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Spinal Diseases: HELP
Articles by Mike Johannes Leonardus Peters
Based on 13 articles published since 2010
(Why 13 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, M. J. L. Peters wrote the following 13 articles about Spinal Diseases.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders: 2015/2016 update. 2017

Agca, R / Heslinga, S C / Rollefstad, S / Heslinga, M / McInnes, I B / Peters, M J L / Kvien, T K / Dougados, M / Radner, H / Atzeni, F / Primdahl, J / Södergren, A / Wallberg Jonsson, S / van Rompay, J / Zabalan, C / Pedersen, T R / Jacobsson, L / de Vlam, K / Gonzalez-Gay, M A / Semb, A G / Kitas, G D / Smulders, Y M / Szekanecz, Z / Sattar, N / Symmons, D P M / Nurmohamed, M T. ·Departments of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Preventive Cardio-Rheuma Clinic, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Internal and Vascular Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Hôpital Cochin. Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris INSERM (U1153): Clinical epidemiology and biostatistics, PRES Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopedic Institute, Milan, Italy. · Institute for Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. · Sygehus Sønderjylland (Hospital of Southern Jutland), Aabenraa, Denmark. · King Christian 10's Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Graasten, Denmark. · Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Rheumatology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden. · PARE (patient research partners), Sint-Joris-Weert, Belgium. · Romanian League Against Rheumatism (Vice-President) and Board Member (General Secretary) of AGORA, the Platform of S-E organisations for patients with RMDs, Bucharest, Romania. · Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Center for Preventive Medicine and Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology & Inflammation Research, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and Section of Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · University of Cantabria, IDIVAL, Santander, Spain. · Head of Research and Development, Academic Affairs Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, University of Manchester, Russells Hall Hospital, Clinical Research Unit, Dudley, UK. · Faculty of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary. · Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Department of Rheumatology Reade, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27697765.

ABSTRACT: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint disorders (IJD) have increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk compared with the general population. In 2009, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) taskforce recommended screening, identification of CVD risk factors and CVD risk management largely based on expert opinion. In view of substantial new evidence, an update was conducted with the aim of producing CVD risk management recommendations for patients with IJD that now incorporates an increasing evidence base. A multidisciplinary steering committee (representing 13 European countries) comprised 26 members including patient representatives, rheumatologists, cardiologists, internists, epidemiologists, a health professional and fellows. Systematic literature searches were performed and evidence was categorised according to standard guidelines. The evidence was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Three overarching principles were defined. First, there is a higher risk for CVD in patients with RA, and this may also apply to ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Second, the rheumatologist is responsible for CVD risk management in patients with IJD. Third, the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids should be in accordance with treatment-specific recommendations from EULAR and Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society. Ten recommendations were defined, of which one is new and six were changed compared with the 2009 recommendations. Each designated an appropriate evidence support level. The present update extends on the evidence that CVD risk in the whole spectrum of IJD is increased. This underscores the need for CVD risk management in these patients. These recommendations are defined to provide assistance in CVD risk management in IJD, based on expert opinion and scientific evidence.

2 Review Diastolic left ventricular dysfunction in ankylosing spondylitis--a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2014

Heslinga, Sjoerd C / Van Dongen, Carlo J / Konings, Thelma C / Peters, Mike J / Van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E / Smulders, Yvo M / Nurmohamed, Michael T. ·Department of Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Cardiology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Electronic address: mt.nurmohamed@vumc.nl. ·Semin Arthritis Rheum · Pubmed #24655534.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is associated with increased mortality largely due to cardiovascular disease. Diastolic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction serves as a precursor to chronic heart failure and may cause morbidity and mortality. A systematic literature search was conducted to determine the prevalence of diastolic LV dysfunction in patients with AS. METHODS: We identified all echocardiographic studies investigating diastolic LV function in patients with AS. The initial search yielded 166 studies of which 11 met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Compared to control subjects, AS patients had a worse E/A ratio [mean difference -0.13 m/s (95% CI: -0.19 to -0.07)], a prolonged deceleration time [mean difference 13.90 ms (95% CI: 6.03-21.78)], and a prolonged mean isovolumetric relaxation time [mean difference 8.06 ms (95% CI: 3.23-12.89)], all suggestive of diastolic LV dysfunction. The best way to establish diastolic LV dysfunction, however, is to combine E/A ratio, deceleration time, and isovolumetric relaxation time. The latter has been done in 3 studies, all reaffirming an increased prevalence rate of diastolic LV dysfunction in AS patients as compared with control subjects, i.e., 9% versus 0%, 30% versus 12%, and 45% versus 18%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our observations support the current evidence base for an increased risk of diastolic LV dysfunction in AS. However, larger studies are needed to investigate the exact magnitude of diastolic LV dysfunction and its clinical relevance in patients with AS.

3 Review Cardiovascular comorbidities in patients with psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review. 2013

Jamnitski, Anna / Symmons, Deborah / Peters, Mike J L / Sattar, Naveed / McInnes, Iain / Nurmohamed, Michael T. ·Department of Rheumatology, Jan van Breemen Research Institute/READE, Dr Jan van Breemenstraat 2, 1056 AB Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #22532629.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Data regarding cardiovascular comorbidity and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are limited. To evaluate the cardiovascular risk profile, a systematic literature search was performed to provide an extensive summary of all studies available on cardiovascular risk in PsA. METHODS: Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane library were searched from January 1966 to April 2011 for English language articles on data concerning cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular risk factors in PsA. Review articles, case reports and studies on psoriasis alone were excluded. RESULTS: Twenty-eight articles were included in this review. Studies on all-cause mortality revealed mixed results. Available data on cardiovascular disease appeared more consistent, indicating an increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in PsA. Commensurate with this, surrogate markers of subclinical atherosclerosis, arterial stiffness and cardiovascular risk factors, for example hypertension, dyslipidaemia, obesity and metabolic-related factors, were more prominent in PsA compared with controls. Suppression of inflammation was linked with a favourable effect on cardiovascular surrogate markers, for example carotid intima media thickness and endothelial dysfunction, in several (un)controlled studies. CONCLUSION: Most studies point towards an increased cardiovascular risk in PsA, broadly on a par with the risk level in rheumatoid arthritis, emphasising the need for similar cardiovascular risk management in both conditions. Further studies are needed to indicate whether inflammatory suppression or modification of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, or both, will reduce cardiovascular risk.

4 Article Assessment of aortic stiffness in patients with ankylosing spondylitis using cardiovascular magnetic resonance. 2018

Biesbroek, P Stefan / Heslinga, Sjoerd C / van de Ven, Peter M / Peters, Mike J L / Amier, Raquel P / Konings, Thelma C / Maroules, Christopher D / Ayers, Colby / Joshi, Parag H / van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E / van Halm, Vokko P / van Rossum, Albert C / Nurmohamed, Michael T / Nijveldt, Robin. ·Department of Cardiology, 5F, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081, HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Netherlands Heart Institute, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Amsterdam Rheumatology and immunology Center, Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Amsterdam Rheumatology and immunology Center, Rheumatology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. · Department of Clinical Science, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. · Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. · Department of Cardiology, 5F, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081, HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Robin@nijveldt.net. ·Clin Rheumatol · Pubmed #29754182.

ABSTRACT: To evaluate aortic stiffness in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and to assess its association with AS characteristics and left ventricular (LV) remodeling. In this prospective study, 14 consecutive AS patients were each matched to two controls without cardiovascular symptoms or known cardiovascular disease who underwent CMR imaging for the assessment of aortic arch pulse wave velocity (PWV) at 1.5 Tesla. To enhance comparability of the samples, matching was done with replacement resulting in 20 unique controls. Only AS patients with abnormal findings on screening echocardiography were included in this exploratory study. Cine CMR was used to assess LV geometry and systolic function, and late gadolinium enhancement was performed to determine the presence of myocardial hyperenhancement (i.e., fibrosis). Aortic arch PWV was significantly higher in the AS group compared with the control group (median 9.7 m/s, interquartile range [IQR] 7.1 to 11.8 vs. 6.1 m/s, IQR 4.6 to 7.6 m/s; p < 0.001). PWV was positively associated with functional disability as measured by BASFI (R: 0.62; p = 0.018). Three patients (21%) with a non-ischemic pattern of hyperenhancement showed increased PWV (11.7, 12.3, and 16.5 m/s) as compared to the 11 patients without hyperenhancement (9.0 m/s, IQR 6.6 to 10.5 m/s; p = 0.022). PWV was inversely associated with LV ejection fraction (R: - 0.63; p = 0.015), but was not found to be statistically correlated to LV volumes or mass. Aortic arch PWV was increased in our cohort of patients with AS. Higher PWV in the aortic arch was associated with functional disability, the presence of non-ischemic hyperenhancement, and reduced LV systolic function.

5 Article Insights into cardiac involvement in ankylosing spondylitis from cardiovascular magnetic resonance. 2017

Biesbroek, P Stefan / Heslinga, Sjoerd C / Konings, Thelma C / van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E / Hofman, Mark B M / van de Ven, Peter M / Kamp, Otto / van Halm, Vokko P / Peters, Mike J L / Smulders, Yvo M / van Rossum, Albert C / Nurmohamed, Mike T / Nijveldt, Robin. ·Departments of Cardiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Netherlands Heart Institute, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Physics and Medical Technology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Heart · Pubmed #27852696.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cardiac involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). METHODS: Patients with ankylosing spondylitis without cardiovascular symptoms or known cardiovascular disease were screened by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) for participation in this exploratory CMR study. We prospectively enrolled 15 ankylosing spondylitis patients with an abnormal TTE for further tissue characterisation using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and T1 mapping. T1 mapping was used to calculate myocardial extracellular volume (ECV). Disease activity was assessed by C reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) measurements. RESULTS: In the total of 15 included patients, 14 had a complete CMR exam (mean age 62 years, 93% male and mean disease duration 21 years). Left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction was the most common finding on TTE (79%), followed by aortic root dilatation (14%), right ventricular (RV) dilatation (7%) and RV dysfunction (7%). CMR revealed focal hyperenhancement in three patients (21%), all with a particular pattern of enhancement. LV dysfunction, as defined by a LV ejection fraction below 55%, was observed in five patients (36%). Myocardial ECV was correlated with the CRP concentration (R=0.78, p<0.01) and ESR level (R CONCLUSIONS: In patients with ankylosing spondylitis, CMR with cine imaging and LGE identified global LV dysfunction and focal areas of hyperenhancement. Myocardial ECV, quantified by CMR T1 mapping, was associated with the degree of disease activity. These results may suggest the presence of cardiac involvement in ankylosing spondylitis and may show the potential of ECV as a marker for disease monitoring.

6 Article Reduction of Inflammation Drives Lipid Changes in Ankylosing Spondylitis. 2015

Heslinga, Sjoerd C / Peters, Mike J / Ter Wee, Marieke M / van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E / van Sijl, Alper M / Smulders, Yvo M / Nurmohamed, Michael T. ·From the Department of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, location Reade and VU University Medical Center; and Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.S.C. Heslinga, MD, Department of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, location Reade, and VU University Medical Center; M.J. Peters, MD, PhD, Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Center; M.M. ter Wee, MSc, Department of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, location VU University Medical Center; I.E. van der Horst-Bruinsma, MD, PhD, Department of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, location Reade, and VU University Medical Center; A.M. van Sijl, MD, PhD, Department of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, location Reade, and VU University Medical Center; Y.M. Smulders, Professor, Doctor, Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Center; M.T. Nurmohamed, Professor, Doctor, Department of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, location Reade, and VU University Medical Center. ·J Rheumatol · Pubmed #26329334.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of changing inflammation on lipid levels in ankylosing spondylitis. METHODS: In a cohort of 230 patients, lipid levels were measured at baseline and after 52 weeks of treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α-blocking agents (anti-TNF). RESULTS: Total cholesterol (TC; +4.6%), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (+4.3%), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; +3.7%) increased upon treatment. Changes were most evident in patients with substantial reduction in inflammatory levels (TC +8.2% vs +1.6% and HDL-C +8.3% vs +2.2% in patients with C-reactive protein ≥ 10 mg/l normalizing upon treatment vs CRP < 10 mg/l throughout treatment period). CONCLUSION: Anti-TNF therapy results in lipid changes mostly when inflammation is appreciably modified.

7 Article Cardiovascular risk management in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis: a detailed evaluation. 2015

Heslinga, Sjoerd C / Van den Oever, Inge A / Van Sijl, Alper M / Peters, Mike J / Van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E / Smulders, Yvo M / Nurmohamed, Michael T. ·Department of Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam, Netherlands. s.heslinga@reade.nl. · Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. s.heslinga@reade.nl. · Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. s.heslinga@reade.nl. · Department of Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam, Netherlands. i.vd.oever@reade.nl. · Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. i.vd.oever@reade.nl. · Department of Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam, Netherlands. a.v.sijl@reade.nl. · Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. a.v.sijl@reade.nl. · Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. a.v.sijl@reade.nl. · Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. mjl.peters@vumc.nl. · Department of Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ie.vanderhorst@vumc.nl. · Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ie.vanderhorst@vumc.nl. · Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. y.smulders@vumc.nl. · Department of Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam, Netherlands. m.nurmohamed@reade.nl. · Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. m.nurmohamed@reade.nl. · Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. m.nurmohamed@reade.nl. ·BMC Musculoskelet Disord · Pubmed #25886634.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an inflammatory disease with documented elevated cardiovascular (CV) risk due to systemic inflammation and a higher prevalence of CV risk factors. CV risk management (CV-RM) could be an effective method to reduce CV mortality and morbidity in AS patients. We assessed CV risk and evaluated guideline adherence according to the Dutch CV-RM guideline. METHODS: This study was conducted with a cohort of consecutive AS patients eligible for treatment with a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α inhibitor. Data from the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and Environment was used to compare the prevalence of CV risk factors in AS patients with the Dutch background population. RESULTS: In total, 254 consecutive AS patients were included. The prevalences of hypertension (41% vs 31%) and smoking (43% vs 27%) were substantially higher in AS patients as compared to the general Dutch background population. Of 138 AS patients older than 40 years the 10-years CV risk could be calculated. Fifty-one of these 138 patients (37%) had an indication for CV risk treatment. CV risk treatment was initiated in 42 of the 51 (82%), however, in only 12 of the 51 (24%) patients treatment targets for either hypertension or hypercholesterolemia were reached. CONCLUSION: The increased rates of hypertension and smoking illustrate the importance of CV-RM in AS patients. Although the majority of all AS patients eligible for CV-RM received CV risk medication, CV-RM remains a challenge for treating physicians, as treatment targets were not achieved in three-quarter of the eligible patients.

8 Article Tumour necrosis factor blocking agents and progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. 2015

van Sijl, Alper M / van Eijk, Izhar C / Peters, Mike J L / Serné, Erik H / van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E / Smulders, Yvo M / Nurmohamed, Michael T. ·Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Jan van Breemen Research Institute | Reade, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Department of Internal Medicine, Institute for Cardiovascular Research (ICAR), VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Internal Medicine, Institute for Cardiovascular Research (ICAR), VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #24092419.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk that might be due to the chronic underlying inflammatory process. We investigated whether subclinical atherosclerosis of the carotid artery in patients with AS was reduced after anti-inflammatory treatment with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors in a prospective observational cohort study. METHODS: 67 out of 81 AS patients who used TNF inhibitors and underwent ultrasonography at baseline returned for follow-up after 4.9 years. Of all patients, 12 (15%) discontinued the use of TNF inhibitors. Assessments of medication use, AS-related factors and cardiovascular risk factors were measured at baseline and repeated at follow-up. B-mode carotid ultrasonography was used to investigate arterial wall parameters, including carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and Young's elastic modulus (YEM). RESULTS: After a median 4.9 years of follow-up, cIMT did not change significantly (paired t test +0.011 mm, p=0.561) in those who continued the use of TNF inhibitors, while cIMT increased substantially (+0.057 mm, p=0.069) in those who did not continue their use of TNF inhibitors. The effect of TNF inhibitors was mainly mediated by a subsequent decrease in AS disease activity. Vascular elasticity (as measured with YEM) did not change significantly in patients who discontinued TNF inhibitors or those who continued TNF inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: The use of TNF inhibitors might stabilise or slow down the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in AS patients, reflecting a decreased cardiovascular risk in these patients.

9 Article Increased risk for chronic comorbid disorders in patients with inflammatory arthritis: a population based study. 2013

Ursum, Jennie / Nielen, Mark M J / Twisk, Jos W R / Peters, Mike J L / Schellevis, François G / Nurmohamed, Michael T / Korevaar, Joke C. ·NIVEL (Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research), PO Box 1568, Utrecht 3500, BN, the Netherlands. j.ursum@nivel.nl. ·BMC Fam Pract · Pubmed #24364915.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Studies determining the development of a wide variety of different comorbid disorders in inflammatory arthritis (IA) patients are scarce, however, this knowledge could be helpful in optimising preventive care in IA patients. The aim of this study is to establish the risk that new chronic comorbid disorders in newly diagnosed patients with IA in a primary care setting are developed. METHODS: This is a nested-case-control study from 2001-2010 using data from electronic medical patient records in general practice. In total, 3,354 patients with newly diagnosed IA were selected. Each patient was matched with two control patients of the same age and sex in the same general practice. The development of 121 chronic comorbid disorders of index and control patients was compared using Cox regression. RESULTS: After a median follow-up period of 2.8 years, 56% of the IA-patients had developed at least one chronic comorbid disorder after the onset of IA, compared to 46% of the control patients (p < 0.05). The most frequent developed comorbid disorders after the onset of IA were of cardiovascular (23%), and musculoskeletal (17%) origin. The highest hazard ratios (HRs) were found for anaemia (HR 2.0 [95% CI: 1.4-2.7]) osteoporosis (HR 1.9 [1.4-2.4]), and COPD (HR 1.8 [1.4-2.3]). CONCLUSION: Patients with IA developed more chronic comorbid disorders after the onset of IA than one might expect based on age and sex. Since comorbidity has a large impact on the disease course, quality of life, and possibly on treatment itself, prevention of comorbidity should be one of the main targets in the treatment of IA patients.

10 Article Coexistence of hypothyroidism with inflammatory arthritis is associated with cardiovascular disease in women. 2012

Raterman, Hennie G / Nielen, Mark M J / Peters, Mike J L / Verheij, Robert A / Nurmohamed, Michael T / Schellevis, Francois G. ·Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #22419774.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Hypothyroidism and inflammatory arthritis tend to coexist, but data on this association are sparse. In terms of cardiovascular risk, this association may have clinical relevance as this coexistence may carry an additional cardiovascular risk. This study calculates, first, the prevalence of hypothyroidism in patients with inflammatory arthritis and, second, the cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevalence rate in patients with either hypothyroidism or inflammatory arthritis, or both. METHODS: Data from the Netherlands Information Network of General Practice, a representative Dutch sample of 360,000 registered patients, were used. Prevalence rates of hypothyroidism were calculated, and multilevel logistic regression analyses were used to calculate CVD prevalence rates. RESULTS: Hypothyroidism prevalence was 6.5% in female patients with arthritis compared to 3.9% in controls (p<0.001). CVD prevalence was 4.3% in patients with hypothyroidism, 5.9% in patients with inflammatory arthritis, 14.3% in patients with hypothyroid inflammatory arthritis and 2.1% in controls. Adjusted CVD prevalence rates were 1.2 (95% CI 0.99 to 1.4) for hypothyroidism, 1.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.0) for inflammatory arthritis and 3.7 (95% CI 1.7 to 8.0) for hypothyroid inflammatory arthritis as compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS: These data raise awareness on the coexistence of hypothyroidism and inflammatory arthritis and emphasise the importance of cardiovascular risk management in these patients, particularly when hypothyroidism and inflammatory arthritis coexist.

11 Article The relationship between disease-related characteristics and conduction disturbances in ankylosing spondylitis. 2010

Dik, V K / Peters, M J L / Dijkmans, P A / Van der Weijden, M A C / De Vries, M K / Dijkmans, B A C / Van der Horst-Bruinsma, I E / Nurmohamed, M T. ·Department of Rheumatology, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Scand J Rheumatol · Pubmed #20132069.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is associated with an increased cardiovascular (CV) risk. Conduction disturbances (CD) may explain the CV burden, as they are independently associated with cardiac disease. The aim of this study was (i) to determine the prevalence of CD in AS, and (ii) to evaluate the relationship between CD and demographic and AS-related characteristics. METHODS: A rheumatological evaluation assessing demographic and AS-related characteristics and a resting standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) were performed in 131 consecutive AS patients. RESULTS: A first-degree atrioventricular (AV) block was found in six (4.6%) patients. One (0.8%) patient suffered from a complete right bundle branch block (RBBB) and one (0.8%) patient had a left anterior hemiblock. A prolonged QRS (pQRS) interval was observed in 38 (29.2%) patients, including those with a complete or incomplete BBB. Age, disease duration, and body mass index (BMI) were significantly associated with the PR interval, and male gender, disease duration, and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI) with the QRS interval. In multivariate analyses, disease duration remained independently associated with both the PR and the QRS intervals. CONCLUSION: Intraventricular CD is highly prevalent in AS, particularly in patients with long-standing disease. Further research is needed to determine whether intraventricular CD contribute to the increased CV risk and long-term CV mortality in AS.

12 Minor Response to: 'The influence of inflammation in the development of subclinical atherosclerosis in psoriatic arthritis' by Gonzalez-Gay et al. 2014

Nurmohamed, Michael T / Jamnitski, Anna / Symmons, Deborah / Peters, Mike Johannes Leonardus / Sattar, Naveed / McInnes, Iain. ·Department of Rheumatology and Internal Medicine, VUMC, , Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #24577335.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Minor Prevalence of cardiovascular diseases in psoriatic arthritis resembles that of rheumatoid arthritis. 2011

Jamnitski, A / Visman, I M / Peters, M J L / Boers, M / Dijkmans, B A C / Nurmohamed, M T. · ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #20956406.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --