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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders: HELP
Articles by Amanda K. Gilmore
Based on 11 articles published since 2010
(Why 11 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Amanda K. Gilmore wrote the following 11 articles about Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review A systematic review of technology-based interventions for co-occurring substance use and trauma symptoms. 2017

Gilmore, Amanda K / Wilson, Sarah M / Skopp, Nancy A / Osenbach, Janyce E / Reger, Greg. ·1 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, USA. · 2 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Mid-Atlantic Region Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC), USA. · 3 National Center for Telehealth and Technology (T2), Joint Base Lewis McChord, USA. · 4 SEIU 775 Benefits Group, USA. · 5 VA Puget Sound Health Care System, USA. · 6 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, USA. ·J Telemed Telecare · Pubmed #27534823.

ABSTRACT: Introduction Technology-based mental health interventions are becoming increasingly common, and several have begun to target multiple outcomes in a single intervention. Recent developments in the treatment of co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder and substance use disorder has led to the development and testing of technology-based interventions for these disorders. The current systematic review examined technology-based interventions designed to improve mental health outcomes among patients with co-occurring trauma symptoms and substance use. Methods Of 601 articles reviewed, 14 included a technology-based intervention for patients with these co-occurring problems. Results Seven of these studies provided preliminary evidence that technology-based interventions are likely to be efficacious in reducing either trauma symptoms or substance use. The seven remaining studies demonstrated that technology-based interventions for co-occurring trauma symptoms and substance use are feasible. Discussion This review suggests that technology-based interventions for co-occurring trauma symptoms and substance use are feasible, but more work is needed to assess efficacy using scientifically rigorous studies.

2 Article Post-Sexual Assault Mental Health: A Randomized Clinical Trial of a Video-Based Intervention. 2019

Gilmore, Amanda K / Walsh, Kate / Frazier, Patricia / Meredith, Liza / Ledray, Linda / Davis, Joanne / Acierno, Ron / Ruggiero, Kenneth J / Kilpatrick, Dean G / Jaffe, Anna E / Resnick, Heidi S. ·Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Yeshiva University, New York, NY, USA. · University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · SANE-SART Resource Service, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · University of Tulsa, OK, USA. · University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA. · Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. ·J Interpers Violence · Pubmed #31709903.

ABSTRACT: The current study assessed the efficacy of a brief video intervention (Prevention of Post-Rape Stress [PPRS]) delivered in the emergency department to recent sexual assault (SA) victims. PPRS was compared to treatment as usual (TAU) and an active control condition (Pleasant Imagery and Relaxation Instruction [PIRI]). Primary outcomes were posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and perceived present control. Prior SA was examined as a moderator of treatment effects. Women (

3 Article A Longitudinal Examination of Interpersonal Violence Exposure, Concern for Loved Ones During a Disaster, and Web-Based Intervention Effects on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Adolescent Victims of the Spring 2011 Tornadoes. 2018

Gilmore, Amanda K / Price, Matthew / Bountress, Kaitlin E / Zuromski, Kelly L / Ruggiero, Ken / Resnick, Heidi. ·1 Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · 2 University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA. · 3 Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA. · 4 Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA. ·J Interpers Violence · Pubmed #30136879.

ABSTRACT: Natural disasters are common and devastating, and can affect the mental health of adolescents. It is also common for adolescents to have histories of interpersonal violence (IPV). The current study was a secondary data analysis of a larger randomized clinical trial and examined the moderating effect of IPV history and concern for loved ones during a disaster on treatment condition effects on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms over time among disaster-exposed adolescents. Participants ( n = 979) were recruited postdisaster to participate in a randomized clinical trial examining the efficacy of a web-based intervention, Bounce Back Now (BBN), on mental health symptoms at 4 and 12 months postintervention. It was found that adolescents with an IPV history and who had caregivers that were concerned for loved ones during a disaster had more PTSD symptoms at baseline than those without such histories. Furthermore, caregiver concern for loved ones during a disaster moderated the effect of BBN on PTSD symptoms over time. Specifically, the BBN condition was most effective for adolescents who had caregivers who were concerned for loved ones during the disaster in reductions of PTSD symptoms over time. The current study provides further evidence for the use of technology-based interventions for individuals as a means to address mental health symptoms after a traumatic event, especially among those with more severe traumatic experiences.

4 Article Predicting PTSD severity from experiences of trauma and heterosexism in lesbian and bisexual women: A longitudinal study of cognitive mediators. 2018

Dworkin, Emily R / Gilmore, Amanda K / Bedard-Gilligan, Michele / Lehavot, Keren / Guttmannova, Katarína / Kaysen, Debra. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina. ·J Couns Psychol · Pubmed #29672082.

ABSTRACT: Sexual minority women (SMW) are at high risk of trauma exposure and, subsequently, the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The authors extended a theoretical model explaining the higher risk of mental disorders in minority populations to the maintenance and exacerbation of PTSD symptoms among young adult SMW specifically. This study used observational longitudinal data from a sample of 348 trauma-exposed 18- to 25-year-old individuals assigned female sex at birth who identified as either bisexual (60.1%) or lesbian (39.9%) and met screening criteria for PTSD. Participants identified as White (82.8%), Hispanic/Latina (12.4%), American Indian/Alaska Native (13.5%), Black/African American (13.8%), and/or Asian/Asian American (4.9%). The authors investigated whether distal stressors (i.e., criterion A traumatic events, daily experiences of heterosexism) produced proximal stressors (i.e., trauma-related cognitions, internalized heterosexism) that maintained or exacerbated PTSD symptoms. Findings indicated that daily heterosexism longitudinally predicted trauma-related cognitions (i.e., cognitions related to the self, world, and self-blame). Internalized heterosexism and cognitions about the self longitudinally predicted PTSD symptom severity. In addition, a significant indirect effect was identified between daily heterosexism and PTSD symptoms via self-related posttraumatic cognitions. These findings suggest that exposure to minority-specific distal stressors appears to promote nonminority-specific cognitive processes that, in turn, may maintain or exacerbate PTSD among young adult SMW exposed to trauma. Clinicians should consider addressing daily heterosexism in young adult SMW presenting with PTSD and evaluate how these experiences might promote clients' global, negative views regarding themselves. (PsycINFO Database Record

5 Article Treatment of co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder and substance use: Does order of onset influence outcomes? 2018

Bountress, Kaitlin E / Badour, Christal / Flanagan, Julianne / Gilmore, Amanda K / Back, Sudie E. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina. · Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky. ·Psychol Trauma · Pubmed #28771018.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUDs) represent major public health concerns, particularly among veterans. They are associated with significant distress and impairment, and are highly comorbid. Little is known, however, about what role the temporal order of diagnostic onset may play in severity of presenting symptomatology and treatment outcomes. The aim of this study, therefore, was to examine treatment outcomes by order of onset. METHOD: Participants were 46 U.S. military veterans (91.3% male) enrolled in a larger randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy of an integrated, exposure-based treatment (Concurrent Treatment of PTSD and Substance Use Disorders Using Prolonged Exposure; COPE). Participants were grouped into 2 categories: (a) primary PTSD (i.e., PTSD developed before the onset of SUD) or (b) primary SUD (i.e., SUD developed before the onset of PTSD). RESULTS: No significant associations between order of onset and baseline symptomatology were observed. The findings revealed that participants with primary PTSD were significantly more likely than participants with primary SUD to report higher levels of PTSD symptoms at the end of treatment. However, there was no effect of order of onset on SUD outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that individuals with earlier PTSD onset are a particularly high-risk group in terms of their trauma-related symptoms. Implications for treatment of comorbid PTSD/SUD are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

6 Article Suicidal Ideation, Posttraumatic Stress, and Substance Abuse Based on Forcible and Drug- or Alcohol-Facilitated/Incapacitated Rape Histories in a National Sample of Women. 2018

Gilmore, Amanda K / Walsh, Kate / Badour, Christal L / Ruggiero, Kenneth J / Kilpatrick, Dean G / Resnick, Heidi S. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA. · Technology Applications Center for Healthful Lifestyles, College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA. ·Suicide Life Threat Behav · Pubmed #28261856.

ABSTRACT: Mental health symptoms differ among women with forcible rape (FR) compared to drug- or alcohol-facilitated/incapacitated rape (DAFR/IR) histories, but differences in suicidal ideation are unknown. The differences in suicidal ideation based on FR and DAFR/IR history were examined in national samples of college (n = 2,000) and household-residing (n = 3,001) women. For both college women and household-residing women, FR and DAFR/IR were associated with recent suicidal ideation. Differences emerged when examined indirectly through recent posttraumatic stress disorder, drug abuse, and alcohol abuse. Therefore, it is important to examine both FR and DAFR/IR when assessing suicidal ideation.

7 Article A non-inferiority trial of Prolonged Exposure for posttraumatic stress disorder: In person versus home-based telehealth. 2017

Acierno, Ron / Knapp, Rebecca / Tuerk, Peter / Gilmore, Amanda K / Lejuez, Carl / Ruggiero, Kenneth / Muzzy, Wendy / Egede, Leonard / Hernandez-Tejada, Melba A / Foa, Edna B. ·Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA; College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. Electronic address: acierno@musc.edu. · Department of Public Health Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA. · Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA; College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. ·Behav Res Ther · Pubmed #27894058.

ABSTRACT: This is the first randomized controlled trial to evaluate non-inferiority of Prolonged Exposure (PE) delivered via home-based telehealth (HBT) compared to standard in-person (IP) PE. One-hundred thirty two Veterans recruited from a Southeastern Veterans Affairs Medical Center and affiliated University who met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were randomized to receive PE via HBT or PE via IP. Results indicated that PE-HBT was non-inferior to PE-IP in terms of reducing PTSD scores at post-treatment, 3 and 6 month follow-up. However, non-inferiority hypotheses for depression were only supported at 6 month follow-up. HBT has great potential to reduce patient burden associated with receiving treatment in terms of travel time, travel cost, lost work, and stigma without sacrificing efficacy. These findings indicate that telehealth treatment delivered directly into patients' homes may dramatically increase the reach of this evidence-based therapy for PTSD without diminishing effectiveness.

8 Article Associations among impulsivity, trauma history, and alcohol misuse within a young adult sample. 2017

Bountress, Kaitlin / Adams, Zachary W / Gilmore, Amanda K / Amstadter, Ananda B / Thomas, Suzanne / Danielson, Carla K. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. Electronic address: bountres@musc.edu. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA; Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA. ·Addict Behav · Pubmed #27619009.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Young adult alcohol misuse is associated with numerous long-term adverse outcomes. Given the link between impulsivity and alcohol use, we examined whether three impulsivity-related traits differentially predicted number of drinks per drinking day (DDD). We also examined whether these effects varied for those with different trauma histories. METHOD: The current study (n=254) examined motor, non-planning, and attentional impulsivity as predictors of DDD. It also examined whether impulsivity was differentially predictive of DDD across individuals in: a control group (non-trauma exposed), a trauma exposed but non-PTSD group, and a PTSD group. RESULTS: Regardless of group, more motor impulsivity was associated with more DDD. The effect of non-planning impulsivity varied according to trauma history. Specifically, more non-planning impulsivity predicted more DDD for those without PTSD. Finally, attentional impulsivity was not predictive of DDD. CONCLUSIONS: Young adults with high levels of motor impulsivity, regardless of trauma history, may be a particularly high-risk group in terms of propensity for alcohol use/misuse. Additionally, high levels of non-planning impulsivity may signify those at greater risk for alcohol misuse, among those without PTSD. Motor impulsivity and non-planning impulsivity may serve as useful intervention targets in alcohol misuse prevention efforts. Implications for future research in this area are discussed.

9 Article Military Sexual Trauma and Co-occurring Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Depressive Disorders, and Substance Use Disorders among Returning Afghanistan and Iraq Veterans. 2016

Gilmore, Amanda K / Brignone, Emily / Painter, Janelle M / Lehavot, Keren / Fargo, Jamison / Suo, Ying / Simpson, Tracy / Carter, Marjorie E / Blais, Rebecca K / Gundlapalli, Adi V. ·Department of Psychiatry, National Crime Victims Research & Treatment Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle Division, Seattle, Washington. Electronic address: gilmoram@musc.edu. · Department of Psychology, Utah State University, Logan, Utah; VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Salt Lake City, Utah. · VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle Division, Seattle, Washington. · VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Salt Lake City, Utah; Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. · VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Department of Psychology, Utah State University, Logan, Utah. ·Womens Health Issues · Pubmed #27528358.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depressive disorders (DD), and substance use disorders (SUD) are prevalent among veterans. A positive military sexual trauma (MST) screen is associated with higher likelihood of each of these disorders. The current study examined the associations between MST, gender, and co-occurring PTSD, DD, and SUD among veterans receiving services at the Department of Veterans Affairs to inform assessment and treatment. We were specifically interested in the interactions between MST and gender on co-occurring disorders. METHODS: The sample included 494,822 Department of Veterans Affairs service-seeking veterans (12.5% women) deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan who recently separated from the military and were screened for MST between 2004 and 2013. MAIN FINDINGS: Veterans with positive MST screens had higher odds than those with negative screens of individual and co-occurring PTSD, DD, and SUD. The association between positive MST screens and diagnostic outcomes, including PTSD, was stronger for women than for men, and the association between positive MST screens and some diagnostic outcomes, including DD, was stronger for men than for women. CONCLUSIONS: These results highlight the importance of assessing for and recognizing the potential MST and gender interactions in the clinical context among veterans with co-occurring PTSD, DD, and/or SUD.

10 Article "Do you expect me to receive PTSD care in a setting where most of the other patients remind me of the perpetrator?": Home-based telemedicine to address barriers to care unique to military sexual trauma and veterans affairs hospitals. 2016

Gilmore, Amanda K / Davis, Margaret T / Grubaugh, Anouk / Resnick, Heidi / Birks, Anna / Denier, Carol / Muzzy, Wendy / Tuerk, Peter / Acierno, Ron. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, United States. · Auburn University Department of Psychology, United States; VA Ann Arbor Health Care System, University of Michigan Department of Psychiatry, United States. · Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, United States. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, United States; Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, United States. · College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina, United States. · Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, United States; College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina, United States. ·Contemp Clin Trials · Pubmed #26992740.

ABSTRACT: Home-based telemedicine (HBT) is a validated method of evidence-based treatment delivery for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and justification for its use has centered on closing gaps related to provider availability and distance to treatment centers. However, another potential use of HBT may be to overcome barriers to care that are inherent to the treatment environment, such as with female veterans who have experienced military sexual trauma (MST) and who must present to VA Medical Centers where the majority of patients share features with perpetrator (e.g. gender, clothing) and may function as reminders of the trauma. Delivering evidence-based therapies to female veterans with MST-related PTSD via HBT can provide needed treatment to this population. This manuscript describes an ongoing federally funded randomized controlled trial comparing Prolonged Exposure (PE) delivered in-person to PE delivered via HBT. Outcomes include session attendance, satisfaction with services, and clinical and quality of life indices. It is hypothesized that based on intent-to-treat analyses, HBT delivery of PE will be more effective than SD at improving both clinical and quality of life outcomes at post, 3-, and 6-month follow-up. This is because 'dose received', that is fewer sessions missed, and lower attrition, will be observed in the HBT group. Although the current manuscript focuses on female veterans with MST-related PTSD, implications for other populations facing systemic barriers are discussed.

11 Article Posttraumatic Cognitions, Somatization, and PTSD severity among Asian American and White College Women with Sexual Trauma Histories. 2014

Koo, Kelly H / Nguyen, Hong V / Gilmore, Amanda K / Blayney, Jessica A / Kaysen, Debra L. ·Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. · Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. ·Psychol Trauma · Pubmed #25419439.

ABSTRACT: The need for trauma research with monoracial groups such as Asian Americans (AA) has recently been emphasized to better understand trauma experiences and inform interventions across populations. Given AA cultural contexts, posttraumatic cognitions and somatization may be key in understanding trauma experiences for this group. AA and White American (WA) trauma-exposed college women completed a survey on sexual trauma history, posttraumatic cognitions, somatic symptoms, and PTSD severity. For the overall sample, higher negative cognitions were associated with higher somatization. Asian race was associated with higher negative cognitions, which then predicted higher PTSD. Unexpectedly, WAs more strongly endorsed somatization than AAs. These findings indicate that posttraumatic cognitions may be helpful in understanding relationships between somatization and PTSD severity among those of Asian backgrounds and that the relationship between somatization and PTSD symptoms is culturally complex.