, 37126 Verona, Italy. maurelli.martina@gmail.com. · Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, 37126 Verona, Italy. micol.delgiglio@univr.it. · Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, 37126 Verona, Italy. paolo.gisondi@univr.it. · Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, 37126 Verona, Italy. giampiero.girolomoni@univr.it. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #29156622.

ABSTRACT: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are extremely oxidant and biologically reactive compounds, which form through oxidation of sugars, lipids and amino acids to create aldehydes that bind covalently to proteins. AGEs formation and accumulation in human tissues is a physiological process during ageing but it is enhanced in case of persistent hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and oxidative or carbonyl stress, which are common in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. Exogenous AGEs may derive from foods, UV irradiation and cigarette smoking. AGEs elicit biological functions by activating membrane receptors expressed on epithelial and inflammatory cell surface. AGEs amplify inflammatory response by favoring the release of cytokines and chemokines, the production of reactive oxygen species and the activation of metalloproteases. AGEs levels are increased in the skin and blood of patients with severe psoriasis independently of associated metabolic disorders. Intensified glycation of proteins in psoriasis skin might have a role in fueling cutaneous inflammation. In addition, AGEs released from psoriatic skin may increase metabolic and cardiovascular risk in patients with severe disease.

12 Review Treatment Approaches to Moderate to Severe Psoriasis. 2017

Gisondi, Paolo / Del Giglio, Micol / Girolomoni, Giampiero. ·Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, University of Verona, 37129 Verona, Italy. paolo.gisondi@univr.it. · Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, University of Verona, 37129 Verona, Italy. micol.delgiglio@univr.it. · Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, University of Verona, 37129 Verona, Italy. giampiero.girolomoni@univr.it. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #29144382.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common disease, which has a considerable impact on patients and the health care system. Treatment approaches to the disease may be various because some issues are not definitely addressed. Moreover, the therapeutic paradigms are continuously changing because of the recent approval of new treatments for psoriasis such as interleukin (IL)-17 inhibitors and apremilast. In this review, the factors influencing psoriasis severity, the indications for systemic treatments, the overall parameters to be considered in the treatment choice, life style interventions, and the recommendations for the use, screening, and monitoring of systemic therapies available including acitretin, cyclosporine, methotrexate, apremilast, adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, secukinumab, ixekizumab, and ustekinumab are discussed. Finally, treatment approaches in special patient populations including children, the elderly, pregnant women, patients with a history of neoplasm, and candidates for surgical procedures are reported.

13 Review The role of IL-23 and the IL-23/T 2017

Girolomoni, G / Strohal, R / Puig, L / Bachelez, H / Barker, J / Boehncke, W H / Prinz, J C. ·Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Federal Academic Teaching Hospital of Feldkirch, Feldkirch, Austria. · Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Sorbonne Paris Cité, Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Paris, France. · UMR INSERM U1163, Institut Imagine, Paris, France. · St John's Institute of Dermatology, King's College London, London, UK. · Division of Dermatology, Geneva University Hospitals, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Dermatology, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28653490.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disease affecting more than 100 million people worldwide and up to 2.2% of the UK population. The aetiology of psoriasis is thought to originate from an interplay of genetic, environmental, infectious and lifestyle factors. The manner in which genetic and environmental factors interact to contribute to the molecular disease mechanisms has remained elusive. However, the interleukin 23 (IL-23)/T-helper 17 (T

14 Review Adalimumab is a safe option for psoriasis patients with concomitant hepatitis B or C infection: a multicentre cohort study of 37 patients and review of the literature. 2017

Piaserico, S / Dapavo, P / Conti, A / Gisondi, P / Russo, F P. ·Dermatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Dermatology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Department of Medicine and Medical Specialties, University of Modena, Modena, Italy. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Surgical, Oncological and Gastroenterological Sciences, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28146345.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Little data are available about the safety of TNF-α inhibitors in patients with HCV and HBV infection. In particular, data concerning the use of adalimumab in patients with psoriasis and concomitant viral hepatitis are lacking and little is known about the drug's real safety in this context. OBJECTIVE: To assess the long-term safety of adalimumab in a group of 17 consecutive psoriatic patients affected by chronic HBV infection and 20 consecutive psoriatic patients affected by chronic HCV infection. METHODS: Thirty-seven consecutive patients with psoriasis and concomitant HBV or HCV infection being treated with adalimumab at four Italian referral centres (Modena, Padova, Verona and Turin) were assessed before the treatment and at the end of follow-up. Viral load and radiological studies (echography, Fibroscan) were also carried out in some of the patients. RESULTS: The patients responded well to treatment and did not show any HBV or HCV reactivation in a mean follow-up period of 27 and 40 months, respectively. The fibrosis score in eight HCV patients showed a slight reduction: pretreatment mean value 5.83 and post-treatment mean value 5.65. CONCLUSION: The use of adalimumab seems to be safe in patients with severe psoriasis and HBV or HCV infection. Nevertheless, large-scale prospective studies will be able to provide vital information on the impact of anti-TNF treatment on hepatic function in patients with psoriasis and concomitant chronic HCV or HBV infection and appropriate monitoring scheduling.

15 Review Experience and challenges for biologic use in the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis in Africa and the Middle East region. 2017

Al Hammadi, Anwar / Al-Sheikh, Afaf / Ammoury, Alfred / Ghosn, Samer / Gisondi, Paolo / Hamadah, Issam / Kibbi, Abdul-Ghani / Shirazy, Khalid. ·a Department of Dermatology , Rashid Hospital , Dubai , UAE. · b Department of Dermatology , King Abdulaziz Medical City , Riyadh , Saudi Arabia. · c Department of Dermatology , St George Hospital University Medical Center , Beirut , Lebanon. · d Department of Dermatology , American University of Beirut Medical Center , Lebanon. · e Department of Dermatology , University Hospital of Verona , Italy. · f Department of Dermatology , King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre , Riyadh , Saudi Arabia. · g Pfizer Inc , Dubai , UAE. ·J Dermatolog Treat · Pubmed #27196814.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of psoriasis in Africa and the Middle East (AfME) is high as in other regions and represents a significant problem for both dermatologists and patients. Psoriasis co-morbidities such as obesity, cardiovascular disease and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are also particularly common in these regions and may be under-recognized and under-treated. Despite this, regional guidelines to aid physicians on the appropriate use of biologic agents in their clinical practice are limited. A group of expert dermatologists from across the AfME region were surveyed to help establish best practice across the region, alongside supporting data from the literature. Although biologics have significantly improved patient outcomes since their introduction, the results of this survey identified several unmet needs, including the lack of consensus regarding their use in clinical practice. Discrepancy also exists among AfME physicians concerning the clinical relevance of immunogenicity to biologics, despite increasing data across inflammatory diseases. Significant treatment and management of challenges for psoriasis patients remain, and a move towards individualized, tailored care may help to address these issues. The development of specific local guidelines for the treatment of both psoriasis and PsA could also be a step towards understanding the distinct patient profiles in these regions.

16 Review Considerations for Systemic Treatment of Psoriasis in Obese Patients. 2016

Gisondi, Paolo / Del Giglio, Micol / Girolomoni, Giampiero. ·Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Piazzale A. Stefani 1, 37126, Verona, Italy. paolo.gisondi@univr.it. · Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Piazzale A. Stefani 1, 37126, Verona, Italy. ·Am J Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #27411805.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is an immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease frequently associated with metabolic disorders, including diabetes, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome. Moreover, a growing number of studies confirm the association between psoriasis and obesity. It has been found that obesity, as measured by body mass index >30 kg/m

17 Review Apremilast in the therapy of moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis. 2016

Gisondi, Paolo / Girolomoni, Giampiero. ·Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Drug Des Devel Ther · Pubmed #27307707.

ABSTRACT: Chronic plaque psoriasis presents clinically as an inflammatory disease of the skin, which is often associated with comorbidities and responsible for a poor quality of life. It can widely vary among patients because of different age of onset, type of symptoms, areas of involvement, and disease severity. The choice of the treatment of psoriasis should be personalized according to the specific needs of the patients. Apremilast is a well-tolerated and effective phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitor that is indicated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. In this article, the pharmacological, clinical, and safety aspects of apremilast are reviewed. Based on these data, apremilast could be indicated for patients with a Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score <10 but with a significant impact on quality of life and seems to be an appropriate treatment for elderly patients also.

18 Review Treatment of psoriasis with etanercept: the typical patient profile. 2016

Prinz, J C / Puig, L / Girolomoni, G. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Piazzale A. Stefani, Verona, Italy. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #27073046.

ABSTRACT: The chronic nature of psoriasis means that patients often require lifetime treatment. Over this time, treatment frequently has to be adapted to meet variable demands resulting from changes in life course and life events. Biological drugs used to treat psoriasis vary in their dosing regimens, convenience and flexibility. Dermatologists need to understand which biologic agent is best suited for each individual patient. A wealth of evidence supports the safe and effective use of etanercept, which offers a rapid and sustained response, flexibility of dosing, maintenance of response after dose reduction or interruption, and efficacy against non-skin manifestations such as psoriatic arthritis. An expert panel met to agree the typical patient profile of a psoriasis patient treated with etanercept, the main benefits of etanercept in psoriasis, and the patient group most likely to benefit from its use. They agreed that flexibility of dosing, the potential to individualize therapy by stopping and starting treatment while maintaining efficacy, and the possibility of cost saving through the use of flexible treatment regimens were important benefits supporting the use of etanercept in many patients with psoriasis.

19 Review Relationship between Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Psoriasis: A Novel Hepato-Dermal Axis? 2016

Mantovani, Alessandro / Gisondi, Paolo / Lonardo, Amedeo / Targher, Giovanni. ·Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University and Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata of Verona, Piazzale Stefani, 1, Verona 37126, Italy. alessandro.mantovani24@gmail.com. · Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University and Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata of Verona, Piazzale Stefani, 1, Verona 37126, Italy. paolo.gisondi@univr.it. · Outpatient Liver Clinic and Division of Internal Medicine-Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, NOCSAE, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia and Azienda USL Modena, Baggiovara, Modena 41126, Italy. a.lonardo@libero.it. · Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University and Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata of Verona, Piazzale Stefani, 1, Verona 37126, Italy. giovanni.targher@univr.it. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #26861300.

ABSTRACT: Over the past 10 years, it has become increasingly evident that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a multisystem disease that affects multiple extra-hepatic organ systems and interacts with the regulation of several metabolic and immunological pathways. In this review we discuss the rapidly expanding body of clinical and epidemiological evidence supporting a strong association between NAFLD and chronic plaque psoriasis. We also briefly discuss the possible biological mechanisms underlying this association, and discuss treatment options for psoriasis that may influence NAFLD development and progression. Recent observational studies have shown that the prevalence of NAFLD (as diagnosed either by imaging or by histology) is remarkably higher in psoriatic patients (occurring in up to 50% of these patients) than in matched control subjects. Notably, psoriasis is associated with NAFLD even after adjusting for metabolic syndrome traits and other potential confounding factors. Some studies have also suggested that psoriatic patients are more likely to have the more advanced forms of NAFLD than non-psoriatic controls, and that psoriatic patients with NAFLD have more severe psoriasis than those without NAFLD. In conclusion, the published evidence argues for more careful evaluation and surveillance of NAFLD among patients with psoriasis.

20 Review Concept of Remission in Chronic Plaque Psoriasis. 2015

Gisondi, Paolo / Di Mercurio, Marco / Idolazzi, Luca / Girolomoni, Giampiero. ·From the Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, and Section of Rheumatology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy.P. Gisondi, MD, Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology; M. Di Mercurio, MD, Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology; L. Idolazzi, MD, Department of Medicine, Section of Rheumatology; and G. Girolomoni, MD, Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, University of Verona. ·J Rheumatol Suppl · Pubmed #26523059.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a lifelong chronic inflammatory disease affecting 2-3% of the worldwide population. Current understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis assigns central importance to an interaction between acquired and innate immunity. The disease is characterized by a series of linked cellular changes in the skin, including hyperplasia of epidermal keratinocytes, angiogenesis, and infiltration of T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and other types of leukocytes in the affected skin. Plaque psoriasis is the most common clinical form and is characterized by red and scaly plaques generally localized at extensor sites such as elbows and knees. Major determinants of psoriasis severity include the extent of skin involvement; localization in highly affected areas such as scalp, palms, and soles; pruritus; presence of comorbidities including psoriatic arthritis; and impairment on quality of life. About one-third of patients have moderate to severe psoriasis defined as PASI (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index) and/or Dermatology Life Quality Index>10, and/or affected body surface area>10%. The optimal treatment goal is to safely achieve complete or almost complete skin clearance. Treatments available are various and they are chosen according to disease features, comorbidities, and patient characteristics and priorities. Topical treatments including corticosteroids and Vitamin D analogs are reserved for mild disease. Phototherapy, cyclosporine, methotrexate, acitretin, or biologics such as tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists and ustekinumab are reserved for the moderate to severe forms.

21 Review A patient-centred approach to biological treatment decision making for psoriasis: an expert consensus. 2015

Strohal, R / Prinz, J C / Girolomoni, G / Nast, A. ·Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Federal Academic Teaching Hospital of Feldkirch, Feldkirch, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Section of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Evidence Based Medicine (dEBM), Department of Dermatology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #26370908.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Each individual psoriasis patient has different expectations and goals for biological treatment, which may differ from those of the clinician. As such, a patient-centred approach to treatment goals remains an unmet need in psoriasis. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to review available data on patients' and physicians' decision criteria and expectations of biological treatment for moderate-to-severe psoriasis with the aim of developing a core set of questions for clinicians to ask patients routinely to understand what is important to them and thus better align physicians' and patients' expectations of treatment with biologics and its outcomes. METHODS: A literature search was conducted to identify key themes and data gaps. Aspects of treatment relevant when choosing a biological agent for an individual patient were identified and compared to an existing validated instrument. A series of questions aimed at helping the physician to identify the particular aspects of treatment that are recognised as important to individual psoriasis patients was developed. RESULTS: Key findings of the literature search were grouped under themes of adherence, decision-making, quality of life, patient/physician goals, communication, patient-reported outcomes, satisfaction and patient benefit index. Several aspects of treatment were identified as being relevant when choosing a biological agent for an individual patient. The questionnaire is devised in two parts. The first part asks questions about patients' experience of psoriasis and satisfaction with previous treatments. The second part aims to identify the treatment attributes patients consider to be important and may as such affect their preference for a particular biological treatment. The questionnaire results will allow the physician to understand the key factors that can be influenced by biological drug choice that are of importance to the patient. This information can be used be the physician in clinical decision making. CONCLUSION: The questionnaire has been developed to provide a new tool to better understand and align patients' and physicians' preferences and goals for biological treatment of psoriasis.

22 Review Measuring psoriatic disease in clinical practice. An expert opinion position paper. 2015

Lubrano, Ennio / Cantini, Fabrizio / Costanzo, Antonio / Girolomoni, Giampiero / Prignano, Francesca / Olivieri, Ignazio / Scarpa, Raffaele / Spadaro, Antonio / Atzeni, Fabiola / Narcisi, Alessandra / Ricceri, Federica / Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo. ·Academic Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences "Vincenzo Tiberio", University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. Electronic address: enniolubrano@hotmail.com. · Unit of Rheumatology, AUSL 4, Prato, Italy. Electronic address: fbrzcantini@gmail.com. · Unit of Dermatology, NESMOS Department, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Italy. Electronic address: acostanzo2000@gmail.com. · Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology, University of Verona, Italy. Electronic address: giampiero.girolomoni@univr.it. · Department of Medical-Surgical Critical Area, Section of Clinical, Preventive and Oncological Dermatology, University of Florence, Italy. Electronic address: francesca.prignano@unifi.it. · Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Italy. Electronic address: ignazioolivieri@tiscali.it. · Rheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Naples "FEDERICO II", Italy. Electronic address: rscarpa@unina.it. · Rheumatology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, University "Sapienza" of Rome, Umberto I Polyclinic, Rome, Italy. · Rheumatology Unit, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: atzenifabiola@hotmail.com. · Unit of Dermatology, NESMOS Department, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Italy. Electronic address: alessandra.narcisi@uniroma1.it. · Department of Medical-Surgical Critical Area, Section of Clinical, Preventive and Oncological Dermatology, University of Florence, Italy. Electronic address: federicaricceri@hotmail.it. · Rheumatology Unit, L. Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: piercarlo.sarziputtini@gmail.com. ·Autoimmun Rev · Pubmed #26025585.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease with a primary involvement of skin and joints, affecting approximately 2% of the population worldwide. Up to one third of patients with psoriasis are diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Psoriasis and PsA are heterogeneous diseases whose severity depends on a number of clinical factors, such as areas affected and pattern of involvement, and are associated with a range of comorbid diseases and risk factors, including obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and liver disease. Thus measuring the severity of psoriatic disease needs to take into account the multidimensional aspects of the disease. Subjective measures including the impairment in quality of life or in daily living activities as well as the presence of cardio-metabolic comorbidities, are important for the outcome and add further levels of complexity that, to a certain extent, need to be assessed. Because of the wide range of comorbid conditions associated with psoriasis, comprehensive screening and treatment must be implemented for a most effective managing of psoriasis patients. A joint dermatologist-rheumatologist roundtable discussion was convened to share evidence on the real-life use of methods for measuring psoriasis severity comprehensively. Our objective was to provide an expert position on which clinical variables are to be taken into account when considering patients affected by psoriasis and/or PsA globally and on the assessment tools more suitable for measuring disease activity and/or severity in clinical practice.

23 Review Why golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis? 2015

Rossini, M / Viapiana, O / Orsolini, G / Fracassi, E / Idolazzi, L / Gatti, D / Adami, S / Govoni, M. ·Rheumatology Unit, University of Verona. maurizio.rossini@univr.it. ·Reumatismo · Pubmed #25829189.

ABSTRACT: Golimumab is an anti-TNF monoclonal antibody administred subcutaneously once a month and produced with an innovative technology that minimizes immunogenicity. This paper reviews and updates the main studies on the efficacy, safety and pharmacoeconomic aspects of treatment with golimumab of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis.

24 Review PSOCUBE, a multidimensional assessment of psoriasis patients as a both clinically/practically sustainable and evidence-based algorithm. 2015

Linder, D / Altomare, G / Amato, S / Amerio, P / Balato, N / Campanati, A / Conti, A / Gisondi, P / Prignano, F / Saraceno, R / Piaserico, S. ·Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Padua, Italy. · Research Unit of Behavioural Medicine, Health Psychology and Empirical Psychosomatics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Dermatology Unit, Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi IRCCS, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Dermatology and STD, ARNAS-Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · Department of Oncology and Neurosciences, Dermatologic Clinic, University G. D'Annunzio, Chieti, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Dermatological Clinic, Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Polytechnic Marche University, Ancona, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Policlinico, Modena, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, University of Verona, Italy. · Division of Clinical, Preventive and Oncology Dermatology, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, Florence University, Florence, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #25370415.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is increasing awareness of the clinical relevance of psoriasis comorbidities and of the importance of timely and effective screening for such comorbidities in the management of psoriatic patients. Previous works have focused on assessing evidence for prevalence of comorbidities and on the best available evidence for sensitivity in diagnosing suspected comorbidities. No algorithms are available, which have been tested on large numbers of physicians concerning the acceptance of such algorithms both by practicing clinical dermatologists and by their consulting specialists from other fields. OBJECTIVE: To propose a multidimensional assessment algorithm for psoriasis comorbidities which may prove at the same time enough sensitive and practically sustainable in daily clinical practice. METHODS: After an exhaustive literature search, we performed a Delphi procedure involving 50 dedicated dermatological centres to obtain a standardized assessment algorithm, which would meet requirements of sustainability and acceptability both from the point of view of Evidence-Based Medicine as well as from the point of view of practical and clinical feasibility: to meet both requirements, results from the Delphi procedure were elaborated and modified by a restricted panel of experts. RESULTS: The procedure has yielded PSOCUBE, a three-dimensional table comprising 14 clinical examination and history taking items, 32 screening laboratory and instrumental exams and 11 clinimetric scores. CONCLUSION: PSOCUBE, a simple algorithm, may be employed by practising dermatologists to perform standardized assessment procedures on psoriatic patients raising the chances of early recognition of patients at risk for comorbidities, thus fostering more effective prevention; PSOCUBE may therefore contribute to reduce the overall impact of this chronic, widespread disease.

25 Review Early intervention in psoriasis and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases: A hypothesis paper. 2015

Girolomoni, G / Griffiths, C E M / Krueger, J / Nestle, F O / Nicolas, J-F / Prinz, J C / Puig, L / Ståhle, M / van de Kerkhof, P C M / Allez, M / Emery, P / Paul, C. ·Department of Medicine, Section of Dermatology and Venereology, University of Verona , Verona , Italy . ·J Dermatolog Treat · Pubmed #24547907.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease (IMID) which may have a major impact on a patient's life, especially when the disease is moderate to severe. There is evidence that treatment of psoriasis during the first years is conservative and frequently based on topical agents which rarely clear lesions. Treatment with systemic agents including biologics is often undertaken only when topical agents have proved unsuitable, even in patients with moderate to severe disease. However, there is evidence that in other IMIDs (rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease), targeted systemic treatment given early in the treatment pathway may improve long-term patient outcomes. We hypothesize that a patient-centered therapeutic approach, undertaken early in the psoriasis treatment pathway ("early intervention") with the goal of complete clearance, may improve control of cutaneous symptoms and may also modify disease course and burden. Critical points to address when designing an early intervention study would include: the definition of psoriasis disease activity; patient selection; intervention selection; and dosing strategies.

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