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Rheumatoid Arthritis: HELP
Articles from Seoul area
Based on 990 articles published since 2010
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These are the 990 published articles about Arthritis, Rheumatoid that originated from Seoul area during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline 2018 update of the APLAR recommendations for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. 2019

Lau, Chak Sing / Chia, Faith / Dans, Leonila / Harrison, Andrew / Hsieh, Tsu Yi / Jain, Rahul / Jung, Seung Min / Kishimoto, Mitsumasa / Kumar, Ashok / Leong, Khai Pang / Li, Zhanguo / Lichauco, Juan Javier / Louthrenoo, Worawit / Luo, Shue Fen / Mu, Rong / Nash, Peter / Ng, Chin Teck / Suryana, Bagus / Wijaya, Linda Kurniaty / Yeap, Swan Sim. ·Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong. · Department of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Pediatrics, University of the Philippines Manila, Manila, Philippines. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology, University of the Philippines Manila, Manila, Philippines. · Department of Medicine, University of Otago Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand. · Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · Jaipur Arthritis Centre, Jaipur, India. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Immuno-Rheumatology Center, St Luke's International Hospital, St Luke's International University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Rheumatology, Fortis Flt. Lt. Rajan Dhall Hospital, New Delhi, India. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Beijing University People's Hospital, Beijing, China. · Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology Center, St. Luke's Medical Center, Quezon City, Philippines. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · Department of Rheumatology, Allergy, Immunology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. · Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Brawijaya University, Malang, Indonesia. · Sari Asih Ciputat Hospital, South Tangerang, Indonesia. · Department of Medicine, Subang Jaya Medical Centre, Subang Jaya, Malaysia. ·Int J Rheum Dis · Pubmed #30809944.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To update recommendations based on current best evidence concerning the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), focusing particularly on the role of targeted therapies, to inform clinicians on new developments that will impact their current practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A search of relevant literature from 2014 to 2016 concerning targeted therapies in RA was conducted. The RA Update Working Group evaluated the evidence and proposed updated recommendations using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations (GRADE) approach, to describe the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. Recommendations were finalized through consensus using the Delphi technique. RESULTS: This update provides 16 RA treatment recommendations based on current best evidence and expert clinical opinion. Recommendations 1-3 deal with the use of conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. The next three recommendations (4-6) cover the need for screening and management of infections and comorbid conditions prior to starting targeted therapy, while the following seven recommendations focus on use of these agents. We address choice of targeted therapy, switch, tapering and discontinuation. The last three recommendations elaborate on targeted therapy for RA in special situations such as pregnancy, cancer, and major surgery. CONCLUSION: Rheumatoid arthritis remains a significant health problem in the Asia-Pacific region. Patients with RA can benefit from the availability of effective targeted therapies, and these updated recommendations provide clinicians with guidance on their use.

2 Guideline The importance of assessment and management of morning stiffness in Asian patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Recommendations from an expert panel. 2016

Mok, Chi Chiu / Cha, Hoon Suk / Hidayat, Rudy / Nguyen, Lan Thi Ngoc / Perez, Emmanuel C / Ramachandran, Raveendran / Tsay, Gregory J / Yoo, Dae Hyun / Anonymous4890843. ·Department of Medicine, Tuen Mun Hospital, Hong Kong, China. · Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, South Korea. · Dr Ciptomangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. · Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam. · De la Salle University Medical Center, Health Science Institute, Cavite, Philippines. · Sime Darby Medical Centre, Subang Jaya, Malaysia. · Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. · Hanyang University, Seoul, South Korea. ·Int J Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26403254.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), morning stiffness is linked more to functional disability and pain than disease activity, as assessed by joint counts and markers of inflammation. As part of the Asia Pacific Morning Stiffness in Rheumatoid Arthritis Expert Panel, a group of eight rheumatologists met to formulate consensus points and develop recommendations for the assessment and management of morning stiffness in RA. METHODS: On the basis of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a panel of Asian rheumatologists formulated recommendations for the assessment and medical treatment of RA. RESULTS: The panel agreed upon 10 consensus statements on morning stiffness, its assessment and treatment. Specifically, the panel recommended that morning stiffness, pain and impaired morning function should be routinely assessed in clinical practice. Although there are currently no validated tools for these parameters, they should be assessed as part of the patients' reported outcomes in RA. The panel also agreed on the benefits of low-dose glucocorticoids in RA, particularly for the improvement of morning stiffness. CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations serve to guide rheumatologists and other stakeholders on the assessment and management of morning stiffness, and help implement the treat-to-target principle in the management of RA.

3 Guideline APLAR rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations. 2015

Lau, Chak Sing / Chia, Faith / Harrison, Andrew / Hsieh, Tsu-Yi / Jain, Rahul / Jung, Seung Min / Kishimoto, Mitsumasa / Kumar, Ashok / Leong, Khai Pang / Li, Zhanguo / Lichauco, Juan Javier / Louthrenoo, Worawit / Luo, Shue-Fen / Nash, Peter / Ng, Chin Teck / Park, Sung-Hwan / Suryana, Bagus Putu Putra / Suwannalai, Parawee / Wijaya, Linda Kurniaty / Yamamoto, Kazuhiko / Yang, Yue / Yeap, Swan Sim / Anonymous4880841. ·Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Queen Mary Hospital, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. · Department of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore City, Singapore. · Department of Medicine, University of Otago Wellington, Wellington South, New Zealand. · Section of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, and Section of Clinical Skills Training, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · Narayana Hospital, Jaipur, India. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. · Immuno-Rheumatology Center, St Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Rheumatology, Fortis Flt. Lt Rajan Dhall Hospital, New Delhi, India. · Department of Rheumatology, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, China. · St. Luke's Medical Center, Quezon City, Philippines. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · Department of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan. · Department of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore City, Singapore. · Rheumatology Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Brawijaya University, Saiful Anwar General Hospital, Malang, Indonesia. · Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Division, Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia. · Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. · Subang Jaya Medical Centre, Selangor, Malaysia. ·Int J Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26334449.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition that affects approximately 1% of the world's population. There are a wide number of guidelines and recommendations available to support the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the evidence used for these guidelines is predominantly based on studies in Caucasian subjects and may not be relevant for rheumatoid arthritis patients in the Asia-Pacific region. Therefore, the Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology established a Steering Committee in 2013 to address this issue. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The AGREE II instrument and the ADAPTE Collaboration framework were applied to systematically identify, appraise, synthesize, and adapt international rheumatoid arthritis guidelines for use in the Asia-Pacific region. RESULTS: Forty rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations, based on evidence and expert opinion, were drafted and are presented in this report. CONCLUSION: The Asia Pacific of Associations for Rheumatology rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations are intended to serve as a reference for best practice management of rheumatoid arthritis in Asia-Pacific, focusing on local issues to ensure the delivery of basic care for these patients, and to improve their outcomes. In addition, the document will serve as a reference for national rheumatology associations in Asia-Pacific for developing guidelines in their respective countries.

4 Editorial Piggybacked by PEGylation? 2018

Shin, Kichul. ·Division of Rheumatology, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. ·Korean J Intern Med · Pubmed #30396253.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Rheumatology in East Asia. 2018

Yamamoto, Kazuhiko / Song, Yeong-Wook / Li, Zhan-Guo. ·RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, 230-0045, Japan. kazuhiko.yamamoto@riken.jp. · Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, South Korea. · Peking University People's Hospital, Peking, China. ·Arthritis Res Ther · Pubmed #29566765.

ABSTRACT: Europe and North America have been leaders in rheumatology for many years. However, for more than a decade now the East Asian region has been catching up dramatically. Some aspects of rheumatology in East Asia are now almost comparable to those in the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). In this article, we describe recent progress in rheumatology in East Asia, focusing specifically on Japan, Korea, and China.

6 Editorial Editorial: Can Prevotella copri Be a Causative Pathobiont in Rheumatoid Arthritis? 2016

Kim, Donghyun / Kim, Wan-Uk. ·Center for Integrative Rheumatoid Transcriptomics and Dynamics, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Center for Integrative Rheumatoid Transcriptomics and Dynamics and The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea. wan725@catholic.ac.kr. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #27390139.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Could tofacitinib, the first oral small-molecule inhibitor proven for use in active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with insufficient response to methotrexate, be the breakthrough drug for RA? 2014

Kwok, Seung-Ki. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. ·Korean J Intern Med · Pubmed #25228832.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Proper time to initiate antiosteoporotic treatment in rheumatoid arthritis with or without glucocorticoid use. 2014

Lee, Sang-Won. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ·Korean J Intern Med · Pubmed #25045290.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial The rise of biosimilars: potential benefits and drawbacks in rheumatoid arthritis. 2014

Yoo, Dae Hyun. ·Department of Rheumatology, Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, College of Medicine, Seoul 133-792, Republic of Korea. ·Expert Rev Clin Immunol · Pubmed #24961712.

ABSTRACT: Although biologic agents are effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, the high price of drugs and restricted health care budgets have restricted easy access to biologics. Eventually, the use of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs might be inversely associated with disease activity in countries with low gross domestic product. The EMA approved an infliximab biosimilar for the first time in September 2013. The first approval of a biosimilar monoclonal antibody by a major regulatory authority provided a global standard for subsequent biosimilars and for biopharmaceutical companies developing biosimilars. Biosimilars with a highly similar quality and efficacy profile at an acceptable lower cost would significantly increase affordability of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we will review the current status of first biosimilar antibody agent and the potential discussion points raised against biosimilars. In addition, the importance of awareness on biosimilars for stakeholders is discussed.

10 Review None 2019

Lee, Joon-Il / Park, Kyoung Sun / Cho, Ik-Hyun. ·Department of Science in Korean Medicine and Brain Korea 21 Plus Program, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Korean Medicine Obstetrics & Gynecology, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Convergence Medical Science and Institute of Korean Medicine, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. ·J Ginseng Res · Pubmed #31308804.

ABSTRACT:

11 Review Era of biosimilars in rheumatology: reshaping the healthcare environment. 2019

Smolen, Josef S / Goncalves, Joao / Quinn, Mark / Benedetti, Fabrizio / Lee, Jake Yongkwon. ·Department of Medicine 3, Medizinische Universitat Wien, Wien, Austria. · iMed - Research Institute for Medicines and Pharmacy Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal. · Hull York Medical School, York Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, York, UK. · Department of Neuroscience, University of Turin Medical School, Turin, Italy. · Medical Affairs, Samsung Bioepis Co Ltd, Incheon, Korea (the Republic of). ·RMD Open · Pubmed #31245050.

ABSTRACT: Compared with the original approved biological drug on which it is based, a biosimilar has highly similar physicochemical characteristics and biological activity, as well as equivalent efficacy and no clinically meaningful differences in safety and immunogenicity. Before they are approved, biosimilars must undergo a rigorous development process using state-of-the-art technologies to establish biosimilarity to the reference biological product. After approval, biosimilars must comply with good pharmacological practices for biological drugs. Several biosimilar disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bsDMARDs) based on the tumour necrosis factor inhibitors adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab have been approved for use in patients with rheumatic diseases. Substantial cost savings can be made if biological-naive patients begin treatment with bsDMARDs, and patients receiving original biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) are switched to bsDMARDs. Despite the consistently similar efficacy, safety and immunogenicity of bsDMARDs relative to their respective original bDMARDs, switching from a reference bDMARD to a bsDMARD can result in nocebo responses, such as subjective increase of disease activity and pain-related adverse events. This may have a negative impact on adherence to bsDMARDs in clinical trials and clinical practice. To ensure optimal and rational integration of bsDMARDs into rheumatology practice and realise the full cost-saving efficacy of these drugs, rheumatologists must be aware that careful communication of the cost-saving efficacy and safety of bsDMARDs to their patients is the key to a successful long-term switch to bsDMARD therapy.

12 Review Could Polyphenols Help in the Control of Rheumatoid Arthritis? 2019

Sung, Siyun / Kwon, Doyoung / Um, Eunsik / Kim, Bonglee. ·College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Seoul 02453, Korea. stellasung95@khu.ac.kr. · College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Seoul 02453, Korea. doyoung@khu.ac.kr. · Department of Clinical Korean Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University Seoul, Seoul 02453, Korea. flare0722@khu.ac.kr. · College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Seoul 02453, Korea. bongleekim@khu.ac.kr. · Department of Pathology, College of Korean Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University Seoul, Seoul 02453, Korea. bongleekim@khu.ac.kr. ·Molecules · Pubmed #31013659.

ABSTRACT: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, joint-invading, autoimmune inflammatory disease, which causes joint cartilage breakdown and bone damage, resulting in functional impairment and deformation of the joints. The percentage of RA patients has been rising and RA represents a substantial burden for patients around the world. Despite the development of many RA therapies, because of the side effects and low effectiveness of conventional drugs, patients still need and researchers are seeking new therapeutic alternatives. Polyphenols extracted from natural products are effective on several inflammatory diseases, including RA. In this review polyphenols are classified into four types: flavonoids, phenolic acids, stilbenes and others, among which mainly flavonoids are discussed. Researchers have reported that anti-RA efficacies of polyphenols are based mainly on three mechanisms: their anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and apoptotic properties. The main RA factors modified by polyphenols are mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor κ light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). Polyphenols could be potent alternative RA therapies and sources for novel drugs for RA by affecting its key mechanisms.

13 Review Successful arthroscopic treatment of refractory and complicated popliteal cyst associated with rheumatoid arthritis in combination with osteoarthritis: case series and literature review. 2019

Yang, Jae-Hyuk / Kwon, Hyuk-Hee / Lee, Jin Kyu / Bang, So Young / Lee, Hye-Soon. ·Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Guri, South Korea. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, 153, Gyeongchunro, Guri, Gyeonggi-do, 11923, South Korea. · Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, 153, Gyeongchunro, Guri, Gyeonggi-do, 11923, South Korea. lhsberon@hanyang.ac.kr. ·Rheumatol Int · Pubmed #30976834.

ABSTRACT: Although popliteal cysts are most frequently identified in patients with osteoarthritis (OA), they may occur in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in which serious complicated cases such as cyst rupture can be developed. The objective of this study was to report four patients with RA (six knees) in combination with OA with a brief review of literature of previous similar published cases. This is a retrospective review of case records of patients with refractory and/or complicated popliteal cysts, who have successfully treated with arthroscopic intervention. We suggest that arthroscopic interventions such as radical debridement, synovectomy, biomechanical valve excision, and/or cystectomy should be considered in patients with refractory and complicated popliteal cysts associated with RA or RA in combination with OA.

14 Review A paradigm shift in studies based on rheumatoid arthritis clinical registries. 2019

Cho, Soo-Kyung / Sung, Yoon-Kyoung. ·Department of Rheumatology, Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Seoul, Korea. ·Korean J Intern Med · Pubmed #30759964.

ABSTRACT: Clinical research is the study of aspects of patient health or illness that are closely related to clinical practice. In the late 20th and early 21th century, outcomes for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) improved dramatically due to breakthroughs in new drugs. Patient-reported outcome measures now play a significant role in the drug development process as study endpoints in clinical trials of new therapies, and this has led to increased interest in the patient's perspective, drug safety and treatment outcomes in clinical practice. In accordance with these needs, many prospective cohorts for RA patients and registries of biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs have been actively conducted in the United States and European and Asian countries. A gradual shift is taking place in the major outcomes of clinical research using these prospective cohorts and registries. This article will introduce representative registries for RA in each country set up in the early 2000s and will discuss future perspectives in clinical research on RA patients using such clinical registries.

15 Review Role of IL-32 Gamma on Bone Metabolism in Autoimmune Arthritis. 2018

Kwon, Oh Chan / Kim, Soohyun / Hong, Seokchan / Lee, Chang-Keun / Yoo, Bin / Chang, Eun-Ju / Kim, Yong-Gil. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505, Korea. · Department of Biomedical Science and Technology, Konkuk University, Seoul 05066, Korea. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505, Korea. ·Immune Netw · Pubmed #29984038.

ABSTRACT: IL-32 acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine by inducing the synthesis of inflammatory molecules as well as promoting the morphological changes involved in the transformation of monocytes into osteoclasts (OCs). Evaluation of the functions of IL-32 has mainly focused on its inflammatory properties, such as involvement in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases. Recently, IL-32 was shown to be involved in bone metabolism, in which it promotes the differentiation and activation of OCs and plays a key role in bone resorption in inflammatory conditions. IL-32γ also regulates bone formation in conditions such as ankylosing spondylitis and osteoporosis. In this review, we summarize the results of recent studies on the role of IL-32γ in bone metabolism in inflammatory arthritis.

16 Review MiR-146a levels in rheumatoid arthritis and their correlation with disease activity: a meta-analysis. 2018

Bae, Sang-Cheol / Lee, Young H. ·Department of Rheumatology, Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Rheumatology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ·Int J Rheum Dis · Pubmed #29968332.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between miR-146a levels and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the correlation with RA activity. METHODS: For the meta-analysis, we searched the PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases, comparing miR-146a levels in patients with RA and controls, and correlation coefficients between miR-146a levels and Disease Activity Score for 28 joints (DAS28) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) in patients with RA. RESULTS: Fourteen studies, totaling 683 patients with RA and 477 controls, were available. miR-146a levels were significantly higher in the RA group than in the control group (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 0.546, 95% CI = 0.033-1.059, P = 0.037). Stratification by adjustment for age and/or sex revealed significantly higher miR-146a levels in the adjusted, but not in the non-adjusted group (SMD = 0.747, 95% CI = 0.094-1.400, P = 0.025; SMD = 0.431, 95% CI = -0.430-1.291, P = 0.326, respectively). Stratification by sample size showed significantly higher miR-146a levels in RA groups of large sample sizes (N ≥ 50), but not in those of small size. miR-146a levels in synovial tissue/fluid were significantly higher in the RA group than in the OA group (SMD = 1.305, 95% CI = 1010-1.639, P < 0.001). A significant positive correlation was found between miR-146a levels and ESR (correlation coefficient = 0.534, 95% CI = 0.029-0.822, P = 0.039). CONCLUSIONS: Circulating and synovial tissue/fluid miR-146a levels are high in patients with RA, and circulating miR-146a levels positively correlate with ESR.

17 Review Cardiovascular Safety of Biologics and JAK Inhibitors in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis. 2018

Kang, Eun Ha / Liao, Katherine P / Kim, Seoyoung C. ·Division of Rheumatology Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, South Korea. · Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. sykim@bwh.harvard.edu. · Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1620 Tremont Street, Suite 3030, Boston, MA, 02120, USA. sykim@bwh.harvard.edu. ·Curr Rheumatol Rep · Pubmed #29846814.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Increased cardiovascular (CV) risk and associated mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are not fully explained by traditional CV risk factors. This review discusses the epidemiology and mechanisms of increased CV risk in RA and treatment effects on CV risk focusing on biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and JAK inhibitors. RECENT FINDINGS: Intermediary metabolic changes by inflammatory cytokines are observed in body composition, lipid profile, and insulin sensitivity of RA patients, leading to accelerated atherosclerosis and increased CV risk. Successful treatment with DMARDs has shown beneficial effects on these metabolic changes and ultimately CV outcomes, in proportion to the treatment efficacy in general but also with drug-specific mechanisms. Recent data provide further information on comparative CV safety between biologic DMARDs or JAK inhibitors as well as their safety signals for non-atherosclerotic CV events. CV benefits or safety signals associated with DMARD treatments can differ despite similar drug efficacy against RA, suggesting that both anti-inflammatory and drug-specific mechanisms are involved in altering CV risk.

18 Review Comparative efficacy and safety of biosimilar-infliximab and originator-infliximab in combination with methotrexate in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. 2018

Bae, Sang-Cheol / Lee, Young Ho. ·Department of Rheumatology, Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Rheumatology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ·Int J Rheum Dis · Pubmed #29671942.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess the relative efficacy and safety of biosimilar-infliximab and originator-infliximab in combination with methotrexate (MTX) compared to placebo plus MTX in active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: We performed a Bayesian network meta-analysis to combine direct and indirect evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the efficacy and safety of biosimilar + MTX and infliximab + MTX and placebo + MTX (MTX group) in patients with active RA despite treatment with MTX. RESULTS: Seven RCts involving 2606 patients met the inclusion criteria. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR)20 response rate was significantly higher in the biosimilar + MTX group than in the MTX group (odds ratio [OR] 3.31, 95% credible interval [CrI] 1.74-6.06). Similarly, the ACR20 response rate was significantly higher in the infliximab + MTX group than in the MTX group (OR 3.15, 95% CrI 1.99-4.70). There was no difference in the ACR20 response rate between the biosimilar+ MTX and infliximab + MTX groups. Ranking probability based on surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) indicated that treatment with biosimilar + MTX had the highest probability of achieving the ACR20 response rate (SUCRA = 0.7964), followed by infliximab + MTX (SUCRA = 0.7018) and MTX alone (SUCRA = 0.0018). The ACR50 and ACR70 response rates showed a similar distribution pattern to the ACR20 response rate. By contrast, the safety based on the number of serious adverse events (SAEs) did not differ significantly among the three interventions. CONCLUSIONS: Biosimilar- and originator-infliximab, in combination with MTX, represent effective interventions for active RA, with a low risk of SAEs. No significant difference between biosimilar- and originator-infliximab was found in terms of efficacy and safety.

19 Review Structural Biology of the TNFα Antagonists Used in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis. 2018

Lim, Heejin / Lee, Sang Hyung / Lee, Hyun Tae / Lee, Jee Un / Son, Ji Young / Shin, Woori / Heo, Yong-Seok. ·Department of Chemistry, Konkuk University, 120 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 05029, Korea. gmlwls454@naver.com. · Department of Chemistry, Konkuk University, 120 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 05029, Korea. dltkdgud92@naver.com. · Department of Chemistry, Konkuk University, 120 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 05029, Korea. hst2649@naver.com. · Department of Chemistry, Konkuk University, 120 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 05029, Korea. jaspersky@naver.com. · Department of Chemistry, Konkuk University, 120 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 05029, Korea. jieyson@hanmail.net. · Department of Chemistry, Konkuk University, 120 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 05029, Korea. woolishin@nate.com. · Department of Chemistry, Konkuk University, 120 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 05029, Korea. ysheo@konkuk.ac.kr. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #29518978.

ABSTRACT: The binding of the tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) to its cognate receptor initiates many immune and inflammatory processes. The drugs, etanercept (Enbrel

20 Review Osteoporosis in Rheumatic Diseases: Anti-rheumatic Drugs and the Skeleton. 2018

Dubrovsky, Alanna M / Lim, Mie Jin / Lane, Nancy E. ·Center for Musculoskeletal Health, University of California at Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, 95817, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Inha University Hospital, Incheon, South Korea. · Center for Musculoskeletal Health, University of California at Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, 95817, USA. nelane@ucdavis.edu. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of California at Davis Medical Center, 4625 2nd Avenue, Suite 2000, Sacramento, CA, 95817, USA. nelane@ucdavis.edu. ·Calcif Tissue Int · Pubmed #29470611.

ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis in rheumatic diseases is a very well-known complication. Systemic inflammation results in both generalized and localized bone loss and erosions. Recently, increased knowledge of inflammatory process in rheumatic diseases has resulted in the development of potent inhibitors of the cytokines, the biologic DMARDs. These treatments reduce systemic inflammation and have some effect on the generalized and localized bone loss. Progression of bone erosion was slowed by TNF, IL-6 and IL-1 inhibitors, a JAK inhibitor, a CTLA4 agonist, and rituximab. Effects on bone mineral density varied between the biological DMARDs. Medications that are approved for the treatment of osteoporosis have been evaluated to prevent bone loss in rheumatic disease patients, including denosumab, cathepsin K, bisphosphonates, anti-sclerostin antibodies and parathyroid hormone (hPTH 1-34), and have some efficacy in both the prevention of systemic bone loss and reducing localized bone erosions. This article reviews the effects of biologic DMARDs on bone mass and erosions in patients with rheumatic diseases and trials of anti-osteoporotic medications in animal models and patients with rheumatic diseases.

21 Review The Tumor-Like Phenotype of Rheumatoid Synovium: Molecular Profiling and Prospects for Precision Medicine. 2018

You, Sungyong / Koh, Jung Hee / Leng, Lin / Kim, Wan-Uk / Bucala, Richard. ·Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. · The Catholic University of Korea and Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. · Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #29287304.

ABSTRACT: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by destructive hyperplasia of the synovium. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are a major component of synovial pannus and actively participate in the pathologic progression of RA. How rheumatoid FLS acquire and sustain such a uniquely aggressive phenotype remains poorly understood. We describe the current state of knowledge of the molecular alterations in rheumatoid FLS at the genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic levels, which offers a means to reconstruct the pathways leading to rheumatoid pannus. Such data provide new pathologic insight and suggest means to more sensitively assess disease activity and response to therapy, as well as support new avenues for therapeutic development.

22 Review Circulating adiponectin and visfatin levels in rheumatoid arthritis and their correlation with disease activity: A meta-analysis. 2018

Lee, Young Ho / Bae, Sang-Cheol. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Rheumatology, Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Seoul, Korea. ·Int J Rheum Dis · Pubmed #28205390.

ABSTRACT: AIM: This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between circulating adiponectin and visfatin levels and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to establish a correlation between serum adipokine levels and RA activity. METHODS: We conducted meta-analyses on serum/plasma adiponectin or visfatin levels in patients with RA and controls and correlation coefficients between circulating adiponectin and visfatin levels and Disease Activity Score of 28 joints (DAS28) in RA patients. RESULTS: Eleven studies comprising 813 RA patients and 684 controls were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that adiponectin levels were significantly higher in the RA group than in the control group (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 1.529, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.354-2.704, P = 0.011). Circulating adiponectin level was not associated with RA activity based on DAS28 and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Visfatin levels were significantly higher in the RA group than in the control group (SMD = 2.575, 95% CI: = 0.963-4.189, P = 0.002). A trend of positive correlation among circulating visfatin levels and DAS28 and CRP levels was found (correlation coefficient = 0.416, 95% CI: = -0.917 to 0.795, P = 0.177; correlation coefficient = 0.366, 95% CI: = -0.074 to 0.687, P = 0.101, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analysis demonstrated that circulating adiponectin levels were significantly higher in patients with RA than in controls. Circulating visfatin levels were significantly higher in patients with RA than in controls and a positive correlation between circulating visfatin level and RA activity is suggested.

23 Review Diagnosis and Treatment of Inflammatory Joint Disease. 2017

Kim, Yeesuk / Oh, Hyun-Cheol / Park, Jang Won / Kim, In-Sung / Kim, Jun-Young / Kim, Ki-Choul / Chae, Dong-Sik / Jo, Woo-Lam / Song, Joo-Hyoun. ·Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Orthopedic Surgery, National Health Insurance Service Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea. · Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ewha Womans University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hallym University Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Hwaseong, Korea. · Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea. · Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan, Korea. · Department of Orthopedic Surgery, International St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Incheon, Korea. · Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The Catholic University of Korea, St. Vincent's Hospital, Suwon, Korea. ·Hip Pelvis · Pubmed #29250494.

ABSTRACT: Arthritis damages the cartilage within joints, resulting in degenerative changes, including loss of function and joint instability. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the spine and bone-to-tendon attachment area within the sacroiliac joint leading to back pain and progressive spinal stiffness. In the final stages, AS causes hyperkyphosis-a condition closely tied to the human leukocyte antigen-B27 gene. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, systemic autoimmune disease characterized by the simultaneous inflammation of the synovium of multiple joints, leading to joint damage (e.g., destruction, deformation and disability). In the past, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARDs) have been used for the treatment of these autoimmune diseases, but biologic DMARDs have recently been introduced with excellent results. Gout is a chronic inflammatory disease that causes an alteration of joints resulting in severe pain. Specifically, gout is associated with an accumulation of uric acid within the body resulting from dysregulated purine metabolism, causing recurrent paroxysmal inflammation in the joints. Allopurinol and febuxostat are the primary treatment options for individuals with gout. It is necessary to have an accurate understanding of the pathogenesis, pathological ecology and treatment of AS, rheumatoid arthritis, and gouty arthritis, which are the representative diseases that may cause inflammatory arthritis.

24 Review Comparative effectiveness of the biosimilar CT-P13. 2017

Yoo, Dae Hyun. ·Department of Rheumatology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Hanyang University, 222-1 Wangsimni-ro Seongdong-gu, Seoul, 04763, Korea. ·J Comp Eff Res · Pubmed #29172717.

ABSTRACT: The first biosimilar infliximab, CT-P13 (infliximab-dyyb) has been used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases for 4 years. CT-P13 has highly similar efficacy and safety profiles with a lower price than the originator infliximab and has been approved in 81 countries. Despite approval for clinical use, some knowledge gaps still limit the widespread and pertinent use of biosimilar CT-P13. One of the most important factors for proper utilization of CT-P13 for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases is confidence in CT-P13, which could be enhanced by scientific evidence supporting the biosimilarity of CT-P13. Overall, five randomized controlled studies have been performed. For the other extrapolated indications, many observational induction and switching studies also support the utility of CT-P13 in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Here, we review profiles of CT-P13 including physicochemical properties, clinical efficacy and safety data in all indications and current status.

25 Review Arthroscopic Synovectomy of Wrist in Rheumatoid Arthritis. 2017

Shim, Jae Woo / Park, Min Jong. ·Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 06351, Republic of Korea. · Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 06351, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: mjp3506@skku.edu. ·Hand Clin · Pubmed #28991588.

ABSTRACT: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple joints. Wrist involvement is common. Patients with persistent symptoms despite medical management are candidates for surgery. Synovectomy can provide pain relief and functional improvement for rheumatoid wrist. Arthroscopic synovectomy is a safe and reliable method, with minimal postoperative morbidity. This article reviews the role, technique, and results of arthroscopic synovectomy in the rheumatoid wrist.

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