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Spinal Diseases: HELP
Articles by Nehal N. Mehta
Based on 5 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Nehal N. Mehta wrote the following 5 articles about Spinal Diseases.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with awareness and attention to comorbidities. 2019

Elmets, Craig A / Leonardi, Craig L / Davis, Dawn M R / Gelfand, Joel M / Lichten, Jason / Mehta, Nehal N / Armstrong, April W / Connor, Cody / Cordoro, Kelly M / Elewski, Boni E / Gordon, Kenneth B / Gottlieb, Alice B / Kaplan, Daniel H / Kavanaugh, Arthur / Kivelevitch, Dario / Kiselica, Matthew / Korman, Neil J / Kroshinsky, Daniela / Lebwohl, Mark / Lim, Henry W / Paller, Amy S / Parra, Sylvia L / Pathy, Arun L / Prater, Elizabeth Farley / Rupani, Reena / Siegel, Michael / Stoff, Benjamin / Strober, Bruce E / Wong, Emily B / Wu, Jashin J / Hariharan, Vidhya / Menter, Alan. ·University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama. · Central Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · National Psoriasis Foundation, Portland, Oregon. · National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. · University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of California San Francisco School of MedicineSan Francisco, California. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, New York, New York. · University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California San Diego, San Diego, California. · Baylor Scott and White, Dallas, Texas. · University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology and Skin Surgery, Sumter, South Carolina. · Colorado Permanente Medical Group, Centennial, Colorado. · University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York. · Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Probity Medical Research, Waterloo, Canada. · San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Joint-Base San Antonio, Texas. · Dermatology Research and Education Foundation, Irvine, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. Electronic address: vhariharan@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30772097.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease that affects up to 3.2% of the US population. This guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in psoriasis management and care, providing recommendations on the basis of available evidence.

2 Review Psoriasis. 2016

Greb, Jacqueline E / Goldminz, Ari M / Elder, James T / Lebwohl, Mark G / Gladman, Dafna D / Wu, Jashin J / Mehta, Nehal N / Finlay, Andrew Y / Gottlieb, Alice B. ·Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Tufts Medical Center, Department of Dermatology, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA. · University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Krembil Research Institute, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Dermatology, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA. · National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Dermatology and Wound Healing, Division of Infection and Immunity, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK. · Department of Dermatology, New York Medical College, 40 Sunshine Cottage Rd, Valhalla, New York 10595, USA. ·Nat Rev Dis Primers · Pubmed #27883001.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder with cutaneous and systemic manifestations and substantial negative effects on patient quality of life. Psoriasis has a strong, albeit polygenic, genetic basis. Whereas approximately half of the accountable genetic effect of psoriasis maps to the major histocompatibility complex, >70 other loci have been identified, many of which implicate nuclear factor-κB, interferon signalling and the IL-23-IL-23 receptor axis. Psoriasis pathophysiology is characterized by abnormal keratinocyte proliferation and immune cell infiltration in the dermis and epidermis involving the innate and adaptive immune systems, with important roles for dendritic cells and T cells, among other cells. Frequent comorbidities are rheumatological and cardiovascular in nature, in particular, psoriatic arthritis. Current treatments for psoriasis include topical agents, photo-based therapies, traditional systemic drugs and biologic agents. Treatments can be used in combination or as monotherapy. Biologic therapies that target specific disease mediators have become a mainstay in the treatment of moderate-to-severe disease, whereas advances in the treatment of mild-to-moderate disease have been limited.

3 Article Risk of major cardiovascular events in patients with psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis: a population-based cohort study. 2015

Ogdie, Alexis / Yu, YiDing / Haynes, Kevin / Love, Thorvardur Jon / Maliha, Samantha / Jiang, Yihui / Troxel, Andrea B / Hennessy, Sean / Kimmel, Steven E / Margolis, David J / Choi, Hyon / Mehta, Nehal N / Gelfand, Joel M. ·Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Pharmacoepidemiology Research and Training, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Pharmacoepidemiology Research and Training, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. · New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Medicine, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Pharmacoepidemiology Research and Training, Center for Therapeutic Effectiveness Research, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Dermatoepidemiology and Translation, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Section of Rheumatology and the Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Section of Inflammation and Cardiometabolic Diseases, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Dermatoepidemiology and Translation, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Pharmacoepidemiology Research and Training, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #25351522.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We aimed to quantify the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) among patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriasis without known PsA compared with the general population after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS: A population-based longitudinal cohort study from 1994 to 2010 was performed in The Health Improvement Network (THIN), a primary care medical record database in the UK. Patients aged 18-89 years of age with PsA, RA or psoriasis were included. Up to 10 unexposed controls matched on practice and index date were selected for each patient with PsA. Outcomes included cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accidents and the composite outcome (MACE). Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the HRs for each outcome adjusted for traditional risk factors. A priori, we hypothesised an interaction between disease status and disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) use. RESULTS: Patients with PsA (N=8706), RA (N=41 752), psoriasis (N=138 424) and unexposed controls (N=81 573) were identified. After adjustment for traditional risk factors, the risk of MACE was higher in patients with PsA not prescribed a DMARD (HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.49), patients with RA (No DMARD: HR 1.39, 95% CI 1.28 to 1.50, DMARD: HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.46 to 1.70), patients with psoriasis not prescribed a DMARD (HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.15) and patients with severe psoriasis (DMARD users: HR 1.42, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.73). CONCLUSIONS: Cardiovascular risk should be addressed with all patients affected by psoriasis, PsA or RA.

4 Article Psoriatic arthritis and sacroiliitis are associated with increased vascular inflammation by 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography: baseline report from the Psoriasis Atherosclerosis and Cardiometabolic Disease Initiative. 2014

Rose, Shawn / Dave, Jenny / Millo, Corina / Naik, Haley B / Siegel, Evan L / Mehta, Nehal N. · ·Arthritis Res Ther · Pubmed #25078679.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, but surrogate markers for CVD in these disorders are inadequate. Because the presence of sacroiliitis may portend more severe PsA, we hypothesized that sacroiliitis defined by computed tomography (CT) would be associated with increased vascular inflammation defined by 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT), which is an established measure of CVD. METHODS: Participants (n = 65) underwent whole-body FDG-PET/CT. Metabolic activity of the aorta was measured using the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax), a measure of atherosclerotic plaque activity. The primary outcome was aortic vascular inflammation. Linear regression (with β-coefficients (β) and P-values reported for PsA and sacroiliitis) was used to adjust for CVD risk factors to determine associations of PsA or sacroiliitis with vascular inflammation. Likelihood ratio testing was performed to evaluate the contribution of sacroiliitis to vascular disease estimation compared to the effects of PsA and traditional CVD risk factors. RESULTS: Vascular inflammation (measured as SUVmax) was greater (P < 0.001) in patients with sacroiliitis (mean ± SD = 7.33 ± 2.09) defined by CT compared to those without sacroiliitis (6.39 ± 1.49, P = 0.038). There were associations between PsA and aortic inflammation (β = 0.124, P < 0.001) and between sacroiliitis and aortic inflammation (β = 0.270, P < 0.001) after adjusting for CVD risk factors. Sacroiliitis predicted vascular inflammation beyond PsA and CVD risk factors (χ2 = 124.6, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Sacroiliitis is associated with increased vascular inflammation detected by FDG-PET/CT, suggesting that sacroiliac joint disease may identify patients at greater risk for CVD. Large, ongoing prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

5 Article Prevalence and treatment patterns of psoriatic arthritis in the UK. 2013

Ogdie, Alexis / Langan, Sinéad / Love, Thorvardur / Haynes, Kevin / Shin, Daniel / Seminara, Nicole / Mehta, Nehal N / Troxel, Andrea / Choi, Hyon / Gelfand, Joel M. ·Division of Rheumatology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, 8 Penn Tower, 1 Convention Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. alexis.ogdie@uphs.upenn.edu ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #23221331.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of PsA in The Health Improvement Network (THIN), a large population-based medical records database in the UK, to examine factors associated with prevalent PsA among patients with psoriasis and to describe the use of DMARDs in patients with PsA. METHODS: Two cohorts were derived from THIN to examine the prevalence of PsA in a cross-sectional study among all patients aged 18-90 years and among a subcohort of 4900 psoriasis patients aged 45-65 years. Prescription codes were used to describe therapies after the diagnosis of PsA. Associations for prevalent PsA among psoriasis patients were assessed using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Among 4.8 million patients in THIN between the ages of 18 and 90 years, 9045 patients had at least one medical code for PsA, giving an overall prevalence of 0.19% (95% CI 0.19%, 0.19%). Of those patients, 45.9% with PsA have been prescribed DMARDs. Among the 4064 confirmed psoriasis patients, the prevalence of PsA was 8.6% (95% CI 7.7%, 9.5%). PsA was more prevalent among patients with severe psoriasis [odds ratio (OR) 3.34; 95% CI 2.40, 4.65], obesity (OR 1.77; 95% CI 1.30, 2.41) and duration of psoriasis for ≥10 years (OR 7.42; 95% CI 3.86, 14.25) in the fully adjusted model. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of PsA in THIN is consistent with previous population-based estimates. Limitations include a definition of PsA based on a diagnostic code rather than Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR) criteria. Given the large population of PsA patients, THIN is an important resource for the study of PsA.