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Sleep Apnea Syndromes: HELP
Articles from New England
Based on 803 articles published since 2008
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These are the 803 published articles about Sleep Apnea Syndromes that originated from New England during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

2 Guideline Perioperative management of obstructive sleep apnea in bariatric surgery: a consensus guideline. 2017

de Raaff, Christel A L / Gorter-Stam, Marguerite A W / de Vries, Nico / Sinha, Ashish C / Jaap Bonjer, H / Chung, Frances / Coblijn, Usha K / Dahan, Albert / van den Helder, Rick S / Hilgevoord, Antonius A J / Hillman, David R / Margarson, Michael P / Mattar, Samer G / Mulier, Jan P / Ravesloot, Madeline J L / Reiber, Beata M M / van Rijswijk, Anne-Sophie / Singh, Preet Mohinder / Steenhuis, Roos / Tenhagen, Mark / Vanderveken, Olivier M / Verbraecken, Johan / White, David P / van der Wielen, Nicole / van Wagensveld, Bart A. ·Department of Surgery, OLVG West, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Electronic address: c.deraaff@olvg.nl. · Department of Surgery, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Oral Kinesiology, ACTA, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Translational Neurosciences Research Group, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, OLVG West, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Anesthesiology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Anesthesiology, LUMC, Leiden, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Noordwest Ziekenhuisgroep, Alkmaar, the Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, OLVG West, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pulmonary Physiology and Sleep Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia. · Department of Anaesthesia, Saint Richard's Hospital, Chichester, United Kingdom. · Department of Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA. · Department of Anesthesiology, AZ Sint Jan, Brugge, Belgium. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, OLVG West, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Rode Kruis Ziekenhuis, Beverwijk, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, MC Slotervaart, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Anesthesiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. · Medical Library, OLVG West, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Translational Neurosciences Research Group, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium. · Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Multidisciplinary Sleep Disorders Centre, Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Edegem, Belgium. · Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Surgery, OLVG West, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #28666588.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The frequency of metabolic and bariatric surgery (MBS) is increasing worldwide, with over 500,000 cases performed every year. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is present in 35%-94% of MBS patients. Nevertheless, consensus regarding the perioperative management of OSA in MBS patients is not established. OBJECTIVES: To provide consensus based guidelines utilizing current literature and, when in the absence of supporting clinical data, expert opinion by organizing a consensus meeting of experts from relevant specialties. SETTING: The meeting was held in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. METHODS: A panel of 15 international experts identified 75 questions covering preoperative screening, treatment, postoperative monitoring, anesthetic care and follow-up. Six researchers reviewed the literature systematically. During this meeting, the "Amsterdam Delphi Method" was utilized including controlled acquisition of feedback, aggregation of responses and iteration. RESULTS: Recommendations or statements were provided for 58 questions. In the judgment of the experts, 17 questions provided no additional useful information and it was agreed to exclude them. With the exception of 3 recommendations (64%, 66%, and 66% respectively), consensus (>70%) was reached for 55 statements and recommendations. Several highlights: polysomnography is the gold standard for diagnosing OSA; continuous positive airway pressure is recommended for all patients with moderate and severe OSA; OSA patients should be continuously monitored with pulse oximetry in the early postoperative period; perioperative usage of sedatives and opioids should be minimized. CONCLUSION: This first international expert meeting provided 58 statements and recommendations for a clinical consensus guideline regarding the perioperative management of OSA patients undergoing MBS.

3 Guideline Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine Guidelines on Preoperative Screening and Assessment of Adult Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea. 2016

Chung, Frances / Memtsoudis, Stavros G / Ramachandran, Satya Krishna / Nagappa, Mahesh / Opperer, Mathias / Cozowicz, Crispiana / Patrawala, Sara / Lam, David / Kumar, Anjana / Joshi, Girish P / Fleetham, John / Ayas, Najib / Collop, Nancy / Doufas, Anthony G / Eikermann, Matthias / Englesakis, Marina / Gali, Bhargavi / Gay, Peter / Hernandez, Adrian V / Kaw, Roop / Kezirian, Eric J / Malhotra, Atul / Mokhlesi, Babak / Parthasarathy, Sairam / Stierer, Tracey / Wappler, Frank / Hillman, David R / Auckley, Dennis. ·From the *Department of Anesthesiology, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; †Department of Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medical College and Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York; ‡Department of Anesthesiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; §Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, University Hospital, St. Joseph's Hospital and Victoria Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre and St. Joseph's Health care, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada; ‖Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Salzburg, Austria; ¶Department of Anesthesiology, Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College New York, New York; #Department of Anesthesia, Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria; **Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California; ††Sparrow Hospital, Lansing, Michigan; ‡‡Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Texas; §§Department of Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; ‖‖University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; ¶¶Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia; ##Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California; ***Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts; †††Library and Information Services, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; ‡‡‡Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota; §§§Department of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota; ‖‖‖School of Medicine, Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Apl ·Anesth Analg · Pubmed #27442772.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine guideline on preoperative screening and assessment of adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is to present recommendations based on the available clinical evidence on the topic where possible. As very few well-performed randomized studies in this field of perioperative care are available, most of the recommendations were developed by experts in the field through consensus processes involving utilization of evidence grading to indicate the level of evidence upon which recommendations were based. This guideline may not be appropriate for all clinical situations and all patients. The decision whether to follow these recommendations must be made by a responsible physician on an individual basis. Protocols should be developed by individual institutions taking into account the patients' conditions, extent of interventions and available resources. This practice guideline is not intended to define standards of care or represent absolute requirements for patient care. The adherence to these guidelines cannot in any way guarantee successful outcomes and is rather meant to help individuals and institutions formulate plans to better deal with the challenges posed by perioperative patients with OSA. These recommendations reflect the current state of knowledge and its interpretation by a group of experts in the field at the time of publication. While these guidelines will be periodically updated, new information that becomes available between updates should be taken into account. Deviations in practice from guidelines may be justifiable and such deviations should not be interpreted as a basis for claims of negligence.

4 Guideline Children's Hospital Association consensus statements for comorbidities of childhood obesity. 2014

Estrada, Elizabeth / Eneli, Ihuoma / Hampl, Sarah / Mietus-Snyder, Michele / Mirza, Nazrat / Rhodes, Erinn / Sweeney, Brooke / Tinajero-Deck, Lydia / Woolford, Susan J / Pont, Stephen J / Anonymous2670800. ·1 Division of Endocrinology, Connecticut Children's Medical Center, University of Connecticut , Hartford, CT. ·Child Obes · Pubmed #25019404.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity and overweight affect approximately 30% of US children. Many of these children have obesity-related comorbidities, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, fatty liver disease, diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), sleep apnea, psychosocial problems, and others. These children need routine screening and, in many cases, treatment for these conditions. However, because primary care pediatric providers (PCPs) often are underequipped to deal with these comorbidities, they frequently refer these patients to subspecialists. However, as a result of the US pediatric subspecialist shortage and considering that 12.5 million children are obese, access to care by subspecialists is limited. The aim of this article is to provide accessible, user-friendly clinical consensus statements to facilitate the screening, interpretation of results, and early treatment for some of the most common childhood obesity comorbidities. METHODS: Members of the Children's Hospital Association (formerly NACHRI) FOCUS on a Fitter Future II (FFFII), a collaboration of 25 US pediatric obesity centers, used a combination of the best available evidence and collective clinical experience to develop consensus statements for pediatric obesity-related comorbidities. FFFII also surveyed the participating pediatric obesity centers regarding their current practices. RESULTS: The work group developed consensus statements for use in the evaluation and treatment of lipids, liver enzymes, and blood pressure abnormalities and PCOS in the child with overweight and obesity. The results of the FFFII survey illustrated the variability in the approach for initial evaluation and treatment as well as pattern of referrals to subspecialists among programs. CONCLUSIONS: The consensus statements presented in this article can be a useful tool for PCPs in the management and overall care of children with overweight and obesity.

5 Guideline Clinical guideline for the evaluation, management and long-term care of obstructive sleep apnea in adults. 2009

Epstein, Lawrence J / Kristo, David / Strollo, Patrick J / Friedman, Norman / Malhotra, Atul / Patil, Susheel P / Ramar, Kannan / Rogers, Robert / Schwab, Richard J / Weaver, Edward M / Weinstein, Michael D / Anonymous5480644. ·Sleep HealthCenters, Brighton, MA 02135, USA. ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #19960649.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common chronic disorder that often requires lifelong care. Available practice parameters provide evidence-based recommendations for addressing aspects of care. OBJECTIVE: This guideline is designed to assist primary care providers as well as sleep medicine specialists, surgeons, and dentists who care for patients with OSA by providing a comprehensive strategy for the evaluation, management and long-term care of adult patients with OSA. METHODS: The Adult OSA Task Force of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) was assembled to produce a clinical guideline from a review of existing practice parameters and available literature. All existing evidence-based AASM practice parameters relevant to the evaluation and management of OSA in adults were incorporated into this guideline. For areas not covered by the practice parameters, the task force performed a literature review and made consensus recommendations using a modified nominal group technique. RECOMMENDATIONS: Questions regarding OSA should be incorporated into routine health evaluations. Suspicion of OSA should trigger a comprehensive sleep evaluation. The diagnostic strategy includes a sleep-oriented history and physical examination, objective testing, and education of the patient. The presence or absence and severity of OSA must be determined before initiating treatment in order to identify those patients at risk of developing the complications of sleep apnea, guide selection of appropriate treatment, and to provide a baseline to establish the effectiveness of subsequent treatment. Once the diagnosis is established, the patient should be included in deciding an appropriate treatment strategy that may include positive airway pressure devices, oral appliances, behavioral treatments, surgery, and/or adjunctive treatments. OSA should be approached as a chronic disease requiring long-term, multidisciplinary management. For each treatment option, appropriate outcome measures and long-term follow-up are described.

6 Editorial Failure of PAP Therapy to Alter the Trajectory of Health Care Utilization Among Patients With OSA: A Wake-up Call for the Field of Sleep Medicine or Just a Bad Dream? 2018

Johnson, Karin G / Lindenauer, Peter K. ·Department of Neurology. · Institute of Health Care Delivery and Population Science. · Departments of Medicine. · Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Springfield, MA. ·Med Care · Pubmed #30256280.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Is there a commonality of occlusion for dental, TMD and obstructive sleep apnea patients? Thoughts on a snowy day. 2018

Mehta, Noshir R. ·a Tufts Craniofacial Pain Center , Boston , MA , USA. ·Cranio · Pubmed #29480136.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Central sleep apnoea in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, adaptive servo-ventilation, and left ventricular ejection fraction: the (still) missing link. 2018

Ramalho, Sergio H R / Shah, Amil M. ·Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. ·Eur J Heart Fail · Pubmed #29271551.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Can a Floppy Upper Airway Lead to Stiff Lungs? 2017

Putman, Rachel K / Owens, Robert L. ·1 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; and. · 2 Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. ·Ann Am Thorac Soc · Pubmed #29192817.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Does Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treatment Reduce Cardiovascular Risk?: It Is Far Too Soon to Say. 2017

Gottlieb, Daniel J. ·Medical Service, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts2Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #28697240.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Sleep apnea in relation to metabolism: An urgent need to study underlying mechanisms and to develop novel treatments for this unmet clinical need. 2017

Farr, Olivia M / Mantzoros, Christos S. ·Division of Endocrinology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Electronic address: ofarr@bidmc.harvard.edu. · Division of Endocrinology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. ·Metabolism · Pubmed #28190524.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Screening for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Implications for the Sleep Health of the Population. 2017

Redline, Susan. ·Sleep Health Institute and Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts2Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #28118433.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial The link between sleep-disordered breathing and cognition in the elderly: New opportunities? 2017

Auerbach, Sanford / Yaffe, Kristine. ·From the Departments of Neurology, Psychiatry, and Behavioral Neurosciences (S.A.), Boston University School of Medicine and Sleep Disorders Center, Boston Medical Center, MA · and Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics (K.Y.), University of California, San Francisco, and San Francisco VA Medical Center. ·Neurology · Pubmed #28039313.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Obstructive sleep apnea and arrhythmia: A systemic review. 2017

Patel, Nirav / Donahue, Caroline / Shenoy, Abhishek / Patel, Arpan / El-Sherif, Nabil. ·Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate, Brooklyn, NY, United States; Department of Cardiology, Brooklyn VA Center, Brooklyn, NY, United States; The Henry Low Heart Center, Hartford Hospital, Connecticut, United States. Electronic address: nirav92@gmail.com. · NYU School of Medicine, Manhattan, NY, United States. · Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate, Brooklyn, NY, United States. · Windsor School of Medicine, St. Kitts, Saint Kitts and Nevis. · Department of Cardiology, Brooklyn VA Center, Brooklyn, NY, United States. ·Int J Cardiol · Pubmed #27914359.

ABSTRACT: There is a growing consensus in the scientific community that suggests a strong association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiovascular (CVD) conditions and events, including coronary artery disease, hypertension, arrhythmia, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. We reviewed evidence on the relationship between OSA and arrhythmia. Our conclusion, based on our review of the literature, is that the evidence supports a strong link between OSA and cardiovascular mortality, which warrants treating OSA. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) appears to reduce the CVD consequences of OSA. Future research is expected to clarify the benefits and optimal application of these treatment approaches.

15 Editorial The High Road, the Low Road, or Both: Effects of Positive Airway Pressure Route of Administration on Treatment Efficacy for OSA. 2016

Cutrufello, Nicholas J / Brown, Lee K. ·Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM. · Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico School of Engineering, Albuquerque, NM. Electronic address: lkbrown@alum.mit.edu. ·Chest · Pubmed #27938738.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Is Hyperinflation from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease "Protective" of Upper Airway Collapse in Obstructive Sleep Apnea? 2016

Stanchina, Michael. ·Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. ·Ann Am Thorac Soc · Pubmed #27388402.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure an Effective and Practical Antihypertensive Agent? 2016

White, David P. ·1 Harvard Medical School Boston, Massachusetts. ·Am J Respir Crit Care Med · Pubmed #26829422.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Random musings on a Sunday afternoon. 2015

Mehta, Noshir R. ·Tufts Craniofacial Pain Center , Boston, MA, USA. ·Cranio · Pubmed #26825194.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial Adaptive Servoventilation: Answer to a Sleep Physician's Dream? 2015

Brown, Lee K. ·Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM. Electronic address: lkbrown@alum.mit.edu. ·Chest · Pubmed #26621290.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial The Weighty Issue of Obesity Management in Sleep Apnea. 2015

Patel, Sanjay R / Mehra, Reena. ·Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH. Electronic address: mehrar@ccf.org. ·Chest · Pubmed #26527436.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Editorial Positive pressure therapy induced harm - non-linear, adaptive and maladaptive responses. 2015

Thomas, Robert Joseph. ·Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: rthomas1@bidmc.harvard.edu. ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #26323646.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Editorial Does Treatment of Sleep Apnea Prevent Perioperative Complications? Wish We Knew! 2015

Gottlieb, Daniel J. ·VA Boston Healthcare System, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA. ·Sleep · Pubmed #26194573.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Editorial Treatment of Central Sleep Apnea with Adaptive Servoventilation in Chronic Heart Failure. 2015

Ayas, Najib T / Patil, Susheel P / Stanchina, Michael / Malhotra, Atul. ·1 Respiratory and Critical Care Divisions University of British Columbia Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · 2 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, Maryland. · 3 Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine Division Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University Providence, Rhode Island. · 4 Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California. ·Am J Respir Crit Care Med · Pubmed #26082979.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Editorial Obstructive sleep apnea and atrial fibrillation progression. Another reason to wear continuous positive airway pressure? 2015

Tung, Patricia / Zimetbaum, Peter. ·Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA. · Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA. Electronic address: pzimetba@BIDMC.harvard.edu. ·Am Heart J · Pubmed #25965705.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Editorial Obstructive sleep apnea: how much is too much? 2015

Gottlieb, Daniel J. ·VA Boston Healthcare System, Brigham & Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. ·Sleep · Pubmed #25845683.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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