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Sleep Apnea Syndromes: HELP
Articles by Ying-Shuo Hsu
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Ying-Shuo Hsu wrote the following 5 articles about Sleep Apnea Syndromes.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Screening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Snoring Patients Using a Patch-Type Device With Electrocardiogram and 3-Axis Accelerometer. 2020

Hsu, Ying-Shuo / Chen, Tien-Yu / Wu, Dean / Lin, Chia-Mo / Juang, Jer-Nan / Liu, Wen-Te. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. · Department of Psychiatry, Tri-Service General Hospital, School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan. · Institute of Brain Science, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Sleep Center, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. · Department of Neurology, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. · Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Division of Chest Medicine, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Chemistry, Fu-Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. · Graduate Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Science, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. · Department of Engineering Science, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan. · Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan. · Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. · School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Sleep Science Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University. ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #32267228.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: People with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) remain undiagnosed owing to lack of easy and comfortable screening tools. Through this study, we aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest wall motion and cyclic variation of heart rate (CVHR) in detecting OSA by using a single-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) patch with a 3-axis accelerometer. METHODS: In total, 119 snoring patients simultaneously underwent polysomnography (PSG) with a single-lead ECG patch. Signals of chest wall motion and CVHR from the single-lead ECG patch were collected. The chest effort index (CEI) was calculated using the chest wall motion recorded by a 3-axis accelerometer in the device. The ability of CEI and CVHR indices in diagnosing moderate-to-severe OSA (apnea hypopnea index ≥ 15) was compared using the area under the curve (AUC) by using the DeLong test. RESULTS: CVHR detected moderate-to-severe OSA with 52.9% sensitivity and 94.1% specificity (AUC: 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.67-0.84, optimal cutoff: 21.2 events/h). By contrast, CEI identified moderate-to-severe OSA with 80% sensitivity and 79.4% specificity (AUC: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.80-0.94, optimal cutoff: 7.1 events/h). CEI significantly outperformed CVHR with regard to the discrimination ability for moderate-to-severe OSA (delta AUC: 0.11, 95% CI: 0.009-0.21, P = 0.032). For determining severe OSA, the performance of discrimination ability was greater (AUC = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.85-0.95) when combining these two signals. CONCLUSIONS: Both CEI and CVHR recorded from a patch-type device with ECG and a 3-axis accelerometer can be used to detect moderate-to-severe OSA. Thus, incorporation of CEI is helpful in the detection of sleep apnea by using a single-lead ECG with a 3-axis accelerometer.

2 Article Association of cumulative surgeon volume and risk of complications in adult uvulopalatopharyngoplasty: a population-based study in Taiwan. 2020

Hsu, Ying-Shuo / Hsu, Wei-Chung / Ko, Jenq-Yuh / Yeh, Te-Huei / Lee, Chia-Hsuan / Kang, Kun-Tai. ·Department of Otolaryngology, Shin Kong Wu-Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Otolaryngology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Otolaryngology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Otolaryngology, Taipei Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, New Taipei City, Taiwan. · Department of Nursing, Hsin Sheng Junior College of Medical Care and Management, Taoyuan, Taiwan. ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #31992400.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: Patients with obstructive sleep apnea undergoing upper airway surgery are known to have an increased perioperative risk, however, the effect of surgeon volume on this risk is largely unknown. We compared the 30-day readmission, bleeding, and mortality rates in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea undergoing uvulopalatopharyngoplasty by cumulative surgeon volume. The objective of this study is to compare the risks of complications among different cumulative surgeon volume groups in adult patients undergoing uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and multilevel surgery. METHODS: In this retrospective study, data of all adult inpatients (aged older than 18 years) who underwent uvulopalatopharyngoplasty in Taiwan between 2000 and 2012 were identified from the National Health Insurance Research Database and then analyzed. Using mixed-effect logistic regression, we compared the risks of major complications in patients undergoing uvulopalatopharyngoplasty alone, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty with nasal surgery, and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty with tongue or hypopharyngeal surgery according to groups of cumulative surgeon volume (divided into four quartiles). RESULTS: A total of 36,483 adults were identified (mean age, 38.6 years; 73.7% men). When quartile 4 was used as reference, very low surgeon volume (quartile 1) was associated with higher risks of readmission within 30 days (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-1.57, P < .001), in-hospital death (aOR, 6.14, 95% CI 1.33-28.27, P = .020), and 30-day mortality (aOR, 4.90, 95% CI 1.83-13.09, P = .002). CONCLUSIONS: Higher complication rates in uvulopalatopharyngoplasty appear to be associated with very low cumulative surgeon volume.

3 Article Readmission after Adult Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty: A Population-Based Inpatient Cohort Study in Taiwan. 2019

Hsu, Ying-Shuo / Hsu, Wei-Chung / Ko, Jenq-Yuh / Yeh, Te-Huei / Lee, Chia-Hsuan / Kang, Kun-Tai. ·1 Department of Otolaryngology, Shin Kong Wu-Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · 2 Department of Otolaryngology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · 3 Department of Otolaryngology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei City, Taiwan. · 4 Department of Otolaryngology, Taipei Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, New Taipei City, Taiwan. · 5 Department of Nursing, Hsin Sheng Junior College of Medical Care and Management, Taoyuan, Taiwan. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #30477389.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate readmissions among adult inpatients who underwent uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) in Taiwan. DESIGN: Population-based survey. SETTING: Retrospective study with the National Health Insurance Database. METHODS: All cases of inpatient adult UPPP (age >20 years) from 1997 to 2012 were identified through International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. Factors associated with readmission within 30 days after surgery were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 38,839 adults with UPPP were identified (mean age, 39.3 years; men, 73.7%). The incidence of UPPP was 14.6 per 100 000 adults, which increased from 1997 to 2012 (6.7 to 16.7 per 100,000, P CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of adult UPPP increased from 1997 to 2012 in Taiwan. Age, sex, comorbidity, concurrent hypopharyngeal surgery, and drug administration were associated with readmission after inpatient UPPP.

4 Article Does Sleep Endoscopy Staging Pattern Correlate With Outcome of Advanced Palatopharyngoplasty for Moderate to Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea? 2017

Hsu, Ying-Shuo / Jacobowitz, Ofer. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · ENT and Allergy Associates, New York, New York. ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #28760191.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: Although drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) is an accepted method to localize upper airway obstruction, it is not known whether all sites identified by DISE must be treated to achieve sufficient apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) improvement. The aim of this study was to compare outcomes for unilevel (upper) versus multilevel DISE collapse patterns in a patient cohort that only underwent modern palatopharyngoplasty. Our hypothesis was that not all tongue base-level obstructions on DISE must be treated. METHODS: Thirty-eight patients with mean AHI of 45 events/h underwent DISE followed by palatopharyngoplasty. Outcome was measured by polysomnography or home sleep apnea testing. RESULTS: Eleven patients (29%) had multilevel, complete tongue base obstruction and nineteen (50%) had no obstruction. These two groups were similar in age, body mass index, and AHI; the complete group had smaller tonsils and higher tongue position. The postoperative success rate and AHI in the group without tongue base obstruction were not significantly different from those of the complete group (68%; 17.4 ± 11.0 versus 73%; 15.4 ± 20.5, CONCLUSIONS: Patients with multilevel obstruction on DISE, treated with palatopharyngoplasty alone, had similar AHI outcome as those with unilevel obstruction. Multilevel surgery may not be needed in some patients with a multilevel obstruction pattern. Circumferential collapse of velum, however, was associated with a higher residual AHI.

5 Article The importance of drug-induced sedation endoscopy (D.I.S.E.) techniques in surgical decision making: conventional versus target controlled infusion techniques-a prospective randomized controlled study and a retrospective surgical outcomes analysis. 2017

De Vito, Andrea / Agnoletti, Vanni / Zani, Gianluca / Corso, Ruggero Massimo / D'Agostino, Giovanni / Firinu, Elisabetta / Marchi, Chiara / Hsu, Ying-Shuo / Maitan, Stefano / Vicini, Claudio. ·Otorhinolaryngology and Oral Surgery Unit, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, Forlì, Italy. dr.andrea.devito@gmail.com. · Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, M. Bufalini Hospital, Cesena, Italy. · Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Santa Maria delle Croci Hospital, Ravenna, Italy. · Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, G.B. Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, Forlì, Italy. · Otorhinolaryngology and Oral Surgery Unit, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, Forlì, Italy. · Department of Otolaryngology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China. ·Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #28213776.

ABSTRACT: Drug-Induced Sedation Endoscopy (DISE) consists of the direct observation of the upper airways during sedative-induced sleep, allowing the identification of the sites of pharyngeal collapse, which is the main pathological event in Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). The Authors have compared Target Controlled Infusion (TCI) sedation endoscopy (TCI-DISE) technique to conventional DISE (CDISE), performed by a manual bolus injection of sedative agent, to recreate accurately and safely snoring and apnea patterns comparable to natural sleep. The authors conducted a prospective, randomized, long-term study and a retrospective analysis of surgical outcomes. The apnea-event observation and its correlation with pharyngeal collapse patterns is the primary endpoint; secondary endpoints are defined as stability and safety of sedation plan of DISE-TCI technique. From January 2009 to January 2011, OSA patients were included in the study and randomly allocated into two groups: the bolus injection conventional DISE group and the TCI-DISE group. Third endpoint is to compare the surgical outcomes enrolling OSA patients from January 2009 to June 2015. We recorded the complete apnea-event at oropharynx and hypopharynx levels in 15/50 pts in conventional DISE group (30%) and in 99/123 pts in TCI-DISE group (81%) (p < 0.0001). Four pts needed oxygen in conventional DISE group because a severe desaturation occurred during the first bolus of propofol (1 mg/kg) (p = 0.4872 ns). We recorded instability of the sedation plan in 13 patients of conventional DISE group (65%) and 1 patient of the TCI-DISE group (5%) (p = 0.0001). In 37 TCI-DISE group surgical patients we reported a significant reduction of postoperative AHI (from 42.7 ± 20.2 to 11.4 ± 10.3) in comparison with postoperative AHI in 15 C-DISE group surgical patients (from 41.3 ± 23.4 to 20.4 ± 15.5) (p = 0.05). Our results suggest the DISE-TCI technique as first choice in performing sleep-endoscopy because of its increased accuracy, stability and safety. However, it is mandatory an accurate assessment of PSG/PM, which allows us to differentiate OSA patients in whom UA anatomical abnormalities are predominant in comparison with not-anatomical pathophysiologic factors, achieving good surgical patient's selection and outcomes as a consequence.