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Psoriatic Arthritis HELP
Based on 3,986 articles published since 2010
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These are the 3986 published articles about Arthritis, Psoriatic that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

2 Guideline Special Article: 2018 American College of Rheumatology/National Psoriasis Foundation Guideline for the Treatment of Psoriatic Arthritis. 2019

Singh, Jasvinder A / Guyatt, Gordon / Ogdie, Alexis / Gladman, Dafna D / Deal, Chad / Deodhar, Atul / Dubreuil, Maureen / Dunham, Jonathan / Husni, M Elaine / Kenny, Sarah / Kwan-Morley, Jennifer / Lin, Janice / Marchetta, Paula / Mease, Philip J / Merola, Joseph F / Miner, Julie / Ritchlin, Christopher T / Siaton, Bernadette / Smith, Benjamin J / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Jonsson, Anna Helena / Shah, Amit Aakash / Sullivan, Nancy / Turgunbaev, Marat / Coates, Laura C / Gottlieb, Alice / Magrey, Marina / Nowell, W Benjamin / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Reddy, Soumya M / Scher, Jose U / Siegel, Evan / Siegel, Michael / Walsh, Jessica A / Turner, Amy S / Reston, James. ·University of Alabama at Birmingham and Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Toronto and Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · New York, New York. · Premier Orthopaedics, Malvern, Pennsylvania. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Concorde Medical Group, New York, New York. · Swedish-Providence Health Systems and University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Comprehensive Therapy Consultants and Therapy Steps, Roswell, Georgia. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. · University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore. · Florida State University College of Medicine School of Physician Assistant Practice, Tallahassee. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · ECRI Institute, Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania. · University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · New York Medical College at Metropolitan Hospital, New York, New York. · Case Western/MetroHealth, Cleveland, Ohio. · Global Healthy Living Foundation, Nyack, New York. · Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. · Arthritis & Rheumatism Associates, Rockville, Maryland. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · University of Utah and George E. Wahlen VeteranS Affairs Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #30499246.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop an evidence-based guideline for the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), as a collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF). METHODS: We identified critical outcomes in PsA and clinically relevant PICO (population/intervention/comparator/outcomes) questions. A Literature Review Team performed a systematic literature review to summarize evidence supporting the benefits and harms of available pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies for PsA. GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology was used to rate the quality of the evidence. A voting panel, including rheumatologists, dermatologists, other health professionals, and patients, achieved consensus on the direction and the strength of the recommendations. RESULTS: The guideline covers the management of active PsA in patients who are treatment-naive and those who continue to have active PsA despite treatment, and addresses the use of oral small molecules, tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, interleukin-12/23 inhibitors (IL-12/23i), IL-17 inhibitors, CTLA4-Ig (abatacept), and a JAK inhibitor (tofacitinib). We also developed recommendations for psoriatic spondylitis, predominant enthesitis, and treatment in the presence of concomitant inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, or serious infections. We formulated recommendations for a treat-to-target strategy, vaccinations, and nonpharmacologic therapies. Six percent of the recommendations were strong and 94% conditional, indicating the importance of active discussion between the health care provider and the patient to choose the optimal treatment. CONCLUSION: The 2018 ACR/NPF PsA guideline serves as a tool for health care providers and patients in the selection of appropriate therapy in common clinical scenarios. Best treatment decisions consider each individual patient situation. The guideline is not meant to be proscriptive and should not be used to limit treatment options for patients with PsA.

3 Guideline The British Society for Rheumatology biologic DMARD safety guidelines in inflammatory arthritis-Executive summary. 2019

Holroyd, Christopher R / Seth, Rakhi / Bukhari, Marwan / Malaviya, Anshuman / Holmes, Claire / Curtis, Elizabeth / Chan, Christopher / Yusuf, Mohammed A / Litwic, Anna / Smolen, Susan / Topliffe, Joanne / Bennett, Sarah / Humphreys, Jennifer / Green, Muriel / Ledingham, Jo. ·Rheumatology Department, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. · Rheumatology Department, University Hospitals of Morecombe Bay NHS Foundation Trust, Lancaster, UK. · Rheumatology Department, Mid Essex Hospital NHS Trust, Chelmsford, UK. · MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · Rheumatology Department, Salisbury District Hospital, Salisbury, UK. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, UK. · Rheumatology Department, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, UK. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #30137623.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Guideline The British Society for Rheumatology biologic DMARD safety guidelines in inflammatory arthritis. 2019

Holroyd, Christopher R / Seth, Rakhi / Bukhari, Marwan / Malaviya, Anshuman / Holmes, Claire / Curtis, Elizabeth / Chan, Christopher / Yusuf, Mohammed A / Litwic, Anna / Smolen, Susan / Topliffe, Joanne / Bennett, Sarah / Humphreys, Jennifer / Green, Muriel / Ledingham, Jo. ·Rheumatology Department, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. · Rheumatology Department, University Hospitals of Morecombe Bay NHS Foundation Trust, Lancaster, UK. · Rheumatology Department, Mid Essex hospitals NHS Trust, Chelmsford, UK. · MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · Rheumatology Department, Salisbury District Hospital, Salisbury, UK. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, UK. · Rheumatology Department, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, UK. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #30137552.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline EULAR recommendations for the health professional's approach to pain management in inflammatory arthritis and osteoarthritis. 2018

Geenen, Rinie / Overman, Cécile L / Christensen, Robin / Åsenlöf, Pernilla / Capela, Susana / Huisinga, Karen L / Husebø, Mai Elin P / Köke, Albère J A / Paskins, Zoe / Pitsillidou, Irene A / Savel, Carine / Austin, Judith / Hassett, Afton L / Severijns, Guy / Stoffer-Marx, Michaela / Vlaeyen, Johan W S / Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César / Ryan, Sarah J / Bergman, Stefan. ·Department of Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Rheumatology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Rheumatology and Metabolic Bone Diseases Department, Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, Portugal. · Rheumatology Research Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Lisbon Academic Medical Centre, Instituto de Medicina Molecular, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal. · Department of Rheumatology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Norwegian National Unit for Rehabilitation for Rheumatic Patients with Special Needs, NBRR, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele, UK. · Haywood Academic Rheumatology Centre, Haywood Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent, UK. · EULAR Patient Research Partner, Cyprus League Against Rheumatism, Nicosia, Cyprus. · Department of Rheumatology, CHU, Clermont Ferrand, Clermont Ferrand, France. · Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Pain Research, Chronic Pain & Fatigue Research Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Harbor, Michigan, USA. · EULAR Social Leagues Patients' Representative, Leuven, Belgium. · Section for Outcomes Research, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Health Sciences, University of Applied Sciences FH Campus Wien, Vienna, Austria. · Research group Health Psychology, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Behavioral Medicine Research, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Department Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation and Physical Medicine, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón, Spain. · Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Primary Health Care Unit, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #29724726.

ABSTRACT: Pain is the predominant symptom for people with inflammatory arthritis (IA) and osteoarthritis (OA) mandating the development of evidence-based recommendations for the health professional's approach to pain management. A multidisciplinary task force including professionals and patient representatives conducted a systematic literature review of systematic reviews to evaluate evidence regarding effects on pain of multiple treatment modalities. Overarching principles and recommendations regarding assessment and pain treatment were specified on the basis of reviewed evidence and expert opinion. From 2914 review studies initially identified, 186 met inclusion criteria. The task force emphasised the importance for the health professional to adopt a patient-centred framework within a biopsychosocial perspective, to have sufficient knowledge of IA and OA pathogenesis, and to be able to differentiate localised and generalised pain. Treatment is guided by scientific evidence and the assessment of patient needs, preferences and priorities; pain characteristics; previous and ongoing pain treatments; inflammation and joint damage; and psychological and other pain-related factors. Pain treatment options typically include education complemented by physical activity and exercise, orthotics, psychological and social interventions, sleep hygiene education, weight management, pharmacological and joint-specific treatment options, or interdisciplinary pain management. Effects on pain were most uniformly positive for physical activity and exercise interventions, and for psychological interventions. Effects on pain for educational interventions, orthotics, weight management and multidisciplinary treatment were shown for particular disease groups. Underpinned by available systematic reviews and meta-analyses, these recommendations enable health professionals to provide knowledgeable pain-management support for people with IA and OA.

6 Guideline Recommendations of the Spanish Society of Rheumatology on treatment and use of systemic biological and non-biological therapies in psoriatic arthritis. 2018

Torre Alonso, Juan Carlos / Díaz Del Campo Fontecha, Petra / Almodóvar, Raquel / Cañete, Juan D / Montilla Morales, Carlos / Moreno, Mireia / Plasencia-Rodríguez, Chamaida / Ramírez García, Julio / Queiro, Rubén. ·Unidad de Reumatología, Hospital Monte Naranco y Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, España. · Unidad de Investigación, Sociedad Española de Reumatología, Madrid, España. · Unidad de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón, Alcorcón, Madrid, España. · Unidad de Artritis, Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Parc Taulí Hospital Universitari, Sabadell, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, IdiPaz, Madrid, España. · Unidad de Artritis, Servicio de Reumatología, IDIBAPS y Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, España. · Sección de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, España. Electronic address: rubenque7@yahoo.es. ·Reumatol Clin · Pubmed #29111261.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The main purpose of this recommendation statement is to provide clinicians with the best available evidence and the best opinion agreed upon by the panelists for a rational use of synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biologicals in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. The present document also focuses on important aspects in the management of PsA, such as early diagnosis, therapeutic objectives, comorbidities and optimization of treatment. METHODS: The recommendations were agreed by consensus by a panel of 8 expert rheumatologists, previously selected by the Spanish Society of Rheumatology (SER) through an open call. The phases of the work were: identification of key areas for updating the previous consensus, analysis and synthesis of scientific evidence (modified Oxford system, Centre for Evidence-based Medicine, 2009) and formulation of recommendations based on this evidence and by consensus techniques. RESULTS: Seventeen recommendations were issued for the treatment of PsA patients. Six of them were of general nature, ranging from the early diagnosis and treatment to the importance of assessing comorbidities. The other 11 were focused on the indications for DMARDs and biological therapy in the distinct clinical forms of the disease. Likewise, the situation of failure of the first biological is addressed and treatment algorithms and a table with the different biological therapies are also included. CONCLUSIONS: We present the update of SER recommendations for the treatment of PsA with DMARDs and biologics.

7 Guideline Treating axial spondyloarthritis and peripheral spondyloarthritis, especially psoriatic arthritis, to target: 2017 update of recommendations by an international task force. 2018

Smolen, Josef S / Schöls, Monika / Braun, Jürgen / Dougados, Maxime / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Landewé, Robert / Mease, Philip / Sieper, Joachim / Stamm, Tanja / Wit, Maarten de / Aletaha, Daniel / Baraliakos, Xenofon / Betteridge, Neil / Bosch, Filip van den / Coates, Laura C / Emery, Paul / Gensler, Lianne S / Gossec, Laure / Helliwell, Philip / Jongkees, Merryn / Kvien, Tore K / Inman, Robert D / McInnes, Iain B / Maccarone, Mara / Machado, Pedro M / Molto, Anna / Ogdie, Alexis / Poddubnyy, Denis / Ritchlin, Christopher / Rudwaleit, Martin / Tanew, Adrian / Thio, Bing / Veale, Douglas / Vlam, Kurt de / van der Heijde, Désirée. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · 2nd Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Health Consult, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Ruhr-University Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. · Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Division of Rheumatology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Rheumatology, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. · Amsterdam Rheumatology & Immunology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Rheumatology Research, Swedish-Providence St. Joseph Health System, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Infectiology and Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Section for Outcomes Research, Center for Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Intelligent Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Medical Humanities, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Neil Betteridge Associates, UK. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Rheumatology, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS); AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Seayn Medical, Voorschoten, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · University Health Network and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Glasgow, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow, UK. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Centre for Rheumatology & MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, University College London, London, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USA. · German Rheumatism Research Centrer, Berlin, Germany. · Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, Erasmus Medical Center, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Klinikum Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany. · Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #28684559.

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic targets have been defined for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) in 2012, but the evidence for these recommendations was only of indirect nature. These recommendations were re-evaluated in light of new insights. Based on the results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of rheumatologists, dermatologists, patients and a health professional developed an update of the 2012 recommendations. These underwent intensive discussions, on site voting and subsequent anonymous electronic voting on levels of agreement with each item. A set of 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations were developed and voted on. Some items were present in the previous recommendations, while others were significantly changed or newly formulated. The 2017 task force arrived at a single set of recommendations for axial and peripheral SpA, including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The most exhaustive discussions related to whether PsA should be assessed using unidimensional composite scores for its different domains or multidimensional scores that comprise multiple domains. This question was not resolved and constitutes an important research agenda. There was broad agreement, now better supported by data than in 2012, that remission/inactive disease and, alternatively, low/minimal disease activity are the principal targets for the treatment of PsA. As instruments to assess the patients on the path to the target, the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) for axial SpA and the Disease Activity index for PSoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and Minimal Disease Activity (MDA) for PsA were recommended, although not supported by all. Shared decision-making between the clinician and the patient was seen as pivotal to the process. The task force defined the treatment target for SpA as remission or low disease activity and developed a large research agenda to further advance the field.

8 Guideline Recommendations for the Use of Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance in Patients With Spondyloarthritis, Including Psoriatic Arthritis, and Patients With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. 2018

Uson, Jacqueline / Loza, Estibaliz / Möller, Ingrid / Acebes, Carlos / Andreu, Jose Luis / Batlle, Enrique / Bueno, Ángel / Collado, Paz / Fernández-Gallardo, Juan Manuel / González, Carlos / Jiménez Palop, Mercedes / Lisbona, María Pilar / Macarrón, Pilar / Maymó, Joan / Narváez, Jose Antonio / Navarro-Compán, Victoria / Sanz, Jesús / Rosario, M Piedad / Vicente, Esther / Naredo, Esperanza. ·Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario de Móstoles, Móstoles, Madrid, España. · Instituto de Salud Musculoesquelética, Madrid, España. Electronic address: estibaliz.loza@inmusc.eu. · Servicio de Reumatología, Instituto Poal de Reumatología, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital General de Villalba, Collado Villalba, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Majadahonda, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario Sant Joan d'Alacant, Sant Joan d'Alacant, Alicante, España. · Servicio de Radiología, Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón, Alcorcón, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario Severo Ochoa, Leganés, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Radiología, Hospital Universitario Severo Ochoa, Leganés, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Radiodiagnóstico, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, IdiPAZ, Madrid, España. · Servicio Andaluz de Salud, Sevilla, España. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Madrid, España. ·Reumatol Clin · Pubmed #28277255.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with spondyloarthritis, including psoriatic arthritis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. METHODS: Recommendations were generated following a nominal group technique. A panel of experts (15 rheumatologists and 3 radiologists) was established in the first panel meeting to define the scope and purpose of the consensus document, as well as chapters, potential recommendations and systematic literature reviews (we used and updated those from previous EULAR documents). A first draft of recommendations and text was generated. Then, an electronic Delphi process (2 rounds) was carried out. Recommendations were voted from 1 (total disagreement) to 10 (total agreement). We defined agreement if at least 70% of participants voted≥7. The level of evidence and grade or recommendation was assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine levels of evidence. The full text was circulated and reviewed by the panel. The consensus was coordinated by an expert methodologist. RESULTS: A total of 12 recommendations were proposed for each disease. They include, along with explanations of the validity of US and magnetic resonance imaging regarding inflammation and damage detection, diagnosis, prediction (structural damage progression, flare, treatment response, etc.), monitoring and the use of US guided injections/biopsies. CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations will help clinicians use US and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with spondyloarthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

9 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: goodmans@hss.edu. · Bryan Springer, MD: OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · Gordon Guyatt, MD: McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Matthew P. Abdel, MD: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Vinod Dasa, MD: Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · Michael George, MD: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Ora Gewurz-Singer, MD: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Jon T. Giles, MD, MPH: Columbia University, New York, New York. · Beverly Johnson, MD: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Steve Lee, DO: Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · Michael A. Mont, MD: Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Scott Sporer, MD: Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · Louis Stryker, MD: University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · Marat Turgunbaev, MD, MPH, Amy S. Miller: American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Antonia F. Chen, MD, MBA: Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Jeremy Gililland, MD: University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · Mark Goodman, MD, Adolph Yates, MD: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Arlene Hurley-Rosenblatt, ANP: Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Elena Losina, PhD: Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Kaleb Michaud, PhD: National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Ted Mikuls, MD, MSPH: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Alexander Sah, MD: Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · Jasvinder A. Singh, MBBS, MPH: University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·J Arthroplasty · Pubmed #28629905.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

10 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas, and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #28620948.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

11 Guideline EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders: 2015/2016 update. 2017

Agca, R / Heslinga, S C / Rollefstad, S / Heslinga, M / McInnes, I B / Peters, M J L / Kvien, T K / Dougados, M / Radner, H / Atzeni, F / Primdahl, J / Södergren, A / Wallberg Jonsson, S / van Rompay, J / Zabalan, C / Pedersen, T R / Jacobsson, L / de Vlam, K / Gonzalez-Gay, M A / Semb, A G / Kitas, G D / Smulders, Y M / Szekanecz, Z / Sattar, N / Symmons, D P M / Nurmohamed, M T. ·Departments of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Preventive Cardio-Rheuma Clinic, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Internal and Vascular Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Hôpital Cochin. Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris INSERM (U1153): Clinical epidemiology and biostatistics, PRES Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopedic Institute, Milan, Italy. · Institute for Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. · Sygehus Sønderjylland (Hospital of Southern Jutland), Aabenraa, Denmark. · King Christian 10's Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Graasten, Denmark. · Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Rheumatology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden. · PARE (patient research partners), Sint-Joris-Weert, Belgium. · Romanian League Against Rheumatism (Vice-President) and Board Member (General Secretary) of AGORA, the Platform of S-E organisations for patients with RMDs, Bucharest, Romania. · Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Center for Preventive Medicine and Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology & Inflammation Research, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and Section of Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · University of Cantabria, IDIVAL, Santander, Spain. · Head of Research and Development, Academic Affairs Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, University of Manchester, Russells Hall Hospital, Clinical Research Unit, Dudley, UK. · Faculty of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary. · Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Department of Rheumatology Reade, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27697765.

ABSTRACT: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint disorders (IJD) have increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk compared with the general population. In 2009, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) taskforce recommended screening, identification of CVD risk factors and CVD risk management largely based on expert opinion. In view of substantial new evidence, an update was conducted with the aim of producing CVD risk management recommendations for patients with IJD that now incorporates an increasing evidence base. A multidisciplinary steering committee (representing 13 European countries) comprised 26 members including patient representatives, rheumatologists, cardiologists, internists, epidemiologists, a health professional and fellows. Systematic literature searches were performed and evidence was categorised according to standard guidelines. The evidence was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Three overarching principles were defined. First, there is a higher risk for CVD in patients with RA, and this may also apply to ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Second, the rheumatologist is responsible for CVD risk management in patients with IJD. Third, the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids should be in accordance with treatment-specific recommendations from EULAR and Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society. Ten recommendations were defined, of which one is new and six were changed compared with the 2009 recommendations. Each designated an appropriate evidence support level. The present update extends on the evidence that CVD risk in the whole spectrum of IJD is increased. This underscores the need for CVD risk management in these patients. These recommendations are defined to provide assistance in CVD risk management in IJD, based on expert opinion and scientific evidence.

12 Guideline Singapore Chapter of Rheumatologists consensus statement on the eligibility for government subsidy of biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic agents for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis. 2017

Lahiri, Manjari / Teng, Gim-Gee / Cheung, Peter P / Suresh, Ernest / Chia, Faith L / Lui, Nai-Lee / Koh, Dow-Rhoon / Koh, Wei-Howe / Leong, Khai-Pang / Lim, Anita Y N / Ng, Swee-Cheng / Thumboo, Julian / Lau, Tang-Ching / Leong, Keng-Hong. ·Division of Rheumatology, University Medicine Cluster, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Medicine, Alexandra Hospital (Jurong Health), Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. · Koh Wei Howe Arthritis & Rheumatism Medical Clinic, Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre, Singapore, Singapore. · Leong Keng Hong Arthritis and Medical Clinic, Gleneagles Medical Centre, Singapore, Singapore. ·Int J Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26353916.

ABSTRACT: AIM: In Singapore, patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) constitute a significant disease burden. There is good evidence for the efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) in PsA; however cost remains a limiting factor. Non-biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (nbDMARDs) hence remain the first-line treatment option in PsA in spite of limited evidence. The Singapore Chapter of Rheumatologists aims to develop national guidelines for clinical eligibility for government-assisted funding of biologic disease modifying anti- rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) for PsA patients in Singapore. METHODS: Evidence synthesis was performed by reviewing seven published guidelines on use of biologics for PsA. Using the modified Research and Development/University of California at Los Angeles Appropriateness Method (RAM), rheumatologists rated indications for therapies for different clinical scenarios. Points reflecting the output from the formal group consensus were used to formulate the practice recommendations. RESULTS: Ten recommendations were formulated relating to initiation, continuation and options of bDMARD therapy. The panellists agreed that a bDMARD is indicated if a patient has active PsA with at least five swollen and tender joints, digits or entheses and has failed two nbDMARD strategies at optimal doses for at least 3 months each. Any anti-TNF may be used and therapy may be continued if an adequate PsARC response is achieved by 3 months after commencement. CONCLUSION: The recommendations developed by a formal group consensus method may be useful for clinical practice and guiding funding decisions by relevant authorities in making bDMARD usage accessible and equitable to eligible patients in Singapore.

13 Guideline [Treat-to-target (T2T) recommendation for patients with spondyloarthritis - translation into German]. 2016

Kiltz, U / Sieper, J / Backhaus, M / Buss, B / Gromnica-Ihle, E / Haíbel, H / Hammel, L / Karberg, K / Rehart, S / Rudwaleit, M / Schuch, F / Steffens-Korbanka, P / Braun, J. ·Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Claudiusstr. 45, 44649, Herne, Deutschland. uta.kiltz@elisabethgruppe.de. · Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité Berlin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203, Berlin, Deutschland. · Park-Klinik Weissensee, Berlin, Deutschland. · Deutsche Rheuma-Liga, Maximilianstr. 14, 53111, Bonn, Deutschland. · Deutsche Vereinigung Morbus Bechterew e. V., Metzgergasse 16, 97421, Schweinfurt, Deutschland. · Praxis für Rheumatologie und Innere Medizin, Schlosstrasse 110, Berlin, Deutschland. · Agaplesion Markus Krankenhaus, Klinik für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie, Wilhelm-Epstein Str. 4, Frankfurt, Deutschland. · Klinikum Bielefeld Rosenhöhe, Bielefeld, Deutschland. · Rheumatologische Schwerpunktpraxis Erlangen, Möhrendorfer Str. 1c, Erlangen, Deutschland. · Rheumapraxis an der Hase, Osnabrück, Deutschland. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Claudiusstr. 45, 44649, Herne, Deutschland. ·Z Rheumatol · Pubmed #27488447.

ABSTRACT: The management of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) has experienced a paradigm shift in recent years. This is true for the treatment of axial as well as peripheral manifestations. International treat to target (T2T) recommendations for SpA based on the T2T strategy have now also been published, which contain 5 higher level principles (A-E) in addition to the 15 recommendations. In order to make the recommendations known and to promote national distribution, German experts have now issued a translation of the T2T recommendations for SpA into German.

14 Guideline Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis 2015 Treatment Recommendations for Psoriatic Arthritis. 2016

Coates, Laura C / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Mease, Philip J / Soriano, Enrique R / Laura Acosta-Felquer, Maria / Armstrong, April W / Bautista-Molano, Wilson / Boehncke, Wolf-Henning / Campbell, Willemina / Cauli, Alberto / Espinoza, Luis R / FitzGerald, Oliver / Gladman, Dafna D / Gottlieb, Alice / Helliwell, Philip S / Husni, M Elaine / Love, Thorvardur J / Lubrano, Ennio / McHugh, Neil / Nash, Peter / Ogdie, Alexis / Orbai, Ana-Maria / Parkinson, Andrew / O'Sullivan, Denis / Rosen, Cheryl F / Schwartzman, Sergio / Siegel, Evan L / Toloza, Sergio / Tuong, William / Ritchlin, Christopher T. ·Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · University of California at San Diego. · Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles. · Hospital Militar Central and Universidad Militar Nueva Grenada, Bogotá, Colombia. · Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland. · Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Cagliari, Monserrato Campus, Cagliari, Italy. · Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, The Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, and University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · University of Toronto and Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, and Bradford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bradford, UK. · Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. · University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy. · Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK. · University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, UK. · St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York. · Arthritis and Rheumatism Associates, Rockville, Maryland. · Ministry of Health, San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca, Argentina. · University of California, Davis. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #26749174.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update the 2009 Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) treatment recommendations for the spectrum of manifestations affecting patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: GRAPPA rheumatologists, dermatologists, and PsA patients drafted overarching principles for the management of PsA, based on consensus achieved at face-to-face meetings and via online surveys. We conducted literature reviews regarding treatment for the key domains of PsA (arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, and nail disease) and convened a new group to identify pertinent comorbidities and their effect on treatment. Finally, we drafted treatment recommendations for each of the clinical manifestations and assessed the level of agreement for the overarching principles and treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members, using an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Six overarching principles had ≥80% agreement among both health care professionals (n = 135) and patient research partners (n = 10). We developed treatment recommendations and a schema incorporating these principles for arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, dactylitis, skin disease, nail disease, and comorbidities in the setting of PsA, using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation process. Agreement of >80% was reached for approval of the individual recommendations and the overall schema. CONCLUSION: We present overarching principles and updated treatment recommendations for the key manifestations of PsA, including related comorbidities, based on a literature review and consensus of GRAPPA members (rheumatologists, dermatologists, other health care providers, and patient research partners). Further updates are anticipated as the therapeutic landscape in PsA evolves.

15 Guideline European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies: 2015 update. 2016

Gossec, L / Smolen, J S / Ramiro, S / de Wit, M / Cutolo, M / Dougados, M / Emery, P / Landewé, R / Oliver, S / Aletaha, D / Betteridge, N / Braun, J / Burmester, G / Cañete, J D / Damjanov, N / FitzGerald, O / Haglund, E / Helliwell, P / Kvien, T K / Lories, R / Luger, T / Maccarone, M / Marzo-Ortega, H / McGonagle, D / McInnes, I B / Olivieri, I / Pavelka, K / Schett, G / Sieper, J / van den Bosch, F / Veale, D J / Wollenhaupt, J / Zink, A / van der Heijde, D. ·Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, GRC-UPMC 08 (EEMOIS), Paris, France Department of rheumatology, AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Second Department of Medicine, Hietzing Hospital, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · EULAR, representing People with Arthritis/Rheumatism in Europe (PARE), London, UK. · Research Laboratory and Clinical Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genova, Viale Benedetto, Italy. · Medicine Faculty, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France Rheumatology B Department, APHP, Cochin Hospital, Paris, France. · Leeds NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, LTHT, Leeds, UK Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands. · North Devon, UK. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine 3, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne and Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. · Arthritis Unit, Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Clínic and IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain. · Belgrade University School of Medicine, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Rheumatology, St. Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Section of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Sweden and School of Business, Engineering and Science, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. · Section of Musculoskeletal Disease, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Laboratory of Tissue Homeostasis and Disease, Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, KU Leuven, Belgium Division of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany. · A.DI.PSO. (Associazione per la Difesa degli Psoriasici)-PE.Pso.POF (Pan European Psoriasis Patients' Organization Forum), Rome, Italy. · Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Potenza, Italy. · Institute and Clinic of Rheumatology Charles University Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Internal Medicine 3, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité, Berlin, Germany. · Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Centre for Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease, Dublin Academic Medical Centre, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. · Schoen Klinik Hamburg, Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, German Rheumatism Research Centre Berlin, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Germany. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26644232.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Since the publication of the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in 2012, new evidence and new therapeutic agents have emerged. The objective was to update these recommendations. METHODS: A systematic literature review was performed regarding pharmacological treatment in PsA. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated based on the evidence and the expert opinion of the 34 Task Force members. Levels of evidence and strengths of recommendations were allocated. RESULTS: The updated recommendations comprise 5 overarching principles and 10 recommendations, covering pharmacological therapies for PsA from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), to conventional synthetic (csDMARD) and biological (bDMARD) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, whatever their mode of action, taking articular and extra-articular manifestations of PsA into account, but focusing on musculoskeletal involvement. The overarching principles address the need for shared decision-making and treatment objectives. The recommendations address csDMARDs as an initial therapy after failure of NSAIDs and local therapy for active disease, followed, if necessary, by a bDMARD or a targeted synthetic DMARD (tsDMARD). The first bDMARD would usually be a tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. bDMARDs targeting interleukin (IL)12/23 (ustekinumab) or IL-17 pathways (secukinumab) may be used in patients for whom TNF inhibitors are inappropriate and a tsDMARD such as a phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor (apremilast) if bDMARDs are inappropriate. If the first bDMARD strategy fails, any other bDMARD or tsDMARD may be used. CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations provide stakeholders with an updated consensus on the pharmacological treatment of PsA and strategies to reach optimal outcomes in PsA, based on a combination of evidence and expert opinion.

16 Guideline PORTUGUESE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE USE OF BIOLOGICAL THERAPIES IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS--2015 UPDATE. 2015

Vieira-Sousa, Elsa / Machado, Pedro M / Costa, José / Ribeiro, Ana / Aguiar, Renata / Cerqueira, Marcos / Neto, Adriano / Bernardo, Alexandra / Cordeiro, Ana / Duarte, Cátia / Vinagre, Filipe / Canhão, Helena / Santos, Helena / Neves, Joana Sousa / Cunha-Miranda, Luís / Silva, Margarida / Santos, Maria José / Bernardes, Miguel / Bogas, Mónica / Abreu, Pedro / Viana-Queiroz, Mário / Barros, Rita / Falcão, Sandra / Pimenta, Sofia / Teixeira, Vitor / Fonseca, João Eurico / Barcelos, Anabela / Anonymous1540850. · ·Acta Reumatol Port · Pubmed #26610694.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To update recommendations for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis with biological therapies, endorsed by the Portuguese Society of Rheumatology (SPR). METHODS: These treatment recommendations were formulated by Portuguese rheumatologists based on literature evidence and consensus opinion. At a national meeting the 16 recommendations included in this document were discussed and updated. The level of agreement among Portuguese Rheumatologists was assessed using an online survey. A draft of the full text of the recommendations was then circulated and suggestions were incorporated. A final version was again circulated before publication. RESULTS: A consensus was achieved regarding the initiation, assessment of response and switching biological therapies in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Specific recommendations were developed for several disease domains: peripheral arthritis, axial disease, enthesitis and dactylitis. CONCLUSION: These recommendations may be used for guidance in deciding which patients with PsA should be treated with biological therapies. They cover a rapidly evolving area of therapeutic intervention. As more evidence becomes available and more biological therapies are licensed, these recommendations will have to be updated.

17 Guideline EULAR recommendations for the use of imaging in the diagnosis and management of spondyloarthritis in clinical practice. 2015

Mandl, P / Navarro-Compán, V / Terslev, L / Aegerter, P / van der Heijde, D / D'Agostino, M A / Baraliakos, X / Pedersen, S J / Jurik, A G / Naredo, E / Schueller-Weidekamm, C / Weber, U / Wick, M C / Bakker, P A C / Filippucci, E / Conaghan, P G / Rudwaleit, M / Schett, G / Sieper, J / Tarp, S / Marzo-Ortega, H / Østergaard, M / Anonymous6520825. ·Division of Rheumatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands University Hospital La Paz, Madrid, Spain. · Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital at Glostrup, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Public Health Department, Ambroise Paré Hospital, Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Ambroise Paré Hospital, Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Gentofte, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Radiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Rheumatology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Gråsten, Denmark. · Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Rheumatology, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy. · NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Rheumatology, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, Department of Rheumatology, The Parker Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #25837448.

ABSTRACT: A taskforce comprised of an expert group of 21 rheumatologists, radiologists and methodologists from 11 countries developed evidence-based recommendations on the use of imaging in the clinical management of both axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA). Twelve key questions on the role of imaging in SpA were generated using a process of discussion and consensus. Imaging modalities included conventional radiography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, dual-emission x-ray absorptiometry and scintigraphy. Experts applied research evidence obtained from systematic literature reviews using MEDLINE and EMBASE to develop a set of 10 recommendations. The strength of recommendations (SOR) was assessed by taskforce members using a visual analogue scale. A total of 7550 references were identified in the search process, from which 158 studies were included in the systematic review. Ten recommendations were produced using research-based evidence and expert opinion encompassing the role of imaging in making a diagnosis of axial SpA or peripheral SpA, monitoring inflammation and damage, predicting outcome, response to treatment, and detecting spinal fractures and osteoporosis. The SOR for each recommendation was generally very high (range 8.9-9.5). These are the first recommendations which encompass the entire spectrum of SpA and evaluate the full role of all commonly used imaging modalities. We aimed to produce recommendations that are practical and valuable in daily practice for rheumatologists, radiologists and general practitioners.

18 Guideline 2014 Update of the Canadian Rheumatology Association/spondyloarthritis research consortium of Canada treatment recommendations for the management of spondyloarthritis. Part I: principles of the management of spondyloarthritis in Canada. 2015

Rohekar, Sherry / Chan, Jon / Tse, Shirley M L / Haroon, Nigil / Chandran, Vinod / Bessette, Louis / Mosher, Dianne / Flanagan, Cathy / Keen, Kevin J / Adams, Karen / Mallinson, Michael / Thorne, Carter / Rahman, Proton / Gladman, Dafna D / Inman, Robert D. ·From the University of Western Ontario, London; University of Toronto; The Hospital for Sick Children; Toronto Western Research Institute University Health Network; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, Toronto Western Hospital; Canadian Spondylitis Association, Toronto; Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario; University of British Columbia, Vancouver; University of North British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia; Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec; Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta; Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada.S. Rohekar, BSc, MD, FRCPC, MSc (Clin. Epi.), Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Western Ontario; J. Chan, BSc, MD, FRCPC; C. Flanagan, MDCM, Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of British Columbia; S.M. Tse, MD, FRCPC, Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children; N. Haroon, MD, PhD, DM, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto Western Research Institute University Health Network; V. Chandran, MBBS, MD, DM, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, Toronto Western Hospital; L. Bessette, MD, MSc, FRCPC, Assistant Professor of Medicine; K. Adams, BSc, MD, FRCPC, Associate Professor of Medicine, Laval University; D. Mosher, MD, FRCPC, Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary; K.J. Keen, PhD, PStat, PStat(ASA), Associate Professor of Mathematics and Statistics, University of North British Columbia; M. Mallinson, BA, MA, President, Canadian Spondylitis Association; C. Thorne, MD, FRCPC, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, Southlake Regional Health Centre; P. Rahman, MD, FRCPC, Associate Dean, Clinical Research and Professor of Medicine, Memorial Unive ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25684770.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) and the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) have collaborated to update the recommendations for the management of spondyloarthritis (SpA). METHODS: A working group was assembled and consisted of the SPARCC executive committee, rheumatologist leaders from SPARCC collaborating sites, Canadian rheumatologists from across the country with an interest in SpA (both academic and community), a rheumatology trainee with an interest in SpA, an epidemiologist/health services researcher, a member of the CRA executive, a member of the CRA therapeutics committee, and a patient representative from the Canadian Spondylitis Association. An extensive review was conducted of literature published from 2007 to 2014 involving the management of SpA. The working group created draft recommendations using multiple rounds of Web-based surveys and an in-person conference. A survey was sent to the membership of the CRA to obtain an extended review that was used to finalize the recommendations. RESULTS: Guidelines for the management of SpA were created. Part I focuses on the principles of management of SpA in Canada and includes 6 general management principles, 5 ethical considerations, target groups for treatment recommendations, 2 wait time recommendations, and recommendations for disease monitoring. Also included are 6 modifications for application to juvenile SpA. CONCLUSION: These recommendations were developed based on current literature and applied to a Canadian healthcare context. It is hoped that the implementation of these recommendations will promote best practices in the treatment of SpA.

19 Guideline 2014 Update of the Canadian Rheumatology Association/Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada Treatment Recommendations for the Management of Spondyloarthritis. Part II: Specific Management Recommendations. 2015

Rohekar, Sherry / Chan, Jon / Tse, Shirley M L / Haroon, Nigil / Chandran, Vinod / Bessette, Louis / Mosher, Dianne / Flanagan, Cathy / Keen, Kevin J / Adams, Karen / Mallinson, Michael / Thorne, Carter / Rahman, Proton / Gladman, Dafna D / Inman, Robert D. ·From the University of Western Ontario, London; University of Toronto; The Hospital for Sick Children; Toronto Western Research Institute University Health Network; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, Toronto Western Hospital; Canadian Spondylitis Association, Toronto; University of Toronto, Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada; University of British Columbia, Vancouver; University of North British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia; Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec; Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta; Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada.S. Rohekar, BSc, MD, FRCPC, MSc (Clin. Epi.), Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Western Ontario; J. Chan, BSc, MD, FRCPC; C. Flanagan, MDCM, Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of British Columbia; S.M. Tse, MD, FRCPC, Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children; N. Haroon, MD, PhD, DM, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto Western Research Institute University Health Network; V. Chandran, MBBS, MD, DM, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, Toronto Western Hospital; L. Bessette, MD, MSc, FRCPC, Assistant Professor of Medicine; K. Adams, BSc, MD, FRCPC, Associate Professor of Medicine, Laval University; D. Mosher, MD, FRCPC, Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary; K.J. Keen, PhD, PStat, PStat(ASA), Associate Professor of Mathematics and Statistics, University of North British Columbia; M. Mallinson, BA, MA, President, Canadian Spondylitis Association; C. Thorne, MD, FRCPC Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, Southlake Regional Health Centre; P. Rahman, MD, FRCPC, Associate Dean, Clinical Research and Profess ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25684768.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) and the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) have collaborated to update the recommendations for the management of spondyloarthritis (SpA). METHODS: A working group was assembled and consisted of the SPARCC executive committee, rheumatologist leaders from SPARCC collaborating sites, Canadian rheumatologists from across the country with an interest in SpA (both academic and community), a rheumatology trainee with an interest in SpA, an epidemiologist/health services researcher, a member of the CRA executive, a member of the CRA therapeutics committee, and a patient representative from the Canadian Spondylitis Association. An extensive review was conducted of literature published from 2007 to 2014 involving the management of SpA. The working group created draft recommendations using multiple rounds of Web-based surveys and an in-person conference. RESULTS: Recommendations for the management of SpA were created. Part II: Specific Management Recommendations addresses management with nonpharmacologic methods, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories and analgesics, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, antibiotics, tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, other biologic agents, and surgery. Also included are 10 modifications for application to juvenile SpA. CONCLUSION: These recommendations were developed based on current literature and applied to a Canadian healthcare context. It is hoped that implementation of these recommendations will promote best practices in the treatment of SpA.

20 Guideline Treatment of nail psoriasis: best practice recommendations from the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. 2015

Crowley, Jeffrey J / Weinberg, Jeffrey M / Wu, Jashin J / Robertson, Andrew D / Van Voorhees, Abby S / Anonymous1700814. ·Bakersfield Dermatology, Bakersfield, California. · Department of Dermatology, Mt Sinai Health System, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · Department of Dermatology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #25471223.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Nail psoriasis can be difficult to treat and has a significant effect on quality of life. Relatively few controlled trials evaluating treatments for nail psoriasis have been published. There is an unmet need for treatment recommendations to guide therapeutic decisions. OBJECTIVE: To develop treatment recommendations for nail psoriasis from the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. EVIDENCE REVIEW: A PubMed search for publications on nail psoriasis treatments was performed from January 1, 1947, through May 11, 2014, without language restrictions. FINDINGS: Treatment recommendations for 4 clinical nail psoriasis scenarios were developed based on the evidence reviewed in this study and expert opinion of the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation. Treatment of nail psoriasis should balance consideration of the extent of skin disease, psoriatic arthritis, and severity of nail disease with concomitant impairment of quality of life. All patients should be evaluated for onychomycosis because this may complicate psoriatic nail disease. For disease limited to the nails, high-potency topical corticosteroids with or without calcipotriol are initial options. For patients with significant nail disease for whom topical therapy has failed, treatment with adalimumab, etanercept, intralesional corticosteroids, ustekinumab, methotrexate sodium, and acitretin are recommended. For patients with significant skin and nail disease, adalimumab, etanercept, and ustekinumab are strongly recommended, and methotrexate, acitretin, infliximab, and apremilast are recommended. Finally, for a patient with significant nail, skin, and joint disease, adalimumab, etanercept, ustekinumab, infliximab, methotrexate, apremilast, and golimumab are recommended. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Treatment of nail psoriasis poses a clinical challenge. Clinical trial data are limited, and results are reported inconsistently, making comparisons among treatment options difficult. The treatment recommendations from the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foundation will help guide treatment decisions for clinicians who are treating patients with nail psoriasis.

21 Guideline Psoriasis: guidance on assessment and referral. 2014

Samarasekera, Eleanor J / Smith, Catherine H / Anonymous5350790 / Anonymous5360790. ·National Clinical Guideline Centre, Royal College of Physicians of London. ·Clin Med (Lond) · Pubmed #24715130.

ABSTRACT: This concise guideline summarises the key recommendations from the recent National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) clinical guideline on the assessment and management of psoriasis (CG153) that are relevant to the non-dermatologist. The aim is to highlight important considerations for assessment and referral of people with psoriasis, including identification of relevant comorbid conditions. Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin condition and, especially when severe, can be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and depression. Functional, psychological and social morbidity can also be encountered, and the extent of the disability is frequently underestimated. Importantly, highly effective treatments are available. Appropriate assessment and referral of people with psoriasis therefore has the potential to improve outcomes by correctly identifying the appropriate treatment pathway. Assessment should involve not only disease severity but also the impact on patient well-being and whether the patient has any comorbid conditions, such as psoriatic arthritis, which requires rapid referral to a rheumatologist.

22 Guideline Recommendations for the coordinated management of psoriatic arthritis by rheumatologists and dermatologists: a Delphi study. 2014

Cañete, J D / Daudén, E / Queiro, R / Aguilar, M D / Sánchez-Carazo, J L / Carrascosa, J M / Carretero, G / García-Vivar, M L / Lázaro, P / López-Estebaranz, J L / Montilla, C / Ramírez, J / Rodríguez-Moreno, J / Puig, L. ·Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona e IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain. · Servicio de Dermatología, IIS-Princesa, Hospital Universitario La Princesa, Madrid, Spain. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. · Técnicas Avanzadas de Investigación en Servicios de Salud (TAISS), Madrid, Spain. · Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital General de Valencia, Valencia, Spain. · Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias y Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain. · Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital Universitario Doctor Negrín, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario Basurto, Bilbao, Spain. · Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón, Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain. · Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: lpuig@santpau.cat. ·Actas Dermosifiliogr · Pubmed #24657018.

ABSTRACT: Psoriatic arthritis, a chronic inflammatory musculoskeletal disease that is associated with psoriasis, causes joint erosions, accompanied by loss of function and quality-of-life. The clinical presentation is variable, with extreme phenotypes that can mimic rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis. Because psoriasis usually presents before psoriatic arthritis, the dermatologist plays a key role in early detection of the latter. As many treatments used in psoriasis are also used in psoriatic arthritis, treatment recommendations should take into consideration the type and severity of both conditions. This consensus paper presents guidelines for the coordinated management of psoriatic arthritis by rheumatologists and dermatologists. The paper was drafted by a multidisciplinary group (6rheumatologists, 6dermatologists, and 2epidemiologists) using the Delphi method and contains recommendations, tables, and algorithms for the diagnosis, referral, and treatment of patients with psoriatic arthritis.

23 Guideline Recommendations of the French Society for Rheumatology (SFR) on the everyday management of patients with spondyloarthritis. 2014

Wendling, Daniel / Lukas, Cédric / Paccou, Julien / Claudepierre, Pascal / Carton, Laurence / Combe, Bernard / Goupille, Philippe / Guillemin, Francis / Hudry, Christophe / Miceli-Richard, Corinne / Dougados, Maxime / Anonymous2330781. ·Service de rhumatologie, université de Franche-Comté (EA 4266), CHRU de Besançon, boulevard Fleming, 25030 Besançon, France. Electronic address: dwendling@chu-besancon.fr. · Hôpital Lapeyronie, Montpellier, Institut Universitaire de Recherche Clinique (EA2415), 34000 Montpellier, France. · Département de rhumatologie, CHU d'Amiens, 80000 Amiens, France; Inserm U1088, UFR Médecine/Pharmacie, Université de Picardie Jules-Verne, 80000 Amiens, France. · Université Paris Est Créteil, Laboratoire d'Investigation Clinique (LIC) EA4393, 94010 Créteil, France; AP-HP, Hôpital Henri-Mondor, Service de Rhumatologie, 94000 Créteil, France. · Association France Spondylarthrites, 19000 Tulle, France. · Departement de Rhumatologie, CHU Lapeyronie,Université Montpellier 1, 34000 Montpellier, France. · CHRU de Tours, service de rhumatologie, UMR CNRS 7292, Université François-Rabelais de Tours, 37000 Tours, France. · Inserm CIC-EC, CHU de Nancy, Service épidémiologie et évaluation cliniques, 54505 Nancy, France. · Cabinet de Rhumatologie, 75008 Paris, France. · Université Paris-Sud, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris-Sud, AP-HP, 94270 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Paris-Descartes University, Medicine Faculty, AP-HP, Cochin hospital, Rheumatology B Department, 75014 Paris, France. ·Joint Bone Spine · Pubmed #24412120.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop practice guidelines for the everyday management of patients with spondyloarthritis (including psoriatic arthritis), by updating previous national and international recommendations, based on a review of recently published data. METHODS: A task force and a multidisciplinary literature review group were established. The task force identified the issues that remained unresolved. Based on existing recommendations and recent publications, the task force developed practice guidelines, which were revised by the literature review group and graded according to AGREE. RESULTS: Practice guidelines for the management of spondyloarthritis are reported. After a review of the general diagnostic principles, 30 practice guidelines are given: 5 on general principles, 4 on the management strategy, 5 on non-pharmacological treatments, 7 on conventional pharmacological treatments, 6 on biotherapies, and 3 on surgical treatments and follow-up. CONCLUSION: The updated practice guidelines reported here constitute a global framework that can guide physicians in the everyday management of spondyloarthritis.

24 Guideline Recommendations for the management and treatment of psoriatic arthritis. 2013

Carneiro, Sueli / Azevedo, Valderílio Feijó / Bonfiglioli, Rubens / Ranza, Roberto / Gonçalves, Célio Roberto / Keiserman, Mauro / Meirelles, Eduardo de Souza / Pinheiro, Marcelo de Medeiros / Ximenes, Antonio Carlos / Bernardo, Wanderley / Sampaio-Barros, Percival Degrava / Anonymous1230770. · ·Rev Bras Reumatol · Pubmed #24051907.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline Spanish evidence-based guidelines on the treatment of psoriasis with biologic agents, 2013. Part 1: on efficacy and choice of treatment. Spanish Psoriasis Group of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology. 2013

Puig, L / Carrascosa, J M / Carretero, G / de la Cueva, P / Lafuente-Urrez, R F / Belinchón, I / Sánchez-Regaña, M / García-Bustínduy, M / Ribera, M / Alsina, M / Ferrándiz, C / Fonseca, E / García-Patos, V / Herrera, E / López-Estebaranz, J L / Marrón, S E / Moreno, J C / Notario, J / Rivera, R / Rodriguez-Cerdeira, C / Romero, A / Ruiz-Villaverde, R / Taberner, R / Vidal, D / Anonymous1090769. ·Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: lpuig@santpau.cat. ·Actas Dermosifiliogr · Pubmed #24018211.

ABSTRACT: Biologic therapy is a well-established strategy for managing moderate and severe psoriasis. Nevertheless, the high cost of such therapy, the relatively short span of clinical experience with biologics, and the abundance of literature now available on these agents have made evidence-based and consensus-based clinical guidelines necessary. The ideal goal of psoriasis treatment is to achieve complete or nearly complete clearing of lesions and to maintain it over time. Failing that ideal, the goal would be to reduce involvement to localized lesions that can be controlled with topical therapy. Although current evidence allows us to directly or indirectly compare the efficacy or risk of primary or secondary failure of available biologics based on objective outcomes, clinical trial findings cannot be directly translated to routine practice. As a result, the prescribing physician must tailor the treatment regimen to the individual patient. This update of the clinical practice guidelines issued by the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV) on biologic therapy for psoriasis incorporates information from the most recent publications on this topic.

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