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Rheumatoid Arthritis: HELP
Articles from Tokyo
Based on 1,018 articles published since 2009
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These are the 1018 published articles about Arthritis, Rheumatoid that originated from Tokyo during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline 2018 update of the APLAR recommendations for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. 2019

Lau, Chak Sing / Chia, Faith / Dans, Leonila / Harrison, Andrew / Hsieh, Tsu Yi / Jain, Rahul / Jung, Seung Min / Kishimoto, Mitsumasa / Kumar, Ashok / Leong, Khai Pang / Li, Zhanguo / Lichauco, Juan Javier / Louthrenoo, Worawit / Luo, Shue Fen / Mu, Rong / Nash, Peter / Ng, Chin Teck / Suryana, Bagus / Wijaya, Linda Kurniaty / Yeap, Swan Sim. ·Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong. · Department of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Pediatrics, University of the Philippines Manila, Manila, Philippines. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology, University of the Philippines Manila, Manila, Philippines. · Department of Medicine, University of Otago Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand. · Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · Jaipur Arthritis Centre, Jaipur, India. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Immuno-Rheumatology Center, St Luke's International Hospital, St Luke's International University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Rheumatology, Fortis Flt. Lt. Rajan Dhall Hospital, New Delhi, India. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Beijing University People's Hospital, Beijing, China. · Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology Center, St. Luke's Medical Center, Quezon City, Philippines. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · Department of Rheumatology, Allergy, Immunology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. · Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Brawijaya University, Malang, Indonesia. · Sari Asih Ciputat Hospital, South Tangerang, Indonesia. · Department of Medicine, Subang Jaya Medical Centre, Subang Jaya, Malaysia. ·Int J Rheum Dis · Pubmed #30809944.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To update recommendations based on current best evidence concerning the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), focusing particularly on the role of targeted therapies, to inform clinicians on new developments that will impact their current practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A search of relevant literature from 2014 to 2016 concerning targeted therapies in RA was conducted. The RA Update Working Group evaluated the evidence and proposed updated recommendations using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations (GRADE) approach, to describe the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. Recommendations were finalized through consensus using the Delphi technique. RESULTS: This update provides 16 RA treatment recommendations based on current best evidence and expert clinical opinion. Recommendations 1-3 deal with the use of conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. The next three recommendations (4-6) cover the need for screening and management of infections and comorbid conditions prior to starting targeted therapy, while the following seven recommendations focus on use of these agents. We address choice of targeted therapy, switch, tapering and discontinuation. The last three recommendations elaborate on targeted therapy for RA in special situations such as pregnancy, cancer, and major surgery. CONCLUSION: Rheumatoid arthritis remains a significant health problem in the Asia-Pacific region. Patients with RA can benefit from the availability of effective targeted therapies, and these updated recommendations provide clinicians with guidance on their use.

2 Guideline Japan College of Rheumatology guideline for the use of methotrexate in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. 2019

Kameda, Hideto / Fujii, Takao / Nakajima, Ayako / Koike, Ryuji / Sagawa, Akira / Kanbe, Katsuaki / Tomita, Tetsuya / Harigai, Masayoshi / Suzuki, Yasuo / Anonymous1041117. ·a Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine , Toho University , Tokyo , Japan. · b Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology , Wakayama Medical University , Wakayama , Japan. · c Department of Rheumatology, Center for Rheumatic Diseases , Mie University Graduate School of Medicine , Mie , Japan. · d Medical Innovation Promotion Center, Clinical Research Center of Medical Hospital, Tokyo Medical and Dental University , Tokyo , Japan. · e Sagawa Akira Rheumatology Clinic , Hokkaido , Japan. · f Department of Kuranomachi Community Medicine , Regional Clinical Education Center, Jichi Medical University , Tochigi , Japan. · g Department of Orthopaedic Biomaterial Science, Graduate School of Medicine , Osaka University , Osaka , Japan. · h Division of Epidemiology and Pharmacoepidemiology of Rheumatic Diseases , Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University , Tokyo , Japan. · i Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology , Tokai University School of Medicine , Kanagawa , Japan. ·Mod Rheumatol · Pubmed #29718746.

ABSTRACT: Methotrexate (MTX), the anchor drug in the current treatment strategy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), was first approved for treatment of RA in Japan in 1999 at the recommended dose of 6-8 mg/week; it was approved as first-line drug with the maximum dose of 16 mg/week in February 2011. However, more than half of Japanese patients with RA are unable to tolerate a dose of 16 mg/week of MTX. Moreover, some serious adverse events during the treatment with MTX, such as pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) and lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) have been observed much more frequently in Japan than in other countries. Therefore, this article, an abridged English translation summarizing the 2016 update of the Japan College of Rheumatology (JCR) guideline for the use of MTX in Japanese patients with RA, is not intended to be valid for global use; however, it is helpful for the Japanese community of rheumatology and its understanding might be useful to the global community of rheumatology.

3 Guideline APLAR rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations. 2015

Lau, Chak Sing / Chia, Faith / Harrison, Andrew / Hsieh, Tsu-Yi / Jain, Rahul / Jung, Seung Min / Kishimoto, Mitsumasa / Kumar, Ashok / Leong, Khai Pang / Li, Zhanguo / Lichauco, Juan Javier / Louthrenoo, Worawit / Luo, Shue-Fen / Nash, Peter / Ng, Chin Teck / Park, Sung-Hwan / Suryana, Bagus Putu Putra / Suwannalai, Parawee / Wijaya, Linda Kurniaty / Yamamoto, Kazuhiko / Yang, Yue / Yeap, Swan Sim / Anonymous4880841. ·Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Queen Mary Hospital, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. · Department of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore City, Singapore. · Department of Medicine, University of Otago Wellington, Wellington South, New Zealand. · Section of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, and Section of Clinical Skills Training, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · Narayana Hospital, Jaipur, India. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. · Immuno-Rheumatology Center, St Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Rheumatology, Fortis Flt. Lt Rajan Dhall Hospital, New Delhi, India. · Department of Rheumatology, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, China. · St. Luke's Medical Center, Quezon City, Philippines. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. · Department of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan. · Department of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore City, Singapore. · Rheumatology Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Brawijaya University, Saiful Anwar General Hospital, Malang, Indonesia. · Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology Division, Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia. · Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. · Subang Jaya Medical Centre, Selangor, Malaysia. ·Int J Rheum Dis · Pubmed #26334449.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition that affects approximately 1% of the world's population. There are a wide number of guidelines and recommendations available to support the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the evidence used for these guidelines is predominantly based on studies in Caucasian subjects and may not be relevant for rheumatoid arthritis patients in the Asia-Pacific region. Therefore, the Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology established a Steering Committee in 2013 to address this issue. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The AGREE II instrument and the ADAPTE Collaboration framework were applied to systematically identify, appraise, synthesize, and adapt international rheumatoid arthritis guidelines for use in the Asia-Pacific region. RESULTS: Forty rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations, based on evidence and expert opinion, were drafted and are presented in this report. CONCLUSION: The Asia Pacific of Associations for Rheumatology rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations are intended to serve as a reference for best practice management of rheumatoid arthritis in Asia-Pacific, focusing on local issues to ensure the delivery of basic care for these patients, and to improve their outcomes. In addition, the document will serve as a reference for national rheumatology associations in Asia-Pacific for developing guidelines in their respective countries.

4 Review Extracellular vesicle-associated MMPs: A modulator of the tissue microenvironment. 2019

Shimoda, Masayuki. ·Department of Pathology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: shimoda@a2.keio.jp. ·Adv Clin Chem · Pubmed #30612606.

ABSTRACT: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small particles that mediate intercellular communications in local and distant microenvironments. Due to their ability to carry bioactive materials such as proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids, and to transfer their cargo into target cells, EVs are thought to be crucial mediators under pathological and physiological conditions. Recent investigations of their protein profiles have revealed the presence of metalloproteinases such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in EVs from various cell types and body fluids. Although information regarding the biological and clinical significance of MMPs in EVs is still limited, EV-associated MMPs can alter EV cargo by ectodomain shedding, exerting proteolytic activity following uptake by target cells, or directly contributing to degradation of extracellular matrix proteins surrounding cells. This review focuses on recent findings regarding EV-associated MMPs, and we further discuss their potential involvement in human diseases.

5 Review Potential Role of Oxidative Stress in Ocular Surface Inflammation and Dry Eye Disease. 2018

Dogru, Murat / Kojima, Takashi / Simsek, Cem / Tsubota, Kazuo. ·Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo, Japan. ·Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci · Pubmed #30481822.

ABSTRACT: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced as a by-product during the mitochondrial respiration of the oxygen and potentially able to damage the tissues. Oxidative stress occurs as a result of the disruption of the balance between the anti-oxidant system and the pro-oxidant system found in cells. It has been accepted that overexpression of ROS can be induced in the ocular surface as a result of many acute and chronic diseases and even in normal aging. Recent studies demonstrated that oxidative stress damages the ocular surface and plays an important role in the mechanism of dry eye disease. There is a need to investigate the therapeutic modalities employing topical/systemic use of antioxidants in dry eye disease. This review will summarize the recent studies showing the important relationship between oxidative stress and dry eye disease.

6 Review Sjögren's Syndrome, Non-Sjögren's Syndrome, and Graft-Versus-Host Disease Related Dry Eye. 2018

Ogawa, Yoko. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. ·Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci · Pubmed #30481809.

ABSTRACT: I have reviewed available literature on dry eye related to Sjögren's syndrome (SS), non-Sjögren's syndrome (non-SS), and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) to examine aqueous tear deficient dry eye as a subtype of dry eye. This section will focus on clinical studies regarding those subtypes of dry eye. I searched the PubMed database from 1990-2017 for discussion of clinical features, diagnostic criteria, and risk factors of SS, non-SS, and GVHD-related dry eye. In addition, therapeutic options for each subtype of dry eye are described. Although the clinical presentations of SS and chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) are similar, ocular surface fibrotic changes are characteristic of ocular GVHD but not SS- or non-SS-related dry eye. Recently, diagnostic criteria for each disease have been proposed and include the American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR-EULAR) for SS and the International Chronic Ocular GVHD consensus criteria. Although there has been gradual progress, there are currently no specific therapies and few approved treatment options for these intractable diseases, including SS and GVHD. As judged by the findings, these subtypes of dry eye are different clinical entities from simple dry eye. Therefore, novel therapies, specific to these subtypes of dry eye, may be required in the future.

7 Review Interferons and Dry Eye in Sjögren's Syndrome. 2018

Ogawa, Yoko / Shimizu, Eisuke / Tsubota, Kazuo. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan. yoko@z7.keio.jp. · Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan. ophthalmolog1st.acek39@gmail.com. · Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan. tsubota@z3.keio.jp. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #30423813.

ABSTRACT: Various cytokines, including interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-17, are augmented, and autoreactive T cells and B cells are activated in the immune pathogenesis of Sjögren's syndrome (SS). In particular, IFNs are involved in both the early stages of innate immunity by high level of type I IFN in glandular tissue and sera and the later stages of disease progression by type I and type II IFN producing T cells and B cells through B cell activating factor in SS. Genetically modified mouse models for some of these molecules have been reported and will be discussed in this review. New findings from human SS and animal models of SS have elucidated some of the mechanisms underlying SS-related dry eye. We will discuss IFN-γ and several other molecules that represent candidate targets for treating inflammation in SS-related dry eye.

8 Review Emerging anti-osteoclast therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. 2018

Tanaka, Sakae. ·Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan. Electronic address: TANAKAS-ORT@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp. ·J Orthop Sci · Pubmed #30075997.

ABSTRACT: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disorder characterized by progressive destruction of affected synovial joints. Recently, it was demonstrated that osteoclasts play critical roles in bone destruction in RA. Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), which belongs to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, is indispensable for osteoclast differentiation and bone destruction in RA. Denosumab, a monoclonal antibody against human RANKL, not only increased bone mineral density, but also efficiently suppressed the progression of bone erosion in RA patients in a randomized controlled study. However, denosumab did not reduce the cartilage destruction or disease activity in RA, and further investigation is required to establish the appropriate positioning of denosumab in the treatment strategy of RA.

9 Review Immune-bone interplay in the structural damage in rheumatoid arthritis. 2018

Komatsu, N / Takayanagi, H. ·Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. ·Clin Exp Immunol · Pubmed #30022480.

ABSTRACT: The immune and bone systems maintain homeostasis by interacting closely with each other. Rheumatoid arthritis is a pathological consequence of their interplay, as activated T cell immune responses result in osteoclast-mediated bone erosion. An imbalance between forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3)

10 Review Genome-wide association study of response to methotrexate in early rheumatoid arthritis patients. 2018

Taylor, John C / Bongartz, Tim / Massey, Jonathan / Mifsud, Borbala / Spiliopoulou, Athina / Scott, Ian C / Wang, Jianmei / Morgan, Michael / Plant, Darren / Colombo, Marco / Orchard, Peter / Twigg, Sarah / McInnes, Iain B / Porter, Duncan / Freeston, Jane E / Nam, Jackie L / Cordell, Heather J / Isaacs, John D / Strathdee, Jenna L / Arnett, Donna / de Hair, Maria J H / Tak, Paul P / Aslibekyan, Stella / van Vollenhoven, Ronald F / Padyukov, Leonid / Bridges, S Louis / Pitzalis, Costantino / Cope, Andrew P / Verstappen, Suzanne M M / Emery, Paul / Barnes, Michael R / Agakov, Felix / McKeigue, Paul / Mushiroda, Taisei / Kubo, Michiaki / Weinshilboum, Richard / Barton, Anne / Morgan, Ann W / Barrett, Jennifer H / Anonymous8581104 / Anonymous8591104 / Anonymous8601104. ·Leeds Institute of Cancer and Pathology, University of Leeds, and NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. · Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Division of Musculoskeletal and Dermatological Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · NIHR Manchester BRC, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · Clinical Pharmacology, William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University, London, UK. · Centre for Population Health Sciences, Usher Institute, University of Edinburgh Old Medical School, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, UK. · Pharmatics Ltd., 9, Little France Road, Edinburgh, UK. · Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences, Primary Care Sciences, Keele University and Department of Rheumatology, Haywood Hospital, High Lane, Burslem, Staffordshire, UK. · Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, King's College London, London, UK. · Roche Products, Welwyn Garden City, UK. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, and NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. · Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK. · Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK. · Musculoskeletal Research Group, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University and NIHR Newcastle Biomedical Research Centre in Ageing and Long Term Conditions, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · University of Kentucky College of Public Health, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA. · University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage, UK. · Cambridge University, Cambridge, UK. · Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. · Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. · Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Barts and The London School of Medicine & Dentistry, William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University, London, UK. · Academic Department of Rheumatology, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College London, London, UK. · RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Tokyo, Japan. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, and NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. a.w.morgan@leeds.ac.uk. ·Pharmacogenomics J · Pubmed #29795407.

ABSTRACT: Methotrexate (MTX) monotherapy is a common first treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but many patients do not respond adequately. In order to identify genetic predictors of response, we have combined data from two consortia to carry out a genome-wide study of response to MTX in 1424 early RA patients of European ancestry. Clinical endpoints were change from baseline to 6 months after starting treatment in swollen 28-joint count, tender 28-joint count, C-reactive protein and the overall 3-component disease activity score (DAS28). No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) reached genome-wide statistical significance for any outcome measure. The strongest evidence for association was with rs168201 in NRG3 (p = 10

11 Review [Diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis:toward the best practice. Management of elderly rheumatoid arthritis.] 2018

Sugihara, Takahiko. ·Department of Medicine and Rheumatology, Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Japan. ·Clin Calcium · Pubmed #29731460.

ABSTRACT: Elderly rheumatoid arthritis(RA)is classified into 2 clinical subsets, elderly-onset RA(EORA)and younger-onset elderly RA. Anti-CCP antibody positive, high disease activity, presence of bone erosion are associated with progression of joint destruction of EORA, and intensive treatment using a treat-to-target strategy is needed in the patients with the poor prognostic factors. Working ability is one of most important goals for RA and also non-frail status should be goal of elderly RA, since it is associated with health expectancy. Biological DMARDs are slightly less or equally effective in reducing disease activity in elderly patients, and disease duration may have a greater impact on disease outcomes than age. Elderly patients had multi-morbidities and risk factors for serious infections, which make it difficult to establish a treatment strategy for elderly RA. We will discuss the treatment strategy of elderly RA in this review.

12 Review Mechanisms and therapeutic targets for bone damage in rheumatoid arthritis, in particular the RANK-RANKL system. 2018

Tanaka, Yoshiya / Ohira, Takeshi. ·The First Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi, Kitakyushu 807-8555, Japan. Electronic address: tanaka@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp. · Clinical Development Department, R&D Division, Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd., 1-2-58 Hiromachi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 140-8710, Japan. ·Curr Opin Pharmacol · Pubmed #29702364.

ABSTRACT: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic inflammatory disorder, causes swelling, bone erosion, and joint deformity. Bone erosion in RA-affected joints arises from activation of osteoclasts by inflammatory processes. RA patients may also have primary, disease-related, or glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, caused by a disrupted balance between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) interfere with the processes causing inflammation in the joint but do not sufficiently treat bone erosion and osteoporosis. Denosumab, an inhibitor of receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL), protects bones in osteoporosis patients. Clinical studies have demonstrated that denosumab can also prevent bone erosion in RA patients. Because joint destruction progresses in some patients treated with DMARDs alone, denosumab will likely become standard treatment for some RA patients.

13 Review Evidence-based clinical practice guideline for adult Still's disease. 2018

Mimura, Toshihide / Kondo, Yuya / Ohta, Akihide / Iwamoto, Masahiro / Ota, Akiko / Okamoto, Nami / Kawaguchi, Yasushi / Kono, Hajime / Takasaki, Yoshinari / Takei, Shuji / Nishimoto, Norihiro / Fujimoto, Manabu / Asanuma, Yu Funakubo / Mimori, Akio / Okiyama, Naoko / Kaneko, Shunta / Takahashi, Hiroyuki / Yokosawa, Masahiro / Sumida, Takayuki. ·a Department of Rheumatology and Applied Immunology , Saitama Medical University , Saitama , Japan. · b Center for Intractable Diseases, Saitama Medical University , Saitama , Japan. · c Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine , University of Tsukuba , Ibaraki , Japan. · d Faculty of Medicine , Saga University , Saga , Japan. · e Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology/Clinical Immunology , Jichi Medical University , Tochigi , Japan. · f Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Division of Public Health , Saitama Medical University , Saitama , Japan. · g Department of Pediatrics , Osaka Medical College , Osaka , Japan. · h Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University , Tokyo , Japan. · i Department of Internal Medicine , Teikyo University School of Medicine , Tokyo , Japan. · j Department of Rheumatology , Juntendo University Koshigaya Hospital , Saitama , Japan. · k Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences , Kagoshima University , Kagoshima , Japan. · l Department of Molecular Regulation for Intractable Diseases , Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo Medical University , Tokyo , Japan. · m Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine , University of Tsukuba , Ibaraki , Japan. · n Department of Rheumatology , Iwate Prefectural Central Hospital , Iwate , Japan. ·Mod Rheumatol · Pubmed #29651907.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Using an expert- and data-driven methodology, we have constructed the first clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for adult Still's disease (ASD) after complete systematic review (SR) of the literature based upon the Medical Information Network Distribution Service (Minds) procedure. METHODS: The CPG committee for ASD organized by the Research Team for Autoimmune Diseases, the Research Program for Intractable Disease of the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare has developed CPG for ASD 2017, according to the procedure proposed by Minds. The CPG development process includes (1) clarification of the purpose of CPG, (2) organization of the steering committee, (3) organization of the CPG committee and secretariat, (4) defining the scope (setting of clinical questions (CQs)), (5) SR, (6) development of recommendations, (7) drafting the CPG, (8) external evaluation and public comments, and (9) release. Because we wanted to construct CPG for ASD to encompass both adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) and adult patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), we also included SR data from sJIA in this study. RESULTS: Twenty-six CQs were selected and roughly divided into the following items: (1) clinical findings (CQs 1-4), (2) laboratory findings (CQs 5-8), (3) complications (CQs 9-13), (4) treatment with oral medicine (CQs 14-19), (5) treatment with biological reagents (CQs 20-23), and (6) treatments for sJIA (CQs 25-26). Recommendations and the strength of the recommendations for these CQs were decided by a modified Delphi method. CONCLUSION: We have developed the first published CPG for ASD including AOSD and sJIA, which includes 26 CQs and recommendations. This guideline will help rheumatologists, non-specialized physicians, other healthcare providers, medical and health-related students, and patients and their family members to understand and treat ASD.

14 Review Overview of Osteoimmunology. 2018

Terashima, Asuka / Takayanagi, Hiroshi. ·Department of Osteoimmunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. takayana@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp. ·Calcif Tissue Int · Pubmed #29589061.

ABSTRACT: Aberrant or prolonged immune responses often affect bone metabolism. The investigation on bone destruction observed in autoimmune arthritis contributed to the development of research area on effect of the immune system on bone. A number of reports on bone phenotypes of immunocompromised mice indicate that the immune and skeletal systems share various molecules, including transcription factors, signaling molecules, and membrane receptors, suggesting the interplay between the two systems. Furthermore, much attention has been paid to the modulation of immune cells, including hematopoietic progenitor cells, by bone cells in the bone marrow. Thus, osteoimmunology which deals with the crosstalk and shared mechanisms of the bone and immune systems became the conceptual framework fundamental to a proper understanding of both systems and the development of new therapeutic strategies.

15 Review The role of lymphotoxin-α in rheumatoid arthritis. 2018

Hirose, Tomohiro / Fukuma, Yuri / Takeshita, Ayumu / Nishida, Keiichiro. ·Immunology & Inflammation Medical Affairs, Pfizer Innovative Health, Pfizer Japan Inc, 3-22-7 Yoyogi Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, 151-8589, Japan. tomohiro.hirose@pfizer.com. · Immunology & Inflammation Medical Affairs, Pfizer Innovative Health, Pfizer Japan Inc, 3-22-7 Yoyogi Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, 151-8589, Japan. · Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama, 700-8558, Japan. ·Inflamm Res · Pubmed #29541795.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in the inflammatory response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is well established, whereas less is known about the role of TNF's close homolog, lymphotoxin alpha (LTα). FINDINGS: Increased levels of LTα are found in the serum and synovial tissue of patients with RA, and in vitro studies found that LTα-induced proliferation of RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes was at a similar level to TNF. These findings support the idea that anti-LTα treatment could be beneficial in patients with RA, but pateclizumab, an anti-LTα antibody, was not as efficacious as the anti-TNF agent adalimumab in reducing symptoms of RA in a head-to-head study, suggesting that anti-LTα therapies might not represent a valid alternative treatment option in patients with RA. However, suppression of LTα activity might be relevant in the context of RA-related comorbidities, as patients with RA have an increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) compared with the general population, and specific polymorphisms of the LTα gene have been linked to increased MI risk. CONCLUSIONS: In this review, we summarize the key characteristics of LTα and the most recent findings on the role of LTα in RA.

16 Review Rhabdomyolysis Induced by Isoniazid in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis and End-stage Renal Disease: A Case Report and Review of the Literature. 2018

Komai, Toshihiko / Sumitomo, Shuji / Teruya, Shuzo / Fujio, Keishi. ·Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Japan. ·Intern Med · Pubmed #29526956.

ABSTRACT: A 76-year-old man complicated with end-stage renal disease had latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and isoniazid (INH) 300 mg daily was started to prevent reactivation of LTBI before using biologic agents for rheumatoid arthritis. On the 8th day after administration of INH, he presented with a fever, petechiae, and myalgia. Serological studies revealed elevated myogenic enzymes and creatinine level. Based on the exclusion of other etiologies, rapid improvement with cessation of INH, and the recurrence of the fever and myalgia with re-administration of a reduced dose of INH, we diagnosed him with INH-induced rhabdomyolysis. Physicians should be aware of rhabdomyolysis induced by INH at a therapeutic dose as an infrequent but potentially fatal adverse drug reaction.

17 Review Clinical practice guideline for Sjögren's syndrome 2017. 2018

Sumida, Takayuki / Azuma, Naoto / Moriyama, Masafumi / Takahashi, Hiroyuki / Asashima, Hiromitsu / Honda, Fumika / Abe, Saori / Ono, Yuko / Hirota, Tomoya / Hirata, Shintaro / Tanaka, Yoshiya / Shimizu, Toshimasa / Nakamura, Hideki / Kawakami, Atsushi / Sano, Hajime / Ogawa, Yoko / Tsubota, Kazuo / Ryo, Koufuchi / Saito, Ichiro / Tanaka, Akihiko / Nakamura, Seiji / Takamura, Etsuko / Tanaka, Masao / Suzuki, Katsuya / Takeuchi, Tsutomu / Yamakawa, Noriyuki / Mimori, Tsuneyo / Ohta, Akiko / Nishiyama, Susumu / Yoshihara, Toshio / Suzuki, Yasunori / Kawano, Mitsuhiro / Tomiita, Minako / Tsuboi, Hiroto. ·a Department of Internal Medicine , University of Tsukuba , Ibaraki , Japan. · b Clinical Practice Guideline Committee for Sjögren's Syndrome, The Research Team for Autoimmune Diseases, The Research Program for Intractable Disease of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) , Tokyo , Japan. · c Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine , Hyogo College of Medicine , Hyogo , Japan. · d Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences , Kyushu University , Fukuoka , Japan. · e The First Department of Internal Medicine , School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan , Fukuoka , Japan. · f Department of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology , Hiroshima University Hospital , Hiroshima , Japan. · g Unit of Translational Medicine, Department of Immunology and Rheumatology , Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences , Nagasaki , Japan. · h Department of Ophthalmology , School of Medicine, Keio University , Tokyo , Japan. · i Department of Pathology , Tsurumi University School of Dental Medicine , Kanagawa , Japan. · j Department of Ophthalmology , Tokyo Women's Medical University, School of Medicine , Tokyo , Japan. · k Department of Advanced Medicine for Rheumatic Diseases , Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine , Kyoto , Japan. · l Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine , School of Medicine, Keio University , Tokyo , Japan. · m Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology , Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine , Kyoto , Japan. · n Department of Rheumatology , Kyoto-Katsura Hospital , Kyoto , Japan. · o Division of Public Health, Department of Social Medicine , Saitama Medical University , Saitama , Japan. · p Kurashiki Medical Center , Okayama , Japan. · q Department of Otorhinolaryngology , Tokyo Women's Medical University , Tokyo , Japan. · r Division of Rheumatology, Department of Cardiovascular and Internal Medicine , Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medicine , Ishikawa , Japan. · s Department of Allergy and Rheumatology , Chiba Children's Hospital , Chiba , Japan. ·Mod Rheumatol · Pubmed #29409370.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to develop clinical practice guideline (CPG) for Sjögren's syndrome (SS) based on recently available clinical and therapeutic evidences. METHODS: The CPG committee for SS was organized by the Research Team for Autoimmune Diseases, Research Program for Intractable Disease of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW), Japan. The committee completed a systematic review of evidences for several clinical questions and developed CPG for SS 2017 according to the procedure proposed by the Medical Information Network Distribution Service (Minds). The recommendations and their strength were checked by the modified Delphi method. The CPG for SS 2017 has been officially approved by both Japan College of Rheumatology and the Japanese Society for SS. RESULTS: The CPG committee set 38 clinical questions for clinical symptoms, signs, treatment, and management of SS in pediatric, adult and pregnant patients, using the PICO (P: patients, problem, population, I: interventions, C: comparisons, controls, comparators, O: outcomes) format. A summary of evidence, development of recommendation, recommendation, and strength for these 38 clinical questions are presented in the CPG. CONCLUSION: The CPG for SS 2017 should contribute to improvement and standardization of diagnosis and treatment of SS.

18 Review Residual symptoms and disease burden among patients with rheumatoid arthritis in remission or low disease activity: a systematic literature review. 2018

Ishida, Masato / Kuroiwa, Yuki / Yoshida, Emiko / Sato, Masayo / Krupa, Dominika / Henry, Nathaniel / Ikeda, Kei / Kaneko, Yuko. ·a Medical Development Unit Japan , Eli Lilly Japan K.K. , Kobe , Japan. · b QuintilesIMS , London , UK. · c Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology , Chiba University Hospital , Chiba , Japan. · d Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine , Keio University School of Medicine , Tokyo , Japan. ·Mod Rheumatol · Pubmed #29251034.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To identify, describe and summarize evidence on residual symptoms and disease burdens in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients qualified as being in remission or low disease activity (LDA). METHODS: A systematic literature review (SLR) was conducted according to Cochrane collaboration guidelines. The population of interest was adult patients with RA in remission or LDA. The reported outcomes of interest were any symptoms or burdens. RESULTS: Fifty-one publications were identified through an eDatabase search. Together with 17 articles found through other sources, 68 were included for full text review. The most commonly reported residual symptoms were pain (number of studies = 25), fatigue (n = 21) and morning stiffness (n = 5). Reported disease burdens included mental health (n = 15), sleep disturbances (n = 7) and work productivity (n = 5), impairment in quality of life (n = 21), and functional disability (n = 34). Substantial residual symptoms and disease burdens were found to be present in patients in remission or LDA. CONCLUSION: This is the first SLR to investigate residual symptoms and disease burdens in RA patients in remission or LDA. The results indicate that despite achieving conventional clinical targets, the disease continues to affect patients, suggesting the existence of unmet need under the current treatment paradigm.

19 Review Origins of fibroblasts in rheumatoid synovial tissues: Implications from organ fibrotic models. 2018

Matsuo, Yusuke / Saito, Tetsuya / Yamamoto, Akio / Kohsaka, Hitoshi. ·a Department of Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences , Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) , Tokyo , Japan. ·Mod Rheumatol · Pubmed #29067846.

ABSTRACT: Fibroblasts play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Accumulation of fibroblasts in the synovial tissues characterizes the pathology of RA. Understanding how fibroblasts accumulate could lead to discovery of new therapeutic targets in RA treatment, while current antirheumatic therapies still have problems in efficacy and safety. In this regard, several studies have revealed cellular origins of fibroblasts in fibrotic tissues in murine models of organ fibrosis. Some studies employed lineage tracing, which bring generally convincing results, using transgenic mice. They demonstrated that resident fibroblasts, pericytes, mesenchymal stem cells, epithelial cells, endothelial cells and bone-marrow-derived and circulating cells can be cellular origins of fibroblasts in organ fibrotic tissues. In this review, we summarize and discuss available evidence for the origins of fibroblasts accumulating in the arthritic synovial tissues and organ fibrotic tissues.

20 Review HMGB proteins and arthritis. 2018

Taniguchi, Noboru / Kawakami, Yasuhiko / Maruyama, Ikuro / Lotz, Martin. ·Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki, 889-1692, Japan. nobutanigu@gmail.com. · Department of Medical Science, Tokyo Medical University, 6-1-1 Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-8402, Japan. nobutanigu@gmail.com. · Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development, and Stem Cell Institute, University of Minnesota, 321 Church St. SE, 6-160 Jackson Hall, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA. · Department of Systems Biology in Thromboregulation, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Science, Kagoshima, 890-8544, Japan. · Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 N. Torrey Pines Road, MEM 161, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA. ·Hum Cell · Pubmed #28916968.

ABSTRACT: The high-mobility group box (HMGB) family includes four members: HMGB1, 2, 3 and 4. HMGB proteins have two functions. In the nucleus, HMGB proteins bind to DNA in a DNA structure-dependent but nucleotide sequence-independent manner to function in chromatin remodeling. Extracellularly, HMGB proteins function as alarmins, which are endogenous molecules released upon tissue damage to activate the immune system. HMGB1 acts as a late mediator of inflammation and contributes to prolonged and sustained systemic inflammation in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis. By contrast, Hmgb2

21 Review RANKL: A therapeutic target for bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. 2018

Tanaka, Sakae / Tanaka, Yoshiya / Ishiguro, Naoki / Yamanaka, Hisashi / Takeuchi, Tsutomu. ·a Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine , The University of Tokyo , Tokyo , Japan. · b First Department of Internal Medicine , University of Occupational and Environmental Health , Fukuoka , Japan. · c Department of Orthopaedic Surgery , Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine , Aichi , Japan. · d Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University , Tokyo , Japan. · e Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine , Keio University School of Medicine , Tokyo , Japan. ·Mod Rheumatol · Pubmed #28880683.

ABSTRACT: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by progressive joint destruction. Recent studies have indicated the critical involvement of osteoclasts in bone destruction in RA. The osteoclast differentiation factor receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), which belongs to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, plays a critical role in osteoclast differentiation and bone destruction in RA. Denosumab, an antibody against human RANKL, efficiently suppressed the progression of bone erosion in RA patients in randomized controlled studies, and is considered as a putative therapeutic option for preventing bone destruction in RA.

22 Review Lymphoproliferative disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in the era of widespread use of methotrexate: A review of the literature and current perspective. 2018

Harigai, Masayoshi. ·a Division of Epidemiology and Pharmacoepidemiology, Institute of Rheumatology , Tokyo Women's Medical University , Tokyo , Japan. ·Mod Rheumatol · Pubmed #28758827.

ABSTRACT: Lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) in patients receiving methotrexate (MTX) have gained strong attention. In this article, I reviewed the basic and clinical findings of this issue. Patients with RA possess a high risk of lymphoma, but epidemiological evidence showing an association between the use of MTX and lymphoma is still limited. Rapid regression of LPD after stopping MTX in patients with RA strongly suggests that there is a causative relationship. Genetic predisposition, accumulated inflammation, impaired generation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, effects of MTX on the regulation of EBV genes, and low hypermethylation of apoptosis-related genes are relevant to the development of LPD and rapid regression after cessation of MTX. The clinical and histological characteristics of LPD in RA patients who are treated with MTX have been established, and recent data indicate that initial cessation of MTX and watchful waiting to observe an increase in peripheral lymphocyte counts have a therapeutic value. In advanced cases, various chemotherapy regimens are used, and consultation with hematologists is recommended to select the optimal treatment. There is no consensus on the treatment of RA after development of LPD, and long-term observation is necessary to investigate the safety of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in these patients.

23 Review Biomarkers as a treatment guide in rheumatoid arthritis. 2018

Takeuchi, Tsutomu. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjyuku, Tokyo 162-5882, Japan. Electronic address: tsutake@z5.keio.jp. ·Clin Immunol · Pubmed #28736274.

ABSTRACT: It is anticipated that biomarkers support rheumatologists to judge a group of patients that can improve the diagnosis and prognosis, and further facilitate appropriate and precise treatment with targeted therapy. In particular, biomarkers for predicting and monitoring response to biological disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are demanding. Given the mechanism action of biological DMARDs is much more simple than the conventional synthetic DMARDs, a variety of approaches to find such biomarkers has been taken recent years. In this article, I will summarize the background for biomarker research and introduce recent topics in the research and the possible clinical applications of biomarkers to guide treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

24 Review [Regulation of bone by IL-17-producing T cells]. 2017

Okamoto, Kazuo. ·Department of Osteoimmunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo. ·Nihon Rinsho Meneki Gakkai Kaishi · Pubmed #29238018.

ABSTRACT:   Bone is a component of the skeletal-locomotor system but also functions as an immunological organ that harbors hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Since the immune and skeletal systems are closely related through a number of shared regulatory molecules including cytokines and receptors, bone can be affected in various immune disorders. Rheumatoid arthritis is a typical disease in which the immune system affects the bone metabolism. The enhanced activity of osteoclasts by the activation of Th17 cells causes the joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. Studies on bone destruction associated rheumatoid arthritis have highlighted the importance of the interplay between the immune and bone systems, and promoted the new interdisciplinary field of "osteoimmunology". Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that regulation of bone tissues by IL-17 is more complicated than we had expected. IL-17-prodcuing cells contribute to new bone formation at the enthesis in ankylosing spondylitis, and IL-17-producing γδ T cells promote bone regeneration by acting on the mesenchymal stem cells in bone fracture healing. It would be necessary to comprehensively understand the interplay between the immune and bone systems for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of various diseases that involves the two systems.

25 Review Targeted antibody therapy and relevant novel biomarkers for precision medicine for rheumatoid arthritis. 2017

Kaneko, Yuko / Takeuchi, Tsutomu. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjyuku, Tokyo, Japan. ·Int Immunol · Pubmed #29069431.

ABSTRACT: Over the past two decades, the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has progressed remarkably, encompassing the development of new diagnostic tools and efficacious biological agents, such as monoclonal antibodies against inflammatory cytokines and surface markers on immune cells. In addition to the significant efficacy of these biological agents, biomarkers for RA are under consideration for their potential to classify heterogeneous patients into several groups based on clinical and immunological phenotypes for the prediction of clinical course and prognosis and the facilitation of appropriate and precise treatment with the appropriate therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Biomarkers, particularly those for the prediction and monitoring of the responses to therapeutic monoclonal antibodies for RA, are in demand, with many approaches examined in recent years. In this article, we have summarized the background research on biomarkers and introduced recent topics in the field that enable the possible clinical applications of biomarkers, especially those related to pathogenic cytokines, to guide the treatment of RA.

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