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Rheumatoid Arthritis: HELP
Articles from Shanghai
Based on 310 articles published since 2008
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These are the 310 published articles about Arthritis, Rheumatoid that originated from Shanghai during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13
1 Review The Effect of Triptolide in Rheumatoid Arthritis: From Basic Research towards Clinical Translation. 2018

Fan, Danping / Guo, Qingqing / Shen, Jiawen / Zheng, Kang / Lu, Cheng / Zhang, Ge / Lu, Aiping / He, Xiaojuan. ·Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China. fdp0406@gmail.com. · Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China. qingqingguo@hkbu.edu.hk. · Law Sau Fai Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone and Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong. qingqingguo@hkbu.edu.hk. · Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China. shenjiawen23@gmail.com. · School of Life Sciences and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, China. shenjiawen23@gmail.com. · Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China. zhengkang@hkbu.edu.hk. · Law Sau Fai Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone and Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong. zhengkang@hkbu.edu.hk. · Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China. lcheng0816@gmail.com. · Law Sau Fai Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone and Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong. zhangge@hkbu.edu.hk. · Law Sau Fai Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone and Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong. aipinglu@hkbu.edu.hk. · School of Basic Medical Sciences, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China. aipinglu@hkbu.edu.hk. · Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700, China. hxjuan19@gmail.com. · Law Sau Fai Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone and Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong. hxjuan19@gmail.com. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #29373547.

ABSTRACT: Triptolide (TP), a major extract of the herb

2 Review Acquired Gitelman syndrome in a primary Sjögren syndrome patient with a SLC12A3 heterozygous mutation: A case report and literature review. 2017

Gu, Xiangchen / Su, Zheling / Chen, Min / Xu, Yanqiu / Wang, Yi. ·Department of Nephrology, Yueyang Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China. ·Nephrology (Carlton) · Pubmed #28685938.

ABSTRACT: Acquired Gitelman's syndrome (GS) associated with Sjögren syndrome (SS) is rare. A 50-year-old woman was admitted to our department because of nausea, acratia and sicca complex. Laboratory tests after admission showed renal failure, hypokalaemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesaemia and hypocalciuria, all of which met the diagnostic criteria for GS. Diagnostic evaluation identified primary SS as the cause of the acquired GS. Light microscopy of the renal tissue from the patient showed severe membranoproliferative glomerunephritis and tubulointerstitial nephritis. Immunohistochemical staining of the renal tissue showed the absence of sodium-chloride co-transporter (NCCT) in distal convoluted tubules. Genetic analysis of chromosomal DNA extracted from the patient's peripheral blood showed SLC12A3 gene heterozygous mutation. The reported case was comprehensively analyzed on the basis of the clinical features, and laboratory, pathological and genetic test findings. The patient has achieved a complete remission after meticulous care and appropriate treatment.

3 Review Vaccinations and risk of systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Wang, Bin / Shao, Xiaoqing / Wang, Dan / Xu, Donghua / Zhang, Jin-An. ·Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 201508, China; Department of Endocrinology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 201508, China. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050017, China; Department of Library, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050017, China. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, The Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang 261000, China. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 201508, China; Department of Endocrinology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 201508, China. Electronic address: zhangjinan@hotmail.com. ·Autoimmun Rev · Pubmed #28483543.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In the past several years, more and more studies proposed some concerns on the possibly increased risk of autoimmune diseases in individuals receiving vaccinations, but published studies on the associations of vaccinations with risks of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) reported conflicting findings. A systematic review and meta-analysis was carried out to comprehensively evaluate the relationship between vaccinations and risk of SLE and RA. METHODS: Pubmed, Web of Science and Embase were searched for observational studies assessing the associations of vaccinations with risks of RA and SLE. Two authors independently extracted data from those eligible studies. The quality of eligible studies was assessed by using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). The pooled relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was used to measure the risk of RA and SLE associated with vaccinations, and was calculated through random-effect meta-analysis. RESULTS: Sixteen observational studies were finally considered eligible, including 12 studies on the association between vaccinations and SLE risk and 13 studies on the association between vaccinations and RA risk. The pooled findings suggested that vaccinations significantly increased risk of SLE (RR=1.50; 95%CI 1.05-2.12, P=0.02). In addition, there was an obvious association between vaccinations and increased risk of RA (RR=1.32; 95%CI 1.09-1.60, P=0.004). Meta-analysis of studies reporting outcomes of short vaccinated time also suggested that vaccinations could significantly increase risk of SLE (RR=1.93; 95%CI 1.07-3.48, P=0.028) and RA (RR=1.48; 95%CI 1.08-2.03, P=0.015). Sensitivity analyses in studies with low risk of bias also found obvious associations of vaccinations with increased risk of RA and SLE. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that vaccinations are related to increased risks of SLE and RA. More and larger observational studies are needed to further verify the findings above and to assess the associations of vaccinations with other rheumatic diseases.

4 Review Systematic review of the methodological quality of controlled trials evaluating Chinese herbal medicine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. 2017

Pan, Xin / Lopez-Olivo, Maria A / Song, Juhee / Pratt, Gregory / Suarez-Almazor, Maria E. ·Department of Rheumatology, Shuguang Hospital affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Department of General Internal Medicine, Rheumatology Section, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Research Medical Library, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #28249848.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We appraised the methodological and reporting quality of randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating the efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). DESIGN: For this systematic review, electronic databases were searched from inception until June 2015. The search was limited to humans and non-case report studies, but was not limited by language, year of publication or type of publication. Two independent reviewers selected RCTs, evaluating CHM in RA (herbals and decoctions). Descriptive statistics were used to report on risk of bias and their adherence to reporting standards. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to determine study characteristics associated with high or unclear risk of bias. RESULTS: Out of 2342 unique citations, we selected 119 RCTs including 18 919 patients: 10 108 patients received CHM alone and 6550 received one of 11 treatment combinations. A high risk of bias was observed across all domains: 21% had a high risk for selection bias (11% from sequence generation and 30% from allocation concealment), 85% for performance bias, 89% for detection bias, 4% for attrition bias and 40% for reporting bias. In multivariable analysis, fewer authors were associated with selection bias (allocation concealment), performance bias and attrition bias, and earlier year of publication and funding source not reported or disclosed were associated with selection bias (sequence generation). Studies published in non-English language were associated with reporting bias. Poor adherence to recommended reporting standards (<60% of the studies not providing sufficient information) was observed in 11 of the 23 sections evaluated. LIMITATIONS: Study quality and data extraction were performed by one reviewer and cross-checked by a second reviewer. Translation to English was performed by one reviewer in 85% of the included studies. CONCLUSIONS: Studies evaluating CHM often fail to meet expected methodological criteria, and high-quality evidence is lacking.

5 Review HLA-DRB1 shared epitope allele polymorphisms and rheumatoid arthritis: a systemic review and meta-analysis. 2016

Liu, Wen-Xin / Jiang, Yao / Hu, Qing-Xiang / You, Xie-Bo. ·Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou, China · Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai, 200233, China ·Clin Invest Med · Pubmed #27917778.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: A meta-analysis was preformed to determine which HLA-DRB1 alleles are associated with increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Asian patients. METHODS: Medline, PubMed, Central, EMBASE, Cochrane, and Google Scholar databases were searched until November 3, 2015 using the following keywords: rheumatoid arthritis; RA, HLA-DRB1; severity; treatment; and, prognosis. Randomized-controlled-trials, prospective, retrospective, cohort and case-controlled studies that examined the HLA-DRB1 allelic association with RA in Asians were included. The frequencies of allelic types and the shared epitope (SE) were compared between patients with or without RA. RESULTS: A total of 331 articles were identified after duplicates removed, and 40 studies, with 5470 RA patients and 5837 control patients, were included in the analysis. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) revealed the frequencies of HLA-DRB1*04 and *10 were higher in the RA group, and the frequency of *14 was lower in the RA group as compared to controls (*04: OR = 3.35, 95% CI: 2.28-3.99, p < .001; *10: OR = 2.08, 95% CI: 1.55-2.78, p < .001; *14: OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.54-0.90, p = .006). No associations were noted for *01 and *09. Pooled ORs revealed associations of *0101 (OR = 1.58), *0401 (OR = 2.17), *0404 (OR = 1.91), *0405 (OR = 3.73), *0410 (OR = 2.24), *1001 (OR = 1.78) and SE positive (OR = 2.38) with RA. HLA-DRB1 *14 subtypes did not show associations with RA. CONCLUSIONS: HLA-DRB1 allelic variations are associated with RA in Asian patients.

6 Review Role of CX3CL1 in Diseases. 2016

Liu, WangMi / Jiang, Libo / Bian, Chong / Liang, Yun / Xing, Rong / Yishakea, Mumingjiang / Dong, Jian. ·Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 180 Fenglin Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. · Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 180 Fenglin Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. dong.jian@zs-hospital.sh.cn. ·Arch Immunol Ther Exp (Warsz) · Pubmed #27098399.

ABSTRACT: Chemokines are a family of small 8-10 kDa inducible cytokines. Initially characterized as chemotactic factors, they are now considered to affect not just cellular recruitment. CX3CL1 is a unique chemokine that can exist in a soluble form, as a chemotactic cytokine, or in a membrane-attached form that acts as a binding molecule. Recently, the effects of CX3CL1 on diseases, such as inflammation and cancer, have been supported and confirmed by numerous publications. However, due to its dual effects, CX3CL1 exerts numerous effects on pathophysiological conditions that have both negative and positive consequences on pathogenesis and outcome. This review article summarizes the important scientific and clinical data that now point to a critical role for CX3CL1 in diseases.

7 Review Effects of tofacitinib and other DMARDs on lipid profiles in rheumatoid arthritis: implications for the rheumatologist. 2016

Charles-Schoeman, Christina / Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A / Kaplan, Irina / Boy, Mary / Geier, Jamie / Luo, Zhen / Zuckerman, Andrea / Riese, Richard. ·University of California, Los Angeles, CA. Electronic address: CCharles@mednet.ucla.edu. · Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, IDIVAL, Santander, Spain. · Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT. · Pfizer Inc., New York, NY. · Pfizer Inc., Shanghai, China. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #27079757.

ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality are increased in patients with active, untreated rheumatoid arthritis (RA), despite lower levels of total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reported in individuals with active RA compared with those without RA. Alterations in non-traditional lipid assessments, such as high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function and HDL-associated proteins, have been described in patients with active RA, including elevated HDL-associated serum amyloid A and decreased paraoxonase-1 activity. We review changes in both traditional lipoprotein concentrations and non-traditional lipoprotein assessments in multiple studies of treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), including non-biologic and biologic DMARDs and tofacitinib. In addition, data from a recently published clinical trial with tofacitinib that describe a potential mechanism for suppression of cholesterol levels in active RA patients are reviewed. Finally, CV event data from various studies of DMARDs are presented, and the current management of RA patients with regard to the CV risk is reviewed.

8 Review Molecular Insight into Gut Microbiota and Rheumatoid Arthritis. 2016

Wu, Xiaohao / He, Bing / Liu, Jin / Feng, Hui / Ma, Yinghui / Li, Defang / Guo, Baosheng / Liang, Chao / Dang, Lei / Wang, Luyao / Tian, Jing / Zhu, Hailong / Xiao, Lianbo / Lu, Cheng / Lu, Aiping / Zhang, Ge. ·Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone & Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. wxho0606@163.com. · Institute of Integrated Bioinformedicine and Translational Science, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. wxho0606@163.com. · Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone & Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. hebinghb@gmail.com. · Institute of Integrated Bioinformedicine and Translational Science, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. hebinghb@gmail.com. · Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone & Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. liujin_hkbu@163.com. · Institute of Integrated Bioinformedicine and Translational Science, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. liujin_hkbu@163.com. · Guanghua Integrative Hospital, Shanghai 200000, China. 13816671472@163.com. · Institute of Arthritis Research, Shanghai Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Shanghai 200000, China. 13816671472@163.com. · Guanghua Integrative Hospital, Shanghai 200000, China. mayinghui021@126.com. · Institute of Arthritis Research, Shanghai Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Shanghai 200000, China. mayinghui021@126.com. · Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone & Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. lidefang@163.com. · Institute of Integrated Bioinformedicine and Translational Science, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. lidefang@163.com. · Research Group of Bone and Joint Diseases, HKBU Institute of Science & Technology, Haimen 226100, China. lidefang@163.com. · Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone & Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. borisguo@hkbu.edu.hk. · Institute of Integrated Bioinformedicine and Translational Science, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. borisguo@hkbu.edu.hk. · Research Group of Bone and Joint Diseases, HKBU Institute of Science & Technology, Haimen 226100, China. borisguo@hkbu.edu.hk. · Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone & Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. liangchao512@163.com. · Institute of Integrated Bioinformedicine and Translational Science, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. liangchao512@163.com. · Research Group of Bone and Joint Diseases, HKBU Institute of Science & Technology, Haimen 226100, China. liangchao512@163.com. · Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone & Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. danglei_hkbu@163.com. · Institute of Integrated Bioinformedicine and Translational Science, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. danglei_hkbu@163.com. · Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone & Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. luyaoben@126.com. · Institute of Integrated Bioinformedicine and Translational Science, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. luyaoben@126.com. · Institute of Arthritis Research, Shanghai Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Shanghai 200000, China. 14441098@life.hkbu.edu.hk. · Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone & Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. hlzhu@hkbu.edu.hk. · Institute of Integrated Bioinformedicine and Translational Science, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. hlzhu@hkbu.edu.hk. · Guanghua Integrative Hospital, Shanghai 200000, China. 13701888178@163.com. · Institute of Arthritis Research, Shanghai Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Shanghai 200000, China. 13701888178@163.com. · Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone & Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. lv_cheng0816@163.com. · Institute of Integrated Bioinformedicine and Translational Science, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. lv_cheng0816@163.com. · Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100000, China. lv_cheng0816@163.com. · Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone & Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. aipinglu@hkbu.edu.hk. · Institute of Integrated Bioinformedicine and Translational Science, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. aipinglu@hkbu.edu.hk. · Guanghua Integrative Hospital, Shanghai 200000, China. aipinglu@hkbu.edu.hk. · Institute of Arthritis Research, Shanghai Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Shanghai 200000, China. aipinglu@hkbu.edu.hk. · Research Group of Bone and Joint Diseases, HKBU Institute of Science & Technology, Haimen 226100, China. aipinglu@hkbu.edu.hk. · Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100000, China. aipinglu@hkbu.edu.hk. · Institute for Advancing Translational Medicine in Bone & Joint Diseases, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. zhangge@hkbu.edu.hk. · Institute of Integrated Bioinformedicine and Translational Science, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, China. zhangge@hkbu.edu.hk. · Institute of Arthritis Research, Shanghai Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Shanghai 200000, China. zhangge@hkbu.edu.hk. · Research Group of Bone and Joint Diseases, HKBU Institute of Science & Technology, Haimen 226100, China. zhangge@hkbu.edu.hk. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #27011180.

ABSTRACT: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, inflammatory, and autoimmune disorder. Gut microbiota play an important role in the etiology of RA. With the considerable progress made in next-generation sequencing techniques, the identified gut microbiota difference between RA patients and healthy individuals provides an updated overview of the association between gut microbiota and RA. We reviewed the reported correlation and underlying molecular mechanisms among gut microbiota, the immune system, and RA. It has become known that gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of RA via multiple molecular mechanisms. The progressive understanding of the dynamic interaction between gut microbiota and their host will help in establishing a highly individualized management for each RA patient, and achieve a better efficacy in clinical practice, or even discovering new drugs for RA.

9 Review The Risk of Tuberculosis in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated with Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antagonist: A Metaanalysis of Both Randomized Controlled Trials and Registry/Cohort Studies. 2015

Ai, Jing-Wen / Zhang, Shu / Ruan, Qiao-Ling / Yu, Yi-Qi / Zhang, Bing-Yan / Liu, Qi-Hui / Zhang, Wen-Hong. ·From the Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.J.W. Ai, MD, Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University; S. Zhang, MD, PhD, Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University; Q.L. Ruan, MD, Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University; Y.Q. Yu, MD, Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University; B.Y. Zhang, MD, Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University; Q.H. Liu, MD, Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University; W.H. Zhang, MD, PhD, Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #26472414.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) antagonists have significantly improved treatment results in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but have also increased the risk of tuberculosis (TB). Etanercept (ETN), adalimumab (ADA), infliximab (IFX), golimumab, and certolizumab pegol are the 5 drugs currently available on the market. This article aimed to evaluate the risk of TB infection from these 5 drugs for patients with RA. METHODS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, COCHRANE library, OVID, and EBSCO for randomized controlled trials (RCT) of TNF-α antagonist versus control and registry/longitudinal cohort studies of 1 TNF-α antagonist versus another. The Mantel-Haenszel test was adopted to analyze risk ratio (RR) in this metaanalysis. RESULTS: Fifty RCT and 13 non-RCT were included in this study. No significant difference in TB risk was found in the RCT because of the short observational periods. In the non-RCT, TNF-α antagonist was associated with a higher TB risk in patients with RA (RR 4.03, 95% CI 2.36-6.88), and the TB incidence rates of IFX and ADA were 2.78 and 3.88 times, respectively, higher than that of ETN. Further, preventive treatment for latent TB infection (LTBI) was shown to reduce the TB risk by 65% (RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.15-0.82). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated a significant increase in TB risk in patients with RA treated with TNF-α antagonists; among them, ETN is least likely to cause active TB. The study also proposes the necessity of LTBI prophylaxis in patients with RA.

10 Review SOCS3 and its role in associated diseases. 2015

Yin, Yanlin / Liu, Weiwei / Dai, Yalei. ·Department of Immunology, Tongji University School of Medicine, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092, China. · Department of Immunology, Tongji University School of Medicine, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092, China. Electronic address: daiyl@tongji.edu.cn. ·Hum Immunol · Pubmed #26429311.

ABSTRACT: Cell-cell communication depends on cytokine and growth factor network. Bound to their receptors on the surface of target cell, these glycoproteins initiate a range of intracellular events. Subsequent dissipation of receptor signaling is essential to ensure the response of the cell does not become pathogenic. The Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are a family of proteins induced to attenuate cytokine signal transduction in response to signals from a diverse range of cytokines and growth factors. Current evidence indicates that intracellular JAK-STAT (Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription) signaling not only governs cytokine-induced immunological responses but also rapidly initiates SOCS expression and its biological functions. This review focuses on current understanding of SOCS3, a member of SOCS family. SOCS3 binds to JAK, certain cytokine receptors in intracellular domain, and some signaling molecules, which results in suppressing further signaling events in the cell. Studies using conditional knockout mice have shown that SOCS3 protein is the key physiological regulator and plays an important pathological role in immune homeostasis. Dysregulation of SOCS3 functions can cause a variety of diseases, including allergy, autoimmune diseases, inflammation and cancer.

11 Review Breastfeeding and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Metaanalysis. 2015

Chen, Haiyan / Wang, Jing / Zhou, Wang / Yin, Huabin / Wang, Meimei. ·From the Division of Rheumatology, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing; Department of Anatomy and Histoembryology, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou; Department of Bone Tumor Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.H. Chen, MM, Division of Rheumatology, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University; J. Wang, MD, Department of Anatomy and Histoembryology, Xuzhou Medical College, and Department of Bone Tumor Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University; W. Zhou, PhD; H. Yin, PhD, Department of Bone Tumor Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University; M. Wang, MM, Division of Rheumatology, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #26178286.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have examined the association between breastfeeding and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but their results were inconsistent. The aim of this study was to perform a metaanalysis to clarify the effect of breastfeeding on RA risk. METHODS: The PubMed, EMBASE, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang databases were searched for relevant studies published up to September 10, 2014. Data were extracted, and multivariable-adjusted OR with 95% CI were pooled in the random-effects model. RESULTS: A total of 6 studies were included in the metaanalysis (RA cases: 1672, sample size: 143,670). Overall, an inverse association between breastfeeding and RA was observed (OR 0.675, 95% CI 0.493-0.924, p = 0.014). In the subgroup analysis, decreased RA risk was also found in both breastfeeding 1-12 months (OR 0.783, 95% CI 0.641-0.957, p = 0.015) and breastfeeding > 12 months (OR 0.579, 95% CI 0.462-0.726, p < 0.0005). Sensitivity analysis and cumulative analysis further strengthened the validity of the results. No publication bias was found in this metaanalysis. CONCLUSION: This metaanalysis suggests that breastfeeding is associated with a lower risk of RA, no matter if breastfeeding time is longer or shorter than 12 months.

12 Review Cardiac arrhythmias as the initial manifestation of adult primary Sjögren's syndrome: a case report and literature review. 2015

Liang, Minrui / Bao, Liwen / Xiong, Nanqing / Jin, Bo / Ni, Huanchun / Zhang, Jinjin / Zou, Hejian / Luo, Xinping / Li, Jian. ·Division of Rheumatology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. · Institute of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. · Department of Cardiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. ·Int J Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26171561.

ABSTRACT: Two middle-aged female patients presenting with heart palpitation and electrocardiogram revealed complex cardiac arrhythmias. A review of systems was positive for dry mouth and transient arthralgia, while laboratory and instrumental tests enabled us to make the diagnosis of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Cardiac electrophysiology revealed atrioventricular node dysfunction and impaired intraventricular conduction. Prednisone therapy induced a significant improvement in symptoms and electrocardiographic readings. The diagnosis of pSS should be considered in a patient presenting with complex cardiac arrhythmias.

13 Review Anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory functions of artemisinin and its derivatives. 2015

Shi, Chenchen / Li, Haipeng / Yang, Yifu / Hou, Lifei. ·Laboratory of Immunology and Virology, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Department of Orthopedics, Beijing Army General Hospital, Beijing, China. · Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital and Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ·Mediators Inflamm · Pubmed #25960615.

ABSTRACT: Artemisinin and its derivatives are widely used in the world as the first-line antimalarial drug. Recently, growing evidences reveal that artemisinin and its derivatives also possess potent anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory properties. Meanwhile, researchers around the world are still exploring the unknown bioactivities of artemisinin derivatives. In this review, we provide a comprehensive discussion on recent advances of artemisinin derivatives affecting inflammation and autoimmunity, the underlying molecular mechanisms, and also drug development of artemisinins beyond antimalarial functions.

14 Review Mast cell and autoimmune diseases. 2015

Xu, Yunzhi / Chen, Guangjie. ·Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Immunology, Shanghai 200025, China. ·Mediators Inflamm · Pubmed #25944979.

ABSTRACT: Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases.

15 Review Body mass index and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis. 2015

Qin, Baodong / Yang, Min / Fu, Haitao / Ma, Ning / Wei, Tingting / Tang, Qingqin / Hu, Zhide / Liang, Yan / Yang, Zaixing / Zhong, Renqian. ·Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai, 200003, China. qbdchn11@126.com. · Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai, 200003, China. yangmin_0213@163.com. · Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 310000, China. yangmin_0213@163.com. · Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai, 200003, China. fuhaotao@hotmail.com. · Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai, 200003, China. mamimg@sina.com. · Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai, 200003, China. 935932100@qq.com. · Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai, 200003, China. 632175323@qq.com. · Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai, 200003, China. hzdlj81@163.com. · Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai, 200003, China. liangyan0829@163.com. · Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai, 200003, China. yangzaixingdiyi@163.com. · Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai, 200003, China. 13901628473@163.com. ·Arthritis Res Ther · Pubmed #25890172.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The evidence from published studies on the association between obesity and rheumatoid arthritis has been contradictory. To clarify the association between obesity and rheumatoid arthritis, we conducted a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis to assess the relationship between body mass index and rheumatoid arthritis risk. METHODS: A systematic literature search of PubMed and Embase (up to 12 July 2014) was performed to identify all eligible published reports. The pooled relative risk results with corresponding 95% confidence intervals of rheumatoid arthritis development were estimated using a random-effects model. RESULTS: Eleven eligible related citations fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Compared with individuals with a body mass index under 30, obese individuals showed an association with a significantly increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis (relative risk = 1.25, 95% confidence interval: 1.07 to 1.45, P heterogeneity <0.01, I(2) = 63%). Compared to normal weight subjects, the pooled relative risks for rheumatoid arthritis were 1.31 (1.12 to 1.53) and 1.15 (1.03 to 1.29) for the categories of obese and overweight, respectively. In the dose-response analysis, there was evidence of a nonlinear association (P nonlinear = 0.005) and the estimated summary relative risk for a 5-unit increment was 1.03 (95% confidence interval: 1.01 to 1.05, P heterogeneity = 0.001, I(2) = 70.0%). CONCLUSIONS: An increase in body mass index can contribute to a higher risk for rheumatoid arthritis development. However, the finding also highlights the need for research on the association between body mass index and rheumatoid arthritis risk with adjustment for more confounding factors.

16 Review The endocannabinoid system and its therapeutic implications in rheumatoid arthritis. 2015

Gui, Huan / Tong, Qiang / Qu, Wenchun / Mao, Chen-Mei / Dai, Sheng-Ming. ·Department of Pharmacy, Children's Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, China; Department of Rheumatology & Immunology, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China. · Department of Rheumatology & Immunology, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China. · Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; Division of Pain Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Pharmacy, Children's Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, China. Electronic address: maocm68@163.com. · Department of Rheumatology & Immunology, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: dsm@medmail.com.cn. ·Int Immunopharmacol · Pubmed #25791728.

ABSTRACT: Since the discovery of the endogenous receptor for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, a main constituent of marijuana, the endocannabinoid system (comprising cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, as well as the enzymes involved in their metabolic processes) has been implicated as having multiple regulatory functions in many central and peripheral conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease that is associated with the involvement of many kinds of cells (such as fibroblastlike synoviocytes [FLSs], osteoclasts, T cells, B cells, and macrophages) and molecules (such as interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, matrix metalloproteinases [MMPs], and chemokines). Increasing evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system, especially cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), has an important role in the pathophysiology of RA. Many members of the endocannabinoid system are reported to inhibit synovial inflammation, hyperplasia, and cartilage destruction in RA. In particular, specific activation of CB2 may relieve RA by inhibiting not only the production of autoantibodies, proinflammatory cytokines, and MMPs, but also bone erosion, immune response mediated by T cells, and the proliferation of FLSs. In this review, we will discuss the possible functions of the endocannabinoid system in the modulation of RA, which may be a potential target for treatment.

17 Review Diabetes mellitus risk factors in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2015

Jiang, Ping / Li, Hao / Li, Xiao. ·Shandong University of Tranditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, China. · Department of Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated First People's Hospital, Shanghai, China. · The Affiliated Hospital of Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, China. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #25535750.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the occurrence of diabetes mellitus (DM). METHODS: A meta-analysis was conducted to explore the risk of DM in RA patients. All relevant studies were identified by searching PUBMED, EMBASE and MEDLINE database prior to 1 January 2014. Pooled risk estimates were calculated with random-effects models using STATA 11.0. RESULTS: A total of 11 case-control studies and 8 cohort studies were included in the final analysis. The pooled risk estimate of 11 case-control studies showed a statistically significant increased risk of DM prevalence among RA individuals (OR=1.40, 95% CI: 1.34-1.47). The pooled risk estimate of 8 cohort studies also showed a statistically significant increasing risk of DM (RR=1.43, 95%CI: 1.38-1.47). In a subgroup analysis for case-control studies, the pooled risk estimate of individuals with RA increased the incidence of T1DM (type 1 diabetes mellitus) and the incidence of T2DM (type 2 diabetes mellitus) (OR, 4.78 vs. 1.41). In a subgroup analysis for cohort studies, RA was also found to have a statistically significant increasing risk of T2DM (RR=1.24, 95%CI: 1.14-1.35). Begg funnel plot and Egger test showed no evidence of publication bias. CONCLUSIONS: RA is associated with increased risk of DM, including T1DM and T2DM.

18 Review The impact of statins therapy on disease activity and inflammatory factor in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a meta-analysis. 2015

Lv, Shunzeng / Liu, Yuting / Zou, Zhigeng / Li, Fei / Zhao, Shigang / Shi, Ranran / Bian, Ruixiang / Tian, Hua. ·Institute of Anatomy & Histology and Embryology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong, China. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · Cancer Institute & Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. ·Clin Exp Rheumatol · Pubmed #25327393.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Statin is the most widely used as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, and contributes to clinically significant vascular risk reduction. However, the role of statins in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) immunomodulation is debatable. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the efficacy of statins therapy in RA patients. METHODS: A structured literature search was undertaken to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in RA patients receiving either statins or control. A meta-analysis on standardised mean difference (SMD) with a 95% confidence interval (95%CI) was conducted. RESULTS: We included 15 studies with a total of 992 patients (487 patients allocated to statins therapy). Our data revealed statins can attenuate disease activity markedly. Overall, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) declined significantly during the treatment (n=12, SMD: -2.222, 95%CI: -2.404, -2.040, p=0.000; n=14, SMD: -3.014, 95%CI: -3.207, -2.821, p=0.000), among which ESR and CRP decreased obviously at 12 months (n=5, SMD: -2.874, 95%CI: -3.224, -2.523, p=0.000; n=7, SMD: -3.970, 95%CI: -4.300, -3.641, p=0.000; respectively). As expected, the tender joint count (TJC) and swollen joint count (SJC) also fell (n=9, SMD: -2.005, 95% CI: -2.216, -1.794; p=0.000; n=10, SMD: -1.76, 95%CI: -1.948, -1.577; p=0.000; respectively). Besides, morning stiffness was attenuated (n=5, SMD: -1.242, 95%CI: -1.474, -1.011, p=0.000), and showed no significant differences between 12 months and 24 months (p=0.205). Notably, statins indeed potently down-regulate inflammatory factors TNF-α (n=7, SMD: -4.290, 95%CI: -4.659, -3.922; p=0.000), IL-1 (n=4, SMD: -1.324, 95%CI: -1.646, -1.003; p=0.000), and IL-6 (n=10, SMD: -1.652, 95%CI: -1.822, -1.482; p=0.000). No publication bias was observed across all studies based on the Begg and Egger test. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis demonstrates the pleiotropic effects of statins on ameliorating RA activity and mediating clinically apparent anti-inflammatory effects in the context of RA autoimmune inflammation, which make it recommended as a potent treatment for RA patients.

19 Review Epidemiology of primary Sjögren's syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2015

Qin, Baodong / Wang, Jiaqi / Yang, Zaixing / Yang, Min / Ma, Ning / Huang, Fenglou / Zhong, Renqian. ·Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China. · Department of Stomatology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China. · Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, 85 Hospital Of People's Liberation Army, Shanghai, China. · Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China Naval Convalescent Department, Hangzhou Sanatorium, Nanjing Military District, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #24938285.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Epidemiological studies of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) are crucial for describing the burden to society and the public medical system and for shedding light on aetiology. Previous reports of the epidemiology of pSS show variable outcomes. We conducted a systematic review of the epidemiology of pSS to assess the prevalence rates (PRs) and incidence rates (IRs), and to investigate possible geographic variations in pSS. METHODS: A systematic literature search of PubMed and Embase (updated to 22 October 2013) was performed to identify all published reports on the epidemiology of pSS. The incidence and prevalence rates of pSS were summarised with IRs or PRs and 95% CIs. RESULTS: The literature search yielded 1880 related citations. Only 21 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. According to a random-effects model, the pooled IR for pSS was 6.92 (95% CI 4.98 to 8.86) per 100 000 person-years. The overall PR was 60.82 (95% CI 43.69 to 77.94) cases per 100 000 inhabitants with a slightly lower estimate of Baodong Qin is BDQ, Jiaqi Wang is JQW, Zaixing Yang is ZXY, Renqian Zhong is RQZ. 43.03 (25.74 to 60.31) cases per 100 000 inhabitants when only considering population-based studies. The female/male ratio in incidence data was 9.15 (95% CI 3.35 to 13.18). The female/male ratio in prevalence data was 10.72 (95% CI 7.35 to 15.62). The overall age of pSS patients was 56.16 years (95% CI 52.54 to 59.78). CONCLUSIONS: Incidence and prevalence rates of pSS vary widely around the world. The results help us better understand the global epidemiology of pSS. Large population-based studies combining meticulous case-finding and case-ascertainment strategies are needed.

20 Review Percutaneous vertebroplasty of the entire thoracic and lumbar vertebrae for vertebral compression fractures related to chronic glucocorticosteriod use: case report and review of literature. 2014

Tian, Qing-Hua / Wu, Chun-Gen / Xiao, Quan-Ping / He, Cheng-Jian / Gu, Yi-Feng / Wang, Tao / Li, Ming-Hua. ·Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai 200233, China. ·Korean J Radiol · Pubmed #25469092.

ABSTRACT: Glucocorticosteroid-induced osteoporosis is the most frequent of all secondary types of osteoporosis, and can increase the risk of vertebral compression fractures (VCFs). There are promising additions to current medical treatment for appropriately selected osteoporotic patients. Few studies have reported on the efficiency of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) or kyphoplasty for whole thoracic and lumbar glucocorticosteroid-induced osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. We report a case of a 67-year-old man with intractable pain caused by successional VCFs treated by PVP.

21 Review Clinical biomarkers and pathogenic-related cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis. 2014

Niu, Xiaoyin / Chen, Guangjie. ·Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Immunology, 280 South Chongqing Road, Shanghai 200025, China. ·J Immunol Res · Pubmed #25215307.

ABSTRACT: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune disease with unknown etiology and pathogenesis. Although major therapeutic advances have been made in recent years, there is no cure for the disease. Current medications mainly reduce inflammation in order to relieve pain and slow joint damage, but many have potentially serious side effects. Therefore, to find specific biomarkers will benefit both RA patients to find relief from the disease and physicians to monitor the disease development. A number of biomarkers have been discovered and used clinically, and others are still under investigation. The autoantibodies, which are widely used in diagnosis and prognosis, novel biomarkers, which reflect clinical disease activity, and newly found biomarkers and pathogenic-related cytokines are discussed in this review.

22 Review Absence of protective effect of oral contraceptive use on the development of rheumatoid arthritis: a meta-analysis of observational studies. 2014

Chen, Qi / Jin, Zhichao / Xiang, Chun / Cai, Qing / Shi, Wentao / He, Jia. ·Department of Health Statistics, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China. ·Int J Rheum Dis · Pubmed #25196669.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To investigate the association between oral contraceptive (OC) use and development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHOD: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis based on observational studies. Summary estimates were obtained using fixed- or random-effects models as appropriate. Dose-response meta-analysis, subgroup analysis, cumulative meta-analysis, sensitivity analysis and publication bias tests were performed. RESULTS: Our meta-analysis of 28 studies included 18 case-control, three nested case-control, and seven cohort studies. In case-control studies, the risk of RA of ever, current and past OC users was 0.69 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.53-0.89), 0.71 (95% CI, 0.48-1.06) and 0.67 (95% CI, 0.44-1.01), respectively, compared to that of never OC users. In prospective studies, the corresponding odds ratios (ORs) of ever, current and past OC use were 1.00 (95% CI, 0.87-1.15), 0.93 (95% CI, 0.70-1.23) and 0.93 (95% CI, 0.78-1.12), respectively. A cumulative meta-analysis showed that the pooled ORs moved to the midline with an increase in sample size as years passed. There was an inverse association between OC use and severity of RA (OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.22-0.78). Dose-response meta-analysis of the study data revealed that the association between OC use and risk of RA was independent of duration of OC use. CONCLUSION: OC use has no protective effect on RA onset, but appears to prevent progression to severe RA. In addition, OC use has a lower protective effect on the risk of RA with change in OC composition. Finally, no cumulative effect was found between OC use and risk of RA.

23 Review Autoantibodies in pre-clinical autoimmune disease. 2014

Hu, Zhi-De / Deng, An-Mei. ·Department of Laboratory Medicine, General Hospital of Ji'nan Military Command Region, Ji'nan, PR China. · Department of Laboratory Diagnosis, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, PR China. Electronic address: amdeng70@163.com. ·Clin Chim Acta · Pubmed #24972003.

ABSTRACT: The presence of autoantibodies is characteristic of autoimmune diseases. It is widely accepted that autoantibodies provide crucial diagnostic and prognostic information for autoimmune diseases. Indeed, numerous studies have demonstrated that the appearance of autoantibodies precedes the clinical onset of autoimmune diseases. We performed a literature review regarding the appearance of autoantibodies that preceded the clinical onset of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, primary biliary cirrhosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and multiple sclerosis. Herein we review and comment on the major findings of these studies.

24 Review Hepatitis reactivation in patients with rheumatic diseases after immunosuppressive therapy--a report of long-term follow-up of serial cases and literature review. 2014

Xuan, Dandan / Yu, Yiqi / Shao, Linyun / Wang, Jiali / Zhang, Wenhong / Zou, Hejian. ·Department of Rheumatology, Huashan Hospital affiliated to Fudan University, 12 Wulumuqi Zhong Rd, Shanghai, 200040, China. ·Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #24343455.

ABSTRACT: The aims of this paper are to report hepatitis B virus reactivation in 12 patients with rheumatic disease undergoing immunosuppressive therapy and to evaluate whether pre-emptive antiviral therapy is necessary in patients receiving disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. From January 2008 to March 2012, a total of 12 HBV-infected patients with rheumatic diseases were consecutively enrolled in the long-term follow-up. Liver function, HBV DNA, and serum aminotransferase level were tested during the follow-up. We also reviewed the published reports and summarized the clinical characteristics of HBV reactivation during immunosuppressive therapy in patients with rheumatic diseases. The medium duration of follow-up was 41 months (range 16-48). Patients were treated with prednisone, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha-blocking agents (TNFBA). HBV reactivation was only documented in two patients treated with prednisone without pre-emptive antiviral therapy. One hundred patients from literature review were identified as having HBV reactivation; 20.8 % of the patients receiving prednisone experienced HBV reactivation compared to only 4.46 and 9.52 % of patients treated with DMARDs or TNFBA, respectively. This long-term follow-up of serial cases suggests that pre-emptive antiviral therapy should be administered in patients receiving prednisone therapy for rheumatic disease. In contrast, DMARDs and TNFBA are relatively safe to HBV-infected patients with rheumatic diseases. Close monitoring of HBV DNA and ALT levels is necessary in the management of HBV reactivation.

25 Review Primary Sjogren's syndrome and malignancy risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2014

Liang, Yan / Yang, Zaixing / Qin, Baodong / Zhong, Renqian. ·Department of Laboratory Diagnostics, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, , Shanghai, China. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #23687261.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) and the risks of malignancy including overall malignancy and site-specific malignancies through a systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: We searched Pubmed before January 2013, with a restriction to English language publications. Studies were included if they met the following criteria: (1) a cohort or observational study; (2) pSS as one of the exposure interests; (3) cancer as an outcome of interest; (4) relative risk (RR) or standardised incidence rate (SIR) with 95% CIs. We used a random or fixed effects model to calculate the pooled RR according to the heterogeneity test. RESULTS: Fourteen studies involving more than 14 523 patients with pSS were included. Compared with the general population, patients with pSS had significantly increased risks of overall cancer (pooled RR 1.53; 95% CI 1.17 to 1.88), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (pooled RR 13.76; 95% CI 8.53 to 18.99) and thyroid cancer (pooled RR 2.58; 95% CI 1.14 to 4.03). A significant association was found in various subgroup meta-analyses for NHL but, for overall malignancy, a significant association was only found in some groups. Additionally, the number of studies exploring the association of pSS with the risk of solid malignancies was so small that we could not carry out subgroup meta-analyses. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis indicates that pSS is significantly associated with increased risks of overall malignancy, NHL and thyroid cancer. However, it is not yet known whether the apparent increased risk of overall malignancy in patients with pSS is due to the relatively high prevalence of NHL in that group.

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