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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders: HELP
Articles by Debra A. Bangasser
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Debra A. Bangasser wrote the following 5 articles about Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Sex differences in stress responses: a critical role for corticotropin-releasing factor. 2018

Bangasser, Debra A / Wiersielis, Kimberly R. ·Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program, Temple University, 1701 North 13th Street, 873 Weiss Hall, Philadelphia, PA, 19122, USA. debra.bangasser@temple.edu. · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program, Temple University, 1701 North 13th Street, 873 Weiss Hall, Philadelphia, PA, 19122, USA. ·Hormones (Athens) · Pubmed #29858858.

ABSTRACT: Rates of post-traumatic stress disorder, panic disorder, and major depression are higher in women than in men. Another shared feature of these disorders is that dysregulation of the stress neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), is thought to contribute to their pathophysiology. Therefore, sex differences in responses to CRF could contribute to this sex bias in disease prevalence. Here, we review emerging data from non-human animal models that reveal extensive sex differences in CRF functions ranging from its presynaptic regulation to its postsynaptic efficacy. Specifically, detailed are sex differences in the regulation of CRF-containing neurons and the amount of CRF that they produce. We also describe sex differences in CRF receptor expression, distribution, trafficking, and signaling. Finally, we highlight sex differences in the processes that mitigate the effects of CRF. In most cases, the identified sex differences can lead to increased stress sensitivity in females. Thus, the relevance of these differences for the increased risk of depression and anxiety disorders in women compared to men is also discussed.

2 Review Sex-specific mechanisms for responding to stress. 2017

Bangasser, Debra A / Wicks, Brittany. ·Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ·J Neurosci Res · Pubmed #27870416.

ABSTRACT: Posttraumatic stress disorder and major depression share stress as an etiological contributor and are more common in women than in men. Traditionally, preclinical studies investigating the neurobiological underpinnings of stress vulnerability have used only male rodents; however, recent studies that include females are finding sex-specific mechanisms for responding to stress. This Mini-Review examines recent literature using a framework developed by McCarthy and colleagues (2012; J Neurosci 32:2241-2247) that highlights different types of sex differences. First, we detail how learned fear responses in rats are sexually dimorphic. Then, we contrast this finding with fear extinction, which is similar in males and females at the behavioral level but at the circuitry level is associated with sex-specific cellular changes and, thus, exemplifies a sex convergence. Next, sex differences in stress hormones are detailed. Finally, the effects of stress on learning, attention, and arousal are used to highlight the concept of a sex divergence in which the behavior of males and females is similar at baseline but diverges following stressor exposure. We argue that appreciating and investigating the diversity of sex differences in stress response systems will improve our understanding of vulnerability and resilience to stress-related psychiatric disorders and likely lead to the development of novel therapeutics for better treatment of these disorders in both men and women. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

3 Review Sex differences in the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system and its regulation by stress. 2016

Bangasser, Debra A / Wiersielis, Kimberly R / Khantsis, Sabina. ·Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program, Temple University, 1701 N. 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA. Electronic address: debra.bangasser@temple.edu. · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program, Temple University, 1701 N. 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA. ·Brain Res · Pubmed #26607253.

ABSTRACT: Women are more likely than men to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression. In addition to their sex bias, these disorders share stress as an etiological factor and hyperarousal as a symptom. Thus, sex differences in brain arousal systems and their regulation by stress could help explain increased vulnerability to these disorders in women. Here we review preclinical studies that have identified sex differences in the locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) arousal system. First, we detail how structural sex differences in the LC can bias females towards increased arousal in response to emotional events. Second, we highlight studies demonstrating that estrogen can increase NE in LC target regions by enhancing the capacity for NE synthesis, while reducing NE degradation, potentially increasing arousal in females. Third, we review data revealing how sex differences in the stress receptor, corticotropin releasing factor 1 (CRF1), can increase LC neuronal sensitivity to CRF in females compared to males. This effect could translate into hyperarousal in women under conditions of CRF hypersecretion that occur in PTSD and depression. The implications of these sex differences for the treatment of stress-related psychiatric disorders are discussed. Moreover, the value of using information regarding biological sex differences to aid in the development of novel pharmacotherapies to better treat men and women with PTSD and depression is also highlighted. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System.

4 Review Cognitive disruptions in stress-related psychiatric disorders: A role for corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). 2015

Bangasser, Debra A / Kawasumi, Yushi. ·Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Electronic address: debra.bangasser@temple.edu. · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. ·Horm Behav · Pubmed #25888454.

ABSTRACT: This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Stress is a potential etiology contributor to both post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) and major depression. One stress-related neuropeptide that is hypersecreted in these disorders is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). Dysregulation of CRF has long been linked to the emotion and mood symptoms that characterize PTSD and depression. However, the idea that CRF also mediates the cognitive disruptions observed in patients with these disorders has received less attention. Here we review literature indicating that CRF can alter cognitive functions. Detailed are anatomical studies revealing that CRF is poised to modulate regions required for learning and memory. We also describe preclinical behavioral studies that demonstrate CRF's ability to alter fear conditioning, impair memory consolidation, and alter a number of executive functions, including attention and cognitive flexibility. The implications of these findings for the etiology and treatment of the cognitive impairments observed in stress-related psychiatric disorders are described.

5 Review Sex differences in stress-related psychiatric disorders: neurobiological perspectives. 2014

Bangasser, Debra A / Valentino, Rita J. ·Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States. Electronic address: debra.bangasser@temple.edu. · Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States. ·Front Neuroendocrinol · Pubmed #24726661.

ABSTRACT: Stress is associated with the onset and severity of several psychiatric disorders that occur more frequently in women than men, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Patients with these disorders present with dysregulation of several stress response systems, including the neuroendocrine response to stress, corticolimbic responses to negatively valenced stimuli, and hyperarousal. Thus, sex differences within their underlying circuitry may explain sex biases in disease prevalence. This review describes clinical studies that identify sex differences within the activity of these circuits, as well as preclinical studies that demonstrate cellular and molecular sex differences in stress responses systems. These studies reveal sex differences from the molecular to the systems level that increase endocrine, emotional, and arousal responses to stress in females. Exploring these sex differences is critical because this research can reveal the neurobiological underpinnings of vulnerability to stress-related psychiatric disorders and guide the development of novel pharmacotherapies.