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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders: HELP
Articles by Tracey A. Brickell
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Tracey Brickell wrote the following 5 articles about Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Postconcussion Symptom Reporting After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Female Service Members: Impact of Gender, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Severity of Injury, and Associated Bodily Injuries. 2018

Lippa, Sara M / Brickell, Tracey A / Bailie, Jason M / French, Louis M / Kennedy, Jan E / Lange, Rael T. ·Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, Silver Spring, Maryland (Drs Lippa, Brickell, Bailie, French, Kennedy, and Lange) · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (Drs Lippa, Brickell, French, and Lange) · National Intrepid Center of Excellence, Bethesda, Maryland (Drs Lippa, Brickell, French, and Lange) · Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (Drs Brickell and French) · Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton, Oceanside, California (Dr Bailie) · Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland (Dr French) · San Antonio Military Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas (Dr Kennedy) · and The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (Dr Lange). ·J Head Trauma Rehabil · Pubmed #29084103.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Examine effects of diagnostically relevant posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) severity, and associated bodily injury severity on postconcussion symptom reporting in female service members (SM) compared with a matched sample of male SM. SETTING: Six US military medical treatment facilities. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 158 SM (79 females, 79 males) evaluated within 30 months after mild TBI. Men and women were matched by age, days postinjury, PTSD symptom status, mild TBI severity, and bodily injury severity. All passed a measure of symptom validity. DESIGN: Compare reported postconcussion symptoms for men and women stratified by PTSD diagnostic symptoms (present/absent), mild TBI severity (alteration of consciousness/loss of consciousness), and bodily injury severity (mild/moderate-severe). MAIN MEASURES: Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory, PTSD Checklist, Abbreviated Injury Scale. RESULTS: Overall postconcussion symptom reporting increased with PTSD but did not significantly differ based on severity of mild TBI or associated bodily injury. Females reported more somatosensory and/or vestibular symptoms than males under some circumstances. Females in the PTSD-Present group, Alteration of Consciousness Only group, and Moderate-Severe Bodily Injury group reported more somatosensory symptoms than males in those groups. Females in the Alteration of Consciousness Only group and Minor Bodily Injury group reported more vestibular symptoms than males in those groups. CONCLUSION: Diagnostically relevant PTSD symptoms, mild TBI severity, and bodily injury severity differentially impact somatosensory and vestibular postconcussion symptom reporting for male and female SM after mild TBI. Controlling for PTSD and symptom validity resulted in fewer gender-based differences in postconcussive symptoms than previously demonstrated in the literature.

2 Article Profile Analysis of the Neurobehavioral and Psychiatric Symptoms Following Combat-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Identification of Subtypes. 2016

Bailie, Jason M / Kennedy, Jan E / French, Louis M / Marshall, Kathryn / Prokhorenko, Olga / Asmussen, Sarah / Reid, Matthew W / Qashu, Felicia / Brickell, Tracey A / Lange, Rael T. ·Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, Bethesda, MD (Drs Bailie, Kennedy, French, Prokhorenko, Reid, Asmussen, Qashu, Brickell, and Lange and Ms Marshall) · Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence, Bethesda, MD (Drs French, Brickell, and Lange) · Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Departments of Neurology (Drs French and Brickell) and Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (Dr French) Bethesda, MD · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Dr Lange) · San Antonio Military Medical Center, Department of Neurology, San Antonio, TX (Drs Kennedy and Reid) · Naval Medical Center San Diego, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Dr Bailie) · Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton (Dr Asmussen) · General Dynamic Information Technology, Frederick, MD (Drs Kennedy, Prokhorenko, Asmussen, Brickell, Reid, and Lange and Ms Marshall) · and American Hospital Services Group LLC, Exton, PA (Dr Bailie). ·J Head Trauma Rehabil · Pubmed #26716696.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To explore the taxonomy of combat-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) based on symptom patterns. PARTICIPANTS: Up to 1341 military personnel who experienced a combat-related mTBI within 2 years of evaluation. MEASURES: Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory and PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C). RESULTS: Cluster analysis revealed the following 4 subtypes: primarily psychiatric (posttraumatic stress disorder) group, a cognitive group, a mixed symptom group, and a good recovery group. The posttraumatic stress disorder cluster (21.9% of the sample) reported symptoms related to hyperarousal and dissociation/depression with few complaints related to cognition or headaches. The cognitive group (21.5% of the sample) had primarily cognitive and headache complaints with few mood symptoms. The mixed profile cluster included 18.6% of the sample and was characterized by a combination of mood complaints (hyperarousal and dissociation/depression), cognitive complaints, and headaches. The largest cluster (37.8% of the sample) had an overall low symptom profile and was labeled the "good recovery" group. CONCLUSIONS: The results support a unique taxonomy for combat-related mTBI. The clinical differences among these subtypes indicate a need for unique treatment resources and programs.

3 Article Subjective cognitive complaints and neuropsychological test performance following military-related traumatic brain injury. 2014

French, Louis M / Lange, Rael T / Brickell, Tracey. ·Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, Bethesda, MD; Neurology, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD; and Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, Bethesda, MD; ·J Rehabil Res Dev · Pubmed #25479042.

ABSTRACT: This study examined the relation between neuropsychological test performance and self-reported cognitive complaints following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants were 109 servicemembers from the U.S. military who completed a neuropsychological evaluation within the first 2 yr following mild-severe TBI. Measures included the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI), Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL-C), Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI), and 17 select measures from a larger neurocognitive test battery that corresponded to three self-reported cognitive complaints from the NSI (i.e., memory, attention/concentration, and processing speed/organization). Self-reported cognitive complaints were significantly correlated with psychological distress (PCL-C total: r = 0.50-0.58; half the PAI clinical scales: r = 0.40-0.58). In contrast, self-reported cognitive complaints were not significantly correlated with overall neurocognitive functioning (with the exception of five measures). There was a low rate of agreement between neurocognitive test scores and self-reported cognitive complaints. For the large minority of the sample (38.5%-45.9%), self-reported cognitive complaints were reported in the presence of neurocognitive test scores that fell within normal limits. In sum, self-reported cognitive complaints were not associated with neurocognitive test performance, but rather were associated with psychological distress. These results provide information to contextualize cognitive complaints following TBI.

4 Article A multisite study of the relationships between blast exposures and symptom reporting in a post-deployment active duty military population with mild traumatic brain injury. 2014

Reid, Matthew W / Miller, Kelly J / Lange, Rael T / Cooper, Douglas B / Tate, David F / Bailie, Jason / Brickell, Tracey A / French, Louis M / Asmussen, Sarah / Kennedy, Jan E. ·1 Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center , Silver Spring, Maryland. ·J Neurotrauma · Pubmed #25036531.

ABSTRACT: Explosive devices have been the most frequent cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among deployed contemporary U.S. service members. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of previous cumulative blast exposures (that did or did not result in TBI) on later post-concussion and post-traumatic symptom reporting after sustaining a mild TBI (MTBI). Participants were 573 service members who sustained MTBI divided into four groups by number of blast exposures (1, 2, 3, and 4-10) and a nonblast control group. Post-concussion symptoms were measured using the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms using the Post-traumatic Checklist-Civilian version (PCL-C). Results show groups significantly differed on total NSI scores (p<0.001), where symptom endorsement increased as number of reported blast exposures increased. Total NSI scores were significantly higher for the 3- and 4-10 blast groups compared with the 1- and 2-blast groups with effect sizes ranging from small to moderate (d=0.31 to 0.63). After controlling for PTSD symptoms using the PCL-C total score, NSI total score differences remained between the 4-10-blast group and the 1- and 2-blast groups, but were less pronounced (d=0.35 and d=0.24, respectively). Analyses of NSI subscale scores using PCL-C scores as a covariate revealed significant between-blast group differences on cognitive, sensory, and somatic, but not affective symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that cumulative blast exposures accounted for a small but significant amount of the variance in total NSI scores (4.8%; p=0.009) and total PCL-C scores (2.3%; p<0.001). Among service members exposed to blast, post-concussion symptom reporting increased as a function of cumulative blast exposures. Future research will need to determine the relationship between cumulative blast exposures, symptom reporting, and neuropathological changes.

5 Article Factors influencing postconcussion and posttraumatic stress symptom reporting following military-related concurrent polytrauma and traumatic brain injury. 2014

Lange, Rael T / Brickell, Tracey A / Kennedy, Jan E / Bailie, Jason M / Sills, Cheryl / Asmussen, Sarah / Amador, Ricardo / Dilay, Angelica / Ivins, Brian / French, Louis M. ·Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, Bethesda, MD, USA Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, Bethesda, MD, USA rael.t.lange@us.army.mil rael.lange@gmail.com. · Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, Bethesda, MD, USA Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, Bethesda, MD, USA San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA. · Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, Bethesda, MD, USA Naval Medical Center San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA. · Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, Bethesda, MD, USA 33 Area Branch Clinic Camp Pendleton, Camp Pendleton, CA, USA. · Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, Bethesda, MD, USA. ·Arch Clin Neuropsychol · Pubmed #24723461.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to identify factors that are predictive of, or associated with, high endorsement of postconcussion and posttraumatic stress symptoms following military-related traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants were 1,600 U.S. service members (age: M = 27.1, SD = 7.1; 95.4% male) who had sustained a mild-to-moderate TBI and who had been evaluated by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center at one of six military medical centers. Twenty-two factors were examined that included demographic, injury circumstances/severity, treatment/evaluation, and psychological/physical variables. Four factors were statistically and meaningfully associated with clinically elevated postconcussion symptoms: (i) low bodily injury severity, (ii) posttraumatic stress, (iii) depression, and (iv) military operation where wounded (p < .001, 43.2% variance). The combination of depression and posttraumatic stress symptoms accounted for the vast majority of unique variance (41.5%) and were strongly associated with, and predictive of, clinically elevated postconcussion symptoms [range: odds ratios (OR) = 4.24-7.75; relative risk (RR) = 2.28-2.51]. Five factors were statistically and meaningfully associated with clinically elevated posttraumatic stress symptoms: (i) low bodily injury severity, (ii) depression, (iii) a longer time from injury to evaluation, (iv) military operation where wounded, and (v) current auditory deficits (p < .001; 65.6% variance accounted for). Depression alone accounted for the vast majority of unique variance (60.0%) and was strongly associated with, and predictive of, clinically elevated posttraumatic stress symptoms (OR = 38.78; RR = 4.63). There was a very clear, strong, and clinically meaningful association between depression, posttraumatic stress, and postconcussion symptoms in this sample. Brain injury severity, however, was not associated with symptom reporting following TBI.