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Sleep Apnea Syndromes HELP
Based on 14,190 articles since 2008
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These are the 14190 published articles about Sleep Apnea Syndromes that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2017.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline [Hungarian Society for Sleep Medicine guideline for detecting drivers with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome]. 2016

Szakács, Zoltán / Ádám, Ágnes / Annus, János Kristóf / Csatlós, Dalma / László, Andrea / Kalabay, László / Torzsa, Péter. ·Magyar Honvédség Egészségügyi Központ Budapest. · Családorvosi Tanszék, Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar Budapest, Kútvölgyi út 4., 1125. · SomnoCenter, Alvászavar Központ Szeged. ·Orv Hetil · Pubmed #27233832.

ABSTRACT: Obstructive sleep apnea is the most frequent sleep-disordered breathing. The prevalence of sleep apnea in the general population is 2-4% and the main characteristics of the disease are the intermittent cessation or substantial reduction of airflow during sleep, which is caused by complete, or near complete upper airway obstruction. Decreased airflow is followed by oxygen desaturation and intermittent arousals. Untreated patients are 4-6 times more likely to cause traffic accidents than their healthy counterparts. The aims of the obstructive sleep apnea screening are to prevent and reduce the incidence of serious car accidents, which are often caused by one of the most dangerous sleep disorders. Since April 1, 2015 a modification of the 13/1992 regulation has been in force in Hungary which orders screening of obstructive sleep apnea during medical checkup of drivers. The Hungarian Society for Sleep Medicine made a guideline according to the regulation which was adapted to national circumstances and family doctors, occupational health specialists can more easily screen obstructive sleep apnea in suspected patients. In sleep ambulances the disease can be diagnosed and effective treatment can be started. Patients receiving appropriate treatment and with appropriate compliance can get their driving licence under regular care and control.

2 Guideline [Mandibular advancement device for obstructive sleep apnea treatment in adults. July 2014]. 2016

Bettega, G / Breton, P / Goudot, P / Saint-Pierre, F / Anonymous1971106. ·Service de chirurgie maxillo-faciale et chirurgie plastique, hôpital A.-Michallon, BP 217, 38043 Grenoble cedex 9, France. Electronic address: GBettega@chu-grenoble.fr. · Service de stomatologie, chirurgie maxillofaciale et chirurgie plastique de la face, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Bénite, France. · Service de stomatologie et chirurgie maxillo-faciale, hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière (AP-HP), 47-83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France. · 32, avenue du Pdt Wilson, 75116 Paris, France. · ·Rev Mal Respir · Pubmed #27160831.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. 2016

Cohen, Ezra E W / LaMonte, Samuel J / Erb, Nicole L / Beckman, Kerry L / Sadeghi, Nader / Hutcheson, Katherine A / Stubblefield, Michael D / Abbott, Dennis M / Fisher, Penelope S / Stein, Kevin D / Lyman, Gary H / Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L. ·Medical Oncologist, Moores Cancer Center, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA. · Retired Head and Neck Surgeon, Former Associate Professor of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Louisiana State University Health and Science Center, New Orleans, LA. · Program Manager, National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Research Analyst-Survivorship, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Professor of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Cancer Surgery, and Director of Head and Neck Surgical Oncology, George Washington University, Washington, DC. · Associate Professor, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Section of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · Medical Director for Cancer Rehabilitation, Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, West Orange, NJ. · Chief Executive Officer, Dental Oncology Professionals, Garland, TX. · Clinical Instructor of Otolaryngology and Nurse, Miller School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Miami, Miami, FL. · Vice President, Behavioral Research, and Director, Behavioral Research Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Co-Director, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Professor of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. · Director, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC. ·CA Cancer J Clin · Pubmed #27002678.

ABSTRACT: Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

4 Guideline Consensus & Evidence-based INOSA Guidelines 2014 (First edition). 2015

Sharma, Surendra K / Katoch, Vishwa Mohan / Mohan, Alladi / Kadhiravan, T / Elavarasi, A / Ragesh, R / Nischal, Neeraj / Sethi, Prayas / Behera, D / Bhatia, Manvir / Ghoshal, A G / Gothi, Dipti / Joshi, Jyotsna / Kanwar, M S / Kharbanda, O P / Kumar, Suresh / Mohapatra, P R / Mallick, B N / Mehta, Ravindra / Prasad, Rajendra / Sharma, S C / Sikka, Kapil / Aggarwal, Sandeep / Shukla, Garima / Suri, J C / Vengamma, B / Grover, Ashoo / Vijayan, V K / Ramakrishnan, N / Gupta, Rasik / Anonymous2740844. · ·Indian J Chest Dis Allied Sci · Pubmed #26410986.

ABSTRACT: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences amongst the general public as well as the majority of primary care physcians across India is poor. This necessiated the development of the INdian initiative on Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep related symptoms or comorbidities or ≥ 15 such episodes without any sleep related symptoms or comorbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents and high risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography (PSG) is the "gold standard" for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer oral appliances to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioural measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy.

5 Guideline 2015 ESC Guidelines for the management of patients with ventricular arrhythmias and the prevention of sudden cardiac death: The Task Force for the Management of Patients with Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Endorsed by: Association for European Paediatric and Congenital Cardiology (AEPC). 2015

Priori, Silvia G / Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina / Mazzanti, Andrea / Blom, Nico / Borggrefe, Martin / Camm, John / Elliott, Perry Mark / Fitzsimons, Donna / Hatala, Robert / Hindricks, Gerhard / Kirchhof, Paulus / Kjeldsen, Keld / Kuck, Karl-Heinz / Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio / Nikolaou, Nikolaos / Norekvål, Tone M / Spaulding, Christian / Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J. · ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #26320108.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline Chronic Cough. 2015

Pacheco, Adalberto / de Diego, Alfredo / Domingo, Christian / Lamas, Adelaida / Gutierrez, Raimundo / Naberan, Karlos / Garrigues, Vicente / López Vime, Raquel. ·Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España. Electronic address: apacheco.hrc@salud.madrid.org. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital La Fe, Valencia, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Parc Taulí, Sabadell, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Rey Juan Carlos, Móstoles, Madrid, España. · Centro de Salud Belchite, Zaragoza, España. · Servicio de Gastroenterología, Hospital La Fe, Valencia, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Severo Ochoa, Madrid, España. ·Arch Bronconeumol · Pubmed #26165783.

ABSTRACT: Chronic cough (CC), or cough lasting more than 8 weeks, has attracted increased attention in recent years following advances that have changed opinions on the prevailing diagnostic and therapeutic triad in place since the 1970s. Suboptimal treatment results in two thirds of all cases, together with a new notion of CC as a peripheral and central hypersensitivity syndrome similar to chronic pain, have changed the approach to this common complaint in routine clinical practice. The peripheral receptors involved in CC are still a part of the diagnostic triad. However, both convergence of stimuli and central nervous system hypersensitivity are key factors in treatment success.

7 Guideline [Mandibular advancement device for obstructive sleep apnea treatment in adults. July 2014]. 2015

Bettega, G / Breton, P / Goudot, P / Saint-Pierre, F / Anonymous3251008 / Anonymous3261008 / Anonymous3271008 / Anonymous3281008 / Anonymous3291008 / Anonymous3301008 / Anonymous3311008 / Anonymous3321008 / Anonymous3331008. ·Service de chirurgie maxillo-faciale et chirurgie plastique, hôpital A.-Michallon, BP 217, 38043 Grenoble cedex 9, France. Electronic address: GBettega@chu-grenoble.fr. · Service de stomatologie, chirurgie maxillofaciale et chirurgie plastique de la face, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Bénite, France. · Service de stomatologie et chirurgie maxillo-faciale, hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière (AP-HP), 47-83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France. · 32, avenue du Pdt Wilson, 75116 Paris, France. · ·Rev Stomatol Chir Maxillofac Chir Orale · Pubmed #25593082.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Guideline Implications of revised AASM rules on scoring apneic and hypopneic respiratory events in patients with heart failure with nocturnal Cheyne-Stokes respiration. 2015

Heinrich, Jessica / Spießhöfer, Jens / Bitter, Thomas / Horstkotte, Dieter / Oldenburg, Olaf. ·Department of Cardiology, Heart and Diabetes Centre North Rhine-Westphalia, Ruhr University Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen, Germany. · ·Sleep Breath · Pubmed #24906544.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the implications of the revised scoring rules of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) in patients with heart failure (HF) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). METHODS: Ninety-one patients (NYHA ≥II, LVEF ≤45 %; age 73.6 ± 11.3 years old; 81 male subjects) with documented CSR underwent 8 h of cardiorespiratory polygraphy recordings. Those were analyzed by a single scorer strictly applying the 2007 recommended, 2007 alternative, and the 2012 scoring rules. RESULTS: Compared with the AASM 2007 recommended rules, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and hypopnea index (HI) increased significantly when the 2007 alternative and 2012 rules were applied (AHI 34.1 ± 13.5/h vs 37.6 ± 13.2/h vs 38.3 ± 13.2/h, respectively; HI 10.2 ± 9.4/h vs 13.7 ± 10.7/h vs 14.4 ± 11.0/h, respectively; all p < 0.001). Duration of CSR increased significantly with the alternate versus recommended 2007 rules (182.2 ± 117.0 vs 170.1 ± 115.0 min; p ≤ 0.001); there was a significant decrease in CSR duration for the 2012 versus 2007 alternative rules (182.2 ± 117.0 vs 166.7 ± 115.4 min; p ≤ 0.001). CONCLUSION: AHI was higher using the AASM 2012 scoring rules due to a less strict definition of hypopnea. Data on the prognostic effects of CSR in patients with HF and the benefits of treatment are mostly based on the AASM 2007 recommended rules, so differences between these and the newer version need to be taken into account.

9 Guideline Diagnosis and treatment of snoring in adults-S2k Guideline of the German Society of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. 2015

Stuck, Boris A / Dreher, Alfred / Heiser, Clemens / Herzog, Michael / Kühnel, Thomas / Maurer, Joachim T / Pistner, Hans / Sitter, Helmut / Steffen, Armin / Verse, Thomas. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Mannheim, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167, Mannheim, Germany, boris.stuck@umm.de. · ·Sleep Breath · Pubmed #24729153.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This guideline aims to promote high-quality care by medical specialists for subjects who snore and is designed for everyone involved in the diagnosis and treatment of snoring in an in- or outpatient setting. DISCUSSION: To date, a satisfactory definition of snoring is lacking. Snoring is caused by a vibration of soft tissue in the upper airway induced by respiration during sleep. It is triggered by relaxation of the upper airway dilator muscles that occurs during sleep. Multiple risk factors for snoring have been described and snoring is of multifactorial origin. The true incidence of snoring is not clear to date, as the incidence differs throughout literature. Snoring is more likely to appear in middle age, predominantly in males. Diagnostic measures should include a sleep medical history, preferably involving an interview with the bed partner, and may be completed with questionnaires. Clinical examination should include examination of the nose to evaluate the relevant structures for nasal breathing and may be completed with nasal endoscopy. Evaluation of the oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx should also be performed. Clinical assessment of the oral cavity should include the size of the tongue, the mucosa of the oral cavity, and the dental status. Furthermore, facial skeletal morphology should be evaluated. In select cases, technical diagnostic measures may be added. Further objective measures should be performed if the medical history and/or clinical examination suggest sleep-disordered breathing, if relevant comorbidities are present, and if the subject requests treatment for snoring. According to current knowledge, snoring is not associated with medical hazard, and generally, there is no medical indication for treatment. Weight reduction should be achieved in every overweight subject who snores. In snorers who snore only in the supine position, positional treatment can be considered. In suitable cases, snoring can be treated successfully with intraoral devices. Minimally invasive surgery of the soft palate can be considered as long as the individual anatomy appears suitable. Treatment selection should be based on individual anatomic findings. After a therapeutic intervention, follow-up visits should take place after an appropriate time frame to assess treatment success and to potentially indicate further intervention.

10 Guideline Diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in adults: a clinical practice guideline from theAmerican College of Physicians. 2014

Qaseem, Amir / Dallas, Paul / Owens, Douglas K / Starkey, Melissa / Holty, Jon-Erik C / Shekelle, Paul / Anonymous5510802. · ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #25089864.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in adults. METHODS: This guideline is based on published literature on this topic that was identified by using MEDLINE (1966 through May 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Searches were limited to English-language publications. The clinical outcomes evaluated for this guideline included all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, nonfatal cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, postsurgical outcomes, and quality of life. Sensitivities, specificities, and likelihood ratios were also assessed as outcomes of diagnostic tests. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations by using ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. RECOMMENDATION 1: ACP recommends a sleep study for patients with unexplained daytime sleepiness. (Grade: weak recommendation, low-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 2: ACP recommends polysomnography for diagnostic testing in patients suspected of obstructive sleep apnea. ACP recommends portable sleep monitors in patients without serious comorbidities as an alternative to polysomnography when polysomnography is not available for diagnostic testing. (Grade: weak recommendation, moderate-quality evidence).

11 Guideline Children's Hospital Association consensus statements for comorbidities of childhood obesity. 2014

Estrada, Elizabeth / Eneli, Ihuoma / Hampl, Sarah / Mietus-Snyder, Michele / Mirza, Nazrat / Rhodes, Erinn / Sweeney, Brooke / Tinajero-Deck, Lydia / Woolford, Susan J / Pont, Stephen J / Anonymous4600800. ·1 Division of Endocrinology, Connecticut Children's Medical Center, University of Connecticut , Hartford, CT. · ·Child Obes · Pubmed #25019404.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity and overweight affect approximately 30% of US children. Many of these children have obesity-related comorbidities, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, fatty liver disease, diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), sleep apnea, psychosocial problems, and others. These children need routine screening and, in many cases, treatment for these conditions. However, because primary care pediatric providers (PCPs) often are underequipped to deal with these comorbidities, they frequently refer these patients to subspecialists. However, as a result of the US pediatric subspecialist shortage and considering that 12.5 million children are obese, access to care by subspecialists is limited. The aim of this article is to provide accessible, user-friendly clinical consensus statements to facilitate the screening, interpretation of results, and early treatment for some of the most common childhood obesity comorbidities. METHODS: Members of the Children's Hospital Association (formerly NACHRI) FOCUS on a Fitter Future II (FFFII), a collaboration of 25 US pediatric obesity centers, used a combination of the best available evidence and collective clinical experience to develop consensus statements for pediatric obesity-related comorbidities. FFFII also surveyed the participating pediatric obesity centers regarding their current practices. RESULTS: The work group developed consensus statements for use in the evaluation and treatment of lipids, liver enzymes, and blood pressure abnormalities and PCOS in the child with overweight and obesity. The results of the FFFII survey illustrated the variability in the approach for initial evaluation and treatment as well as pattern of referrals to subspecialists among programs. CONCLUSIONS: The consensus statements presented in this article can be a useful tool for PCPs in the management and overall care of children with overweight and obesity.

12 Guideline [Perioperative management of patients with obstructive sleep apnea : update on the practice guidelines of the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force]. 2014

Fahlenkamp, A / Rossaint, R / Coburn, M / Anonymous2560795. ·Klinik für Anästhesiologie, Universitätsklinik der RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstr. 30, 52074, Aachen, Deutschland, anaesthesiologie@ukaachen.de. · ·Anaesthesist · Pubmed #24851836.

ABSTRACT: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a widespread disease which is associated with many cardiovascular diseases and can have health-related consequences for affected patients if untreated. It is known that perioperative airway complications occur more often in OSA patients during general anesthesia. Some years ago the Task Force of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) published practice guidelines on the perioperative approach to OSA patients. These guidelines have now been revised and updated. This article gives a summary of the recommended approach for the perioperative treatment of patients with OSA given in the 2014 guidelines.

13 Guideline Obstructive sleep apnea and primary snoring: treatment. 2014

Zancanella, E / Haddad, F M / Oliveira, L A M P / Nakasato, A / Duarte, B B / Soares, C F P / Cahali, M B / Eckeli, A / Caramelli, B / Drager, L F / Ramos, B D / Nóbrega, M / Fagondes, S C / Andrada, N C / Anonymous5690794 / Anonymous5700794 / Anonymous5710794 / Anonymous5720794 / Anonymous5730794. · ·Braz J Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #24838761.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline Obstructive sleep apnea and primary snoring: diagnosis. 2014

Zancanella, E / Haddad, F M / Oliveira, L A M P / Nakasato, A / Duarte, B B / Soares, C F P / Cahali, M B / Eckeli, A / Caramelli, B / Drager, L F / Ramos, B D / Nóbrega, M / Fagondes, S C / Andrada, N C / Anonymous5640794 / Anonymous5650794 / Anonymous5660794 / Anonymous5670794 / Anonymous5680794. · ·Braz J Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #24838760.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Guideline Practice guidelines for the perioperative management of patients with obstructive sleep apnea: an updated report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Perioperative Management of patients with obstructive sleep apnea. 2014

Anonymous3140779. · ·Anesthesiology · Pubmed #24346178.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline Guidelines to decrease unanticipated hospital admission following adenotonsillectomy in the pediatric population. 2014

Raman, Vidya T / Jatana, Kris R / Elmaraghy, Charles A / Tobias, Joseph D. ·Departments of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States. Electronic address: Vidya.Raman@Nationwidechildrens.org. · Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States. · Departments of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #24239021.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Tonsillectomy has become one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in the pediatric-aged patient. Many of these children are diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Although polysomnography is considered the gold standard, many practioners rely on the clinical examination and parental history. Nationwide Children's Hospital recently instituted pediatric adenotonsillectomy guidelines for hospital admission to help determine which patients should be done in main hospital OR vs. outpatient surgery facility. The main goal was to decrease unanticipated admissions. The secondary goal was to determine areas for practice improvement. METHODS: Using databases for the hospital, operating room, and otolaryngology, all cases with CPT codes 42820, 42830, 42825, 42826, and 42821 were evaluated from October 2009 to August 2012 in the main operating room and 2 outpatient surgery centers. Data for each unanticipated admission were reviewed to determine whether the criteria were met according to the developed guidelines. Fisher's exact test was applied to the unplanned admission rate before and after the institution of the guidelines. Non-paired t-test and a Fisher's exact test were used for comparison of the demographic data between the two groups. RESULTS: Following the institution of the pediatric adenotonsillectomy guidelines, the number of unanticipated admissions decreased from an absolute number of 88 to 43. This represents a decrease from 2.38% to 1.44% (p=0.008). Forty-two percent of the unanticipated admissions prior to establishing guidelines were in patients who would have met criteria for admission based on the guidelines. This decreased to 30% after establishing the guidelines. CONCLUSION: We found that the institution of pediatric adenotonsillectomy guidelines for patients undergoing adenotonsillectomy significantly decreased the rate of unanticipated admission. However, there was still a significant percentage (30%) of unanticipated admissions due to non-compliance with the guidelines demonstrating the need for ongoing practice improvement.

17 Guideline [Introduction to 2011 American clinical practice guideline: polysomnography for sleep disordered breathing prior to tonsillectomy in children]. 2013

Qiu, Shu-yao / Liu, Da-bo. · · Email: daboliu@126.com. ·Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi · Pubmed #24406195.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Guideline Clinical guidelines for oral appliance therapy in the treatment of snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea. 2013

Ngiam, J / Balasubramaniam, R / Darendeliler, M A / Cheng, A T / Waters, K / Sullivan, C E. ·Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales; Faculty of Medicine, The University of Sydney, New South Wales. · ·Aust Dent J · Pubmed #24320895.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this review is to provide guidelines for the use of oral appliances (OAs) for the treatment of snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in Australia. A review of the scientific literature up to June 2012 regarding the clinical use of OAs in the treatment of snoring and OSA was undertaken by a dental and medical sleep specialists team consisting of respiratory sleep physicians, an otolaryngologist, orthodontist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon and an oral medicine specialist. The recommendations are based on the most recent evidence from studies obtained from peer reviewed literature. Oral appliances can be an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of snoring and OSA across a broad range of disease severity. However, the response to therapy is variable. While a significant proportion of subjects have a near complete control of the apnoea and snoring when using an OA, a significant proportion do not respond, and others show a partial response. Measurements of baseline and treatment success should ideally be undertaken. A coordinated team approach between medical practitioner and dentist should be fostered to enhance treatment outcomes. Ongoing patient follow-up to monitor treatment efficacy, OA comfort and side effects are cardinal to long-term treatment success and OA compliance.

19 Guideline [ATS clinical policy statement: congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. Genetic basis, diagnosis and management]. 2013

Weese-Mayer, D E / Berry-Kravis, E M / Ceccherini, I / Keens, T G / Loghmanee, D A / Trang, H / Anonymous3990774. · ·Rev Mal Respir · Pubmed #24182656.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Guideline Management of obstructive sleep apnea in adults: A clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians. 2013

Qaseem, Amir / Holty, Jon-Erik C / Owens, Douglas K / Dallas, Paul / Starkey, Melissa / Shekelle, Paul / Anonymous4150770. ·190 N. Independence Mall West, Philadelphia, PA 19106. · ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #24061345.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on the management of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in adults. METHODS: This guideline is based on published literature from 1966 to September 2010 that was identified by using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. A supplemental MEDLINE search identified additional articles through October 2012. Searches were limited to English-language publications. The clinical outcomes evaluated for this guideline included cardiovascular disease (such as heart failure, hypertension, stroke, and myocardial infarction), type 2 diabetes, death, sleep study measures (such as the Apnea-Hypopnea Index), measures of cardiovascular status (such as blood pressure), measures of diabetes status (such as hemoglobin A1c levels), and quality of life. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations using ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. RECOMMENDATION 1: ACP recommends that all overweight and obese patients diagnosed with OSA should be encouraged to lose weight. (Grade: strong recommendation; low-quality evidence) RECOMMENDATION 2: ACP recommends continuous positive airway pressure treatment as initial therapy for patients diagnosed with OSA. (Grade: strong recommendation; moderate-quality evidence) RECOMMENDATION 3: ACP recommends mandibular advancement devices as an alternative therapy to continuous positive airway pressure treatment for patients diagnosed with OSA who prefer mandibular advancement devices or for those with adverse effects associated with continuous positive airway pressure treatment. (Grade: weak recommendation; low-quality evidence).

21 Guideline An official American Thoracic Society statement: continuous positive airway pressure adherence tracking systems. The optimal monitoring strategies and outcome measures in adults. 2013

Schwab, Richard J / Badr, Safwan M / Epstein, Lawrence J / Gay, Peter C / Gozal, David / Kohler, Malcolm / Lévy, Patrick / Malhotra, Atul / Phillips, Barbara A / Rosen, Ilene M / Strohl, Kingman P / Strollo, Patrick J / Weaver, Edward M / Weaver, Terri E / Anonymous781106. · ·Am J Respir Crit Care Med · Pubmed #23992588.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is considered the treatment of choice for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and studies have shown that there is a correlation between patient adherence and treatment outcomes. Newer CPAP machines can track adherence, hours of use, mask leak, and residual apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Such data provide a strong platform to examine OSA outcomes in a chronic disease management model. However, there are no standards for capturing CPAP adherence data, scoring flow signals, or measuring mask leak, or for how clinicians should use these data. METHODS: American Thoracic Society (ATS) committee members were invited, based on their expertise in OSA and CPAP monitoring. Their conclusions were based on both empirical evidence identified by a comprehensive literature review and clinical experience. RESULTS: CPAP usage can be reliably determined from CPAP tracking systems, but the residual events (apnea/hypopnea) and leak data are not as easy to interpret as CPAP usage and the definitions of these parameters differ among CPAP manufacturers. Nonetheless, ends of the spectrum (very high or low values for residual events or mask leak) appear to be clinically meaningful. CONCLUSIONS: Providers need to understand how to interpret CPAP adherence tracking data. CPAP tracking systems are able to reliably track CPAP adherence. Nomenclature on the CPAP adherence tracking reports needs to be standardized between manufacturers and AHIFlow should be used to describe residual events. Studies should be performed examining the usefulness of the CPAP tracking systems and how these systems affect OSA outcomes.

22 Guideline [Practical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome]. 2013

Nogueira, Facundo / Nigro, Carlos / Cambursano, Hugo / Borsini, Eduardo / Silio, Julio / Avila, Jorge. ·Sección Sueño, Oxigenoterapia y otros Cuidados Respiratorios Domiciliarios, Asociación Argentina de Medicina Respiratoria, Buenos Aires. nogueirafacundo@speedy.com.ar · ·Medicina (B Aires) · Pubmed #23924537.

ABSTRACT: Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is one of the most relevant chronic respiratory pathologies due to its high prevalence and impact in morbidity and mortality. In 2001, the Asociación Argentina de Medicina Respiratoria (AAMR) published the first Argentinean Consensus on Sleep-Related breathing Disorders. Since then, wide new scientific evidence has emerged, increasing significantly the knowledge about this pathology. According to this, the Sleep-Related breathing Disorders and Oxygen Therapy Section of the AAMR, decided to update its Consensus, developing this Practical Guidelines on Management of patients with OSAS. A working group was created with members belonging to the section, experts in OSAS. They extensively reviewed the literature and wrote these guidelines, orientated to practical resolution of clinical problems and giving answers to questions emerged from dealing with patients who suffer from this syndrome. The document defines OSAS and describes the diagnosis and severity criteria, as well as the risk factors, ways of presentation and epidemiology. Clinical consequences, mainly on cognition, cardiovascular system and metabolism are pointed out. Different diagnostic methods, with their indications and technical aspects for validation and interpretation are detailed. Finally, we describe therapeutic alternatives, as well as practical aspects of their implementation. The authors' aim was to generate an accessible tool for teaching and spreading the knowledge on these disorders, which have a great impact in public health.

23 Guideline 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension: the Task Force for the Management of Arterial Hypertension of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) and of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). 2013

Mancia, Giuseppe / Fagard, Robert / Narkiewicz, Krzysztof / Redon, Josep / Zanchetti, Alberto / Böhm, Michael / Christiaens, Thierry / Cifkova, Renata / De Backer, Guy / Dominiczak, Anna / Galderisi, Maurizio / Grobbee, Diederick E / Jaarsma, Tiny / Kirchhof, Paulus / Kjeldsen, Sverre E / Laurent, Stéphane / Manolis, Athanasios J / Nilsson, Peter M / Ruilope, Luis Miguel / Schmieder, Roland E / Sirnes, Per Anton / Sleight, Peter / Viigimaa, Margus / Waeber, Bernard / Zannad, Faiez / Redon, Josep / Dominiczak, Anna / Narkiewicz, Krzysztof / Nilsson, Peter M / Burnier, Michel / Viigimaa, Margus / Ambrosioni, Ettore / Caufield, Mark / Coca, Antonio / Olsen, Michael Hecht / Schmieder, Roland E / Tsioufis, Costas / van de Borne, Philippe / Zamorano, Jose Luis / Achenbach, Stephan / Baumgartner, Helmut / Bax, Jeroen J / Bueno, Héctor / Dean, Veronica / Deaton, Christi / Erol, Cetin / Fagard, Robert / Ferrari, Roberto / Hasdai, David / Hoes, Arno W / Kirchhof, Paulus / Knuuti, Juhani / Kolh, Philippe / Lancellotti, Patrizio / Linhart, Ales / Nihoyannopoulos, Petros / Piepoli, Massimo F / Ponikowski, Piotr / Sirnes, Per Anton / Tamargo, Juan Luis / Tendera, Michal / Torbicki, Adam / Wijns, William / Windecker, Stephan / Clement, Denis L / Coca, Antonio / Gillebert, Thierry C / Tendera, Michal / Rosei, Enrico Agabiti / Ambrosioni, Ettore / Anker, Stefan D / Bauersachs, Johann / Hitij, Jana Brguljan / Caulfield, Mark / De Buyzere, Marc / De Geest, Sabina / Derumeaux, Geneviève Anne / Erdine, Serap / Farsang, Csaba / Funck-Brentano, Christian / Gerc, Vjekoslav / Germano, Giuseppe / Gielen, Stephan / Haller, Herman / Hoes, Arno W / Jordan, Jens / Kahan, Thomas / Komajda, Michel / Lovic, Dragan / Mahrholdt, Heiko / Olsen, Michael Hecht / Ostergren, Jan / Parati, Gianfranco / Perk, Joep / Polonia, Jorge / Popescu, Bogdan A / Reiner, Zeljko / Rydén, Lars / Sirenko, Yuriy / Stanton, Alice / Struijker-Boudier, Harry / Tsioufis, Costas / van de Borne, Philippe / Vlachopoulos, Charalambos / Volpe, Massimo / Wood, David A. ·Centro di Fisiologia Clinica e Ipertensione, Università Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy. giuseppe.mancia@unimib.it · ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #23771844.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline Managing patients with stable respiratory disease planning air travel: a primary care summary of the British Thoracic Society recommendations. 2013

Josephs, Lynn K / Coker, Robina K / Thomas, Mike / Anonymous2330760 / Anonymous2340760. ·Primary Care Research, Aldermoor Health Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. L.Josephs@soton.ac.uk · ·Prim Care Respir J · Pubmed #23732637.

ABSTRACT: Air travel poses medical challenges to passengers with respiratory disease, principally because of exposure to a hypobaric environment. In 2002 the British Thoracic Society published recommendations for adults and children with respiratory disease planning air travel, with a web update in 2004. New full recommendations and a summary were published in 2011, containing key recommendations for the assessment of high-risk patients and identification of those likely to require in-flight supplemental oxygen. This paper highlights the aspects of particular relevance to primary care practitioners with the following key points: (1) At cabin altitudes of 8000 feet (the usual upper limit of in-flight cabin pressure, equivalent to 0.75 atmospheres) the partial pressure of oxygen falls to the equivalent of breathing 15.1% oxygen at sea level. Arterial oxygen tension falls in all passengers; in patients with respiratory disease, altitude may worsen preexisting hypoxaemia. (2) Altitude exposure also influences the volume of any air in cavities, where pressure x volume remain constant (Boyle's law), so that a pneumothorax or closed lung bulla will expand and may cause respiratory distress. Similarly, barotrauma may affect the middle ear or sinuses if these cavities fail to equilibrate. (3) Patients with respiratory disease require clinical assessment and advice before air travel to: (a) optimise usual care; (b) consider contraindications to travel and possible need for in-flight oxygen; (c) consider the need for secondary care referral for further assessment; (d) discuss the risk of venous thromboembolism; and (e) discuss forward planning for the journey.

25 Guideline [Sleep related breathing disorders in adults - recommendations of Polish Society of Lung Diseases]. 2013

Pływaczewski, Robert / Brzecka, Anna / Bielicki, Piotr / Czajkowska-Malinowska, Małgorzata / Cofta, Szczepan / Jonczak, Luiza / Radliński, Jakub / Tażbirek, Maciej / Wasilewska, Jolanta / Anonymous5290756. ·r.plywaczewski@igichp.edu.pl · ·Pneumonol Alergol Pol · Pubmed #23609429.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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