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Sleep Apnea Syndromes: HELP
Articles by Elisabetta Firinu
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, E. Firinu wrote the following 5 articles about Sleep Apnea Syndromes.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Risk Factors for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Children: State of the Art. 2019

Gulotta, Giampiero / Iannella, Giannicola / Vicini, Claudio / Polimeni, Antonella / Greco, Antonio / de Vincentiis, Marco / Visconti, Irene Claudia / Meccariello, Giuseppe / Cammaroto, Giovanni / De Vito, Andrea / Gobbi, Riccardo / Bellini, Chiara / Firinu, Elisabetta / Pace, Annalisa / Colizza, Andrea / Pelucchi, Stefano / Magliulo, Giuseppe. ·Department of "Organi di Senso", University "Sapienza", 00185 Rome, Italy. · Department of "Organi di Senso", University "Sapienza", 00185 Rome, Italy. giannicola.iannella@uniroma1.it. · Department of Head-Neck Surgery, Otolaryngology, Head-Neck and Oral Surgery Unit, Morgagni Pierantoni Hospital, 47121 Forlì, Italy. giannicola.iannella@uniroma1.it. · Department of Head-Neck Surgery, Otolaryngology, Head-Neck and Oral Surgery Unit, Morgagni Pierantoni Hospital, 47121 Forlì, Italy. · Ear-Nose-Throat & Audiology Unit, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara, Italy. · Department of Oral and Maxillo Facial Sciences, University "Sapienza", 00185 Rome, Italy. ·Int J Environ Res Public Health · Pubmed #31487798.

ABSTRACT: The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) represents only part of a large group of pathologies of variable entity called respiratory sleep disorders (RSD) which include simple snoring and increased upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS). Although the etiopathogenesis of adult OSAS is well known, many aspects of this syndrome in children are still debated. Its prevalence is about 2% in children from 2 to 8 years of age, mostly related to the size of the upper airways adenoid tissue. Several risk factors linked to the development of OSAS are typical of the pediatric age. The object of this paper is to analyze the state of the art on this specific topic, discussing its implications in terms of diagnosis and management.

2 Article Aging effect on sleepiness and apneas severity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a meta-analysis study. 2019

Iannella, Giannicola / Vicini, Claudio / Colizza, Andrea / Meccariello, Giuseppe / Polimeni, Antonella / Greco, Antonio / de Vincentiis, Marco / de Vito, Andrea / Cammaroto, Giovanni / Gobbi, Riccardo / Bellini, Chiara / Firinu, Elisabetta / Pelucchi, Stefano / Gulotta, Giampiero / Visconti, Irene Claudia / di Luca, Milena / Magliulo, Giuseppe. ·Department of 'Organi Di Senso', University "Sapienza", Via Satrico 7, 00183, Rome, Italy. giannicolaiannella@hotmail.it. · Department of Head-Neck Surgery, Otolaryngology, Head-Neck and Oral Surgery Unit, Morgagni Pierantoni Hospital, Forlì, Italy. giannicolaiannella@hotmail.it. · Department of Head-Neck Surgery, Otolaryngology, Head-Neck and Oral Surgery Unit, Morgagni Pierantoni Hospital, Forlì, Italy. · Department ENT and Audiology, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. · Department of 'Organi Di Senso', University "Sapienza", Via Satrico 7, 00183, Rome, Italy. · Department of Oral and Maxillo Facial Sciences, University "Sapienza", Rome, Italy. · Department of ENT, University of Catania, Catania, Italy. ·Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #31482333.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Different authors have reported that aging could be associated with changes in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) related parameters (apnea/hypopnea index, SpO METHODS: In this paper, we reviewed the literature regarding the studies which compared older (> 65 years old) and young (< 65 years old) OSA patients regarding the effect of aging on daytime sleepiness (ESS evaluation) and OSA severity (AHI evaluation). A meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of age on daytime sleepiness and OSAS severity was also performed to corroborate previously reported experience. RESULTS: Meta-analysis showed no statistical (p = 0.8) differences regarding AHI differences emerged from the comparison of the two groups of patients. Elderly patients (> 65 years old) showed less daytime sleepiness, showing a statistical difference in the meta-analysis of data (p = 0.004) CONCLUSION: Although a direct correlation between aging and AHI values would seem to be present, no significant differences in baseline AHI between young (< 65-years-old) and elderly (> 65-years-old) patients emerged in this meta-analysis study. The effects of OSAS on daytime sleepiness seem to be much more prominent in young or middle-aged patients than in elderly patients.

3 Article Prospective multicentre study on barbed reposition pharyngoplasty standing alone or as a part of multilevel surgery for sleep apnoea. 2018

Montevecchi, F / Meccariello, G / Firinu, E / Rashwan, M S / Arigliani, M / De Benedetto, M / Palumbo, A / Bahgat, Y / Bahgat, A / Lugo Saldana, R / Marzetti, A / Pignataro, L / Mantovani, M / Rinaldi, V / Carrasco, M / Freire, F / Delgado, I / Salamanca, F / Bianchi, A / Onerci, M / Agostini, P / Romano, L / Benazzo, M / Baptista, P / Salzano, F / Dallan, I / Nuzzo, S / Vicini, C. ·Head and Neck Department, ENT & Oral Surgery Unit, G.B. Morgagni - L. Pierantoni Hospital, Forlì - Infermi Hospital, Faenza - ASL of Romagna, Forli, University of Ferrrara, Italy. · Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Fazzi Hospital, Lecce, Italy. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Grupo Medico San Pedro, Monterrey, Mexico. · Department of Otolaryngology, Fabrizio Spaziani Hospital, Frosinone, Italy. · Department of Otolaryngology, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Doctor Peset University Hospital, Valencia, Spain. · Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital Professor Doutor Fernando Fonseca, Amadora, Portugal. · Department of Otolaryngology, S. Pio X Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Ear Nose Throat-Head and Neck Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. · Department of Otolaryngology, San Bassiano Hospital, Bassano del Grappa, Vicenza, Italy. · Department of Otolaryngology Head Neck Surgery, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · Department of Otolaringology, Campus Universitario, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Otorhinolaryngologic Unit, San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d' Aragona University Hospital, Salerno, Italy. · First Otorhinolaryngologic Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy. · Biostatistics Unit, G.B. Morgagni - L. Pierantoni Hospital, Forlì - ASL of Romagna, Forli, Italy. ·Clin Otolaryngol · Pubmed #28981208.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to demonstrate in a prospective multicentre study that Barbed Reposition Pharyngoplasty (BRP) procedure is safe and effective in management of obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Multicentre study. PARTICIPANTS: Patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnoea. MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURES: Values of postoperative apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI), oxygen desaturation index (ODI), epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). RESULTS: 111 Barbed Reposition Pharyngoplasty procedures standing alone or as a part of multilevel surgery for OSAHS, performed between January and September 2016, were analysed in 15 different centres. The average hospitalisation period was 2.5 ± 0.5 days. The mean patient age was 46.3 ± 10.5 years. The average body mass index at the time of the procedure was 27.9 ± 3.2, and the majority of the patients were men (83%). The mean preoperative and postoperative apnoea/hypopnea index was 33.4 ± 19.5 and 13.5 ± 10.3, respectively (P < .001). The mean preoperative and postoperative ESS score was 10.2 ± 4.5 and 6.1 ± 3.6, respectively (P < .001). The mean preoperative and postoperative ODI were 29.6 ± 20.7 and 12.7 ± 10.8, respectively (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing BRP standing alone or as part of a multilevel approach for the treatment of OSAHS have a reasonable expectation for success with minimal morbidity.

4 Article The interpretation of compact polysomnography/polygraphy in sleep breathing disorders patients: a validation's study. 2017

Bosi, Marcello / De Vito, Andrea / Bellini, Chiara / D'Agostino, Giovanni / Firinu, Elisabetta / Gobbi, Riccardo / Pacella, Alessandro / Filograna Pignatelli, Giulio / Zeccardo, Ermelinda / Poletti, Venerino / Vicini, Claudio. ·Department of Diseases of the Thorax, GB Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, AUSL of Romagna, Forlì, Italy. · Ear-Nose-Throat Unit, Head and Neck Department, Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, AUSL of Romagna, 47121, Forlì, Italy. dr.andrea.devito@gmail.com. · Ear-Nose-Throat Unit, Head and Neck Department, Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, AUSL of Romagna, 47121, Forlì, Italy. · Oral Medical and Biotechnological Science Department, Obstructive Sleep Breathing Disorders Screening University Center, G. D'Annunzio University, Chieti, Italy. · Department of Respiratory Diseases and Allergy, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · ENT Clinic, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. ·Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #28451755.

ABSTRACT: The Otorhinolaryngologist (ENT) frequently has to deal with OSA or suspicious OSA patients and undergone polysomnography (PSG) or portable monitoring (PM) and should be confident about the quality and consistency of the polysomnographic diagnosis. The main polysomnographic traces compressed in a unique epoch, defined as compact PSG/PM (CP), could represent an efficient tool to confirm the quality of PSG/PM Sleep Breathing Disorders diagnosis. This is a validation's study of a CP interpretation's method, analyzing the learning curve, the level of diagnostic accuracy, and the inter-operator agreement in interpreting the CP pattern between a group of ENT specialists not skilled in PSG/PM scoring, but managing SBD patients during daily practice. Seven ENT specialists have been enrolled in the study. 50 CP traces (ranging from normal to all main SBD patterns) have been showed to each participant for the interpretation and scoring process, before and after a 2-h theoretical-practical interactive lesson, focusing on the recognition of the four main oximetric patterns on CP traces (normal, phasic, prolonged, and overlap patterns). RESULTS: before and after the theoretical-practical interactive lesson, the whole diagnostic accuracy in interpreting the 50 CP has been reported improved from 0.12 to 0.80 (median 0.52) to 0.82-0.96 (median 0.92) (p = 0.006) and the inter-scorers' agreement showed a kappa value increased from of 0.18 to 0.75 (p < 0.0001). A complete clinical diagnostic evaluation is essential in OSA patients and the ENT specialist should be concerned to verify if the patient, suitable for surgical therapy, is affected really by an isolated form of OSA. The CP interpretation allows a checking of the proper nosographic SBD framework and could be significantly important for all ENT specialists not skilled in PSG/PM scoring, but managing SBD patients during daily practice. The data reported in our validation's study showed that the CP interpretation's method is easy to apply, with a rapid learning curve. The level of diagnostic accuracy is high with a high inter-scorer agreement in interpreting the CP patterns.

5 Article The importance of drug-induced sedation endoscopy (D.I.S.E.) techniques in surgical decision making: conventional versus target controlled infusion techniques-a prospective randomized controlled study and a retrospective surgical outcomes analysis. 2017

De Vito, Andrea / Agnoletti, Vanni / Zani, Gianluca / Corso, Ruggero Massimo / D'Agostino, Giovanni / Firinu, Elisabetta / Marchi, Chiara / Hsu, Ying-Shuo / Maitan, Stefano / Vicini, Claudio. ·Otorhinolaryngology and Oral Surgery Unit, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, Forlì, Italy. dr.andrea.devito@gmail.com. · Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, M. Bufalini Hospital, Cesena, Italy. · Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Santa Maria delle Croci Hospital, Ravenna, Italy. · Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, G.B. Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, Forlì, Italy. · Otorhinolaryngology and Oral Surgery Unit, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, Forlì, Italy. · Department of Otolaryngology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China. ·Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #28213776.

ABSTRACT: Drug-Induced Sedation Endoscopy (DISE) consists of the direct observation of the upper airways during sedative-induced sleep, allowing the identification of the sites of pharyngeal collapse, which is the main pathological event in Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). The Authors have compared Target Controlled Infusion (TCI) sedation endoscopy (TCI-DISE) technique to conventional DISE (CDISE), performed by a manual bolus injection of sedative agent, to recreate accurately and safely snoring and apnea patterns comparable to natural sleep. The authors conducted a prospective, randomized, long-term study and a retrospective analysis of surgical outcomes. The apnea-event observation and its correlation with pharyngeal collapse patterns is the primary endpoint; secondary endpoints are defined as stability and safety of sedation plan of DISE-TCI technique. From January 2009 to January 2011, OSA patients were included in the study and randomly allocated into two groups: the bolus injection conventional DISE group and the TCI-DISE group. Third endpoint is to compare the surgical outcomes enrolling OSA patients from January 2009 to June 2015. We recorded the complete apnea-event at oropharynx and hypopharynx levels in 15/50 pts in conventional DISE group (30%) and in 99/123 pts in TCI-DISE group (81%) (p < 0.0001). Four pts needed oxygen in conventional DISE group because a severe desaturation occurred during the first bolus of propofol (1 mg/kg) (p = 0.4872 ns). We recorded instability of the sedation plan in 13 patients of conventional DISE group (65%) and 1 patient of the TCI-DISE group (5%) (p = 0.0001). In 37 TCI-DISE group surgical patients we reported a significant reduction of postoperative AHI (from 42.7 ± 20.2 to 11.4 ± 10.3) in comparison with postoperative AHI in 15 C-DISE group surgical patients (from 41.3 ± 23.4 to 20.4 ± 15.5) (p = 0.05). Our results suggest the DISE-TCI technique as first choice in performing sleep-endoscopy because of its increased accuracy, stability and safety. However, it is mandatory an accurate assessment of PSG/PM, which allows us to differentiate OSA patients in whom UA anatomical abnormalities are predominant in comparison with not-anatomical pathophysiologic factors, achieving good surgical patient's selection and outcomes as a consequence.