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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders: HELP
Articles from Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
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These are the 4 published articles about Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic that originated from Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Association Between Perceived Threat and the Development of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in Patients With Life-threatening Medical Emergencies. 2020

Moss, Jeena / Roberts, Michael B / Shea, Lisa / Jones, Christopher W / Kilgannon, Hope / Edmondson, Donald E / Trzeciak, Stephen / Roberts, Brian W. ·Department of Emergency Medicine, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Camden, NJ. · Institutional Research and Outcomes Assessment, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY. · Department of Medicine, Cooper University Health Care, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Camden, NJ. · Center for Humanism, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Camden, NJ. ·Acad Emerg Med · Pubmed #31650652.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Our objectives were to test whether during a potentially life-threatening medical emergency, perceived threat (a patient's sense of life endangerment) in the emergency department (ED) is common and associated with the subsequent development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. METHODS: This study was an ED-based prospective cohort study in an academic hospital. We included adult patients requiring acute intervention in the ED for resuscitation of a potentially life-threatening medical emergency, defined as respiratory or cardiovascular instability. We measured patient-perceived threat in the ED using a validated patient self-assessment measure (score range = 0 to 21, with higher scores indicating greater perceived threat). We performed blinded assessment of PTSD symptoms 30 days after discharge using the PTSD Checklist for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (PCL-5). RESULTS: Ninety-nine of 113 (88%) patients completed follow-up, with 98% reporting some degree of perceived threat, median (interquartile range [IQR]) perceived threat score 12 (6 to 17), and 72% reported PTSD symptoms in relation to their ED visit (median [IQR] PCL-5 score = 7 [0 to 30]). Patients with respiratory instability had higher median (IQR) perceived threat scores (16 [9 to 18] vs. 9 [6 to 14)] and PCL-5 scores (10 [2 to 40] vs. 3 [0 to 17]) compared to patients without respiratory instability. In a multivariable linear regression model adjusting for potential confounders, greater perceived threat in the ED was independently associated with higher PCL-5 scores (β = 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.15 to 1.42). Among the individual perceived threat items, the feeling of helplessness during resuscitation had the strongest association with PCL-5 score (β = 5.24, 95% CI = 2.29 to 8.18). CONCLUSIONS: Perceived threat during potentially life-threatening emergencies is common and independently associated with development of PTSD symptoms. Additional research to test whether reduction of perceived threat in the ED attenuates the development of PTSD symptoms following potentially life-threatening emergencies is warranted.

2 Article Healthcare provider compassion is associated with lower PTSD symptoms among patients with life-threatening medical emergencies: a prospective cohort study. 2019

Moss, Jeena / Roberts, Michael B / Shea, Lisa / Jones, Christopher W / Kilgannon, Hope / Edmondson, Donald E / Trzeciak, Stephen / Roberts, Brian W. ·Department of Emergency Medicine, Cooper University Health Care, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, One Cooper Plaza, K152, Camden, NJ, 08103, USA. · Institutional Research and Outcomes Assessment, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Medicine, Cooper University Health Care, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Camden, NJ, USA. · Center for Humanism, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Camden, NJ, USA. · Department of Emergency Medicine, Cooper University Health Care, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, One Cooper Plaza, K152, Camden, NJ, 08103, USA. roberts-brian-w@cooperhealth.edu. · Center for Humanism, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Camden, NJ, USA. roberts-brian-w@cooperhealth.edu. ·Intensive Care Med · Pubmed #30911803.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: We tested the hypothesis that, during a life-threatening medical emergency, patient perception of healthcare provider (HCP) compassion is associated with the subsequent development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. METHODS: Prospective cohort study in the emergency department (ED) of an urban academic medical center. We included adult patients presenting with a life-threatening medical emergency, defined as respiratory or cardiovascular instability requiring a potentially life-sustaining intervention in the ED. We measured patient perception of HCP compassion in the ED using the Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) measure, a validated 40-point scale. Blinded to clinical outcomes (including the CARE measure), we assessed PTSD symptoms 1 month post-discharge using the PTSD Checklist for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5. RESULTS: Of the 99/113 (88%) patients who completed follow-up, 25% (95% CI 17-35%) had PTSD symptoms at 1 month. In a multivariable model adjusting for potential confounders (e.g. severity of illness score in ED, need for intensive care unit admission, ED overcrowding, and family member emotional support in the ED), patient perception of greater HCP compassion in the ED was independently associated with lower PTSD symptoms at 1 month [odds ratio 0.93 (95% CI 0.89-0.98)]. A one-point increase in the CARE measure was associated with a 7% decrease in the odds of developing PTSD symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: PTSD symptoms are common among ED patients with life-threatening medical emergencies. Patient perception of greater HCP compassion during the emergency is independently associated with lower risk of developing PTSD symptoms.

3 Article A motor vehicle collision involving a veteran: a teaching case from the joining forces teaching curriculum for medical students. 2012

Berkowitz, Murray / Cruser, Dès Anges / Podawiltz, Alan / Henley, Charles E / Yuan, Andrew / Navarro, Anita M / Cymet, Tyler. ·Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, PA, USA. ·Md Med · Pubmed #23477263.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Unspecified Transient Global Amnesia in a 60-year-old female with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. 2019

Espiridion, Eduardo D / Gupta, Jayesh / Bshara, Andre / Danssaert, Zachary. ·Psychiatry, Frederick Memorial Hospital, Frederick, USA. · Psychiatry, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, USA. · Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, USA. · Medicine, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia, USA. ·Cureus · Pubmed #31728239.

ABSTRACT: This is a case report involving a 60-year-old female who developed transient global amnesia (TGA) after an emotional psychotherapy session in the framework of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). She presented to the local emergency room, three days after her psychotherapist appointment, with complaints of memory impairment. She and her husband were worried about acute stroke since it was a sudden memory loss. The patient discussed with her psychotherapist a physical assault that occurred five years ago. Three days after that discussion, the patient developed the memory loss acutely. PTSD is associated with dissociative and retrograde amnesia. This case report demonstrates that PTSD can present with anterograde amnesia in the form of TGA.