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Sleep Apnea Syndromes: HELP
Articles from Crete
Based on 39 articles published since 2008
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These are the 39 published articles about Sleep Apnea Syndromes that originated from Crete during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
26 Article Medical treatment with thiamine, coenzyme Q, vitamins E and C, and carnitine improved obstructive sleep apnea in an adult case of Leigh disease. 2013

Mermigkis, Charalampos / Bouloukaki, Izolde / Mastorodemos, Vasileios / Plaitakis, Andreas / Alogdianakis, Vangelis / Siafakas, Nikolaos / Schiza, Sophia. ·Sleep Disorders Unit, Department of Thoracic Medicine, University General Hospital, Medical School of the University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece. ·Sleep Breath · Pubmed #23389837.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The multi-organ involvement of mitochondrial diseases means that patients are likely to be more vulnerable to sleep disturbances. We aimed to assess if early recognition and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with Leigh disease may influence primary disease outcome. METHODS: We describe a case of adult-onset Leigh disease presenting as severe brainstem encephalopathy of subacute onset. Based on the clinical symptoms that developed after the appearance of the neurological disease, an attended overnight polysomnography examination was performed. RESULTS: A marked clinical recovery was seen after administration of high doses of thiamine, coenzyme Q, L-carnitine, and vitamins C and E, combined with effective treatment with continuous positive airway pressure for the underlying severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The latter condition was diagnosed on the basis of suggestive symptoms that appeared a few weeks before the establishment of the neurological disease. The improvement in the neurological disease (based on clinical and brain MRI features) with the appropriate medical treatment also resulted in a significant improvement in the OSA. CONCLUSIONS: Early recognition and treatment of sleep apnea may not only improve sleep and overall quality of life but also ameliorate the deleterious effects of nocturnal desaturations on the neurological features. This may be crucial for disease outcome when added to the generally advised pharmacological therapy.

27 Article CPAP therapy in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and obstructive sleep apnea: does it offer a better quality of life and sleep? 2013

Mermigkis, Charalampos / Bouloukaki, Izolde / Antoniou, Katerina M / Mermigkis, Demetrios / Psathakis, Kostas / Giannarakis, Ioannis / Varouchakis, Georgios / Siafakas, Nikolaos / Schiza, Sophia E. ·Sleep Disorders Unit, Department of Thoracic Medicine, University General Hospital, Medical School of the University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece, mermigh@gmail.com. ·Sleep Breath · Pubmed #23386371.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The recent literature shows an increased incidence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). On the other hand, there are no published studies related to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment in this patient group. Our aim was to assess the effect of CPAP on sleep and overall life quality parameters in IPF patients with OSA and to recognize and overcome possible difficulties in CPAP initiation and acceptance by these patients. METHODS: Twelve patients (ten males and two females, age 67.1 ± 7.2 years) with newly diagnosed IPF and moderate to severe OSA, confirmed by overnight attended polysomnography, were included. Therapy with CPAP was initiated after a formal in-lab CPAP titration study. The patients completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Functional Outcomes in Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), the SF-36 quality of life questionnaire, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at CPAP initiation and after 1, 3, and 6 months of effective CPAP therapy. RESULTS: A statistically significant improvement was observed in the FOSQ at 1, 3, and 6 months after CPAP initiation (baseline 12.9 ± 2.9 vs. 14.7 ± 2.6 vs. 15.8 ± 2.1 vs. 16.9 ± 1.9, respectively, p = 0.02). Improvement, although not statistically significant, was noted in ESS score (9.2 ± 5.6 vs. 7.6 ± 4.9 vs. 7.5 ± 5.3 vs. 7.7 ± 5.2, p = 0.84), PSQI (10.7 ± 4.4 vs. 10.1 ± 4.3 vs. 9.4 ± 4.7 vs. 8.6 ± 5.2, p = 0.66), FSS (39.5 ± 10.2 vs. 34.8 ± 8.5 vs. 33.6 ± 10.7 vs. 33.4 ± 10.9, p = 0.44), SF-36 (63.2 ± 13.9 vs. 68.9 ± 13.5 vs. 72.1 ± 12.9 vs. 74.4 ± 11.3, p = 0.27), and BDI (12.9 ± 5.5 vs. 10.7 ± 4.3 vs. 9.4 ± 4.8 vs. 9.6 ± 4.5, p = 0.40). Two patients had difficulty complying with CPAP for a variety of reasons (nocturnal cough, claustrophobia, insomnia) and stopped CPAP use after the first month, despite intense follow-up by the CPAP clinic staff. Heated humidification was added for all patients in order to improve the common complaint of disabling nocturnal cough. CONCLUSION: Effective CPAP treatment in IPF patients with OSA results in a significant improvement in daily living activities based on the FOSQ, namely an OSA-specific follow-up instrument. Improvement was also noted in other questionnaires assessing quality of life, though not to a statistically significant degree, probably because of the multifactorial influences of IPF on physical and mental health. The probability of poor CPAP compliance was high and could only be eliminated with intense follow-up by the CPAP clinic staff.

28 Article Gluteal adipose tissue fatty acids and sleep quality parameters in obese adults with OSAS. 2013

Papandreou, Christopher. ·Department of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, Medical School, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, 71003, Heraklion, Greece, papchris10@gmail.com. ·Sleep Breath · Pubmed #23371890.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between gluteal adipose tissue fatty acids and sleep quality parameters in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). METHODS: Fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography in 63 OSAS patients, and sleep was assessed by polysomnography. RESULTS: Significant positive correlations were found between total sleep time, sleep efficiency, slow-wave sleep, and fatty acid concentrations (myristic, palmitic, stearic, saturated fatty acids, oleic acid, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and n - 6 fatty acids). CONCLUSIONS: The current study revealed associations between certain gluteal adipose tissue fatty acids and sleep quality in obese patients with moderate to severe OSAS.

29 Article Levels of TBARS are inversely associated with lowest oxygen saturation in obese patients with OSAS. 2013

Papandreou, Christopher. ·Department of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, Medical School, University of Crete, P.O.B. 2208, 71003, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, papchris10@gmail.com. ·Sleep Breath · Pubmed #23361138.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate the most important factors that determine lipid peroxidation in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). METHODS: Twenty-one obese patients with OSAS based on overnight attended polysomnography were included. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were measured in serum. Anthropometric measurements were carried out. Dietary habits were assessed by a standardised food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: Spearman's correlation analysis showed significant positive correlations between TBARS and apnoea-hypopnoea index and desaturations/hour while negative between TBARS and mean/lowest oxygen saturation. The most significant predicting factor in the multiple linear regression model was lowest oxygen saturation. CONCLUSIONS: This study has revealed an independent association between lowest oxygen saturation and TBARS levels after controlling for age, gender, diet and obesity in predominantly male patients with moderate to severe OSAS.

30 Article Sleep disordered breathing in patients with acute coronary syndromes. 2012

Schiza, Sophia E / Simantirakis, Emmanuel / Bouloukaki, Izolde / Mermigkis, Charalampos / Kallergis, Eleftherios M / Chrysostomakis, Stauros / Arfanakis, Dimitrios / Tzanakis, Nikolaos / Vardas, Panos / Siafakas, Nikolaos M. ·Sleep Disorders Unit, Department of Thoracic Medicine, Medical School, University of Crete, Greece. schiza@med.uoc.gr ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #22334805.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: Although the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is high in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), there is little knowledge about the persistence of OSAHS in ACS patients after the acute event. We aimed to assess the prevalence and time course of OSAHS in patients with ACS during and after the acute cardiac event. METHODS: Fifty-two patients with first-ever ACS, underwent attended overnight polysomnography (PSG) in our sleep center on the third day after the acute event. In patients with an apnea hypopnea index (AHI) > 10/h, we performed a follow up PSG 1 and 6 months later. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients (54%) had an AHI > 10/h. There was a significant decrease in AHI 1 month after the acute event (13.9 vs. 19.7, p = 0.001), confirming the diagnosis of OSAHS in 22 of 28 patients (79%). At 6-month follow-up, the AHI had decreased further (7.5 vs. 19.7, p < 0.05), and at that time only 6 of the 28 patients (21%) were diagnosed as having OSAHS. Twelve of the 16 current smokers stopped smoking after the acute event. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated a high prevalence of OSAHS in ACS patients, which did not persist 6 months later, indicating that, to some degree, OSAHS may be transient and related with the acute phase of the underlying disease or the reduction in the deleterious smoking habit.

31 Article Effect of Mediterranean diet versus prudent diet combined with physical activity on OSAS: a randomised trial. 2012

Papandreou, Christopher / Schiza, Sophia E / Bouloukaki, Izolde / Hatzis, Christos M / Kafatos, Anthony G / Siafakas, Nikolaos M / Tzanakis, Nikolaos E. ·Dept of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, Heraklion, Crete, Greece. papchris10@gmail.com ·Eur Respir J · Pubmed #22034645.

ABSTRACT: We aimed to evaluate the effect of the Mediterranean diet (MD) compared with a prudent diet (PD) combined with physical activity on obese obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) patients who were treated with continuous positive airway pressure. 900 patients were evaluated and 40 obese patients (body mass index ≥ 30.0 kg · m(-2)) who met the inclusion criteria, with moderate-to-severe OSAS (apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) >15 events · h(-1) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale score >10) based on overnight attended polysomnography, were included in the study. After randomisation, 20 patients followed the MD and 20 a PD for a 6-month period. All patients were counselled to increase their physical activity. Concerning sleep parameters, only AHI during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was reduced to a statistically significant degree, by mean ± SD 18.4 ± 17.6 events · h(-1) in the MD group and by 2.6 ± 23.7 events · h(-1) in the PD group (p<0.05). The MD group also showed a greater reduction in waist circumference (WC) (-8.7 ± 3.6 cm), WC/height ratio (-0.04 ± 0.02 cm · m(-1)) and WC/hip ratio (-0.04 ± 0.03 cm · cm(-1)), compared with the other group (-2.6 ± 1.7 events · h(-1), -5.7 ± 3.8 cm, -0.03 ± 0.02 cm · m(-1) and 0.02 ± 0.02 cm · cm(-1), respectively; p<0.05). Our results showed that the MD combined with physical activity for a 6-month period was effective in reducing the AHI during REM sleep without any statistically significant effect in the other sleep parameters, compared with a PD in obese adults with moderate-to-severe OSAS.

32 Article Effect of Mediterranean diet on lipid peroxidation marker TBARS in obese patients with OSAHS under CPAP treatment: a randomised trial. 2012

Papandreou, Christopher / Schiza, Sophia E / Tzatzarakis, Manolis N / Kavalakis, Mathaios / Hatzis, Christos M / Tsatsakis, Aristidis M / Kafatos, Anthony G / Siafakas, Nikolaos M / Tzanakis, Nikolaos E. ·Department of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece. papchris10@gmail.com ·Sleep Breath · Pubmed #21918812.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The aim of our study was to examine the possible effect of the Mediterranean diet on thiobarbituric acid reacting substances (TBARS) in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) who are under continuous positive airway pressure treatment. METHODS: Nine hundred patients were evaluated during a 1-year period (November 2008-October 2009), and 21 obese patients who met the inclusion criteria, with moderate to severe OSAHS based on overnight attended polysomnography, were included in the study. After randomisation, 11 followed the Mediterranean diet and 10 a prudent diet for a 6-month period. TBARS were measured in serum. RESULTS: TBARS levels decreased notably in both groups (p < 0.05), but no difference was observed between them (p > 0.05). There were significant differences in other characteristics. The Mediterranean diet group showed a greater reduction in weight (-10.8 ± 3.8), body mass index (-3.9 ± 1.6), waist circumference (-9.9 ± 3.0) and percentage of body fat (-4.7 ± 2.3) compared with the other group (-6.9 ± 3.1, -2.5 ± 1.0, -5.3 ± 2.6 and -2.2 ± 1.5, respectively; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that the Mediterranean diet did not reduce the TBARS more than the prudent diet.

33 Article Gluteal adipose-tissue polyunsaturated fatty-acids profiles and depressive symptoms in obese adults with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome: a cross-sectional study. 2011

Papandreou, Christopher / Schiza, Sophia E / Tsibinos, George / Mermigkis, Charalampos / Hatzis, Christos M / Kafatos, Anthony G / Siafakas, Nikolaos M / Fragkiadakis, George A / Tzanakis, Nikolaos E. ·Department of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece. papchris10@gmail.com ·Pharmacol Biochem Behav · Pubmed #21281660.

ABSTRACT: Biomarkers of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs) have been related to depressive symptoms in healthy adults. It is also known that depression is high prevalent in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS) and obesity. The aim of our study was to examine a possible association between PUFAs of the n-6 and n-3 families and depressive symptoms in obese OSAHS patients. Sixty three patients with OSAHS based on overnight attended polysomnography were included. Gluteal adipose tissue biopsies were performed in all participants. Fatty acids were analyzed by gas chromatography. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale. The majority of participants had grade II obesity (BMI: 36.2±4.3 kg/m(2)) and moderate to severe OSAHS. Mild depressive symptoms were found to affect 27.8% of the studied patients. No link between symptoms of depression and individual n-6 and/or n-3 PUFAs of gluteal adipose tissue was detected. However, multiple linear regression analysis showed a positive correlation between depressive symptoms and 20:3n-6/18:3n-6 ratio, and a negative association with age and n-6/n-3 ratio. The possible influence of OSAHS and obesity in depression development and the quiescent nature of gluteal adipose tissue may account for the absence of any significant relations between n-6 and/or n-3 PUFAs and depressive symptoms in our sample. The positive relationship between symptoms of depression and the particular fatty acid ratio probably indicates an increase in prostaglandins family although this needs further research.

34 Article Prediction of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in a large Greek population. 2011

Bouloukaki, Izolde / Kapsimalis, Fotis / Mermigkis, Charalampos / Kryger, Meir / Tzanakis, Nikos / Panagou, Panagiotis / Moniaki, Violeta / Vlachaki, Eleni M / Varouchakis, Georgios / Siafakas, Nikolaos M / Schiza, Sophia E. ·Sleep Disorders Unit, Department of Thoracic Medicine, University General Hospital, Medical School of the University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece. izolthi@gmail.com ·Sleep Breath · Pubmed #20872180.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: We aimed to evaluate the predictive value of anthropometric measurements and self-reported symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in a large number of not yet diagnosed or treated patients. Commonly used clinical indices were used to derive a prediction formula that could identify patients at low and high risk for OSAS. METHODS: Two thousand six hundred ninety patients with suspected OSAS were enrolled. We obtained weight; height; neck, waist, and hip circumference; and a measure of subjective sleepiness (Epworth sleepiness scale--ESS) prior to diagnostic polysomnography. Excessive daytime sleepiness severity (EDS) was coded as follows: 0 for ESS ≤ 3 (normal), 1 for ESS score 4-9 (normal to mild sleepiness), 2 for score 10-16 (moderate to severe sleepiness), and 3 for score >16 (severe sleepiness). Multivariate linear and logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and derive a prediction formula. RESULTS: Neck circumference (NC) in centimeters, body mass index (BMI) in kilograms per square meter, sleepiness as a code indicating EDS severity, and gender as a constant were significant predictors for AHI. The derived formula was: AHIpred = NC × 0.84 + EDS × 7.78 + BMI × 0.91 - [8.2 × gender constant (1 or 2) + 37]. The probability that this equation predicts AHI greater than 15 correctly was 78%. CONCLUSIONS: Gender, BMI, NC, and sleepiness were significant clinical predictors of OSAS in Greek subjects. Such a prediction formula can play a role in prioritizing patients for PSG evaluation, diagnosis, and initiation of treatment.

35 Article Evidence of dysregulated affect indicated by high alexithymia in obstructive sleep apnea. 2011

Nikolaou, Alexandra / Schiza, Sofia E / Chatzi, Leda / Koudas, Vassilis / Fokos, Stefanos / Solidaki, Eleni / Bitsios, Panos. ·Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece. ·J Sleep Res · Pubmed #20629938.

ABSTRACT: Alexithymia refers to dysregulation of affect characterized by difficulty in identifying and expressing emotions. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by increased medical/psychiatric comorbidity and possibly by affect dysregulation. In the present case-control study, we examined alexithymia levels with the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) in 23 psychiatrically uncomplicated OSA outpatients and 23 same gender controls one-to-one matched for age, education and subjective depressive symptomatology. General health/quality of life was assessed with the Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) in the patient group. Hierarchical multivariate regression models were used to evaluate the association of alexithymia with the presence of OSA, and clinical and polysomnographic parameters of this condition. TAS-20 total and subscale scores were associated positively with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-21 and negatively with SF-36 scores. After adjusting for all confounders, OSA was positively associated with total TAS-20 score, 'expressing feelings' and 'externally oriented thinking' subscales. The latter was associated with increased sleepiness and reduced blood oxygenation in the OSA group. Finally, 'difficulty describing feelings' and 'externally oriented thinking' significantly predicted risk for OSA. Alexithymia is higher in non-psychiatrically ill patients with OSA compared with carefully matched controls even after adjustment for subjective depressive symptoms and demographic confounders. Total alexithymia is associated with greater subjective depression and poor general health/quality of life, while 'externally oriented thinking' is associated with disease severity and together with 'difficulty describing feelings' may be vulnerability factors for OSA, although reverse causality cannot be excluded.

36 Article Utility of formulas predicting the optimal nasal continuous positive airway pressure in a Greek population. 2011

Schiza, Sophia E / Bouloukaki, Izolde / Mermigkis, Charalampos / Panagou, Panagiotis / Tzanakis, Nikolaos / Moniaki, Violeta / Tzortzaki, Eleni / Siafakas, Nikolaos M. ·Department of Thoracic Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece. ·Sleep Breath · Pubmed #20424921.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There have been reports that optimal CPAP pressure can be predicted from a previously derived formula, with the Hoffstein formula being the most accurate and accepted in the literature so far. However, the validation of this predictive model has not been applied in different clinical settings. Our aim was to compare both the Hoffstein prediction formula and a newly derived formula to the CPAP pressure setting assessed during a formal CPAP titration study. METHODS: We prospectively studied 1,111 patients (871 males/240 females) with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) undergoing a CPAP titration procedure. In this large population sample, we tested the Hoffstein formula, utilizing body mass index (BMI), neck circumference and apnea/hypopnea index (AHI), and we compared it with our new formula that included not only AHI and BMI but also smoking history and gender adjustment. RESULTS: We found that using the Hoffstein prediction formula, successful prediction (predicted CPAP pressure within ±2 cm H(2)O compared to the finally assessed optimum CPAP pressure during titration) was accomplished in 873 patients (79%), with significant correlation between CPAP predicted pressure (CPAPpred(1)) and the optimum CPAP pressure (CPAPopt) [r = 0.364, p < 0.001]. With the new formula, including smoking history and gender adjustment, successful prediction was accomplished in 1,057 patients (95%), with significant correlation between CPAP predicted pressure (CPAPpred(2)) and the CPAPopt (r = 0.392, p < 0.001). However, there was a highly significant correlation between the two formulas (r = 0.918, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the level of CPAP necessary to abolish sleep apnea can be successfully predicted from both equations, using common clinical measurements and prediction formulas that may be useful in calculating the starting pressure for initiating CPAP titration. It may also be possible to shorten CPAP titration and perhaps in selected cases to combine it with the initial diagnostic study.

37 Article C-reactive protein evolution in obstructive sleep apnoea patients under CPAP therapy. 2010

Schiza, Sophia E / Mermigkis, Charalampos / Panagiotis, Panagou / Bouloukaki, Izolde / Kallergis, Eleftherios / Tzanakis, Nikolaos / Tzortzaki, Eleni / Vlachaki, Eleni / Siafakas, Nikolaos M. ·Sleep Disorders Unit, Department of Thoracic Medicine, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Voutes, Greece. schiza@med.uoc.gr ·Eur J Clin Invest · Pubmed #20629709.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is recognized as a potential factor implicated in atherogenesis and associated cardiovascular morbidity. The aim of our study was to assess the CRP evolution during 1-year follow-up period in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients under CPAP treatment. METHODS: Five hundred and twenty-eight patients with newly diagnosed moderate to severe OSA were included. CRP was assessed before CPAP initiation and at the 3rd, 6th and 12th month of the follow-up period. Patients were divided into good and poor CPAP compliance groups. RESULTS: A significant reduction in CRP levels was observed after CPAP therapy (0·74±0·62mgdL(-1) vs. 0·31±0·29mgdL(-1) , P<0·001) in the whole patient group. The evolution of CRP values showed a gradual decrease at 3months with a steep decline at 6months, reaching a plateau after this time point. When the patients were divided into those with good and poor compliance with CPAP therapy, the above CRP evolution pattern was observed only in the former group. CONCLUSION: Good CPAP compliance results in a significant CRP reduction. To achieve the best positive impact on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, a time period of at least 6months of CPAP use is required.

38 Article Sleep patterns in patients with acute coronary syndromes. 2010

Schiza, Sophia E / Simantirakis, Emmanuel / Bouloukaki, Izolde / Mermigkis, Charalampos / Arfanakis, Dimitrios / Chrysostomakis, Stavros / Chlouverakis, Grecory / Kallergis, Eleftherios M / Vardas, Panos / Siafakas, Nikolaos M. ·Sleep Disorders Unit, Department of Thoracic Medicine, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Voutes, P.O. 71110, Greece. schiza@med.uoc.gr ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #20083431.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Little is known about sleep quality in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) admitted to the coronary care unit (CCU). The aim of this study was to assess nocturnal sleep in these patients, away from the CCU environment, and to evaluate potential connections with the disease process. METHODS: Twenty-two patients with first ever ACS, who were not on sedation or inotropes, underwent a full-night polysomnography (PSG) in our sleep disorders unit within 3 days of the ACS and follow-up PSGs 1 and 6 months later. RESULTS: PSG parameters showed a progressive improvement over the study period. There was a statistically significant increase in total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency, slow wave sleep (SWS), and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, while arousal index, wake after sleep onset (WASO) and sleep latency decreased. Six months after the acute event, sleep architecture was within the normal range. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with ACS have marked alterations in sleep macro- and micro-architecture, which have a negative influence on sleep quality. The changes tend to disappear over time, suggesting a relationship with the acute phase of the underlying disease.

39 Minor Effects of different weight loss percentages on moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. 2015

Papandreou, Christopher / Hatzis, Christos M / Fragkiadakis, Georgios A. ·Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Technological Education Institute of Crete, Sitia, Greece papchris10@gmail.com. · Department of Social Medicine, Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece. · Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Technological Education Institute of Crete, Sitia, Greece. ·Chron Respir Dis · Pubmed #26015461.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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