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  Site Guide ··   
Sleep Apnea Syndromes: HELP
Articles by Lisa F. Wolfe
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Lisa Wolfe wrote the following 8 articles about Sleep Apnea Syndromes.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Sleep disorders in traumatic brain injury. 2018

Wolfe, Lisa F / Sahni, Ashima S / Attarian, Hrayr. ·Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. · Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Neurology Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. ·NeuroRehabilitation · Pubmed #30347632.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sleep disorders play a significant role in the care of those with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). OBJECTIVE: To provide a literature review on the interaction of sleep and circadian processes on those with TBI. METHODS: A literature review was conducted on PubMed using the following key words and their combination: "Sleep Apnea", "Traumatic Brain Injury", "Circadian", "Parasomnia", "Insomnia", "Hypersomnia", "Narcolepsy", and "Restless Legs". We review the spectrum of traumatic brain injury associated sleep disorders and discuss clinical approaches to diagnosis and treatment. RESULTS: Disordered sleep and wakefulness after TBI is common. Sleep disruption contributes to morbidity, such as the development of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral deficits, and prolongs the recovery phase after injury. Early recognition and correction of these problems may limit the secondary effects of traumatic brain injury and improve neuro recovery/patient outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: A more focused approach to sleep health is appropriate when caring for those with TBI.

2 Review Initiation of Noninvasive Ventilation for Sleep Related Hypoventilation Disorders: Advanced Modes and Devices. 2018

Selim, Bernardo J / Wolfe, Lisa / Coleman, John M / Dewan, Naresh A. ·Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL. · Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Creighton University, Omaha, NE. Electronic address: ndewan@creighton.edu. ·Chest · Pubmed #28694199.

ABSTRACT: Although noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has been used since the 1950s in the polio epidemic, the development of modern bilevel positive airway pressure (BPAP) devices did not become a reality until the 1990s. Over the past 25 years, BPAP technology options have increased exponentially. The number of patients receiving this treatment both in the acute setting and at home is growing steadily. However, a knowledge gap exists in the way the settings on these devices are adjusted to achieve synchrony and match the patient's unique physiology of respiratory failure. This issue is further complicated by differences in pressure and flow dynamic settings among different types of NIV devices available for inpatient and home care.

3 Review ATS Core Curriculum 2017: Part I. Adult Sleep Medicine. 2017

Jamil, Shazia M / Conwell, Walter D / T Poston, Jason / Patel, Sarah / Billings, Molly / Boland, Elaine / Gehrman, Philip / Chang, Melisa / Martin, Jennifer L / Khadadah, Sulaiman / Kaminska, Marta / Sharma, Rahul / Wolfe, Lisa / Yafawi, Jihane Zaza Dit / Hammond, Terese / De Cruz, Sharon / Balachandran, Jay / Wang, Tisha. ·1 Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, California. · 2 University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California. · 3 Department of Pulmonology, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Denver, Colorado. · 4 Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. · 5 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. · 6 UW Medicine Sleep Center, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. · 7 Department of Psychiatry, Corporal Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · 8 Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · 9 Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, and. · 11 Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. · 10 Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Health System, Los Angeles, California. · 12 Respirology Division/Sleep Laboratory, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · 13 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. · 14 Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California; and. · 15 Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Columbia St. Mary's Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ·Ann Am Thorac Soc · Pubmed #28857627.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Review Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation: review and update. 2014

Patwari, Pallavi P / Wolfe, Lisa F. ·Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA. ·Curr Opin Pediatr · Pubmed #24914877.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The focus of this review is to compare and contrast two orphan disorders of late-onset hypoventilation. Specifically, rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) and congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) are distinct in presentation, pathophysiology, and etiology. RECENT FINDINGS: While limited new information is available, appreciation and understanding of rare disorders can be attained through case reports. Recent literature in ROHHAD has included case reports with new findings that may provide insight into pathophysiology involving possible aberrant immune process and dysregulation at the level of the orexinergic system. SUMMARY: The etiology of ROHHAD continues to be elusive. The hope is that, with growing recognition, discussion, and investigation into the overlap of ROHHAD with disorders outside congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, further advancement will be made.

5 Review The changing landscape of adult home noninvasive ventilation technology, use, and reimbursement in the United States. 2014

Sunwoo, Bernie Y / Mulholland, Mary / Rosen, Ilene M / Wolfe, Lisa F. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Division of Sleep Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Electronic address: bernie.sunwoo@uphs.upenn.edu. · Department of Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Division of Sleep Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL. ·Chest · Pubmed #24798837.

ABSTRACT: There has been an exponential increase in the use of home noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Despite growing use, there is a paucity of evidence-based guidelines and practice standards in the United States to assist clinicians in the initiation and ongoing management of home NIV. Consequently, home NIV practices are being influenced by complicated local reimbursement policies and coding. This article aims to provide a practice management perspective for clinicians providing home NIV, including Local Coverage Determination reimbursement criteria for respiratory assist devices, Durable Medical Equipment coding, and Current Procedural Terminology coding to optimize clinical care and minimize lost revenue. It highlights the need for further research and development of evidence-based clinical practice standards to ensure best practice policies are in place for this rapidly evolving patient population.

6 Article The complex sleep apnea resolution study: a prospective randomized controlled trial of continuous positive airway pressure versus adaptive servoventilation therapy. 2014

Morgenthaler, Timothy I / Kuzniar, Tomasz J / Wolfe, Lisa F / Willes, Leslee / McLain, William C / Goldberg, Rochelle. ·Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL. · Willes Consulting Group, Inc. · SleepMed, Columbia, SC. · Sleep Medicine Services Mail Line Health, Wynnewood, PA. ·Sleep · Pubmed #24790271.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Prior studies show that adaptive servoventilation (ASV) is initially more effective than continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for patients with complex sleep apnea syndrome (CompSAS), but choosing therapies has been controversial because residual central breathing events may resolve over time in many patients receiving chronic CPAP therapy. We conducted a multicenter, randomized, prospective trial comparing clinical and polysomnographic outcomes over prolonged treatment of patients with CompSAS, with CPAP versus ASV. METHODS: Qualifying participants meeting criteria for CompSAS were randomized to optimized CPAP or ASV treatment. Clinical and polysomnographic data were obtained at baseline and after 90 days of therapy. RESULTS: We randomized 66 participants (33 to each treatment). At baseline, the diagnostic apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 37.7 ± 27.8 (central apnea index [CAI] = 3.2 ± 5.8) and best CPAP AHI was 37.0 ± 24.9 (CAI 29.7 ± 25.0). After second-night treatment titration, the AHI was 4.7 ± 8.1 (CAI = 1.1 ± 3.7) on ASV and 14.1 ± 20.7 (CAI = 8.8 ± 16.3) on CPAP (P ≤ 0.0003). At 90 days, the ASV versus CPAP AHI was 4.4 ± 9.6 versus 9.9 ± 11.1 (P = 0.0024) and CAI was 0.7 ± 3.4 versus 4.8 ± 6.4 (P < 0.0001), respectively. In the intention-to-treat analysis, success (AHI < 10) at 90 days of therapy was achieved in 89.7% versus 64.5% of participants treated with ASV and CPAP, respectively (P = 0.0214). Compliance and changes in Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index were not significantly different between treatment groups. CONCLUSION: Adaptive servoventilation (ASV) was more reliably effective than CPAP in relieving complex sleep apnea syndrome. While two thirds of participants experienced success with CPAP, approximately 90% experienced success with ASV. Because both methods produced similar symptomatic changes, it is unclear if this polysomnographic effectiveness may translate into other desired outcomes. CLINICAL TRIALS: Clinicaltrials.Gov NCT00915499.

7 Article Ictal central apnea as a predictor for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. 2011

Schuele, Stephan U / Afshari, Mitra / Afshari, Zahra S / Macken, Michael P / Asconape, Jorge / Wolfe, Lisa / Gerard, Elizabeth E. ·Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. s-schuele@northwestern.edu ·Epilepsy Behav · Pubmed #21816679.

ABSTRACT: Epidemiological evidence associating ictal hypoventilation during focal seizures with a heightened risk for subsequent sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is lacking. We describe a patient with temporal lobe epilepsy with two focal seizures recorded in the epilepsy monitoring unit that were associated with central apnea lasting 57 and 58 seconds. During these events, she demonstrated oxygen desaturation down to 68 and 62%. The patient subsequently died at home from autopsy-confirmed SUDEP. The family was not alerted of any seizure activity by the auditory alarm system in her room nor by sleeping in the adjacent room with open doors. This case emphasizes the fact that ictal hypoxia and SUDEP may occur in seizures without noticeable convulsive activity. The report gives credibility to the growing body of literature suggesting that epilepsies affecting the autonomic nervous system may predispose to SUDEP independent of the effects of a secondary generalized convulsion.

8 Article Joubert syndrome associated with severe central sleep apnea. 2010

Wolfe, Lisa / Lakadamyali, Hüseyin / Mutlu, Gökhan M. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #20726289.

ABSTRACT: We report on a patient with mental retardation and chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure who was found to have severe central apnea and periodic breathing while undergoing an evaluation of low oxygen saturation during wakefulness at rest. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, which was performed to uncover potential causes for the central sleep apnea, revealed a "molar tooth sign" consistent with the diagnosis of Joubert syndrome. Joubert syndrome-related disorders are autosomal-recessive disorders characterized by diffuse hypotonia, developmental delay, abnormal respiratory patterns, and the pathognomonic neuroradiologic finding of a molar tooth sign. Adaptive servoventilation failed to correct the central apneas or the periodic breathing. Treatment with bilevel positive airway pressure in S/T mode led to resolution of the central events, improvement in sleep quality, and normalization of the oxygen saturation during wakefulness.