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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders: HELP
Articles by Jordan Cargill
Based on 1 article published since 2010
(Why 1 article?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Jordan Cargill wrote the following article about Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Increasing Resilience to Traumatic Stress: Understanding the Protective Role of Well-Being. 2018

Tory Toole, J / Rice, Mark A / Cargill, Jordan / Craddock, Travis J A / Nierenberg, Barry / Klimas, Nancy G / Fletcher, Mary Ann / Morris, Mariana / Zysman, Joel / Broderick, Gordon. ·College of Psychology, Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, USA. · Center for Clinical Systems Biology, Rochester General Hospital Research Institute, Rochester, NY, USA. · Institute for Neuro-Immune Medicine, Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, USA. · Miami Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Miami, FL, USA. · Center for Computational Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA. · Center for Clinical Systems Biology, Rochester General Hospital Research Institute, Rochester, NY, USA. gordonbroderick55@gmail.com. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY, USA. gordonbroderick55@gmail.com. ·Methods Mol Biol · Pubmed #29705844.

ABSTRACT: The brain maintains homeostasis in part through a network of feedback and feed-forward mechanisms, where neurochemicals and immune markers act as mediators. Using a previously constructed model of biobehavioral feedback, we found that in addition to healthy equilibrium another stable regulatory program supported chronic depression and anxiety. Exploring mechanisms that might underlie the contributions of subjective well-being to improved therapeutic outcomes in depression, we iteratively screened 288 candidate feedback patterns linking well-being to molecular signaling networks for those that maintained the original homeostatic regimes. Simulating stressful trigger events on each candidate network while maintaining high levels of subjective well-being isolated a specific feedback network where well-being was promoted by dopamine and acetylcholine, and itself promoted norepinephrine while inhibiting cortisol expression. This biobehavioral feedback mechanism was especially effective in reproducing well-being's clinically documented ability to promote resilience and protect against onset of depression and anxiety.