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Spinal Diseases: HELP
Articles by Naveed Sattar
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, N. Sattar wrote the following 7 articles about Spinal Diseases.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders: 2015/2016 update. 2017

Agca, R / Heslinga, S C / Rollefstad, S / Heslinga, M / McInnes, I B / Peters, M J L / Kvien, T K / Dougados, M / Radner, H / Atzeni, F / Primdahl, J / Södergren, A / Wallberg Jonsson, S / van Rompay, J / Zabalan, C / Pedersen, T R / Jacobsson, L / de Vlam, K / Gonzalez-Gay, M A / Semb, A G / Kitas, G D / Smulders, Y M / Szekanecz, Z / Sattar, N / Symmons, D P M / Nurmohamed, M T. ·Departments of Rheumatology, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Preventive Cardio-Rheuma Clinic, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Internal and Vascular Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology, Paris Descartes University, Hôpital Cochin. Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris INSERM (U1153): Clinical epidemiology and biostatistics, PRES Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Rheumatology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopedic Institute, Milan, Italy. · Institute for Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. · Sygehus Sønderjylland (Hospital of Southern Jutland), Aabenraa, Denmark. · King Christian 10's Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Graasten, Denmark. · Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Rheumatology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden. · PARE (patient research partners), Sint-Joris-Weert, Belgium. · Romanian League Against Rheumatism (Vice-President) and Board Member (General Secretary) of AGORA, the Platform of S-E organisations for patients with RMDs, Bucharest, Romania. · Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Center for Preventive Medicine and Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Rheumatology & Inflammation Research, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and Section of Rheumatology, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · University of Cantabria, IDIVAL, Santander, Spain. · Head of Research and Development, Academic Affairs Dudley Group NHS Foundation Trust, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, University of Manchester, Russells Hall Hospital, Clinical Research Unit, Dudley, UK. · Faculty of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary. · Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology, Arthritis Research UK Centre for Epidemiology, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. · Department of Rheumatology Reade, Amsterdam Rheumatology and Immunology Center, Reade & VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #27697765.

ABSTRACT: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint disorders (IJD) have increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk compared with the general population. In 2009, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) taskforce recommended screening, identification of CVD risk factors and CVD risk management largely based on expert opinion. In view of substantial new evidence, an update was conducted with the aim of producing CVD risk management recommendations for patients with IJD that now incorporates an increasing evidence base. A multidisciplinary steering committee (representing 13 European countries) comprised 26 members including patient representatives, rheumatologists, cardiologists, internists, epidemiologists, a health professional and fellows. Systematic literature searches were performed and evidence was categorised according to standard guidelines. The evidence was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Three overarching principles were defined. First, there is a higher risk for CVD in patients with RA, and this may also apply to ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Second, the rheumatologist is responsible for CVD risk management in patients with IJD. Third, the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids should be in accordance with treatment-specific recommendations from EULAR and Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society. Ten recommendations were defined, of which one is new and six were changed compared with the 2009 recommendations. Each designated an appropriate evidence support level. The present update extends on the evidence that CVD risk in the whole spectrum of IJD is increased. This underscores the need for CVD risk management in these patients. These recommendations are defined to provide assistance in CVD risk management in IJD, based on expert opinion and scientific evidence.

2 Editorial Psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and cardiovascular risk: are we closer to a clinical recommendation? 2015

Kristensen, Søren Lund / McInnes, Iain B / Sattar, Naveed. ·BHF Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK Department of Cardiology, Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · BHF Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #25429028.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Review Cardiometabolic comorbidities in RA and PsA: lessons learned and future directions. 2019

Ferguson, Lyn D / Siebert, Stefan / McInnes, Iain B / Sattar, Naveed. ·Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. lyn.ferguson@glasgow.ac.uk. · Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. lyn.ferguson@glasgow.ac.uk. · Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. naveed.sattar@glasgow.ac.uk. ·Nat Rev Rheumatol · Pubmed #31292564.

ABSTRACT: Cardiometabolic comorbidities present a considerable burden for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Both RA and PsA are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). PsA more often exhibits an increased risk of metabolically linked comorbidities such as obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Although both RA and PsA are characterized by a state of chronic inflammation, the mechanisms that contribute to CVD risk in these conditions might not be identical. In RA, systemic inflammation is thought to directly contribute to CVD risk, whereas in PsA, adiposity is thought to contribute to a notable metabolic phenotype that, in turn, contributes to CVD risk. Hence, appropriate management strategies that consider the increased risk of cardiometabolic comorbidities in patients with inflammatory arthropathy are important. In RA, such strategies should focus on the prediction of CVD risk and its management through targeting chronic inflammation and traditional CVD risk factors. In PsA, management strategies should additionally focus on targeting metabolic components, including weight management, which might not only help improve disease activity in the joints, entheses and skin, but also reduce the risk of metabolic comorbidities and improve the quality of life of patients.

4 Review Cardiovascular comorbidities in patients with psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review. 2013

Jamnitski, Anna / Symmons, Deborah / Peters, Mike J L / Sattar, Naveed / McInnes, Iain / Nurmohamed, Michael T. ·Department of Rheumatology, Jan van Breemen Research Institute/READE, Dr Jan van Breemenstraat 2, 1056 AB Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #22532629.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Data regarding cardiovascular comorbidity and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are limited. To evaluate the cardiovascular risk profile, a systematic literature search was performed to provide an extensive summary of all studies available on cardiovascular risk in PsA. METHODS: Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane library were searched from January 1966 to April 2011 for English language articles on data concerning cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular risk factors in PsA. Review articles, case reports and studies on psoriasis alone were excluded. RESULTS: Twenty-eight articles were included in this review. Studies on all-cause mortality revealed mixed results. Available data on cardiovascular disease appeared more consistent, indicating an increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in PsA. Commensurate with this, surrogate markers of subclinical atherosclerosis, arterial stiffness and cardiovascular risk factors, for example hypertension, dyslipidaemia, obesity and metabolic-related factors, were more prominent in PsA compared with controls. Suppression of inflammation was linked with a favourable effect on cardiovascular surrogate markers, for example carotid intima media thickness and endothelial dysfunction, in several (un)controlled studies. CONCLUSION: Most studies point towards an increased cardiovascular risk in PsA, broadly on a par with the risk level in rheumatoid arthritis, emphasising the need for similar cardiovascular risk management in both conditions. Further studies are needed to indicate whether inflammatory suppression or modification of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, or both, will reduce cardiovascular risk.

5 Review Cardiovascular and metabolic risks in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: pragmatic clinical management based on available evidence. 2012

Johnsson, Hanna / McInnes, Iain B / Sattar, Naveed. ·Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, UK. h.johnsson@doctors.org.uk ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #22294632.

ABSTRACT: Several studies suggest that patients with psoriasis and, in particular, psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. These patients are also more likely to be obese and to have diabetes and fatty liver disease. This article discusses the association between psoriasis and PsA and cardiometabolic disorders, emphasising the need for better consideration of simple lifestyle interventions. It also highlights areas for future research and proposes a simple and pragmatic test portfolio to screen for cardiovascular risk and metabolic disorders in patients at higher risk.

6 Article Association of central adiposity with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study of the UK Biobank. 2019

Ferguson, Lyn D / Brown, Rosemary / Celis-Morales, Carlos / Welsh, Paul / Lyall, Donald M / Pell, Jill P / McInnes, Iain B / Siebert, Stefan / Sattar, Naveed. ·Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Institute of Health & Wellbeing, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. ·Rheumatology (Oxford) · Pubmed #31131407.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To determine the independent association of central adiposity, assessed by waist circumference, with odds of psoriasis, PsA and RA prevalence after controlling for general adiposity (BMI). METHODS: A cross-sectional study of UK Biobank participants aged 40-70 years was performed. Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds of psoriasis, PsA and RA occurrence compared with controls without these conditions by waist circumference, adjusting for covariates: age, sex, smoking status, socioeconomic deprivation and self-reported physical activity (Model 1), followed additionally by BMI (Model 2). RESULTS: A total of 502 417 participants were included; 5074 with psoriasis (1.02%), 905 with PsA (0.18%), 5532 with RA (1.11%) and 490 906 controls without these conditions. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) (Model 1) for psoriasis, PsA and RA, per s.d. (13.5 cm) higher waist circumference were 1.20 (95% CI 1.16, 1.23), 1.30 (95% CI 1.21, 1.39) and 1.21 (95% CI 1.17, 1.24), respectively (all P < 0.001). These ORs remained significant after further adjustment for BMI (Model 2) in psoriasis [OR 1.19 (95% CI 1.12, 1.27), P < 0.001] and RA [OR 1.19 (95% CI 1.12, 1.26), P < 0.001], but not in PsA [OR 1.11 (95% CI 0.95, 1.29), P = 0.127]. CONCLUSION: Central adiposity as measured by waist circumference is associated with greater odds of psoriasis and RA prevalence after adjustment for confounders and for BMI. Our findings add support for central adiposity as a long-term clinically relevant component of these conditions.

7 Minor Response to: 'The influence of inflammation in the development of subclinical atherosclerosis in psoriatic arthritis' by Gonzalez-Gay et al. 2014

Nurmohamed, Michael T / Jamnitski, Anna / Symmons, Deborah / Peters, Mike Johannes Leonardus / Sattar, Naveed / McInnes, Iain. ·Department of Rheumatology and Internal Medicine, VUMC, , Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #24577335.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --