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Psoriasis: HELP
Articles from Washington area
Based on 166 articles published since 2008
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These are the 166 published articles about Psoriasis that originated from Washington area during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with biologics. 2019

Menter, Alan / Strober, Bruce E / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kivelevitch, Dario / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Stoff, Benjamin / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Davis, Dawn M R / Elewski, Boni E / Gelfand, Joel M / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Leonardi, Craig L / Lichten, Jason / Lim, Henry W / Mehta, Nehal N / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Rupani, Reena N / Siegel, Michael / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Elmets, Craig A. ·Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, San Francisco. · University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, San Francisco, California. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772098.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations based on the available evidence. The treatment of psoriasis with biologic agents will be reviewed, emphasizing treatment recommendations and the role of the dermatologist in monitoring and educating patients regarding benefits as well as associated risks.

2 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

3 Guideline Psoriasis in solid organ transplant patients: best practice recommendations from The Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. 2018

Prussick, Ronald / Wu, Jashin J / Armstrong, April W / Siegel, Michael P / Van Voorhees, Abby S. ·a Department of Dermatology , George Washington University , Washington D.C. , USA. · b Department of Dermatology , Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center , Los Angeles , CA , USA. · c Department of Dermatology , University of Southern California , Los Angeles , CA , USA. · d National Psoriasis Foundation , Portland , OR , USA. · e Department of Dermatology , Eastern Virginia Medical School , Norfolk , VA , USA. ·J Dermatolog Treat · Pubmed #28884635.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Treatment of solid organ transplant patients who have psoriasis can be a therapeutic challenge. Biologic and systemic drugs used to treat psoriasis can result in an increase in infections or malignancies. OBJECTIVE: We sought to develop a treatment algorithm for organ transplant recipients (OTR) diagnosed with psoriasis vulgaris. METHODS: A systematic literature search for psoriasis treatment in organ transplant patients was performed using MEDLINE and GOOGLE. RESULTS: In mild-to-moderate disease, topical therapy should be a first-line treatment. In moderate-to-severe disease, first-line treatment is acitretin with narrow band ultraviolet light (NBUVB), NBUVB, or acitretin. Second-line treatment is increasing the current antirejection drug dose. Other systemic or biologic therapies should be reserved for more severe or refractory cases. CONCLUSION: No systematic clinical studies have been done to explore psoriasis treatments among affected solid organ transplant patients who have psoriasis, and only a few case reports are available. The algorithm for best practices was developed based on these reports and on the clinical experience and judgment of the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. There remains a need for further research on the management of psoriasis in the organ transplant patient population.

4 Guideline Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis 2015 Treatment Recommendations for Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Coates, Laura C / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Mease, Philip J / Soriano, Enrique R / Laura Acosta-Felquer, Maria / Armstrong, April W / Bautista-Molano, Wilson / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Campbell, Willemina / Cauli, Alberto / Espinoza, Luis R / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Gottlieb, Alice / Helliwell, Philip S / Husni, M Elaine / Love, Thorvardur J / Lubrano, Ennio / McHugh, Neil / Nash, Peter / Ogdie, Alexis / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Parkinson, Andrew / O'Sullivan, Denis / Rosen, Cheryl F / Schwartzman, Sergio / Siegel, Evan L / Toloza, Sergio / Tuong, William / Ritchlin, Christopher T. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · University of California at San Diego. · Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles. · Hospital Militar Central and Universidad Militar Nueva Grenada, Bogotá, Colombia. · Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Cagliari, Monserrato Campus, Cagliari, Italy. · Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, The Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, and University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Toronto and Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK. · Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. · University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK. · University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York. · Arthritis and Rheumatism Associates, Rockville, Maryland. · Ministry of Health, San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca, Argentina. · University of California, Davis. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #26749174.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the 2009 Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) treatment recommendations for the spectrum of manifestations affecting patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: GRAPPA rheumatologists, dermatologists, and PsA patients drafted overarching principles for the management of PsA, based on consensus achieved at face-to-face meetings and via online surveys. We conducted literature reviews regarding treatment for the key domains of PsA (arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, and nail disease) and convened a new group to identify pertinent comorbidities and their effect on treatment. Finally, we drafted treatment recommendations for each of the clinical manifestations and assessed the level of agreement for the overarching principles and treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members, using an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Six overarching principles had ≥80% agreement among both health care professionals (n = 135) and patient research partners (n = 10). We developed treatment recommendations and a schema incorporating these principles for arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, nail disease, and comorbidities in the setting of PsA, using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation process. Agreement of >80% was reached for approval of the individual recommendations and the overall schema. CONCLUSION: We present overarching principles and updated treatment recommendations for the key manifestations of PsA, including related comorbidities, based on a literature review and consensus of GRAPPA members (rheumatologists, dermatologists, other health care providers, and patient research partners). Further updates are anticipated as the therapeutic landscape in PsA evolves.

5 Editorial Psoriasis and Cardiovascular Disease: Two Sides of the Same Coin? 2018

Doumas, Michael / Katsiki, Niki / Papademetriou, Vasilios. ·1 Second Department of Propaedeutic Internal Medicine, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Hippocration Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece. · 2 VAMC and George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. · 3 VAMC and Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA. ·Angiology · Pubmed #28401789.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial JAK Inhibitors Taking on Psoriatic Arthritis. 2017

Colbert, Robert A / Ward, Michael M. ·From the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #29045217.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Aortic valve stenosis: a new cardiovascular comorbidity of psoriasis? 2015

Gelfand, Joel M / Mehta, Nehal N. ·University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Joel.Gelfand@uphs.upenn.edu. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #26074463.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Review Psoriasis therapy and aortic inflammation - translating statistical to clinical significance. 2018

Kazemi, Abrahem / Cline, Abigail / Cardwell, Leah A / Feldman, Steven R. ·Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, DC. kazemiabrahem@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Online J · Pubmed #30677825.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis patients are known to have comorbid aortic vascular inflammation, which is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in this population. Many studies report statistically significant improvements in aortic vascular inflammation after use of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors or interleukin-12/23 antagonists. However, the clinical significance in reduction of adverse cardiovascular events in psoriatic patients owing to biologic therapy has not been examined. Regardless of clinically significant cardiovascular benefits, dermatologists should continue to treat psoriasis patients optimally to mitigate the unfavorable effect this disease has on quality of life.

9 Review Interleukin 17, inflammation, and cardiovascular risk in patients with psoriasis. 2018

Lockshin, Benjamin / Balagula, Yevgeniy / Merola, Joseph F. ·DermAssociates, Silver Spring, Maryland; Georgetown University, Washington, DC; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: blockshin@dermassociates.com. · Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York. · Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29477740.

ABSTRACT: In addition to being recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease that manifests in the skin, psoriasis is increasingly understood to be a systemic disease that causes immune dysregulation throughout the body. The systemic nature of psoriasis is evidenced by the higher burden of comorbidities and shorter life expectancies of patients with psoriasis, particularly those with early-onset and severe disease. Notably, psoriasis is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, which is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with psoriasis. In this review, we examine the association between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease and specifically focus on the role of interleukin 17-mediated inflammation as a potential mechanistic link between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease. Moreover, we describe potential treatment approaches to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in patients with psoriasis and discuss the clinical importance of the association of these 2 diseases with respect to patient management and education.

10 Review Skin and Diet: An Update on the Role of Dietary Change as a Treatment Strategy for Skin Disease. 2018

Katta, Rajani / Kramer, Mary Jo. ·Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. · Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA. ·Skin Therapy Lett · Pubmed #29357214.

ABSTRACT: An increasing body of research indicates that dietary change may serve as a component of therapy for certain skin conditions. This includes conditions such as acne, atopic dermatitis, aging skin, psoriasis, and rosacea. Certain nutrients, foods, or dietary patterns may act as disease "triggers", while others may prove beneficial. Avoidance or elimination diets may be helpful in some conditions, although testing may be recommended first. In terms of beneficial effects, an eating pattern that emphasizes the consumption of whole foods over highly processed foods may help in the treatment of certain skin conditions, and will certainly help in the prevention of associated co-morbidities.

11 Review A systematic review of measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures in psoriatic arthritis: A GRAPPA-OMERACT initiative. 2018

Højgaard, Pil / Klokker, Louise / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Holmsted, Kim / Bartels, Else M / Leung, Ying Ying / Goel, Niti / de Wit, Maarten / Gladman, Dafna D / Mease, Philip / Dreyer, Lene / Kristensen, Lars E / FitzGerald, Oliver / Tillett, William / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Strand, Vibeke / Ogdie, Alexis / Terwee, Caroline B / Christensen, Robin. ·The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, Gentofte Hospital, Kildegaardsvej 28, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. · The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, 20 College Rd, the Academia, S169856, Singapore. · Division of Rheumatology, Duke University School of Medicine, Advisory Services, QuintilesIMS, Durham, NC. · VU University Amsterdam, Department of Medical Humanities, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology and Krembil Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, 399 Bathurst St, 1E-410B, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 2S8. · Division of Rheumatology Clinical Research, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Rheumatology, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, University of Bath, Bath, UK. · Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-08, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, Paris, France; Pitie-Salpétrière Hospital, AP-HP, Rheumatology Department, 47-83 Bd de l'Hopital, Paris 75013, France. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, 2nd Floor, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Harehills Lane, Leeds LS7 4SA, UK. · Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Nordre Fasanvej 57, DK-2000, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: Robin.christensen@regionh.dk. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #29037523.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An updated psoriatic arthritis (PsA) core outcome set (COS) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was endorsed at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) meeting in 2016. OBJECTIVES: To synthesize the evidence on measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for PsA and thereby contribute to development of a PsA core outcome measurement set (COMS) as described by the OMERACT Filter 2.0. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO on Jan 1, 2017 to identify full-text articles with an aim of assessing the measurement properties of PROMs in PsA. Two independent reviewers rated the quality of studies using the COnsensus based standards for the Selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist, and performed a qualitative evidence synthesis. RESULTS: Fifty-five studies were included in the systematic review. Forty-four instruments and a total of 89 scales were analyzed. PROMs measuring COS domains with at least fair quality evidence for good validity and reliability (and no evidence for poor properties) included the Stockerau Activity Score for PsA (German), Psoriasis Symptom Inventory, visual analogue scale for Patient Global, 36 Item Short Form Health Survey Physical Function subscale, Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, PsA Impact of Disease questionnaire, PsA Quality of Life questionnaire, VITACORA-19, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue scale and Social Role Participation Questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: At least one PROM with some evidence for aspects of validity and reliability was available for six of the eight mandatory domains of the PsA COS.

12 Review A 2018

Jacobson, Kenneth A / Merighi, Stefania / Varani, Katia / Borea, Pier Andrea / Baraldi, Stefania / Aghazadeh Tabrizi, Mojgan / Romagnoli, Romeo / Baraldi, Pier Giovanni / Ciancetta, Antonella / Tosh, Dilip K / Gao, Zhan-Guo / Gessi, Stefania. ·Molecular Recognition Section, Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892. · Department of Medical Sciences, Pharmacology Section, University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 17/19, 44121, Ferrara, Italy. · Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 17, 44121, Ferrara, Italy. ·Med Res Rev · Pubmed #28682469.

ABSTRACT: The A

13 Review Emerging Associations Between Neutrophils, Atherosclerosis, and Psoriasis. 2017

Sanda, G E / Belur, A D / Teague, H L / Mehta, Nehal N. ·Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Branch, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH, 10 Center Drive, CRC, Room 5-5140, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Branch, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH, 10 Center Drive, CRC, Room 5-5140, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. nehal.mehta@nih.gov. ·Curr Atheroscler Rep · Pubmed #29086088.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Atherogenesis, once thought to be a passive process, is now recognized as a dynamic, immune-driven process. The critical innate immune cells, including neutrophils, normal-density granulocytes, and their newly identified subset low-density granulocytes, are moving to the forefront of interest in cardiovascular medicine due to their abundance in atherosclerotic plaques and chronic inflammatory diseases associating with early cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as psoriasis. In this review, we discuss the emerging roles of neutrophils in CVD and how they play a potential role in early CVD observed in psoriasis patients. This review aims to describe the roles of neutrophils in both early atherosclerosis and psoriasis. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent work has demonstrated mechanistic links between vascular inflammation and neutrophil frequency. Evolving mouse models and clinical trials targeting IL-17-associated pathways continue to elucidate contributions of neutrophils in both atherosclerosis and psoriasis. Early animal, in vitro and human studies suggest an important emerging role of neutrophils in atherosclerosis and psoriasis.

14 Review Dermatologic Manifestations of Chronic Hepatitis C Infection. 2017

Sayiner, Mehmet / Golabi, Pegah / Farhat, Freba / Younossi, Zobair M. ·Betty and Guy Beatty Center for Integrated Research, Inova Health System, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Claude Moore Health Education and Research Building, 3rd Floor, 3300 Gallows Road, Falls Church, VA 22042, USA; Department of Medicine, Center for Liver Disease, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Claude Moore Health Education and Research Building, 3rd Floor, 3300 Gallows Road, Falls Church, VA 22042, USA. · Betty and Guy Beatty Center for Integrated Research, Inova Health System, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Claude Moore Health Education and Research Building, 3rd Floor, 3300 Gallows Road, Falls Church, VA 22042, USA. · Department of Medicine, Center for Liver Disease, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Claude Moore Health Education and Research Building, 3rd Floor, 3300 Gallows Road, Falls Church, VA 22042, USA. · Betty and Guy Beatty Center for Integrated Research, Inova Health System, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Claude Moore Health Education and Research Building, 3rd Floor, 3300 Gallows Road, Falls Church, VA 22042, USA; Department of Medicine, Center for Liver Disease, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Claude Moore Health Education and Research Building, 3rd Floor, 3300 Gallows Road, Falls Church, VA 22042, USA. Electronic address: Zobair.Younossi@inova.org. ·Clin Liver Dis · Pubmed #28689593.

ABSTRACT: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with various extrahepatic manifestations, including dermatologic involvement mostly caused by immune complexes. Mixed cryoglobulinemia has a strong relationship with HCV with 95% of these patients being infected with HCV. Lichen planus is a disease of the squamous epithelium and may affect any part of the skin, with 4% to 24% of patients with lichen planus reported to have chronic HCV infection. Porphyria cutanea tarda is the most common form of porphyria, and it is thought that HCV interferes with iron stores, which can promote porphyria cutanea tarda. Finally, necrolytic acral erythema is a rare, psoriasis-like disease closely associated with HCV.

15 Review Act1: A Psoriasis Susceptibility Gene Playing its Part in Keratinocytes. 2017

Hobbs, Ryan P / Smith, Susan H / Getsios, Spiro. ·Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Discovery and Preclinical Development, Dermatology Therapy Area Unit, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, Pennsylvania, USA. · Discovery and Preclinical Development, Dermatology Therapy Area Unit, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, Pennsylvania, USA. Electronic address: spiro.x.getsios@gsk.com. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #28390815.

ABSTRACT: Unchecked inflammation, impaired keratinocyte differentiation, and heightened host defense responses typify psoriasis. Lambert et al. make clever use of psoriasis patient genetics and whole transcriptome RNA-Seq analysis to implicate Act1 in these seemingly variegated processes by keeping IL-17 receptor signaling in check while supporting differentiation and limiting innate immune responses in human keratinocytes.

16 Review Psoriatic Arthritis. 2017

Ritchlin, Christopher T / Colbert, Robert A / Gladman, Dafna D. ·From the Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical School, Rochester, NY (C.T.R.) · the Pediatric Translational Research Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Bethesda, MD (R.A.C.) · and the University Health Network (UHN) Krembil Research Institute, the Psoriatic Arthritis Program, and the Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases - all at Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto (D.D.G.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #28273019.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Review Psoriasis as a human model of disease to study inflammatory atherogenesis. 2017

Harrington, Charlotte L / Dey, Amit K / Yunus, Raza / Joshi, Aditya A / Mehta, Nehal N. ·National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland; and. · Department of Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia. · National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland; and nehal.mehta@nih.gov. ·Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol · Pubmed #28258057.

ABSTRACT: Inflammation is known to play a significant role in the process of atherogenesis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Indeed, patients with chronic inflammatory diseases are at increased risk for cardiovascular events. However, the mechanisms linking chronic inflammation and CVD remain poorly understood. Psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory skin disease associated with a greater risk of early cardiovascular events, provides a suitable human model to study the pathophysiology of inflammatory atherogenesis in humans. Additionally, cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-17A, and other immune pathways are the common links between the pathogenesis of psoriasis and atherosclerosis, and hence the approved treatments for psoriasis, which include selective cytokine inhibition (e.g., anti-TNF, anti-IL-17A, and anti-IL-12/23) and immune modulation (e.g., methotrexate or cyclosporine), provide an opportunity to examine the effect of modulating these pathways on atherogenesis. We have been using this human model in a large, prospective cohort study, and this review summarizes our approach and results of using this human model to study inflammatory atherogenesis. Specifically, we review simultaneous multimodal imaging of several vascular beds using

18 Review Psoriasis and comorbid diseases: Implications for management. 2017

Takeshita, Junko / Grewal, Sungat / Langan, Sinéad M / Mehta, Nehal N / Ogdie, Alexis / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Gelfand, Joel M. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: Junko.Takeshita@uphs.upenn.edu. · Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and St. John's Institute of Dermatology, London, United Kingdom. · National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Division of Rheumatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Dermatology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. · Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #28212760.

ABSTRACT: As summarized in the first article in this continuing medical education series, the currently available epidemiologic data suggest that psoriasis may be a risk factor for cardiometabolic disease. Emerging data also suggest associations between psoriasis and other comorbidities beyond psoriatic arthritis, including chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease, hepatic disease, certain malignancies, infections, and mood disorders. Recognizing the comorbid disease burden of psoriasis is essential for ensuring comprehensive care of patients with psoriasis. The clinical implications of the comorbid diseases that are associated with psoriasis and recommendations for clinical management are reviewed in this article.

19 Review Psoriasis and comorbid diseases: Epidemiology. 2017

Takeshita, Junko / Grewal, Sungat / Langan, Sinéad M / Mehta, Nehal N / Ogdie, Alexis / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Gelfand, Joel M. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: Junko.Takeshita@uphs.upenn.edu. · Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and St. John's Institute of Dermatology, London, United Kingdom. · National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Division of Rheumatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Dermatology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. · Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #28212759.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory disease of the skin that is increasingly being recognized as a systemic inflammatory disorder. Psoriatic arthritis is a well-known comorbidity of psoriasis. A rapidly expanding body of literature in various populations and settings supports additional associations between psoriasis and cardiometabolic diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, kidney disease, malignancy, infection, and mood disorders. The pathogenesis of comorbid disease in patients with psoriasis remains unknown; however, shared inflammatory pathways, cellular mediators, genetic susceptibility, and common risk factors are hypothesized to be contributing elements. As additional psoriasis comorbidities continue to emerge, education of health care providers is essential to ensuring comprehensive medical care for patients with psoriasis.

20 Review Performing Skin Microbiome Research: A Method to the Madness. 2017

Kong, Heidi H / Andersson, Björn / Clavel, Thomas / Common, John E / Jackson, Scott A / Olson, Nathan D / Segre, Julia A / Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia. ·Dermatology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Electronic address: konghe@mail.nih.gov. · Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Core Facility NGS/Microbiome, ZIEL Institute for Food and Health, Technical University of Munich, Freising, Germany. · Institute of Medical Biology, A*STAR, Singapore. · Biosystems and Biomaterials Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA. · Translational and Functional Genomics Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Institute of Environmental Medicine, UNIKA-T, Technical University of Munich and Helmholtz Zentrum München-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Augsburg, Germany; Christine Kühne Center for Allergy Research and Education, Davos, Switzerland. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #28063650.

ABSTRACT: Growing interest in microbial contributions to human health and disease has increasingly led investigators to examine the microbiome in both healthy skin and cutaneous disorders, including acne, psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis. The need for common language, effective study design, and validated methods is critical for high-quality standardized research. Features, unique to skin, pose particular challenges when conducting microbiome research. This review discusses microbiome research standards and highlights important factors to consider, including clinical study design, skin sampling, sample processing, DNA sequencing, control inclusion, and data analysis.

21 Review From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation: Treatment targets for plaque psoriasis. 2017

Armstrong, April W / Siegel, Michael P / Bagel, Jerry / Boh, Erin E / Buell, Megan / Cooper, Kevin D / Callis Duffin, Kristina / Eichenfield, Lawrence F / Garg, Amit / Gelfand, Joel M / Gottlieb, Alice B / Koo, John Y M / Korman, Neil J / Krueger, Gerald G / Lebwohl, Mark G / Leonardi, Craig L / Mandelin, Arthur M / Menter, M Alan / Merola, Joseph F / Pariser, David M / Prussick, Ronald B / Ryan, Caitriona / Shah, Kara N / Weinberg, Jeffrey M / Williams, MaryJane O U / Wu, Jashin J / Yamauchi, Paul S / Van Voorhees, Abby S. ·Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: aprilarmstrong@post.harvard.edu. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Windsor Dermatology, East Windsor, New Jersey; University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro, Plainsboro, New Jersey. · Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana. · University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah. · University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California. · Northwell Health and Hofstra North Shore University Hospital, Long Island Jewish Medical Center School of Medicine, Manhasset, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California San Francisco Medical Center, San Francisco, California. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · St Louis University Medical School, St Louis, Missouri. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Baylor University Medical Center and Texas A&M Health Science Center, Dallas, Texas. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia; Virginia Clinical Research Inc, Norfolk, Virginia. · George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia. · Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. · Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · Division of Dermatology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #27908543.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An urgent need exists in the United States to establish treatment goals in psoriasis. OBJECTIVE: We aim to establish defined treatment targets toward which clinicians and patients with psoriasis can strive to inform treatment decisions, reduce disease burden, and improve outcomes in practice. METHODS: The National Psoriasis Foundation conducted a consensus-building study among psoriasis experts using the Delphi method. The process consisted of: (1) literature review, (2) pre-Delphi question selection and input from general dermatologists and patients, and (3) 4 Delphi rounds. RESULTS: A total of 25 psoriasis experts participated in the Delphi process. The most preferred instrument was body surface area (BSA). The most preferred time for evaluating patient response after starting new therapies was at 3 months. The acceptable response at 3 months postinitiation was either BSA 3% or less or BSA improvement 75% or more from baseline. The target response at 3 months postinitiation was BSA 1% or less. During the maintenance period, evaluation every 6 months was most preferred. The target response at every 6 months maintenance evaluation is BSA 1% or less. LIMITATIONS: Although BSA is feasible in practice, it does not encompass health-related quality of life, costs, and risks of side effects. CONCLUSION: With defined treatment targets, clinicians and patients can regularly evaluate treatment responses and perform benefit-risk assessments of therapeutic options individualized to the patient.

22 Review Psoriasis. 2016

Greb, Jacqueline E / Goldminz, Ari M / Elder, James T / Lebwohl, Mark G / Gladman, Dafna D / Wu, Jashin J / Mehta, Nehal N / Finlay, Andrew Y / Gottlieb, Alice B. ·Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Tufts Medical Center, Department of Dermatology, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. · University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Krembil Research Institute, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Dermatology and Wound Healing, Division of Infection and Immunity, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK. · Department of Dermatology, New York Medical College, 40 Sunshine Cottage Rd, Valhalla, New York 10595, USA. ·Nat Rev Dis Primers · Pubmed #27883001.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder with cutaneous and systemic manifestations and substantial negative effects on patient quality of life. Psoriasis has a strong, albeit polygenic, genetic basis. Whereas approximately half of the accountable genetic effect of psoriasis maps to the major histocompatibility complex, >70 other loci have been identified, many of which implicate nuclear factor-κB, interferon signalling and the IL-23-IL-23 receptor axis. Psoriasis pathophysiology is characterized by abnormal keratinocyte proliferation and immune cell infiltration in the dermis and epidermis involving the innate and adaptive immune systems, with important roles for dendritic cells and T cells, among other cells. Frequent comorbidities are rheumatological and cardiovascular in nature, in particular, psoriatic arthritis. Current treatments for psoriasis include topical agents, photo-based therapies, traditional systemic drugs and biologic agents. Treatments can be used in combination or as monotherapy. Biologic therapies that target specific disease mediators have become a mainstay in the treatment of moderate-to-severe disease, whereas advances in the treatment of mild-to-moderate disease have been limited.

23 Review Patient-Reported Outcomes in Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Orbai, Ana-Maria / Ogdie, Alexis. ·Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University, Asthma and Allergy Building, Room 1B19, 5501 Hopkins Bayview Circle, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA. Electronic address: aorbai1@jhmi.edu. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, White Building, Room 5024, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ·Rheum Dis Clin North Am · Pubmed #27133489.

ABSTRACT: Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are an important component to assessing disease impact and therapy response in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Overall, there are few PsA-specific PROs. Most PROs used in PsA are borrowed from other diseases (eg, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis) or general population PROs. PROs are used in PsA clinical trials and in the clinical management of PsA. In this review, we discuss the most commonly used PRO in PsA, including their inclusion in composite measures. Future studies may be helpful to determine the best performing PROs in patients with PsA.

24 Review Psoriasis-associated fatigue: pathogenesis, metrics, and treatment. 2016

Rosen, Jamie / Landriscina, Angelo / Friedman, Adam J. ·Department of Medicine (Dermatology), Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA. · Department of Dermatology, George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #26919500.

ABSTRACT: Fatigue, a substantial symptom of psoriasis, is triggered by complex interactions of inflammation in psoriatic disease, both directly via inflammatory cytokines and indirectly via psychological and physiological factors. We provide data and observations that highlight the importance of qualifying and quantifying fatigue among patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and underscore the need to develop novel therapeutics to target this debilitating element of a multisystem disease.

25 Review Applications of the Excimer Laser: A Review. 2015

Beggs, Sarah / Short, Jack / Rengifo-Pardo, Monica / Ehrlich, Alison. ·*All the authors are affiliated with the Department of Dermatology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC. ·Dermatol Surg · Pubmed #26458038.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The 308-nm excimer laser has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of psoriasis and vitiligo. Its ability to treat localized areas has led to many studies determining its potential in the treatment of focal diseases with inflammation or hypopigmentation. OBJECTIVE: To review the different applications of the 308-nm excimer laser for treating dermatologic conditions. METHODS AND MATERIALS: An extensive literature review was conducted by searching PubMed, MEDLINE, and ClinicalKey to find articles pertaining to dermatologic conditions treated with the 308-nm excimer laser. Articles published that contributed to new applications of the excimer laser were included, as well as initial studies utilizing the excimer laser. RESULTS: The outcomes and results were compiled for different dermatologic conditions treated with the excimer laser. CONCLUSION: The 308-nm excimer laser has a wide range of uses for focal inflammatory and hypopigmented conditions. Treatment is generally well tolerated, with few adverse reactions. Larger studies and studies evaluating the long-term effects of the 308-nm excimer laser are needed.

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