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Stomatognathic Diseases HELP
Based on 99,989 articles published since 2009
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These are the 99989 published articles about Stomatognathic Diseases that originated from Worldwide during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Clinical Practice Guideline: Tonsillectomy in Children (Update). 2019

Mitchell, Ron B / Archer, Sanford M / Ishman, Stacey L / Rosenfeld, Richard M / Coles, Sarah / Finestone, Sandra A / Friedman, Norman R / Giordano, Terri / Hildrew, Douglas M / Kim, Tae W / Lloyd, Robin M / Parikh, Sanjay R / Shulman, Stanford T / Walner, David L / Walsh, Sandra A / Nnacheta, Lorraine C. ·1 UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA. · 2 University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA. · 3 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. · 4 SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA. · 5 University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix, Arizona, USA. · 6 Consumers United for Evidence-based Healthcare, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. · 7 Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, USA. · 8 Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · 9 Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · 10 University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · 11 Mayo Clinic Center for Sleep Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · 12 Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 13 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · 14 Advocate Children's Hospital, Park Ridge, Illinois, USA. · 15 Department of Research and Quality, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia, USA. ·Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg · Pubmed #30798778.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This update of a 2011 guideline developed by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation provides evidence-based recommendations on the pre-, intra-, and postoperative care and management of children 1 to 18 years of age under consideration for tonsillectomy. Tonsillectomy is defined as a surgical procedure performed with or without adenoidectomy that completely removes the tonsil, including its capsule, by dissecting the peritonsillar space between the tonsil capsule and the muscular wall. Tonsillectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures in the United States, with 289,000 ambulatory procedures performed annually in children <15 years of age based on the most recent published data. This guideline is intended for all clinicians in any setting who interact with children who may be candidates for tonsillectomy. PURPOSE: The purpose of this multidisciplinary guideline is to identify quality improvement opportunities in managing children under consideration for tonsillectomy and to create explicit and actionable recommendations to implement these opportunities in clinical practice. Specifically, the goals are to educate clinicians, patients, and/or caregivers regarding the indications for tonsillectomy and the natural history of recurrent throat infections. Additional goals include the following: optimizing the perioperative management of children undergoing tonsillectomy, emphasizing the need for evaluation and intervention in special populations, improving the counseling and education of families who are considering tonsillectomy for their children, highlighting the management options for patients with modifying factors, and reducing inappropriate or unnecessary variations in care. Children aged 1 to 18 years under consideration for tonsillectomy are the target patient for the guideline. For this guideline update, the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation selected a panel representing the fields of nursing, anesthesiology, consumers, family medicine, infectious disease, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, pediatrics, and sleep medicine. KEY ACTION STATEMENTS: The guideline update group made strong recommendations for the following key action statements (KASs): (1) Clinicians should recommend watchful waiting for recurrent throat infection if there have been <7 episodes in the past year, <5 episodes per year in the past 2 years, or <3 episodes per year in the past 3 years. (2) Clinicians should administer a single intraoperative dose of intravenous dexamethasone to children undergoing tonsillectomy. (3) Clinicians should recommend ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or both for pain control after tonsillectomy. The guideline update group made recommendations for the following KASs: (1) Clinicians should assess the child with recurrent throat infection who does not meet criteria in KAS 2 for modifying factors that may nonetheless favor tonsillectomy, which may include but are not limited to multiple antibiotic allergies/intolerance, PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis), or history of >1 peritonsillar abscess. (2) Clinicians should ask caregivers of children with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing and tonsillar hypertrophy about comorbid conditions that may improve after tonsillectomy, including growth retardation, poor school performance, enuresis, asthma, and behavioral problems. (3) Before performing tonsillectomy, the clinician should refer children with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing for polysomnography if they are <2 years of age or if they exhibit any of the following: obesity, Down syndrome, craniofacial abnormalities, neuromuscular disorders, sickle cell disease, or mucopolysaccharidoses. (4) The clinician should advocate for polysomnography prior to tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing in children without any of the comorbidities listed in KAS 5 for whom the need for tonsillectomy is uncertain or when there is discordance between the physical examination and the reported severity of oSDB. (5) Clinicians should recommend tonsillectomy for children with obstructive sleep apnea documented by overnight polysomnography. (6) Clinicians should counsel patients and caregivers and explain that obstructive sleep-disordered breathing may persist or recur after tonsillectomy and may require further management. (7) The clinician should counsel patients and caregivers regarding the importance of managing posttonsillectomy pain as part of the perioperative education process and should reinforce this counseling at the time of surgery with reminders about the need to anticipate, reassess, and adequately treat pain after surgery. (8) Clinicians should arrange for overnight, inpatient monitoring of children after tonsillectomy if they are <3 years old or have severe obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index ≥10 obstructive events/hour, oxygen saturation nadir <80%, or both). (9) Clinicians should follow up with patients and/or caregivers after tonsillectomy and document in the medical record the presence or absence of bleeding within 24 hours of surgery (primary bleeding) and bleeding occurring later than 24 hours after surgery (secondary bleeding). (10) Clinicians should determine their rate of primary and secondary posttonsillectomy bleeding at least annually. The guideline update group made a strong recommendation against 2 actions: (1) Clinicians should not administer or prescribe perioperative antibiotics to children undergoing tonsillectomy. (2) Clinicians must not administer or prescribe codeine, or any medication containing codeine, after tonsillectomy in children younger than 12 years. The policy level for the recommendation about documenting recurrent throat infection was an option: (1) Clinicians may recommend tonsillectomy for recurrent throat infection with a frequency of at least 7 episodes in the past year, at least 5 episodes per year for 2 years, or at least 3 episodes per year for 3 years with documentation in the medical record for each episode of sore throat and ≥1 of the following: temperature >38.3°C (101°F), cervical adenopathy, tonsillar exudate, or positive test for group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus. DIFFERENCES FROM PRIOR GUIDELINE: (1) Incorporating new evidence profiles to include the role of patient preferences, confidence in the evidence, differences of opinion, quality improvement opportunities, and any exclusion to which the action statement does not apply. (2) There were 1 new clinical practice guideline, 26 new systematic reviews, and 13 new randomized controlled trials included in the current guideline update. (3) Inclusion of 2 consumer advocates on the guideline update group. (4) Changes to 5 KASs from the original guideline: KAS 1 (Watchful waiting for recurrent throat infection), KAS 3 (Tonsillectomy for recurrent infection with modifying factors), KAS 4 (Tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing), KAS 9 (Perioperative pain counseling), and KAS 10 (Perioperative antibiotics). (5) Seven new KASs: KAS 5 (Indications for polysomnography), KAS 6 (Additional recommendations for polysomnography), KAS 7 (Tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnea), KAS 12 (Inpatient monitoring for children after tonsillectomy), KAS 13 (Postoperative ibuprofen and acetaminophen), KAS 14 (Postoperative codeine), and KAS 15a (Outcome assessment for bleeding). (6) Addition of an algorithm outlining KASs. (7) Enhanced emphasis on patient and/or caregiver education and shared decision making.

2 Guideline 2019 AAHA Dental Care Guidelines for Dogs and Cats. 2019

Bellows, Jan / Berg, Mary L / Dennis, Sonnya / Harvey, Ralph / Lobprise, Heidi B / Snyder, Christopher J / Stone, Amy E S / Van de Wetering, Andrea G. ·From All Pets Dental, Weston, Florida (J.B.) · Beyond the Crown Veterinary Education, Lawrence, Kansas (M.L.B.) · Stratham-Newfields Veterinary Hospital, Newfields, New Hampshire (S.D.) · Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee (R.H.) · Main Street Veterinary Dental Hospital, Flower Mount, Texas (H.B.L.) · Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (C.J.S.) · Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (A.E.S.S.) · and Advanced Pet Dentistry, LLC, Corvallis, Oregon (A.G.VdW.). ·J Am Anim Hosp Assoc · Pubmed #30776257.

ABSTRACT: The 2019 AAHA Dental Care Guidelines for Dogs and Cats outline a comprehensive approach to support companion animal practices in improving the oral health and often, the quality of life of their canine and feline patients. The guidelines are an update of the 2013 AAHA Dental Care Guidelines for Dogs and Cats. A photographically illustrated, 12-step protocol describes the essential steps in an oral health assessment, dental cleaning, and periodontal therapy. Recommendations are given for general anesthesia, pain management, facilities, and equipment necessary for safe and effective delivery of care. To promote the wellbeing of dogs and cats through decreasing the adverse effects and pain of periodontal disease, these guidelines emphasize the critical role of client education and effective, preventive oral healthcare.

3 Guideline Diagnosis and treatment of otitis media with effusion: CODEPEH recommendations. 2019

Núñez-Batalla, Faustino / Jáudenes-Casaubón, Carmen / Sequí-Canet, Jose Miguel / Vivanco-Allende, Ana / Zubicaray-Ugarteche, Jose. ·Presidente de la CODEPEH (Comisión para la detección precoz de la hipoacusia). Electronic address: fnunezb@telefonica.net. · Vocales de la CODEPEH. ·Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp · Pubmed #29033123.

ABSTRACT: The incidence and the prevalence rates of otitis media with effusion (OME) are high. However, there is evidence that only a minority of professionals follow the recommendations provided in clinical practice guidelines. For the purpose of improving diagnosis and treatment of OME in children to prevent and/or reduce its impact on children's development, the Commission for the Early Detection of Deafness (CODEPEH) has deeply reviewed the scientific literature on this field and has drafted a document of recommendations for a correct clinical reaction to of OME, including diagnosis and medical and surgical treatment methodology. Among others, medication, in particular antibiotics and corticoids, should not be prescribed and 3 months of watchful waiting should be the first adopted measure. If OME persists, an ENT doctor should assess the possibility of sugical treatment. The impact of OME in cases of children with a comorbidity is higher, so it requires immediate reaction, without watchful waiting.

4 Guideline ISBI Practice Guidelines for Burn Care, Part 2. 2018

Anonymous271237 / Anonymous281237 / Anonymous291237. · ·Burns · Pubmed #30343831.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline AIUM-ACR-SPR-SRU Practice Parameter for the Performance and Interpretation of a Diagnostic Ultrasound Examination of the Extracranial Head and Neck. 2018

Anonymous2501450. · ·J Ultrasound Med · Pubmed #30308087.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline Acquired Velopharyngeal Dysfunction: Survey, Literature Review, and Clinical Recommendations. 2018

Guyton, Kelsey B / Sandage, Mary J / Bailey, Dallin / Haak, Nancy / Molt, Lawrence / Plumb, Allison. ·Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, AL. ·Am J Speech Lang Pathol · Pubmed #30208483.

ABSTRACT: Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical assessment recommendations for acquired velopharyngeal dysfunction (AVPD) and, through a literature review and online survey, summarize current practice patterns for evaluation and treatment pathway determination for this target population. Method: An online survey to query current assessment procedures and treatment pathway recommendations for AVPD was developed. Following survey results, a literature review was completed to determine evidence-based recommendations for assessment procedures and intervention recommendations based on assessment findings. Literature search terms included the following: acquired velopharyngeal dysfunction, hypernasality, non-cleft velopharyngeal dysfunction, velopharyngeal dysfunction, velopharyngeal dysfunction AND iatrogenic, velopharyngeal dysfunction AND neurogenic, velopharyngeal dysfunction AND assessment OR evaluation, velopharyngeal dysfunction AND treatment OR intervention, velopharyngeal dysfunction AND practice patterns OR clinical guidelines, velopharyngeal insufficiency. Inclusion criteria were limited to practice patterns/recommendations for assessment and/or treatment recommendations for AVPD, English language articles published between 2000 and 2017, and peer-reviewed journals. Studies regarding solely congenital or cleft palate velopharyngeal dysfunction and intervention outcome studies were excluded. Forty articles met inclusionary criteria. Results: The online survey results indicated lack of consensus for AVPD assessment and treatment recommendation protocols, with 93% of respondents indicating the need for a clinical guide for developing treatment recommendations. The majority of recommendations were filtered into an algorithm for clinical decision making. Conclusions: Clinical uncertainty among speech-language pathologists surveyed and the paucity of published clinical guidelines for assessing individuals with AVPD indicate the need for additional clinical research for this disorder, one that is heterogeneous and distinct from those with congenital velopharyngeal dysfunction. The proposed evidence-based clinical worksheet may assist in determining management for patients with AVPD and may serve as a starting place for validation of a clinical guideline.

7 Guideline The American Academy of Oral Medicine Clinical Practice Statement: Oromandibular dystonia. 2018

France, Katherine / Stoopler, Eric T. ·Department of Oral Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Oral Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Electronic address: Ets@upenn.edu. ·Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol · Pubmed #30084363.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Guideline Periodontal manifestations of systemic diseases and developmental and acquired conditions: Consensus report of workgroup 3 of the 2017 World Workshop on the Classification of Periodontal and Peri-Implant Diseases and Conditions. 2018

Jepsen, Søren / Caton, Jack G / Albandar, Jasim M / Bissada, Nabil F / Bouchard, Philippe / Cortellini, Pierpaolo / Demirel, Korkud / de Sanctis, Massimo / Ercoli, Carlo / Fan, Jingyuan / Geurs, Nicolaas C / Hughes, Francis J / Jin, Lijian / Kantarci, Alpdogan / Lalla, Evanthia / Madianos, Phoebus N / Matthews, Debora / McGuire, Michael K / Mills, Michael P / Preshaw, Philip M / Reynolds, Mark A / Sculean, Anton / Susin, Cristiano / West, Nicola X / Yamazaki, Kazuhisa. ·Department of Periodontology, Operative and Preventive Dentistry, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany. · University of Rochester, Periodontics, Eastman Institute for Oral Health, Rochester, NY, USA. · Department of Periodontology and Oral Implantology, Temple University School of Dentistry, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. · U.F.R. d'Odontologie, Université Paris Diderot, Hôpital Rothschild AP-HP, Paris, France. · Private practice, Firenze, Italy; European Research Group on Periodontology, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Periodontology, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Periodontology, Università Vita e Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy. · University of Rochester, Prosthodontics & Periodontics, Eastman Institute for Oral Health, Rochester, NY, USA. · Department of Periodontology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, School of Dentistry, Birmingham, AL, USA. · King's College London Dental Institute, London, UK. · Discipline of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Prince Philip Dental Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China. · Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, Division of Periodontics, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. · Faculty of Dentistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. · Private practice,  Perio Health Professionals, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX, USA. · Centre for Oral Health Research and Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · University of Maryland, School of Dentistry, Department of Advanced Oral Sciences and Therapeutics, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Periodontology, University of Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Periodontics, Augusta University Dental College of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA. · Restorative Dentistry and Periodontology, School of Oral and Dental Sciences, Bristol Dental School & Hospital, Bristol, UK. · Research Unit for Oral-Systemic Connection, Division of Oral Science for Health Promotion, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata, Japan. ·J Clin Periodontol · Pubmed #29926500.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A variety of systemic diseases and conditions can affect the course of periodontitis or have a negative impact on the periodontal attachment apparatus. Gingival recessions are highly prevalent and often associated with hypersensitivity, the development of caries and non-carious cervical lesions on the exposed root surface and impaired esthetics. Occlusal forces can result in injury of teeth and periodontal attachment apparatus. Several developmental or acquired conditions associated with teeth or prostheses may predispose to diseases of the periodontium. The aim of this working group was to review and update the 1999 classification with regard to these diseases and conditions, and to develop case definitions and diagnostic considerations. METHODS: Discussions were informed by four reviews on 1) periodontal manifestions of systemic diseases and conditions; 2) mucogingival conditions around natural teeth; 3) traumatic occlusal forces and occlusal trauma; and 4) dental prostheses and tooth related factors. This consensus report is based on the results of these reviews and on expert opinion of the participants. RESULTS: Key findings included the following: 1) there are mainly rare systemic conditions (such as Papillon-Lefevre Syndrome, leucocyte adhesion deficiency, and others) with a major effect on the course of periodontitis and more common conditions (such as diabetes mellitus) with variable effects, as well as conditions affecting the periodontal apparatus independently of dental plaque biofilm-induced inflammation (such as neoplastic diseases); 2) diabetes-associated periodontitis should not be regarded as a distinct diagnosis, but diabetes should be recognized as an important modifying factor and included in a clinical diagnosis of periodontitis as a descriptor; 3) likewise, tobacco smoking - now considered a dependence to nicotine and a chronic relapsing medical disorder with major adverse effects on the periodontal supporting tissues - is an important modifier to be included in a clinical diagnosis of periodontitis as a descriptor; 4) the importance of the gingival phenotype, encompassing gingival thickness and width in the context of mucogingival conditions, is recognized and a novel classification for gingival recessions is introduced; 5) there is no evidence that traumatic occlusal forces lead to periodontal attachment loss, non-carious cervical lesions, or gingival recessions; 6) traumatic occlusal forces lead to adaptive mobility in teeth with normal support, whereas they lead to progressive mobility in teeth with reduced support, usually requiring splinting; 7) the term biologic width is replaced by supracrestal tissue attachment consisting of junctional epithelium and supracrestal connective tissue; 8) infringement of restorative margins within the supracrestal connective tissue attachment is associated with inflammation and/or loss of periodontal supporting tissue. However, it is not evident whether the negative effects on the periodontium are caused by dental plaque biofilm, trauma, toxicity of dental materials or a combination of these factors; 9) tooth anatomical factors are related to dental plaque biofilm-induced gingival inflammation and loss of periodontal supporting tissues. CONCLUSION: An updated classification of the periodontal manifestations and conditions affecting the course of periodontitis and the periodontal attachment apparatus, as well as of developmental and acquired conditions, is introduced. Case definitions and diagnostic considerations are also presented.

9 Guideline [French guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of classical trigeminal neuralgia (French Headache Society and French Neurosurgical Society)]. 2018

Donnet, A / Simon, E / Cuny, E / Demarquay, G / Ducros, A / De Gaalon, S / Giraud, P / Massardier, E Guégan / Lanteri-Minet, M / Leclercq, D / Lucas, C / Navez, M / Roos, C / Valade, D / Mertens, P. ·Centre d'évaluation et de traitement de la douleur, hôpital Timone, AP-HM, 264, rue St-Pierre, 13005 Marseille, France; Inserm/UdA, U1107, Neuro-Dol, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France. Electronic address: adonnet@ap-hm.fr. · Département de neurochirurgie, 69000 Lyon, France. · Service de neurochirurgie, 33000 Bordeaux, France. · Service de neurologie, hôpital de la Croix-Rousse, hospices civils de Lyon, 69004 Lyon, France. · Service de neurologie hôpital Gui-de-Chaulliac, 34000 Montpellier, France. · Service de neurologie, 44000 Nantes, France. · Centre d'évaluation et de traitement de la douleur, 74000 Annecy, France. · Service de neurologie, hôpital Charles-Nicolle, 76000 Rouen, France. · Inserm/UdA, U1107, Neuro-Dol, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France; Département d'évaluation et de traitement de la douleur, hôpital Cimiez, 06000 Nice, France. · Service de neuroradiologie diagnostique et fonctionnelle, 75000 Paris, France. · Centre d'évaluation et de traitement de la douleur, hôpital Salengro, 59000 Lille, France. · Centre d'évaluation et de traitement de la douleur, hôpital Bellevue, CHU St.-Étienne, 42000 St-Etienne, France. · Centre urgence céphalées, hôpital Lariboisière, 75000 Paris, France. ·Neurochirurgie · Pubmed #29909973.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline 2018 update of the EULAR recommendations for the management of Behçet's syndrome. 2018

Hatemi, Gulen / Christensen, Robin / Bang, Dongsik / Bodaghi, Bahram / Celik, Aykut Ferhat / Fortune, Farida / Gaudric, Julien / Gul, Ahmet / Kötter, Ina / Leccese, Pietro / Mahr, Alfred / Moots, Robert / Ozguler, Yesim / Richter, Jutta / Saadoun, David / Salvarani, Carlo / Scuderi, Francesco / Sfikakis, Petros P / Siva, Aksel / Stanford, Miles / Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur / West, Richard / Yurdakul, Sebahattin / Olivieri, Ignazio / Yazici, Hasan. ·Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey. · Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital & Department of Rheumatology, Odense University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Dermatology, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary's Hospital, Incheon, Korea. · Department of Ophthalmology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Sorbonne University, Paris, France. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey. · Centre for Clinical and Diagnostic Oral Sciences, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, and the London Behçet's Centre, Barts Health London, London, UK. · Department of Vascular Surgery, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Sorbonne University, Paris, France. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Rheumatology, Immunology and Nephrology, Asklepios Clinic Altona, Hamburg, Germany. · Rheumatology Institute of Lucania (IRel) and the Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Potenza and Matera, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · National Behcet's Syndrome Centre of Excellence, Aintree University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · Institute for Haematopathology Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Inflammation-Immunopathology-Biotherapy, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Paris, France. · INSERM, Paris, France. · CNRS, Paris, France. · Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Immunology, Centre de Référence des Maladies Auto-Immunes et Systémiques Rares, Centre de Référence des Maladies Auto-Inflammatoires, AP-HP, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France. · Division of Rheumatology, Azienda USL-IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Patient Research Partner, Catania, Italy. · First Department of Propaedeutic and Internal Medicine & Rheumatology Unit, National Kapodistrian University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · Department of Neurology, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Ophthalmology, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Ophthalmology, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey. · Patient Research Partner, Member of the UK Behcet's Syndrome Society and Director of Behcets International, London, UK. · Rheumatology Institute of Lucania (IRel) and the Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, and the Basilicata Ricerca Biomedica (BRB) Foundation, Potenza and Matera, Italy. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #29625968.

ABSTRACT: Several new treatment modalities with different mechanisms of action have been studied in patients with Behçet's syndrome (BS). The aim of the current effort was to update the recommendations in the light of these new data under the auspices of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Standing Committee for Clinical Affairs. A task force was formed that included BS experts from different specialties including internal medicine, rheumatology, ophthalmology, dermatology, neurology, gastroenterology, oral health medicine and vascular surgery, along with a methodologist, a health professional, two patients and two fellows in charge of the systematic literature search. Research questions were determined using a Delphi approach. EULAR standardised operating procedures was used as the framework. Results of the systematic literature review were presented to the task force during a meeting. The former recommendations were modified or new recommendations were formed after thorough discussions followed by voting. The recommendations on the medical management of mucocutaneous, joint, eye, vascular, neurological and gastrointestinal involvement of BS were modified; five overarching principles and a new recommendation about the surgical management of vascular involvement were added. These updated, evidence-based recommendations are intended to help physicians caring for patients with BS. They also attempt to highlight the shortcomings of the available clinical research with the aim of proposing an agenda for further research priorities.

11 Guideline The 2016 JAID/JSC guidelines for clinical management of infectious disease-Odontogenic infections. 2018

Anonymous3291107 / Anonymous3301107 / Anonymous3311107. · ·J Infect Chemother · Pubmed #29503229.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Guideline Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines on Intraoperative Cranial Nerve Monitoring in Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery. 2018

Vivas, Esther X / Carlson, Matthew L / Neff, Brian A / Shepard, Neil T / McCracken, D Jay / Sweeney, Alex D / Olson, Jeffrey J. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Neurosurgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Bobby R. Alford Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. ·Neurosurgery · Pubmed #29309641.

ABSTRACT: Question 1: Does intraoperative facial nerve monitoring during vestibular schwannoma surgery lead to better long-term facial nerve function? Target Population: This recommendation applies to adult patients undergoing vestibular schwannoma surgery regardless of tumor characteristics. Recommendation: Level 3: It is recommended that intraoperative facial nerve monitoring be routinely utilized during vestibular schwannoma surgery to improve long-term facial nerve function. Question 2: Can intraoperative facial nerve monitoring be used to accurately predict favorable long-term facial nerve function after vestibular schwannoma surgery? Target Population: This recommendation applies to adult patients undergoing vestibular schwannoma surgery. Recommendation: Level 3: Intraoperative facial nerve can be used to accurately predict favorable long-term facial nerve function after vestibular schwannoma surgery. Specifically, the presence of favorable testing reliably portends a good long-term facial nerve outcome. However, the absence of favorable testing in the setting of an anatomically intact facial nerve does not reliably predict poor long-term function and therefore cannot be used to direct decision-making regarding the need for early reinnervation procedures. Question 3: Does an anatomically intact facial nerve with poor electromyogram (EMG) electrical responses during intraoperative testing reliably predict poor long-term facial nerve function? Target Population: This recommendation applies to adult patients undergoing vestibular schwannoma surgery. Recommendation: Level 3: Poor intraoperative EMG electrical response of the facial nerve should not be used as a reliable predictor of poor long-term facial nerve function. Question 4: Should intraoperative eighth cranial nerve monitoring be used during vestibular schwannoma surgery? Target Population: This recommendation applies to adult patients undergoing vestibular schwannoma surgery with measurable preoperative hearing levels and tumors smaller than 1.5 cm. Recommendation: Level 3: Intraoperative eighth cranial nerve monitoring should be used during vestibular schwannoma surgery when hearing preservation is attempted. Question 5: Is direct monitoring of the eighth cranial nerve superior to the use of far-field auditory brain stem responses? Target Population: This recommendation applies to adult patients undergoing vestibular schwannoma surgery with measurable preoperative hearing levels and tumors smaller than 1.5 cm. Recommendation: Level 3: There is insufficient evidence to make a definitive recommendation.  The full guideline can be found at: https://www.cns.org/guidelines/guidelines-manage-ment-patients-vestibular-schwannoma/chapter_4.

13 Guideline Scientific evidence on the links between periodontal diseases and diabetes: Consensus report and guidelines of the joint workshop on periodontal diseases and diabetes by the International Diabetes Federation and the European Federation of Periodontology. 2018

Sanz, Mariano / Ceriello, Antonio / Buysschaert, Martin / Chapple, Iain / Demmer, Ryan T / Graziani, Filippo / Herrera, David / Jepsen, Søren / Lione, Luca / Madianos, Phoebus / Mathur, Manu / Montanya, Eduard / Shapira, Lior / Tonetti, Maurizio / Vegh, Daniel. ·ETEP Research Group, Faculty of Odontology, University Complutense of Madrid, Madrid, Spain. · Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS) and Centro de Investigación Biomedica en Red de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metabólicas Asociadas (CIBERDEM), Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, IRCCS Multimedica, Sesto San Giovanni (MI), Italy. · Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Clinic Saint Luc, UCL, Brussels, Belgium. · School of Dentistry, Institute of Clinical Sciences, College of Medical & Dental Sciences, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Surgical, Medical and Molecular Pathology and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Periodontology, Operative and Preventive Dentistry, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany. · Territorial diabetology, ASL 2 (Local Health Agency), Coordinator of Oral Care Study Group, AMD (Italian Diabetologists Association) Savona, Savona, Italy. · Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Public Health Foundation of India, Gurgaon|Haryana, India. · Hospital Universitari Bellvitge - IDIBELL CIBERDEM University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Periodontology, Hebrew University - Hadassah Faculty of Dental Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel. · Department of Periodontology, The University of Hong Kong, Prince Philip Dental Hospital, Hong Kong. · Department of Prosthodontics, Semmelweis University Faculty of Dentistry, Budapest, Hungary. ·J Clin Periodontol · Pubmed #29280174.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Diabetes and periodontitis are chronic non-communicable diseases independently associated with mortality and have a bidirectional relationship. AIMS: To update the evidence for their epidemiological and mechanistic associations and re-examine the impact of effective periodontal therapy upon metabolic control (glycated haemoglobin, HbA1C). EPIDEMIOLOGY: There is strong evidence that people with periodontitis have elevated risk for dysglycaemia and insulin resistance. Cohort studies among people with diabetes demonstrate significantly higher HbA1C levels in patients with periodontitis (versus periodontally healthy patients), but there are insufficient data among people with type 1 diabetes. Periodontitis is also associated with an increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes. MECHANISMS: Mechanistic links between periodontitis and diabetes involve elevations in interleukin (IL)-1-β, tumour necrosis factor-α, IL-6, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio, oxidative stress and Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2/4 expression. INTERVENTIONS: Periodontal therapy is safe and effective in people with diabetes, and it is associated with reductions in HbA1C of 0.27-0.48% after 3 months, although studies involving longer-term follow-up are inconclusive. CONCLUSIONS: The European Federation of Periodontology (EFP) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) report consensus guidelines for physicians, oral healthcare professionals and patients to improve early diagnosis, prevention and comanagement of diabetes and periodontitis.

14 Guideline Delineation of the primary tumour Clinical Target Volumes (CTV-P) in laryngeal, hypopharyngeal, oropharyngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: AIRO, CACA, DAHANCA, EORTC, GEORCC, GORTEC, HKNPCSG, HNCIG, IAG-KHT, LPRHHT, NCIC CTG, NCRI, NRG Oncology, PHNS, SBRT, SOMERA, SRO, SSHNO, TROG consensus guidelines. 2018

Grégoire, Vincent / Evans, Mererid / Le, Quynh-Thu / Bourhis, Jean / Budach, Volker / Chen, Amy / Eisbruch, Abraham / Feng, Mei / Giralt, Jordi / Gupta, Tejpal / Hamoir, Marc / Helito, Juliana K / Hu, Chaosu / Hunter, Keith / Johansen, Jorgen / Kaanders, Johannes / Laskar, Sarbani Ghosh / Lee, Anne / Maingon, Philippe / Mäkitie, Antti / Micciche', Francesco / Nicolai, Piero / O'Sullivan, Brian / Poitevin, Adela / Porceddu, Sandro / Składowski, Krzysztof / Tribius, Silke / Waldron, John / Wee, Joseph / Yao, Min / Yom, Sue S / Zimmermann, Frank / Grau, Cai. ·Université catholique de Louvain, St-Luc University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: Vincent.gregoire@uclouvain.be. · Velindre Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wales, UK. · Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, USA. · CHUV and University of Lausanne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Switzerland. · Charité University Hospital, Department of Radio-oncology and Radiotherapy, Berlin, Germany. · Sun Yat-Sen University, Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guangzhou, China. · University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sichuan Cancer Hospital, Chengdu, China. · Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Radiation Oncology Service, Barcelona, Spain. · Tata Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mumbai, India. · Université catholique de Louvain, St-Luc University Hospital, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Brussels, Belgium. · Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, China. · University of Sheffield, School of Clinical Dentistry, Unit of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, UK. · Odense University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Denmark. · Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · University of Hong Kong and University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Hospital, Department of Clinical Oncology, Hong Kong, China. · Hôpitaux Universitaires Pitié Salpêtrière - Charles Foix, Department of Radiation Oncology, Paris, France. · University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Finland. · Universita' Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Polo Scienze Oncologiche ed Ematologiche, Rome, Italy. · University of Brescia, Divisions of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Italy. · University of Toronto, The Princess Margaret Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Canada. · Medica Sur, Unit for Radiotherapy, México DF, Mexico. · Princess Alexander Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Brisbane, Australia. · Institute of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Cancer Center, Gliwice, Poland. · Asklepios St. Georg Hospital, Hermann-Holthusen Institute for Radiotherapy, Hamburg, Germany. · National Cancer Centre Singapore, Division of Radiation Oncology, Singapore. · Case Western Reserve University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland, USA. · University of California-San Francisco, Department of Radiation Oncology, USA. · University Hospital Basel, Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Switzerland. · Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Denmark. ·Radiother Oncol · Pubmed #29180076.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Few studies have reported large inter-observer variations in target volume selection and delineation in patients treated with radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Consensus guidelines have been published for the neck nodes (see Grégoire et al., 2003, 2014), but such recommendations are lacking for primary tumour delineation. For the latter, two main schools of thoughts are prevailing, one based on geometric expansion of the Gross Tumour Volume (GTV) as promoted by DAHANCA, and the other one based on anatomical expansion of the GTV using compartmentalization of head and neck anatomy. METHOD: For each anatomic location within the larynx, hypopharynx, oropharynx and oral cavity, and for each T-stage, the DAHANCA proposal has been comprehensively reviewed and edited to include anatomic knowledge into the geometric Clinical Target Volume (CTV) delineation concept. A first proposal was put forward by the leading authors of this publication (VG and CG) and discussed with opinion leaders in head and neck radiation oncology from Europe, Asia, Australia/New Zealand, North America and South America to reach a worldwide consensus. RESULTS: This consensus proposes two CTVs for the primary tumour, the so called CTV-P1 and CVT-P2, corresponding to a high and lower tumour burden, and which should be associated with a high and a lower dose prescription, respectively. CONCLUSION: Implementation of these guidelines in the daily practice of radiation oncology should contribute to reduce treatment variations from clinicians to clinicians, facilitate the conduct of multi-institutional clinical trials, and contribute to improved care of patients with head and neck carcinoma.

15 Guideline SEOM clinical guideline in nasopharynx cancer (2017). 2018

Pastor, M / Lopez Pousa, A / Del Barco, E / Perez Segura, P / Astorga, B Gonzalez / Castelo, B / Bonfill, T / Martinez Trufero, J / Grau, J Jose / Mesia, R. ·Servicio de Oncología Médica, Hospital La Fe de Valencia, Valencia, Spain. · Servicio de Oncología Médica - IIBSP, Hospital Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain. · Servicio de Oncología Médica Complejo Asistencial Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain. · Servicio de Oncología Médica Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain. · Servicio de Oncología Médica Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Granada, Spain. · Servicio de Oncología Médica Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain. · Servicio de Oncología Médica Corporació Sanitària Parc Taulí, Sabadell, Spain. · Servicio de Oncología Médica Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet, Saragossa, Spain. · Servicio de Oncología Médica, Hospital Clínic i Provincial de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Servicio de Oncología Médica, Institut Català d'Oncologia - Badalona, Barcelona, Spain. rmesia@iconcologia.net. ·Clin Transl Oncol · Pubmed #29098554.

ABSTRACT: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is distinct from other cancers of the head and neck in biology, epidemiology, histology, natural history, and response to treatment. Radiation therapy is an essential component of curative-intent of non-disseminated disease and the association of chemotherapy improves the rates of survival. In the case of metastatic disease stages, treatment requires platinum/gemcitabine-based chemotherapy and patients may achieve a long survival time.

16 Guideline Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: American Society of Clinical Oncology Endorsement of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline Summary. 2018

Quon, Harry / Vapiwala, Neha / Forastiere, Arlene / Kennedy, Erin B. ·Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; and American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA. ·J Oncol Pract · Pubmed #29068751.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Guideline European Society of Endodontology position statement: the use of antibiotics in endodontics. 2018

Segura-Egea, J J / Gould, K / Şen, B Hakan / Jonasson, P / Cotti, E / Mazzoni, A / Sunay, H / Tjäderhane, L / Dummer, P M H. ·Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain. · Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Private Practice, Alsancak, Izmir, Turkey. · Department of Endodontology, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Sardinia, Italy. · Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, DIBINEM, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Endodontology, Dental Faculty of Istanbul, Kemerburgaz University, Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. · Research Unit of Oral Health Sciences, Medical Research Center Oulu (MRC Oulu), University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. · School of Dentistry, College of Biomedical & Life Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK. ·Int Endod J · Pubmed #28436043.

ABSTRACT: This position statement represents a consensus of an expert committee convened by the European Society of Endodontology (ESE) on Antibiotics in Endodontics. The statement is based on current scientific evidence as well as the expertise of the committee. The goal is to provide dentists and other healthcare workers with evidence-based criteria for when to use antibiotics in the treatment of endodontic infections, traumatic injuries of the teeth, revascularization procedures in immature teeth with pulp necrosis, and in prophylaxis for medically compromised patients. It also highlights the role that dentists and others can play in preventing the overuse of antibiotics. A recent review article provides the basis for this position statement and more detailed background information (International Endodontic Journal, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1111/iej.12741). Given the dynamic nature of research in this area, this position statement will be updated at appropriate intervals.

18 Guideline AAOM clinical practice statement: Subject: The use of serum C-terminal telopeptide cross-link of type 1 collagen (CTX) testing in predicting risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). 2017

Anonymous5290957. · ·Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol · Pubmed #30084362.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline Guideline for Periodontal Therapy. 2017

Anonymous4170928. · ·Pediatr Dent · Pubmed #29179387.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Guideline Guidelines for the Management of Traumatic Dental Injuries: 3. Injuries in the Primary Dentition. 2017

Malmgren, Barbro / Andreasen, Jens O / Flores, Marie Therese / Robertson, Agneta / DiAngelis, Anthony J / Andersson, Lars / Cavalleri, Giacomo / Cohenca, Nestor / Day, Peter / Hicks, Morris Lamar / Malmgren, Olle / Moule, Alex J / Onetto, Juan / Tsukiboshi, Mitsuhiro. ·Division of Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Dental Medicine, Division of Pediatric Dentistry, POB 4064, SE-14104 Huddinge, Sweden. barbro.malmgren@ki.se. · Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Center of Rare Oral Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Universidad de Valparaiso, Valparaiso, Chile. · Department of Pedodontics, Institute of Odontology, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Department of Dentistry, Hennepin County Medical Center and University of Minnesota School of Dentistry, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Health Sciences Center, Kuwait University, Kuwait City, Kuwait. · Department of Dentistry, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Endodontics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Pediatric Dentistry, Leeds Dental Institute and Bradford District Care Trust Salaried Dental Service, Leeds, UK. · Department of Endodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Orthodontic Clinic, Folktandvården, Uppsala, Sweden. · Private Practice, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Private Practice, Amagun, Aichi, Japan. ·Pediatr Dent · Pubmed #29179384.

ABSTRACT: Traumatic injuries to the primary dentition present special problems and the management is often different as compared with the permanent dentition. The International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) has developed a consensus statement after a review of the dental literature and group discussions. Experienced researchers and clinicians from various specialities were included in the task group. In cases where the data did not appear conclusive, recommendations were based on the consensus opinion or majority decision of the task group. Finally, the IADT board members were giving their opinion and approval. The primary goal of these guidelines is to delineate an approach for the immediate or urgent care for management of primary teeth injuries. The IADT cannot and does not guarantee favorable outcomes from strict adherence to the guidelines, but believe that their application can maximize the chances of a positive outcome.

21 Guideline Guidelines for the Management of Traumatic Dental Injuries: 2. Avulsion of Permanent Teeth. 2017

Andersson, Lars / Andreasen, Jens O / Day, Peter / Heithersay, Geoffrey / Trope, Martin / DiAngelis, Anthony J / Kenny, David J / Sigurdsson, Asgeir / Bourguignon, Cecilia / Flores, Marie Therese / Hicks, Morris Lamar / Lenzi, Antonio R / Malmgren, Barbro / Moule, Alex J / Tsukiboshi, Mitsuhiro. ·Department of Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Health Sciences Center, Kuwait University, Kuwait City, Kuwait; Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Health Sciences Center, P.O. Box 24923, Safat 13110, Kuwait. dr.lars.andersson@gmail.com. · Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Center of Rare Oral Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshopitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Paedriatic Dentistry, Leeds Dental Institute and Bradford District Care Trust Salaried Dental Service, Leeds, UK. · Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Dentistry, Endodontology, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia. · Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Dentistry, Hennepin County Medical Center and University of Minnesota School of Dentistry, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Endodontics, UNC School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Private Practice, Paris, France. · Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Universidad de Valparaiso, Valparaiso, Chile. · Department of Endodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Private Practice, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. · Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Sciences Intervention and Technology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Private Practice, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. · Private Practice, Amagun, Aichi, Japan. ·Pediatr Dent · Pubmed #29179383.

ABSTRACT: Avulsion of permanent teeth is one of the most serious dental injuries, and a prompt and correct emergency management is very important for the prognosis. The International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) has developed a consensus statement after a review of the dental literature and group discussions. Experienced researchers and clinicians from various specialties were included in the task group. The guidelines represent the current best evidence and practice based on literature research and professionals' opinion. In cases where the data did not appear conclusive, recommendations were based on the consensus opinion or majority decision of the task group. Finally, the IADT board members were giving their opinion and approval. The primary goal of these guidelines is to delineate an approach for the immediate orurgent care of avulsed permanent teeth.

22 Guideline Guidelines for the Management of Traumatic Dental Injuries: 1. Fractures and Luxations of Permanent Teeth. 2017

Diangelis, Anthony J / Andreasen, Jens O / Ebeleseder, Kurt A / Kenny, David J / Trope, Martin / Sigurdsson, Asgeir / Andersson, Lars / Bourguignon, Cecilia / Flores, Marie Therese / Hicks, Morris Lamar / Lenzi, Antonio R / Malmgren, Barbro / Moule, Alex J / Pohl, Yango / Tsukiboshi, Mitsuhiro. ·Department of Dentistry, Hennepin County Medical Center and University of Minnesota School of Dentistry, Minneapolis, MN, USA;, Hennepin County Medical Center, 701 Park Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55415, USA. anthony.diangelis@hcmed.org. · Center of Rare Oral Diseases, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshopitalet, Denmark. · Department of Conservative Dentistry, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria. · Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Endodontics, UNC School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Department of Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Health Sciences Center Kuwait University, Kuwait City, Kuwait. · Private Practice, Paris, France. · Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Universidad de Valparaiso, Valparaiso, Chile. · Department of Endodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Private Practice, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. · Department of Clinical Sciences Intervention and Technology, Division of Pediatrics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Private Practice, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. · Department of Oral Surgery, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany. · Private Practice, Amagun, Aichi, Japan. ·Pediatr Dent · Pubmed #29179382.

ABSTRACT: Traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) of permanent teeth occur frequently in children and young adults. Crown fractures and luxations are the most commonly occurring of all dental injuries. Proper diagnosis, treatment planning and followup are important for improving a favorable outcome. Guidelines should assist dentists and patients in decision making and for providing the best care effectively and efficiently. The International Association of Dental Traumatology (IADT) has developed a consensus statement after a review of the dental literature and group discussions. Experienced researchers and clinicians from various specialties were included in the group. In cases where the data did not appear conclusive, recommendations were based on the consensus opinion of the IADT board members. The guidelines represent the best current evidence based on literature search and professional opinion. The primary goal of these guidelines is to delineate an approach for the immediate or urgent care of TDIs. In this first article, the IADT Guidelines for management of fractures and luxations of permanent teeth will be presented.

23 Guideline Dental Management of Pediatric Patients Receiving Chemotherapy, Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, and/or Radiation Therapy. 2017

Anonymous4120928. · ·Pediatr Dent · Pubmed #29179379.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline Use of Antibiotic Therapy for Pediatric Dental Patients. 2017

Anonymous4100928. · ·Pediatr Dent · Pubmed #29179377.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline Management Considerations for Pediatric Oral Surgery and Oral Pathology. 2017

Anonymous4090928. · ·Pediatr Dent · Pubmed #29179376.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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