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  Site Guide ··   
Sleep Apnea Syndromes: HELP
Articles by Simon C. Warby
Based on 3 articles published since 2009
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Simon Warby wrote the following 3 articles about Sleep Apnea Syndromes.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Biomarkers of dementia in obstructive sleep apnea. 2018

Baril, Andrée-Ann / Carrier, Julie / Lafrenière, Alexandre / Warby, Simon / Poirier, Judes / Osorio, Ricardo S / Ayas, Najib / Dubé, Marie-Pierre / Petit, Dominique / Gosselin, Nadia / Anonymous861007. ·Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada. · Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Department of Psychology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada. · Centre for Studies on Prevention of Alzheimer's disease, Douglas Institute, Montreal, Canada; Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. · Department of Psychiatry, Center for Brain Health, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, USA. · Division of Critical Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; Center for Health Evaluation & Outcomes Sciences, St. Paul Hospital, Vancouver, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Beaulieu-Saucier Pharmacogenomics Center, Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Canada. · Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montreal, Canada. · Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Department of Psychology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada. Electronic address: nadia.gosselin@umontreal.ca. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #30241998.

ABSTRACT: Epidemiologic and mechanistic evidence is increasingly supporting the notion that obstructive sleep apnea is a risk factor for dementia. Hence, the identification of patients at risk of cognitive decline due to obstructive sleep apnea may significantly improve preventive strategies and treatment decision-making. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood biomarkers obtained through genomic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches are improving the ability to predict incident dementia. Therefore, fluid biomarkers have the potential to predict vulnerability to neurodegeneration in individuals with obstructive sleep apnea, as well as deepen our understanding of pathophysiological processes linking obstructive sleep apnea and dementia. Many fluid biomarkers linked to Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia show abnormal levels in individuals with obstructive sleep apnea, suggesting that these conditions share common underlying mechanisms, including amyloid and tau protein neuropathology, inflammation, oxidative stress, and metabolic disturbances. Markers of these processes include amyloid-β, tau proteins, inflammatory cytokines, acute-phase proteins, antioxydants and oxidized products, homocysteine and clusterin (apolipoprotein J). Thus, these biomarkers may have the ability to identify adults with obstructive sleep apnea at high risk of dementia and provide an opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Large cohort studies are necessary to establish a specific fluid biomarker panel linking obstructive sleep apnea to dementia risk.

2 Article Multiethnic Meta-Analysis Identifies RAI1 as a Possible Obstructive Sleep Apnea-related Quantitative Trait Locus in Men. 2018

Chen, Han / Cade, Brian E / Gleason, Kevin J / Bjonnes, Andrew C / Stilp, Adrienne M / Sofer, Tamar / Conomos, Matthew P / Ancoli-Israel, Sonia / Arens, Raanan / Azarbarzin, Ali / Bell, Graeme I / Below, Jennifer E / Chun, Sung / Evans, Daniel S / Ewert, Ralf / Frazier-Wood, Alexis C / Gharib, Sina A / Haba-Rubio, José / Hagen, Erika W / Heinzer, Raphael / Hillman, David R / Johnson, W Craig / Kutalik, Zoltan / Lane, Jacqueline M / Larkin, Emma K / Lee, Seung Ku / Liang, Jingjing / Loredo, Jose S / Mukherjee, Sutapa / Palmer, Lyle J / Papanicolaou, George J / Penzel, Thomas / Peppard, Paul E / Post, Wendy S / Ramos, Alberto R / Rice, Ken / Rotter, Jerome I / Sands, Scott A / Shah, Neomi A / Shin, Chol / Stone, Katie L / Stubbe, Beate / Sul, Jae Hoon / Tafti, Mehdi / Taylor, Kent D / Teumer, Alexander / Thornton, Timothy A / Tranah, Gregory J / Wang, Chaolong / Wang, Heming / Warby, Simon C / Wellman, D Andrew / Zee, Phyllis C / Hanis, Craig L / Laurie, Cathy C / Gottlieb, Daniel J / Patel, Sanjay R / Zhu, Xiaofeng / Sunyaev, Shamil R / Saxena, Richa / Lin, Xihong / Redline, Susan. ·1 Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · 2 Human Genetics Center, Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, School of Public Health and. · 3 Center for Precision Health, School of Public Health & School of Biomedical Informatics, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas. · 4 Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · 5 Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · 6 Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. · 7 Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · 8 Center for Genomic Medicine and Department of Anesthesia, Pain, and Critical Care Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · 9 Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · 10 Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, California. · 11 the Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Division of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · 12 Section of Adult and Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. · 13 Vanderbilt Genetics Institute, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · 14 Division of Medical Sciences, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · 15 California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, California. · 16 Internal Medicine B, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. · 17 Children's Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · 18 Computational Medicine Core, Center for Lung Biology, University of Washington Medicine Sleep Center, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · 19 Center of Investigation and Research on Sleep, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland. · 20 Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. · 21 Department of Pulmonary Physiology and Sleep Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. · 22 Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University Hospital of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · 23 Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland. · 24 Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts. · 25 Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · 26 Institute of Human Genomic Study, College of Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Jeokgum-ro, Danwon-gu, Ansan-si, Gyeonggi-Do, Republic of Korea. · 27 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. · 28 Division of Pulmonary Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California. · 29 Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health, Flinders Centre of Research Excellence, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · 30 School of Public Health, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · 31 Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland. · 32 University Hospital Charité Berlin, Sleep Center, Berlin, Germany. · 33 Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · 34 Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida. · 35 Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Los Angeles BioMedical Research Institute and Department of Pediatrics at Harbor-University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, California. · 36 Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · 37 Department of Pulmonary, Sleep, and Critical Care Medicine, College of Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Jeokgum-ro, Danwon-gu, Ansan-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea. · 38 Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. · 39 Department of Physiology, Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · 40 Institute for Community Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. · 41 Computational and Systems Biology, Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore. · 42 Department of Psychiatry, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · 43 Department of Neurology and Sleep Medicine Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. · 44 Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts. · 45 Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · 46 Department of Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; and. · 47 Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol · Pubmed #29077507.

ABSTRACT: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common heritable disorder displaying marked sexual dimorphism in disease prevalence and progression. Previous genetic association studies have identified a few genetic loci associated with OSA and related quantitative traits, but they have only focused on single ethnic groups, and a large proportion of the heritability remains unexplained. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) is a commonly used quantitative measure characterizing OSA severity. Because OSA differs by sex, and the pathophysiology of obstructive events differ in rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep, we hypothesized that additional genetic association signals would be identified by analyzing the NREM/REM-specific AHI and by conducting sex-specific analyses in multiethnic samples. We performed genome-wide association tests for up to 19,733 participants of African, Asian, European, and Hispanic/Latino American ancestry in 7 studies. We identified rs12936587 on chromosome 17 as a possible quantitative trait locus for NREM AHI in men (N = 6,737; P = 1.7 × 10

3 Article Nocturnal intermittent hypoxia is independently associated with pain in subjects suffering from sleep-disordered breathing. 2013

Doufas, Anthony G / Tian, Lu / Davies, Margaret Frances / Warby, Simon C. ·* Associate Professor, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, and Outcomes Research Consortium, Cleveland, Ohio. † Assistant Professor, Department of Health Research and Policy, ‡ Director of Faculty Development, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine. § Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, and Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine. ·Anesthesiology · Pubmed #24025612.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: On the basis of experimental and clinical evidence, the authors hypothesized that nocturnal hypoxemia would be associated with pain reports in subjects suffering from sleep-disordered breathing, independently of sleep fragmentation and inflammation. METHODS: After obtaining institutional approval and access to the Cleveland Family Study phenotype and genotype data, the authors used proportional odds regression to examine the association between arterial desaturation and four different types of pain, as well as their composite measure, sequentially adjusted for: (1) clinical characteristics and (2) sleep fragmentation and inflammation. The authors also examined the association of selected candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms with pain reports. RESULTS: Decreased minimum nocturnal arterial saturation increased the odds for morning headache (adjusted odds ratio per SD=1.36; 95% CI [1.08-1.71]; P=0.009), headache disrupting sleep (1.29 [1.10-1.51]; P=0.002), and chest pain while in bed (1.37 [1.10-1.70]; P=0.004). A decrease in the minimum nocturnal saturation from 92 to 75% approximately doubled the odds for pain. One single-nucleotide polymorphism for the α 1 chain of collagen type XI (COL11A1-rs1676486) gene was significantly associated with headache disrupting sleep (odds ratio=1.72 [1.01-2.94]; P=0.038), pain disrupting sleep (odds ratio=1.85 [1.04-3.28]; P=0.018), and pain composite (odds ratio=1.89 [1.14-3.14]; P=0.001). CONCLUSION: Nocturnal arterial desaturation may be associated with an increased pain in subjects with sleep-disordered breathing, independently of sleep fragmentation and inflammation.