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Rheumatoid Arthritis: HELP
Articles from New York
Based on 851 articles published since 2008
||||

These are the 851 published articles about Arthritis, Rheumatoid that originated from New York during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: goodmans@hss.edu. · Bryan Springer, MD: OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · Gordon Guyatt, MD: McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Matthew P. Abdel, MD: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Vinod Dasa, MD: Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · Michael George, MD: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Ora Gewurz-Singer, MD: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Jon T. Giles, MD, MPH: Columbia University, New York, New York. · Beverly Johnson, MD: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Steve Lee, DO: Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · Michael A. Mont, MD: Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Scott Sporer, MD: Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · Louis Stryker, MD: University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · Marat Turgunbaev, MD, MPH, Amy S. Miller: American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Antonia F. Chen, MD, MBA: Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Jeremy Gililland, MD: University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · Mark Goodman, MD, Adolph Yates, MD: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Arlene Hurley-Rosenblatt, ANP: Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Elena Losina, PhD: Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Kaleb Michaud, PhD: National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Ted Mikuls, MD, MSPH: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Alexander Sah, MD: Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · Jasvinder A. Singh, MBBS, MPH: University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·J Arthroplasty · Pubmed #28629905.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

2 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas, and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #28620948.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

3 Guideline Treatment Guidelines for Rheumatologic Manifestations of Sjögren's Syndrome: Use of Biologic Agents, Management of Fatigue, and Inflammatory Musculoskeletal Pain. 2017

Carsons, Steven E / Vivino, Frederick B / Parke, Ann / Carteron, Nancy / Sankar, Vidya / Brasington, Richard / Brennan, Michael T / Ehlers, William / Fox, Robert / Scofield, Hal / Hammitt, Katherine M / Birnbaum, Julius / Kassan, Stuart / Mandel, Steven. ·Winthrop-University Hospital Campus, State University of New York, Stony Brook, Mineola. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington. · University of California at San Francisco. · University of Texas San Antonio Dental School, San Antonio. · Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri. · Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · Scripps Memorial Hospital Xi-Med, La Jolla, California. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, and Oklahoma City Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City. · Sjögren's Syndrome Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland. · Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · University of Colorado, Denver. · Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, and Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #27390247.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The Sjögren's Syndrome Foundation clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are designed to improve quality and consistency of care in Sjögren's syndrome by offering recommendations for management. METHODS: Management questions for the systemic manifestations of Sjögren's syndrome were posed by the CPG committee with input from patients and rheumatologists. Clinical questions were assigned to a topic review group that performed systematic reviews and data extraction and drafted guidelines. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendation were rated using the American Society of Clinical Oncology's modification of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation. Guideline recommendations were reviewed by a consensus expert panel (CEP) composed of 30-40 clinicians from academia and community practices, as well as registered nurses and patients, using a modified Delphi process. A CEP agreement level of 75% was set as a minimum for adoption of a guideline recommendation. RESULTS: Consensus was achieved for 19 recommendations; for 11 additional modules, available data were insufficient to allow a recommendation to be formulated. Of the 19 recommendations, 15 required 1 Delphi round, 2 required 2 rounds, and 2 required 3 rounds. CONCLUSION: Key recommendations include a decision tree for the use of oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for inflammatory musculoskeletal pain, use of self-care measures and advice regarding exercise to reduce fatigue, and the use of rituximab in selected clinical settings for oral and ocular dryness and for certain extraglandular manifestations, including vasculitis, severe parotid swelling, inflammatory arthritis, pulmonary disease, and mononeuritis multiplex. The CPG committee strongly discouraged the use of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors for sicca symptoms and for the majority of clinical contexts in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

4 Guideline 2015 American College of Rheumatology Guideline for the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis. 2016

Singh, Jasvinder A / Saag, Kenneth G / Bridges, S Louis / Akl, Elie A / Bannuru, Raveendhara R / Sullivan, Matthew C / Vaysbrot, Elizaveta / McNaughton, Christine / Osani, Mikala / Shmerling, Robert H / Curtis, Jeffrey R / Furst, Daniel E / Parks, Deborah / Kavanaugh, Arthur / O'Dell, James / King, Charles / Leong, Amye / Matteson, Eric L / Schousboe, John T / Drevlow, Barbara / Ginsberg, Seth / Grober, James / St Clair, E William / Tindall, Elizabeth / Miller, Amy S / McAlindon, Timothy. ·University of Alabama at Birmingham. · American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon, and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri. · University of California, San Diego. · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · North Mississippi Medical Center, Tupelo. · Healthy Motivation, Santa Barbara, California. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Minnesota and Park Nicollet Clinic, St. Louis Park. · NorthShore University Health System, Evanston, Illinois. · Global Healthy Living Foundation, New York, New York. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Rheumatology Consultants of Oregon, West Linn. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #26545940.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop a new evidence-based, pharmacologic treatment guideline for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: We conducted systematic reviews to synthesize the evidence for the benefits and harms of various treatment options. We used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology to rate the quality of evidence. We employed a group consensus process to grade the strength of recommendations (either strong or conditional). A strong recommendation indicates that clinicians are certain that the benefits of an intervention far outweigh the harms (or vice versa). A conditional recommendation denotes uncertainty over the balance of benefits and harms and/or more significant variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline covers the use of traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in early (<6 months) and established (≥6 months) RA. In addition, it provides recommendations on using a treat-to-target approach, tapering and discontinuing medications, and the use of biologic agents and DMARDs in patients with hepatitis, congestive heart failure, malignancy, and serious infections. The guideline addresses the use of vaccines in patients starting/receiving DMARDs or biologic agents, screening for tuberculosis in patients starting/receiving biologic agents or tofacitinib, and laboratory monitoring for traditional DMARDs. The guideline includes 74 recommendations: 23% are strong and 77% are conditional. CONCLUSION: This RA guideline should serve as a tool for clinicians and patients (our two target audiences) for pharmacologic treatment decisions in commonly encountered clinical situations. These recommendations are not prescriptive, and the treatment decisions should be made by physicians and patients through a shared decision-making process taking into account patients' values, preferences, and comorbidities. These recommendations should not be used to limit or deny access to therapies.

5 Guideline 2015 American College of Rheumatology Guideline for the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis. 2016

Singh, Jasvinder A / Saag, Kenneth G / Bridges, S Louis / Akl, Elie A / Bannuru, Raveendhara R / Sullivan, Matthew C / Vaysbrot, Elizaveta / McNaughton, Christine / Osani, Mikala / Shmerling, Robert H / Curtis, Jeffrey R / Furst, Daniel E / Parks, Deborah / Kavanaugh, Arthur / O'Dell, James / King, Charles / Leong, Amye / Matteson, Eric L / Schousboe, John T / Drevlow, Barbara / Ginsberg, Seth / Grober, James / St Clair, E William / Tindall, Elizabeth / Miller, Amy S / McAlindon, Timothy / Anonymous1780848. ·University of Alabama at Birmingham. · American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon, and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri. · University of California, San Diego. · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · North Mississippi Medical Center, Tupelo. · Healthy Motivation, Santa Barbara, California. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Minnesota and Park Nicollet Clinic, St. Louis Park. · NorthShore University Health System, Evanston, Illinois. · Global Healthy Living Foundation, New York, New York. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Rheumatology Consultants of Oregon, West Linn. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. ·Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) · Pubmed #26545825.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To develop a new evidence-based, pharmacologic treatment guideline for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: We conducted systematic reviews to synthesize the evidence for the benefits and harms of various treatment options. We used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology to rate the quality of evidence. We employed a group consensus process to grade the strength of recommendations (either strong or conditional). A strong recommendation indicates that clinicians are certain that the benefits of an intervention far outweigh the harms (or vice versa). A conditional recommendation denotes uncertainty over the balance of benefits and harms and/or more significant variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline covers the use of traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in early (<6 months) and established (≥6 months) RA. In addition, it provides recommendations on using a treat-to-target approach, tapering and discontinuing medications, and the use of biologic agents and DMARDs in patients with hepatitis, congestive heart failure, malignancy, and serious infections. The guideline addresses the use of vaccines in patients starting/receiving DMARDs or biologic agents, screening for tuberculosis in patients starting/receiving biologic agents or tofacitinib, and laboratory monitoring for traditional DMARDs. The guideline includes 74 recommendations: 23% are strong and 77% are conditional. CONCLUSION: This RA guideline should serve as a tool for clinicians and patients (our two target audiences) for pharmacologic treatment decisions in commonly encountered clinical situations. These recommendations are not prescriptive, and the treatment decisions should be made by physicians and patients through a shared decision-making process taking into account patients' values, preferences, and comorbidities. These recommendations should not be used to limit or deny access to therapies.

6 Editorial Breathing New Life into Interstitial Lung Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis. 2018

Gregersen, Peter K / Gravallese, Ellen M. ·From the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Robert S. Boas Center for Genomics and Human Genetics, Manhasset, NY (P.K.G.) · and the Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester (E.M.G.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #30345908.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Too Little Too Late: Effect of Poor Access to Biologics for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis. 2017

Johnson, Beverly K / Bahçe-Altuntaş, Asena. ·Assistant Professor of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Director of Rheumatology, Jacobi Medical Center and North Central Bronx (NCB) Hospital; beverly.johnson06@gmail.com. · Assistant Professor of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Director of the Joint Pain Clinic, Jacobi/NCB, New York, New York, USA. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #29196544.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Sjogren's syndrome: New paradigms and areas for future research. 2017

Ambrus, Julian L. ·Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, SUNY at Buffalo School of Medicine, Room C281 BGH, 100 High Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, United States. Electronic address: jambrus@buffalo.edu. ·Clin Immunol · Pubmed #28673862.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Rheumatoid Arthritis Therapy and Joint-replacement Surgery: Are We Making a Difference? 2016

Goodman, Susan M. ·Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine College, Associate Attending Physician, Department of Rheumatology, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York, USA. goodmans@hss.edu. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #27134264.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Can Methotrexate Prevent Knee Arthroplasties in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis? 2015

Kremer, Joel M. ·Pfaff Family Professor of Medicine, Albany Medical College, Director of Research, Center for Rheumatology, 1367 Washington Ave., Albany, New York 12206, USA. jkremer@joint-docs.com. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #26628706.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis: does it still happen and does it matter? 2014

Bykerk, Vivian P. ·Department of Rheumatology, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th St., New York, New York 10021, USA bykerkv@hss.edu. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25452176.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Still trying to understand methotrexate. 2014

Kremer, Joel M. ·Pfaff Family Professor of Medicine, Albany Medical College, Director of Research, The Center for Rheumatology, Albany, New York, USA. jkremer@joint-docs.com. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25362706.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Adipokine mediators of inflammation and cardiometabolic comorbidity in rheumatoid arthritis: is there a master adipokine? 2014

Giles, Jon T. ·Division of Rheumatology, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Physicians & Surgeons Building, Suite 10-445, 630 W 168th St., New York, New York 10032, USA. jtg2122@columbia.edu. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #25226593.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial The growing challenge of nontuberculous mycobacteria. 2014

Schluger, Neil W. ·The Department of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology, Department of Environmental Health Science, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Mailman School of Public Health. Electronic address: ns311@cumc.columbia.edu. ·Chest · Pubmed #25180714.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Is a patient questionnaire without a joint examination as undesirable as a joint examination without a patient questionnaire? 2014

Pincus, Theodore / Gibson, Kathryn A / Berthelot, Jean-Marie M. ·Division of Rheumatology, NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, New York, USA; ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #24692600.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Are excellent systematic reviews of clinical trials useful for patient care? 2008

Pincus, Theodore / Yazici, Yusuf / Sokka, Tuulikki. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, New York University Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY 10003, USA. tedpincus@gmail.com ·Nat Clin Pract Rheumatol · Pubmed #18461062.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Review Nonopioid versus opioid agents for chronic neuropathic pain, rheumatoid arthritis pain, cancer pain and low back pain. 2019

Noori, Selaiman A / Aiyer, Rohit / Yu, James / White, Robert S / Mehta, Neel / Gulati, Amitabh. ·Department of Pain Management, Anesthesiology Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA. · Department of Anesthesiology, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · Department of Anesthesiology, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, IL, 60612 USA. · Department of Anesthesia & Critical Care, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. ·Pain Manag · Pubmed #30681031.

ABSTRACT: Chronic pain continues to be a major health issue throughout the world and a huge economic burden for nations around the world. While the use of opioids does have risks, they are still widely used by clinicians as a treatment option for various chronic pain conditions. This review explores and compares the efficacy and safety of opioid and nonopioid agents for the following commonly encountered chronic pain conditions: neuropathic pain, rheumatoid arthritis joint pain, cancer pain and low back pain. Our findings demonstrate that while there are several nonopioid pharmacologic options that are clinically effective, opioids maintain a role in the treatment of certain chronic pain conditions and should continue to have an important place in the armamentarium of clinicians.

18 Review Current and Emerging Evidence for Toll-Like Receptor Activation in Sjögren's Syndrome. 2018

Kiripolsky, Jeremy / Kramer, Jill M. ·Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA. · Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA. ·J Immunol Res · Pubmed #30671484.

ABSTRACT: While the importance of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is well established in many autoimmune diseases, the role of TLR activation in Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is poorly understood. Studies in mice and humans reveal that TLRs are potent mediators of inflammation in SS. TLRs are expressed and functional in salivary tissue, and TLRs in peripheral blood cells of SS patients are also upregulated and hyperresponsive to ligation. In this review, we will detail observations in mouse models regarding the importance of TLR activation in both local and systemic disease. We will then discuss studies in SS patients that provide evidence of the importance of TLR-mediated signaling in disease. While the ligands that activate TLRs in the context of SS are unknown, emerging data suggest that damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) may be significant drivers of the chronic and unremitting inflammation that is characteristic of SS. We will discuss putative DAMPs that may be of clinical significance in disease. Therapies that target TLR signaling cascades will likely reduce both exocrine-specific and systemic manifestations of SS.

19 Review Renal Manifestations of Rheumatoid Arthritis. 2018

Kapoor, Teja / Bathon, Joan. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: Tmk2134@cumc.columbia.edu. · Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA. ·Rheum Dis Clin North Am · Pubmed #30274624.

ABSTRACT: Renal manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have evolved as RA management has improved. In the past, older disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, uncontrolled systemic inflammation, and chronic nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) use contributed to kidney disease. Over time, the use of methotrexate and biologic medications, decrease in NSAID use, and a treat-to-target strategy have contributed to a decrease in renal manifestations. Chronic kidney disease in RA now is more likely to be caused by cardiovascular risk factors than uncontrolled RA disease severity. In patients with renal dysfunction, NSAIDs, methotrexate, and tofacitinib may need to be adjusted or avoided to prevent adverse events.

20 Review Role of periodontal therapy in management of common complex systemic diseases and conditions: An update. 2018

Sabharwal, Amarpreet / Gomes-Filho, Isaac S / Stellrecht, Elizabeth / Scannapieco, Frank A. ·Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA. · Department of Health, Feira de Santana State University, Bahia, Brazil. · Health Sciences Library, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA. ·Periodontol 2000 · Pubmed #30198128.

ABSTRACT: The goal of this review is to summarize the results of randomized trials reported since 2010 that assessed the effect of periodontal interventions on at least one systemic outcome in human subjects of any age, gender or ethnicity. Oral outcome measures included gingivitis, pocket depth, clinical attachment loss and/or radiographic bone loss and oral hygiene indices. Studies were excluded if the trial was not completed or if treatment was not randomized. The results suggest that nonsurgical periodontal intervention provided to pregnant women is safe and improves periodontal status without preventing adverse pregnancy outcomes. Nonsurgical periodontal intervention was also found to provide modest improvement in glycemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus and periodontitis. Also, improving oral care through mechanical or chemical control of dental-plaque biofilm formation can contribute to the prevention of respiratory infections in differing clinical settings, including hospitals and nursing homes, and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. No clinical trials were reported that tested the effect of periodontal interventions on medical outcomes of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, chronic kidney disease or malignant neoplasia.

21 Review The potential impact of monitoring disease activity biomarkers on rheumatoid arthritis outcomes and costs. 2018

Oderda, Gary M / Lawless, Grant D / Wright, Grace C / Nussbaum, Samuel R / Elder, Renwyck / Kim, Kibum / Brixner, Diana I. ·University of Utah College of Pharmacy, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. · University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. · NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. · University of Southern California, Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA. · AffectRX LLC, Southlake, TX 76092, USA. ·Per Med · Pubmed #29693487.

ABSTRACT: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) management requires monitoring of disease activity to determine course of treatment. Global assessments are used in clinical practice to determine RA disease activity. Monitoring disease activity via biomarkers may also help providers optimize biologic and nonbiologic drug use while decreasing overall drug spend by delaying use of expensive biologic therapies. By testing multiple biologic domains at the same time, a multibiomarker disease activity test may have utility in RA patient management, through improved intra- and inter-rater reliability. This report provides a comprehensive review of studies of objective measures, single biomarkers and multibiomarker disease activity tests as disease activity measures to decrease uncertainty in treatment decisions, and of biomarkers' potential impact on economic and clinical outcomes of treatment choices.

22 Review The gut microbiome and elevated cardiovascular risk in obesity and autoimmunity. 2018

Kasselman, Lora J / Vernice, Nicholas A / DeLeon, Joshua / Reiss, Allison B. ·Winthrop Research Institute and Department of Medicine, NYU Winthrop Hospital, Mineola, NY, USA. Electronic address: lkasselman@nyuwinthrop.org. · Winthrop Research Institute and Department of Medicine, NYU Winthrop Hospital, Mineola, NY, USA. ·Atherosclerosis · Pubmed #29524863.

ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular disease associated with obesity and autoimmunity is the leading cause of death in these populations and significant residual risk remains despite current treatment approaches. Obesity, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are linked to chronic inflammation, and subjects with these disorders have characteristic shifts in their gut microbiome composition. Recent data suggest that alterations in gut microbial and metabolic composition may be responsible, in part, for induction of chronic inflammation, thus promoting cardiovascular disease. Common microbiome changes observed in obesity, T1DM, RA, and SLE include a decrease in the ratio of bacteria, such as Gram-positive Firmicutes to Gram-negative Bacteroidetes, as well as an overabundance or depletion of certain species, including Prevotella copri. The consequent effects of these shifts include alterations in the metabolic composition of the gut, hyper-activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), upregulation of inflammatory pathways, e.g. c-Jun N-terminal kinase and nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB), increased intestinal permeability, increased C-reactive protein, and increased levels of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). Differential microbiome compositions may also explain sex differences observed in autoimmunity, where a male gut microbiome promotes anti-inflammatory processes as compared to a female pro-inflammatory gut microbiome. Intervention at the level of the microbiota appears to attenuate symptoms in these inflammatory syndromes with probiotic treatment, such as Lactobacilli, playing a uniquely beneficial role in restoring intestinal health, decreasing inflammation, and reducing cardiovascular disease. This review will discuss obesity, T1DM, RA, and SLE in the context of how each unique microbiome profile contributes to elevated cardiovascular risk.

23 Review The complex associations between obstructive sleep apnea and auto-immune disorders: A review. 2018

Vakil, Mayand / Park, Steven / Broder, Anna. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Sleep Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, United States. Electronic address: Mayand.Vakil@gmail.com. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Sleep Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, United States. · Department of Rheumatology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, United States. ·Med Hypotheses · Pubmed #29317057.

ABSTRACT: Obstructive sleep apnea is known to be associated with diseases such as hypertension, metabolic disorder, and cancer. A more controversial and less understood association is that of sleep apneas and the development and worsening of autoimmune and rheumatologic disorders. Through the main pathways of intermittent hypoxia and sleep deprivation, we hypothesize that obstructive sleep apnea creates a chronic inflammatory state that worsens or incites autoimmune disorders. This thorough review of the available literature highlights our current understanding of the relationship between these disease processes in order to demonstrate the importance of diagnosis and appropriate management of sleep disorders in patients suffering from rheumatologic diseases.

24 Review Diseases of the lips. 2017

Greenberg, Sophie A / Schlosser, Bethanee J / Mirowski, Ginat W. ·Department of Dermatology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY. Electronic address: sophieagreenberg@gmail.com. · Women's Skin Health Program, Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL. · Department of Oral Pathology, Medicine, Radiology, Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, IN; Department of Dermatology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN. ·Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #29289276.

ABSTRACT: Heath care providers should be comfortable with normal as well as pathologic findings in the lips, because the lips are highly visible and may display clinical manifestations of local, as well as systemic inflammatory, allergic, irritant, and neoplastic alterations. Fortunately, the lips are easily accessible. The evaluation should include a careful history and physical examination, including visual inspection, as well as palpation of the lips and an examination of associated cervical, submandibular, and submental nodes. Pathologic and microscopic studies, as well as a review of medications, allergies, and habits, may further highlight possible etiologies. Many lip conditions, including premalignant changes, are relatively easy to treat, when the abnormalities are detected early; however, advanced disease and malignancies are challenging for both the patient and clinician. Treatment should be focused on eliminating potential irritants or allergens and treatment of the primary dermatosis. In this paper we review physiologic variants as well as pathologic conditions of the lips.

25 Review Human microbiome, infections, and rheumatic disease. 2017

Caminer, Ana Clara / Haberman, Rebecca / Scher, Jose U. ·Sanatorio Parque, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Rosario, Santa Fe, Argentina. · Psoriatic Arthritis Center, Division of Rheumatology, New York University Langone Health, New York, NY, USA. · Psoriatic Arthritis Center, Division of Rheumatology, New York University Langone Health, New York, NY, USA. Jose.Scher@nyumc.org. · Microbiome Center for Rheumatolgy and Autoimmunity (MiCRA), Division of Rheumatology, New York University School of Medicine and Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY, USA. Jose.Scher@nyumc.org. · Division of Rheumatology, NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, Room 1608, 301 East 17th Street, New York, NY, 10003, USA. Jose.Scher@nyumc.org. ·Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #29101674.

ABSTRACT: Microbes have coevolved with their human hosts for millions of years and are vital to their normal development and homoeostasis. It is now clear that there is direct and indirect cross talk between the microbiome and host immune responses. However, the exact mechanisms for this microbial influence in disease pathogenesis remain elusive and are now a major research focus.

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