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Spinal Diseases: HELP
Articles by Lisa A. Mandl
Based on 6 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Lisa A. Mandl wrote the following 6 articles about Spinal Diseases.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: goodmans@hss.edu. · Bryan Springer, MD: OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · Gordon Guyatt, MD: McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Matthew P. Abdel, MD: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Vinod Dasa, MD: Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · Michael George, MD: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Ora Gewurz-Singer, MD: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Jon T. Giles, MD, MPH: Columbia University, New York, New York. · Beverly Johnson, MD: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Steve Lee, DO: Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Susan M. Goodman, MD, Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, Peter Sculco, MD, Barry Brause, MD, Kyriakos Kirou, MD, Ronald MacKenzie, MD, Linda Russell, MD: Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · Michael A. Mont, MD: Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Scott Sporer, MD: Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · Louis Stryker, MD: University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · Marat Turgunbaev, MD, MPH, Amy S. Miller: American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Antonia F. Chen, MD, MBA: Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Jeremy Gililland, MD: University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · Mark Goodman, MD, Adolph Yates, MD: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Arlene Hurley-Rosenblatt, ANP: Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Elena Losina, PhD: Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Kaleb Michaud, PhD: National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Ted Mikuls, MD, MSPH: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Alexander Sah, MD: Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · Jasvinder A. Singh, MBBS, MPH: University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·J Arthroplasty · Pubmed #28629905.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

2 Guideline 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty. 2017

Goodman, Susan M / Springer, Bryan / Guyatt, Gordon / Abdel, Matthew P / Dasa, Vinod / George, Michael / Gewurz-Singer, Ora / Giles, Jon T / Johnson, Beverly / Lee, Steve / Mandl, Lisa A / Mont, Michael A / Sculco, Peter / Sporer, Scott / Stryker, Louis / Turgunbaev, Marat / Brause, Barry / Chen, Antonia F / Gililland, Jeremy / Goodman, Mark / Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene / Kirou, Kyriakos / Losina, Elena / MacKenzie, Ronald / Michaud, Kaleb / Mikuls, Ted / Russell, Linda / Sah, Alexander / Miller, Amy S / Singh, Jasvinder A / Yates, Adolph. ·Hospital for Special Surgery/Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York. · OrthoCarolina Hip and Knee Center, Charlotte, North Carolina. · McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Louisiana State University, New Orleans. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Chicago, Illinois. · University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston. · American College of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia. · Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Rockefeller University, New York, New York. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases, Wichita, Kansas, and University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha. · Dearborn-Sah Institute for Joint Restoration, Fremont, California. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #28620948.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. RESULTS: The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional and based on low- or moderate-quality evidence. CONCLUSION: This guideline should help decision-making by clinicians and patients regarding perioperative antirheumatic medication management at the time of elective THA or TKA. These conditional recommendations reflect the paucity of high-quality direct randomized controlled trial data.

3 Article IgA-coated 2017

Viladomiu, Monica / Kivolowitz, Charles / Abdulhamid, Ahmed / Dogan, Belgin / Victorio, Daniel / Castellanos, Jim G / Woo, Viola / Teng, Fei / Tran, Nhan L / Sczesnak, Andrew / Chai, Christina / Kim, Myunghoo / Diehl, Gretchen E / Ajami, Nadim J / Petrosino, Joseph F / Zhou, Xi K / Schwartzman, Sergio / Mandl, Lisa A / Abramowitz, Meira / Jacob, Vinita / Bosworth, Brian / Steinlauf, Adam / Scherl, Ellen J / Wu, Hsin-Jung Joyce / Simpson, Kenneth W / Longman, Randy S. ·Jill Roberts Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY 10021, USA. · College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. · Department of Immunobiology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719, USA. · Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94709, USA. · Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. · Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY 10021, USA. · Jill Roberts Center for IBD, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY 10021, USA. · Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. · Jill Roberts Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY 10021, USA. ral2006@med.cornell.edu. ·Sci Transl Med · Pubmed #28179509.

ABSTRACT: Peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a common extraintestinal manifestation in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) characterized by inflammatory enthesitis, dactylitis, or synovitis of nonaxial joints. However, a mechanistic understanding of the link between intestinal inflammation and SpA has yet to emerge. We evaluated and functionally characterized the fecal microbiome of IBD patients with or without peripheral SpA. Coupling the sorting of immunoglobulin A (IgA)-coated microbiota with 16

4 Article Short-Term Total Hip Arthroplasty Outcomes in Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis or Psoriatic Skin Disease Compared to Patients With Osteoarthritis. 2016

Mandl, Lisa A / Zhu, Rebecca / Huang, Wei-Ti / Zhang, Meng / Alexiades, Michael M / Figgie, Mark P / Goodman, Susan M. ·Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #26360522.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with psoriasis have been poorly studied. This study was undertaken to assess whether patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) or those with cutaneous psoriasis (PsC) without evidence of inflammatory joint disease are at an increased risk for worse outcomes after THA as compared to patients with osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Among subjects in a prospective THA registry, PsA and PsC cases were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes, and all cases were matched with patients with OA as controls. Analyses were performed to identify predictors of poor postoperative pain or function. RESULTS: Of the 289 potential cases of PsA or PsC, 63 with PsA and 153 with PsC were validated. Self-report data were available postoperatively from 75% of PsA patients, 69% of PsC patients, and 94% of OA controls. In total, 51% of PsA patients and 56% of PsC patients were male, compared to 45% of OA controls (P = 0.04). Body mass index was higher in those with PsA or PsC (P = 0.002 versus controls). There were no differences in race or education between the 3 groups. PsA patients and PsC patients had more comorbidities than OA controls. PsA patients were more likely than PsC patients and OA controls to be current or previous smokers. Moreover, 54% of PsA patients were being treated with biologics or nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, compared to 8% of PsC patients. There were no significant differences in pre- or postoperative Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA Index scores for pain or function between the 3 groups. Short-Form 36 mental component summary scores were significantly better in the OA controls, both pre- and postoperatively (P = 0.006 and P < 0.001, respectively, versus PsA or PsC). EuroQol 5-domain health-related quality of life scores were significantly worse postoperatively for those with PsA or PsC (P < 0.0001 versus OA controls). In regression analyses, neither PsA nor PsC were risk factors for worse THA outcomes. Satisfaction with the outcomes of THA was similarly high among all 3 groups (P = 0.54). CONCLUSION: Neither PsA nor PsC are risk factors for poor outcomes after THA. This is important information to convey to patients with either PsA or PsC who are contemplating surgical intervention with THA.

5 Article Short-term total hip replacement outcomes in ankylosing spondylitis. 2014

Goodman, Susan M / Zhu, Rebecca / Figgie, Mark P / Huang, Wei-Ti / Mandl, Lisa A. ·From *Weill Cornell Medical College and †Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY. ·J Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #25275762.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: While rates of total hip replacement (THR) in spondyloarthritis are increasing, contemporary outcomes are not well described. OBJECTIVES: This study analyzes 2-year outcomes in a contemporary cohort of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients undergoing THR. METHODS: A case-control study was performed using data from an institutional arthroplasty registry. Validated AS cases were matched 4:1 by age and procedure to patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Data were obtained prior to surgery and at 2 years. Multiple imputation techniques were performed to avoid systematic bias due to missing data. RESULTS: Thirty eligible AS cases were identified between May 2007 and February 2010. Ankylosing spondylitis cases had worse American Society of Anesthesia class (P < 0.001) and more comorbidities (P = 0.02) compared with OA. Ankylosing spondylitis had worse preoperative lower-extremity Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index pain (46.8 vs 55.4; P = 0.03), function (43.0 vs 55.1; P = 0.04), and general health status measured as SF-12 (Short-Form Health Survey) physical component scale (PCS) score (29.6 vs 36.0; P < 0.001), however, there was no difference at two years in pain (89.4 vs 92.5; P = 0.23) or function (83.9 vs 90.1; P = 0.04). Physical component scale score remained significantly worse (41.2 vs 50.1; P < 0.001). Better preoperative SF-12 PCS score significantly decreased the risk of a poor pain outcome (odds ratio, 0.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.40). Overall satisfaction was high. CONCLUSIONS: Although patients with AS in a contemporary cohort have more comorbidities and worse physical function prior to THR, they achieve similar gains as OA. In a multivariate regression controlling for multiple potential confounders including back pain, only preoperative health status measured as SF-12 PCS score was a significant risk factor for a poor 2-year pain. Among contemporary patients, AS is not an independent risk factor for poor THR outcomes.Take-Home Message Patients with AS have significant improvement in pain and function after THR.Poor preoperative function and low-back pain are not risk factors for poor THR outcomes for patients with AS.Despite improvements, low SF-12 PCS scores indicate persistent limitations due to health.

6 Article US trends in rates of arthroplasty for inflammatory arthritis including rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and spondyloarthritis. 2014

Mertelsmann-Voss, Christina / Lyman, Stephen / Pan, Ting Jung / Goodman, Susan M / Figgie, Mark P / Mandl, Lisa A. ·Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York. ·Arthritis Rheumatol · Pubmed #24591462.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Although rates of arthroplasty have increased dramatically, rates among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are reported to be decreasing. It is not known if this is also the case among patients with other inflammatory arthritides. This study was undertaken to evaluate rates of arthroplasty due to RA, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), spondyloarthritis (SpA), and a composite group of patients with inflammatory arthritides (IA), compared to arthroplasty rates among patients without inflammatory or autoimmune conditions. METHODS: Administrative discharge databases (State Inpatient Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, New York Department of Health Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System, California Statewide Health Planning and Development) were used to compare rates of knee, hip, and shoulder arthroplasty occurring from 1991 to 2005. RESULTS: Of 2,839,325 arthroplasties in 1991-2005, 2.7% were performed in patients with IA. The rate of arthroplasty for noninflammatory conditions doubled (124.5 per 100,000 persons in 1991 versus 247.5 per 100,000 persons in 2005), while the rate for IA remained stable at 5.1 per 100,000. Rates of arthroplasty for RA decreased slightly (4.6 per 100,000 versus 4.5 per 100,000) and those for JIA decreased by nearly 50% (0.22 per 100,000 versus 0.13 per 100,000), but the rate of arthroplasty for SpA increased by nearly 50% (0.22 per 100,000 versus 0.31 per 100,000). Age at the time of arthroplasty increased for patients with RA (mean ± SD 63.4 ± 12.7 years versus 64.9 ± 12.8 years), JIA (30.9 ± 12.2 years versus 36.7 ± 14.9 years), and SpA (54.3 ± 16.1 years versus 60.4 ± 13.9 years). However, the mean age at the time of arthroplasty among non-IA cases decreased (71.5 ± 11.8 years versus 69.0 ± 12.0 years). CONCLUSION: This population-based study is the first to show that arthroplasty rates have decreased significantly among patients with JIA and minimally among patients with RA, and have increased among patients with SpA. The increased age at the time of arthroplasty among patients with JIA and SpA suggests that these patients are increasingly able to defer surgical interventions. Further research is needed to assess the ongoing effect of biologic agents on the need for arthroplasties in patients with IA.