Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders: HELP
Articles by Isabel Augur
Based on 1 article published since 2010
(Why 1 article?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Isabel Augur wrote the following article about Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Doxazosin for the treatment of co-occurring PTSD and alcohol use disorder: Design and methodology of a randomized controlled trial in military veterans. 2018

Back, Sudie E / Flanagan, Julianne C / Jones, Jennifer L / Augur, Isabel / Peterson, Alan L / Young-McCaughan, Stacey / Shirley, David W / Henschel, Aisling / Joseph, Jane E / Litz, Brett T / Hancock, Allison K / Roache, John D / Mintz, Jim / Wachen, Jennifer S / Keane, Terence M / Brady, Kathleen T / Anonymous10151195. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA. Electronic address: backs@musc.edu. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. Electronic address: hellmuth@musc.edu. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. Electronic address: jonjen@musc.edu. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. Electronic address: augur@musc.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA; Research and Development Service, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, TX, USA; Department of Psychology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA. Electronic address: petersona3@uthscsa.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA. Electronic address: youngs1@uthscsa.edu. · Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. Electronic address: josep@musc.edu. · Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiological Research and Information Center, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: brett.litz@va.gov. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA. Electronic address: hancocka@uthscsa.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA. Electronic address: roache@uthscsa.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA. Electronic address: mintz@uthscsa.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; National Center for PTSD, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: jennifer.wachen@va.gov. · Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; National Center for PTSD, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: terence.keane@va.gov. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA. Electronic address: bradyk@musc.edu. ·Contemp Clin Trials · Pubmed #30145268.

ABSTRACT: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD) are two of the most common mental health disorders affecting civilians as well as military populations. If left untreated, individuals with co-occurring PTSD/AUD are at increased risk for developing other mental health problems (e.g., depression, anxiety), physical health problems, reduced resiliency and military readiness, and vocational and social impairment. Substantial gaps in the treatment of co-occurring PTSD/AUD exist and there is a critical need to develop more effective pharmacological treatments. The current study addresses this gap in the literature by testing the efficacy and safety of doxazosin, a long-acting and selective alpha-1 adrenergic antagonist, as compared to placebo in reducing PTSD and AUD severity among U.S. military veterans. Noradrenergic dysregulation has been implicated in the development and maintenance of PTSD and AUD, and pilot studies examining doxazosin in PTSD-only or AUD-only samples have shown promise. This is the first study, however, to evaluate doxazosin in a comorbid PTSD/AUD sample. This paper describes the rationale, design and methodology of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of doxazosin (16 mg/day) delivered over 12 weeks among military veterans with current PTSD and AUD. In addition, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is applied at pre- and post-treatment to investigate the underlying pathophysiology of comorbid PTSD/AUD and identify prognostic indicators of treatment outcome. This study is designed to accelerate research on co-occurring PTSD/AUD and provide empirical evidence to inform clinical practice.