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Sleep Apnea Syndromes: HELP
Articles by Meredith August
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Meredith August wrote the following 2 articles about Sleep Apnea Syndromes.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Does the Medical Comorbidity Profile of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients Treated With Maxillomandibular Advancement Differ From That of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients Managed Nonsurgically? 2018

Ngo, Richard / Pullano, Elaina / Peacock, Zachary S / Lahey, Edward T / August, Meredith. ·Resident, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. · Student, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA. · Assistant Professor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. · Associate Professor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Electronic address: maugust@partners.org. ·J Oral Maxillofac Surg · Pubmed #29425754.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients with retrognathia and measurable anatomic airway determinants may represent a subset of OSA patients and have distinct comorbidity profiles. Our aim was to compare the medical comorbidities of OSA patients managed surgically with maxillomandibular advancement with those of nonsurgical patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional retrospective study, patients for both cohorts were identified through the Massachusetts General Hospital oral and maxillofacial surgery data registry and the Massachusetts General Hospital Research Patient Data Registry. The inclusion criteria consisted of clinical records documenting body mass index (BMI), apnea-hypopnea index, respiratory disturbance index, and/or oxygen nadir. The primary predictor variable was the treatment modality chosen: surgical (maxillomandibular advancement) or nonsurgical. Demographic information and OSA parameters were evaluated. The primary outcome variable was the number of documented comorbidities in each group. Two-sample t tests were used for continuous variables, whereas χ RESULTS: The nonsurgical cohort consisted of 71 patients (67.6% men), and the surgical cohort consisted of 51 patients (84.3% men). Comparison of descriptive characteristics showed that the nonsurgical cohort had a higher average age (49 ± 9.4 years) than the surgical cohort (41 ± 10.7 years, P < .001). In addition, a higher average BMI was present in the nonsurgical group (42.3 ± 11.9 in nonsurgical group vs 29.7 ± 5.5 in surgical group, P < .001). Polysomnogram parameters were comparable with the exception of a higher Epworth Sleepiness Scale score in the surgical cohort (15.5 ± 5.30 in surgical group vs 9.90 ± 6.80 in nonsurgical group, P = .005). The nonsurgical cohort had a higher total number of comorbidities (7 ± 4 in nonsurgical group vs 4 ± 3 in surgical group, P < .001). Hypertension, cardiovascular disease, hyperlipidemia, pulmonary hypertension, obstructive pulmonary disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus had higher prevalences within the nonsurgical group. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that nonsurgically managed OSA patients tend to have more complex medical comorbidity profiles than those managed surgically. Obesity (BMI >30) was more prevalent in the nonsurgical cohort, which may be contributory. The additive contribution of OSA needs to be further elucidated.

2 Article Three-dimensional computed tomographic analysis of airway anatomy in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. 2010

Abramson, Zachary / Susarla, Srinivas / August, Meredith / Troulis, Maria / Kaban, Leonard. ·Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. ·J Oral Maxillofac Surg · Pubmed #20116708.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To identify abnormalities in airway size and shape that correlate with the presence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective case series of patients undergoing treatment of OSA who had preoperative computed tomographic (CT) scans of the upper airway available. Patients who had undergone CT scanning for nonairway pathologic features during the same period served as the controls. Digital 3D-CT reconstructions were made and 12 parameters of airway size and 4 of shape were analyzed. The posterior airway space, middle airway space, and hyoid to mandibular plane distance were measured on the lateral cephalograms of the patients with OSA. Bivariate analysis was used to identify the factors associated with the presence and severity of OSA as measured by the respiratory disturbance index (RDI). Multiple regression analysis identified the factors that correlated with the RDI. RESULTS: Of the 44 patients with OSA, 15 (10 men and 5 women) had pre- and postoperative CT scans available. In addition, 17 patients (11 men and 6 women) were used as controls. The airway length was significantly increased in the patients with OSA (P < .01). On bivariate analysis, the length, lateral/retroglossal anteroposterior dimension ratio and genial tubercle to hyoid bone distance were associated with the RDI (P < .03). On multiple regression analysis, length (P < .01) had a positive correlation and the lateral/retroglossal anteroposterior dimension ratio (P = .04) an inverse correlation with the RDI. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study indicate that the presence of OSA is associated with an increase in airway length. Airways that were more elliptical in shape and mediolaterally oriented (greater lateral/retroglossal anteroposterior dimension ratio) had a decreased tendency toward obstruction.