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Sleep Apnea Syndromes: HELP
Articles from San Francisco Bay area
Based on 331 articles published since 2009
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These are the 331 published articles about Sleep Apnea Syndromes that originated from San Francisco Bay area during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

2 Guideline Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine Guideline on Intraoperative Management of Adult Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea. 2018

Memtsoudis, Stavros G / Cozowicz, Crispiana / Nagappa, Mahesh / Wong, Jean / Joshi, Girish P / Wong, David T / Doufas, Anthony G / Yilmaz, Meltem / Stein, Mark H / Krajewski, Megan L / Singh, Mandeep / Pichler, Lukas / Ramachandran, Satya Krishna / Chung, Frances. ·From the Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care & Pain Management, Weill Cornell Medical College and Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York. · Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care Medicine, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria. · Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre and St Joseph's Health Care, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas. · Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Anesthesiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Anesthesiology, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey. · Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Management, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Anesthesia, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Toronto Sleep and Pulmonary Centre, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Anesthesia and Pain Management, Women's College Hospital, Toronto, Canada. · Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Anesthesiology, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Anesth Analg · Pubmed #29944522.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine Guideline on Intraoperative Management of Adult Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is to present recommendations based on current scientific evidence. This guideline seeks to address questions regarding the intraoperative care of patients with OSA, including airway management, anesthetic drug and agent effects, and choice of anesthesia type. Given the paucity of high-quality studies with regard to study design and execution in this perioperative field, recommendations were to a large part developed by subject-matter experts through consensus processes, taking into account the current scientific knowledge base and quality of evidence. This guideline may not be suitable for all clinical settings and patients and is not intended to define standards of care or absolute requirements for patient care; thus, assessment of appropriateness should be made on an individualized basis. Adherence to this guideline cannot guarantee successful outcomes, but recommendations should rather aid health care professionals and institutions to formulate plans and develop protocols for the improvement of the perioperative care of patients with OSA, considering patient-related factors, interventions, and resource availability. Given the groundwork of a comprehensive systematic literature review, these recommendations reflect the current state of knowledge and its interpretation by a group of experts at the time of publication. While periodic reevaluations of literature are needed, novel scientific evidence between updates should be taken into account. Deviations in practice from the guideline may be justifiable and should not be interpreted as a basis for claims of negligence.

3 Guideline Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Commercial Motor Vehicle Operators: Recommendations of the AASM Sleep and Transportation Safety Awareness Task Force. 2017

Gurubhagavatula, Indira / Sullivan, Shannon / Meoli, Amy / Patil, Susheel / Olson, Ryan / Berneking, Michael / Watson, Nathaniel F. ·Division of Sleep Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Corporal Michael Crescenz VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California. · Penn State Sleep Research and Treatment Center, Hummelstown, Pennsylvania. · Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Concentra, Inc., Grand Rapids, Michigan. · University of Washington Medicine Sleep Disorders Center and Department of Neurology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #28356173.

ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT: The American Academy of Sleep Medicine Sleep and Transportation Safety Awareness Task Force responded to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and Federal Railroad Administration Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and request for public comments regarding the evaluation of safety-sensitive personnel for moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The following document represents this response. The most salient points provided in our comments are that (1) moderate-to-severe OSA is common among commercial motor vehicle operators (CMVOs) and contributes to an increased risk of crashes; (2) objective screening methods are available and preferred for identifying at-risk drivers, with the most commonly used indicator being body mass index; (3) treatment in the form of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is effective and reduces crashes; (4) CPAP is economically viable; (5) guidelines are available to assist medical examiners in determining whether CMVOs with moderate-to-severe OSA should continue to work without restrictions, with conditional certification, or be disqualified from operating commercial motor vehicles.

4 Guideline Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine Guidelines on Preoperative Screening and Assessment of Adult Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea. 2016

Chung, Frances / Memtsoudis, Stavros G / Ramachandran, Satya Krishna / Nagappa, Mahesh / Opperer, Mathias / Cozowicz, Crispiana / Patrawala, Sara / Lam, David / Kumar, Anjana / Joshi, Girish P / Fleetham, John / Ayas, Najib / Collop, Nancy / Doufas, Anthony G / Eikermann, Matthias / Englesakis, Marina / Gali, Bhargavi / Gay, Peter / Hernandez, Adrian V / Kaw, Roop / Kezirian, Eric J / Malhotra, Atul / Mokhlesi, Babak / Parthasarathy, Sairam / Stierer, Tracey / Wappler, Frank / Hillman, David R / Auckley, Dennis. ·From the *Department of Anesthesiology, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; †Department of Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medical College and Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York; ‡Department of Anesthesiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; §Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, University Hospital, St. Joseph's Hospital and Victoria Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre and St. Joseph's Health care, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada; ‖Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Salzburg, Austria; ¶Department of Anesthesiology, Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College New York, New York; #Department of Anesthesia, Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria; **Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California; ††Sparrow Hospital, Lansing, Michigan; ‡‡Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Texas; §§Department of Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; ‖‖University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; ¶¶Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia; ##Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California; ***Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts; †††Library and Information Services, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; ‡‡‡Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota; §§§Department of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota; ‖‖‖School of Medicine, Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Apl ·Anesth Analg · Pubmed #27442772.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine guideline on preoperative screening and assessment of adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is to present recommendations based on the available clinical evidence on the topic where possible. As very few well-performed randomized studies in this field of perioperative care are available, most of the recommendations were developed by experts in the field through consensus processes involving utilization of evidence grading to indicate the level of evidence upon which recommendations were based. This guideline may not be appropriate for all clinical situations and all patients. The decision whether to follow these recommendations must be made by a responsible physician on an individual basis. Protocols should be developed by individual institutions taking into account the patients' conditions, extent of interventions and available resources. This practice guideline is not intended to define standards of care or represent absolute requirements for patient care. The adherence to these guidelines cannot in any way guarantee successful outcomes and is rather meant to help individuals and institutions formulate plans to better deal with the challenges posed by perioperative patients with OSA. These recommendations reflect the current state of knowledge and its interpretation by a group of experts in the field at the time of publication. While these guidelines will be periodically updated, new information that becomes available between updates should be taken into account. Deviations in practice from guidelines may be justifiable and such deviations should not be interpreted as a basis for claims of negligence.

5 Editorial Sleep Surgery: From Reconstruction to Restoration and Re-education. 2019

Liu, Stanley Yung-Chuan. ·Assistant Professor, Division of Sleep Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Co-director, Stanford Sleep Surgery Fellowship, Stanford University School of Medicine, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94304, USA. Electronic address: ycliu@stanford.edu. ·Atlas Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am · Pubmed #30717929.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Orthostatic hypotension: does the heart rate matter? And other updates on recent autonomic research. 2018

Miglis, Mitchell G / Muppidi, Srikanth. ·Stanford Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA, USA. · Stanford Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA, USA. muppidis@stanford.edu. · Stanford Neurosciences Health Center, 213 Quarry Road, 2nd Floor, Palo Alto, CA, 94304, USA. muppidis@stanford.edu. ·Clin Auton Res · Pubmed #29779066.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial The link between sleep-disordered breathing and cognition in the elderly: New opportunities? 2017

Auerbach, Sanford / Yaffe, Kristine. ·From the Departments of Neurology, Psychiatry, and Behavioral Neurosciences (S.A.), Boston University School of Medicine and Sleep Disorders Center, Boston Medical Center, MA · and Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics (K.Y.), University of California, San Francisco, and San Francisco VA Medical Center. ·Neurology · Pubmed #28039313.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Introducing a new concept in obstructive sleep apnea: The continuum of treatment. 2017

Certal, Victor / Camacho, Macario / Song, Sungjin A / Capasso, Robson. ·a Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Sleep Medicine Centre , Hospital CUF Porto & CHEDV , Portugal. · b CINTESIS - Center for Research in Health Technologies and Information Systems, University of Porto , Porto , Portugal. · c Division of Sleep Surgery and Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery , Tripler Army Medical Center , Honolulu , HI , USA. · d Sleep Surgery Division, Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery , Stanford University School of Medicine , Stanford , CA , USA. ·Cranio · Pubmed #27875929.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial How Was Your Sleep? New Implications for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Retinal Disease. 2016

Brodie, Frank L. ·Department of Ophthalmology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. ·Retina · Pubmed #26841214.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Screening for Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Patients Hospitalized for Heart Failure. 2015

Oldenburg, Olaf / Teerlink, John R. ·Department of Cardiology, Heart and Diabetes Center North Rhine-Westphalia, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen, Germany. Electronic address: akleemeyer@hdz-nrw.de. · Section of Cardiology, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and School of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. ·JACC Heart Fail · Pubmed #26362450.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Oral appliances and sleep-disordered breathing. 2011

Ruoff, Chad M / Guilleminault, Christian. ·Sleep Medicine Division, Stanford University, Redwood City, CA. · Sleep Medicine Division, Stanford University, Redwood City, CA. Electronic address: cguil@stanford.edu. ·Chest · Pubmed #22045873.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Review Epidemiological and pathophysiological evidence supporting links between obstructive sleep apnoea and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. 2019

Lee, Chuen Peng / Kushida, Clete A / Abisheganaden, John Arputhan. ·Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore. · Stanford Sleep Medicine Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, California, United States. ·Singapore Med J · Pubmed #30843078.

ABSTRACT: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are common diseases. The global prevalence of OSA is between 2% and 7% in general population cohorts. The worldwide prevalence of T2DM among adults (aged 20-79 years) was estimated to be 6.4%. The concurrent presence of OSA and T2DM can be expected in the same patient, given their high prevalence and similar predisposition. We reviewed the overlapping pathophysiology of OSA and T2DM in this article.

13 Review Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy. 2019

Awad, Michael / Okland, Tyler S / Nekhendzy, Vladimir. ·Division of Sleep Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 95304, USA. Electronic address: michaelawad@gmail.com. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 95304, USA. · Department of Anesthesia, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 95304, USA. ·Atlas Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am · Pubmed #30717927.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Review Upper Airway (Hypoglossal Nerve) Stimulation for Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea. 2019

Gupta, Rishi Jay / Kademani, Deepak / Liu, Stanley Yung-Chuan. ·Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Section, Department of Dental Service, San Francisco VA Health Care System, 4150 Clement Street (160), San Francisco, CA 94121, USA; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, 707 Parnassus Ave, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA; Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Davis, 2521 Stockton Blvd, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA. · Head and Neck Oncologic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, North Memorial Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN 55422, USA. · Division of Sleep Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford Sleep Surgery Fellowship, Stanford University School of Medicine, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Electronic address: ycliu@stanford.edu. ·Atlas Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am · Pubmed #30717924.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Review Maxillomandibular Advancement: Contemporary Approach at Stanford. 2019

Liu, Stanley Yung-Chuan / Awad, Michael / Riley, Robert Wayne. ·Division of Sleep Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford Sleep Surgery Fellowship, Stanford University School of Medicine, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94304, USA. Electronic address: ycliu@stanford.edu. · Division of Sleep Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 95304, USA. · Division of Sleep Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford Sleep Surgery Fellowship, Stanford University School of Medicine, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94304, USA. ·Atlas Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am · Pubmed #30717921.

ABSTRACT: Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has remained a reliable and highly effective surgical intervention since its introduction in 1989. Modifications have been made to maximize skeletal movement and upper airway stability without compromising facial balance. Contemporary indications of recommending MMA prior to other soft tissue surgery are described. MMA poses unique challenges to surgeons. There are patient-related factors, including OSA, a chronic inflammatory condition with associated cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidity. Perioperative management is more complex than routine orthognathic patients. Key details are shared from a 3-decade experience at Stanford.

16 Review Tonsillectomy and Pharyngoplasty: Tissue-Preserving Techniques. 2019

Awad, Michael / Gouveia, Christopher / Capasso, Robson / Liu, Stanley Yung-Chuan. ·Division of Sleep Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 95304, USA. Electronic address: Michaelawad@gmail.com. · Division of Sleep Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 95304, USA. · Division of Sleep Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford Sleep Surgery Fellowship, Stanford University School of Medicine, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94304, USA. ·Atlas Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am · Pubmed #30717919.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Review Sleep Surgery in the Era of Precision Medicine. 2019

Liu, Stanley Yung-Chuan / Wayne Riley, Robert / Pogrel, Anthony / Guilleminault, Christian. ·Division of Sleep Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford Sleep Surgery Fellowship, Stanford University School of Medicine, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94304, USA. Electronic address: ycliu@stanford.edu. · Division of Sleep Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford Sleep Surgery Fellowship, Stanford University School of Medicine, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94304, USA. · Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of California San Francisco, 533 Parnassus Ave, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 450 Broadway St, Redwood City, CA 94063, USA. ·Atlas Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am · Pubmed #30717917.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Review The Role of the Revised Stanford Protocol in Today's Precision Medicine. 2019

Liu, Stanley Yung-Chuan / Awad, Michael / Riley, Robert / Capasso, Robson. ·Division of Sleep Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94304, USA. Electronic address: ycliu@stanford.edu. · Division of Sleep Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94304, USA. ·Sleep Med Clin · Pubmed #30709539.

ABSTRACT: Whereas the original Stanford protocol relied on a tiered approach to care to avoid unnecessary surgery, it did not address the issue of surgical relapse, a common concern among sleep medicine specialists. With 3 decades of experience since the original 2-tiered Powell-Riley protocol was introduced and the role of evolving skeletal techniques and upper airway stimulation, we are pleased to present our current protocol. This update includes emphasis on the facial skeletal development with impact on function including nasal breathing, and the incorporation of upper airway stimulation. The increased versatility of palatopharyngoplasty as an adjunctive procedure is also discussed.

19 Review Sleep-Disordered Breathing, Orofacial Growth, and Prevention of Obstructive Sleep Apnea. 2019

Guilleminault, Christian / Sullivan, Shannon S / Huang, Yu-Shu. ·Division of Sleep Medicine, Stanford University, 450 Broadway Pavillion C 2nd Floor, Redwood City, CA 94063, USA. Electronic address: cguil@stanford.edu. · Division of Sleep Medicine, Stanford University, 450 Broadway Pavillion C 2nd Floor, Redwood City, CA 94063, USA. · Division of Child-Psychiatry and Pediatric-Sleep laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Medical College, No. 5, Fuxing Street, Guishan, Taoyuan 333, Linkou, Taiwan. ·Sleep Med Clin · Pubmed #30709527.

ABSTRACT: Abnormal breathing during sleep is related to intrinsic and extrinsic factors that are present early in life. Investigation of fetal development and early-in-life orofacial growth allows recognition of risk factors that lead to change in upper airway patency, which leads to abnormal upper airway resistance, abnormal inspiratory efforts, and further increase in resistance and progressive narrowing of the collapsible upper airway. Such evolution can be recognized by appropriate clinical evaluation, specific polysomnographic patterns, and orofacial imaging. Recognition of the problems should lead to appropriate treatments and prevention of obstructive sleep apnea and its comorbidities.

20 Review Obstructive Sleep Apnea's Connections with Clinical Dentistry. 2018

Carstensen, Steve. ·Private Practice, Premier Sleep Associates, 636 120th Avenue NE A204, Bellevue, WA 98005, USA; Medmark Media, LLC, Dental Sleep Practice Magazine, 15720 N. Greenway Hayden Loop, Suite 9, Scottsdale, AZ 85260, USA; The Pankey Institute, One Crandon Boulevard Key Biscayne, FL 33149, USA; Louisiana State University Health Continuing Dental Education, 1100 Florida Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70119, USA; Department of Continuing Dental Education, The University of the Pacific, San Francisco, CA, USA; Spear Education, 7201 E Princess Boulevard, Scottsdale, AZ 85255, USA. Electronic address: SeattleSleepEd@gmail.com. ·Sleep Med Clin · Pubmed #30396446.

ABSTRACT: Adding airway services to a dental practice disrupts scheduling, examinations, treatment planning, billing, and team roles. Problems connected with the airway can be addressed with more precise therapy and better prognosis while building confidence between the patient and the dental team. Each team member must understand the connections between airway problems and patient health and be able to talk about it with confidence. If the entire team supports the inclusion of airway therapy into the service mix, patients will feel well cared for and rewards to the office will be plentiful.

21 Review Magnetic resonance imaging of obstructive sleep apnea in children. 2018

Fleck, Robert J / Shott, Sally R / Mahmoud, Mohamed / Ishman, Stacey L / Amin, Raouf S / Donnelly, Lane F. ·Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH, 45229, USA. Robert.Fleck@CCHMC.org. · Center for Pulmonary Imaging Research, Cincinnati Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Robert.Fleck@CCHMC.org. · Imaging Research Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Robert.Fleck@CCHMC.org. · Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati School of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Department of Anesthesia, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. · Quality and Safety, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford, CA, USA. ·Pediatr Radiol · Pubmed #30078047.

ABSTRACT: Sleep-disordered breathing has a spectrum of severity that spans from snoring and partial airway collapse with increased upper airway resistance, to complete upper airway obstruction with obstructive sleep apnea during sleeping. While snoring occurs in up to 20% of children, obstructive sleep apnea affects approximately 1-5% of children. The obstruction that occurs in obstructive sleep apnea is the result of the airway collapsing during sleep, which causes arousal and impairs restful sleep. Adenotonsillectomy is the first-line treatment of obstructive sleep apnea and is usually effective in otherwise healthy nonsyndromic children. However, there are subgroups in which this surgery is less effective. These subgroups include children with obesity, severe obstructive sleep apnea preoperatively, Down syndrome, craniofacial anomalies and polycystic ovarian disease. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the first-line therapy for persistent obstructive sleep apnea despite previous adenotonsillectomy, but it is often poorly tolerated by children. When CPAP is not tolerated or preferred by the family, surgical options beyond adenotonsillectomy are discussed with the parent and child. Dynamic MRI of the airway provides a means to identify and localize the site or sites of obstruction for these children. In this review the authors address clinical indications for imaging, ideal team members to involve in an effective multidisciplinary program, basic anesthesia requirements, MRI protocol techniques and interpretation of the findings on MRI that help guide surgery.

22 Review Recent Advancements in Treating Sleep Disorders in Co-Occurring PTSD. 2018

Colvonen, Peter J / Straus, Laura D / Stepnowsky, Carl / McCarthy, Michael J / Goldstein, Lizabeth A / Norman, Sonya B. ·VA San Diego Healthcare System, University of California San Diego, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr. (116B), San Diego, CA, 92161, USA. Peter.Colvonen@va.gov. · Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA. Peter.Colvonen@va.gov. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA. Peter.Colvonen@va.gov. · Sierra Pacific Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Centers, San Francisco VA Healthcare System, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · VA San Diego Healthcare System, University of California San Diego, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr. (116B), San Diego, CA, 92161, USA. · Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA. · Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA. · National Center for PTSD, Boston, MA, USA. ·Curr Psychiatry Rep · Pubmed #29931537.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Comorbidity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and insomnia, nightmares, and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is high. We review recent research on psychotherapeutic and pharmacological interventions for sleep disorders in PTSD. RECENT FINDINGS: PTSD treatments decrease PTSD severity and nightmare frequency, but do not resolve OSA or insomnia. Research on whether insomnia hinders PTSD treatment shows mixed results; untreated OSA does interfere with PTSD treatment. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia is the recommended treatment for insomnia; however, optimal ordering with PTSD treatment is unclear. PTSD treatment may be most useful for PTSD-related nightmares. CPAP therapy is recommended for OSA but adherence can be low. Targeted treatment of sleep disorders in the context of PTSD offers a unique and underutilized opportunity to advance clinical care and research. Research is needed to create screening protocols, determine optimal order of treatment, and elucidate mechanisms between sleep and PTSD treatments.

23 Review A review of the associations between obstructive sleep apnea and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and possible mechanisms of disease. 2018

Dominguez, Jennifer E / Habib, Ashraf S / Krystal, Andrew D. ·Duke Department of Anesthesiology, Durham, NC, 27710, USA. Electronic address: Jennifer.dominguez@dm.duke.edu. · Duke Department of Anesthesiology, Durham, NC, 27710, USA. · Duke Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Durham, NC 27710, USA; University of California, San Francisco Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #29929840.

ABSTRACT: Obesity is prevalent among pregnant women in the United States; 15-20% of obese pregnant women have obstructive sleep apnea. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea increases along with body mass index, age and in the presence of other co-morbidities. Untreated obstructive sleep apnea in women is associated with a range of cardiovascular, pulmonary and metabolic co-morbidities; recent studies suggest that women with obstructive sleep apnea in pregnancy may be at significantly greater risk of entering pregnancy with chronic hypertension and/or of developing hypertensive disorders of pregnancy: gestational hypertension; preeclampsia; or eclampsia. This has serious public health implications; hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are a major cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality and are associated with a greater lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms that associated obstructive sleep apnea with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy have not been defined, but several pathways are scientifically plausible. In this review, we will present a comprehensive literature review of the following: the associations between obstructive sleep apnea and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; the proposed mechanisms that may connect obstructive sleep apnea and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; and the effectiveness of treatment at mitigating these adverse outcomes.

24 Review Effects of Chronic Opioid Use on Sleep and Wake. 2018

Cao, Michelle / Javaheri, Shahrokh. ·Division of Sleep Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, 450 Broadway Street, Redwood City, CA 94063, USA. · Bethesda North Hospital, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 10535 Montgomery Road, Suite 200, Cincinnati, OH 45242, USA; Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, The Ohio State University, 181 Taylor Avenue, Columbus, OH 43203, USA. Electronic address: shahrokhjavaheri@icloud.com. ·Sleep Med Clin · Pubmed #29759277.

ABSTRACT: Chronic use of opioids negatively affects sleep on 2 levels: sleep architecture and breathing. Patients suffer from a variety of daytime sequelae. There may be a bidirectional relationship between poor sleep quality, sleep-disordered breathing, and daytime function. Opioids are a potential cause of incident depression. The best therapeutic option is withdrawal of opioids, which proves difficult. Positive airway pressure devices are considered first-line treatment for sleep-related breathing disorders. New generation positive pressure servo ventilators are increasingly popular as a treatment option for opioid-induced sleep-disordered breathing. Treatments to improve sleep quality, sleep-related breathing disorders, and quality of life in patients who use opioids chronically are discussed.

25 Review Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Pregnant Women: A Review of Pregnancy Outcomes and an Approach to Management. 2018

Dominguez, Jennifer E / Krystal, Andrew D / Habib, Ashraf S. ·From the Departments of Anesthesiology. · Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California. ·Anesth Analg · Pubmed #29649034.

ABSTRACT: Among obese pregnant women, 15%-20% have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and this prevalence increases along with body mass index and in the presence of other comorbidities. Prepregnancy obesity and pregnancy-related weight gain are certainly risk factors for sleep-disordered breathing in pregnancy, but certain physiologic changes of pregnancy may also increase a woman's risk of developing or worsening OSA. While it has been shown that untreated OSA in postmenopausal women is associated with a range of cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic comorbidities, a body of literature is emerging that suggests OSA may also have serious implications for the health of mothers and fetuses during and after pregnancy. In this review, we discuss the following: pregnancy as a vulnerable period for the development or worsening of OSA; the associations between OSA and maternal and fetal outcomes; the current screening modalities for OSA in pregnancy; and current recommendations regarding peripartum management of OSA.

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