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Testicular Diseases HELP
Based on 7,008 articles published since 2010
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These are the 7008 published articles about Testicular Diseases that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Diagnosis and Treatment of Early Stage Testicular Cancer: AUA Guideline. 2019

Stephenson, Andrew / Eggener, Scott E / Bass, Eric B / Chelnick, David M / Daneshmand, Siamak / Feldman, Darren / Gilligan, Timothy / Karam, Jose A / Leibovich, Bradley / Liauw, Stanley L / Masterson, Timothy A / Meeks, Joshua J / Pierorazio, Phillip M / Sharma, Ritu / Sheinfeld, Joel. ·American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. , Linthicum , Maryland. ·J Urol · Pubmed #31059667.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Testis cancer is the most common solid malignancy in young males. The purpose of this guideline is to provide a useful reference on the effective evidence-based treatment of early stage testicular cancer. METHODS: The systematic review utilized to inform this guideline was conducted by a methodology team at the Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center. The methodology team searched using PubMed®, Embase®, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) from January 1980 through August 2018. The evidence review team also reviewed relevant systematic reviews and references provided by the panel to identify articles that may have been missed by the database searches. RESULTS: When sufficient evidence existed, the body of evidence was assigned a strength rating of A (high), B (moderate), or C (low). Such evidence-based statements are provided as Strong, Moderate, or Conditional Recommendations. In instances of insufficient evidence, additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles and Expert Opinions. CONCLUSIONS: This guideline attempts to improve a clinician's ability to evaluate and treat patients with testicular cancer, but higher quality evidence in future trials will be essential to improve level of care for these patients.

2 Guideline Development of a best-practice clinical guideline for the use of bleomycin in the treatment of germ cell tumours in the UK. 2018

Watson, Robert A / De La Peña, Hugo / Tsakok, Maria T / Joseph, Johnson / Stoneham, Sara / Shamash, Jonathan / Joffe, Johnathan / Mazhar, Danish / Traill, Zoe / Ho, Ling-Pei / Brand, Sue / Protheroe, Andrew S. ·Department of Oncology, Oxford Cancer and Haematology Centre, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK. · Department of Radiology, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK. · University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Medical Oncology, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK. · Department of Oncology, Huddersfield Royal Infirmary, Calderdale & Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust, Huddersfield, UK. · Department of Oncology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. · Oxford Interstitial Lung Disease Service, Oxford Centre for Respiratory Medicine, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK. · Bristol Testicular Cancer Service, Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, University Hospitals Bristol, Bristol, UK. · Department of Oncology, Oxford Cancer and Haematology Centre, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK. andrew.protheroe@oncology.ox.ac.uk. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #30356125.

ABSTRACT: Bleomycin, a cytotoxic chemotherapy agent, forms a key component of curative regimens for lymphoma and germ cell tumours. It can be associated with severe toxicity, long-term complications and even death in extreme cases. There is a lack of evidence or consensus on how to prevent and monitor bleomycin toxicity. We surveyed 63 germ cell cancer physicians from 32 cancer centres across the UK to understand their approach to using bleomycin. Subsequent guideline development was based upon current practice, best available published evidence and expert consensus. We observed heterogeneity in practice in the following areas: monitoring; route of administration; contraindications to use; baseline and follow-up investigations performed, and advice given to patients. A best-practice clinical guideline for the use of bleomycin in the treatment of germ cell tumours has been developed and includes recommendations regarding baseline investigations, the use of pulmonary function tests, route of administration, monitoring and patient advice. It is likely that existing heterogeneity in clinical practice of bleomycin prescribing has significant economic, safety and patient experience implications. The development of an evidence-based consensus guideline was supported by 93% of survey participants and aims to address these issues and homogenise practice across the UK.

3 Guideline European Society of Paediatric Radiology Abdominal Imaging Task Force recommendations in paediatric uroradiology, part X: how to perform paediatric gastrointestinal ultrasonography, use gadolinium as a contrast agent in children, follow up paediatric testicular microlithiasis, and an update on paediatric contrast-enhanced ultrasound. 2018

Riccabona, Michael / Lobo, M Luisa / Augdal, Thomas A / Avni, Fred / Blickman, Johan / Bruno, Costanza / Damasio, M Beatrice / Darge, Kassa / Mentzel, Hans-Joachim / Napolitano, Marcello / Ntoulia, Aikaterini / Papadopoulou, Frederica / Petit, Philippe / Woźniak, Magdalena M / Ording-Müller, Lil-Sofie. ·Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital LKH Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 34, A-8036, Graz, Austria. michael.riccabona@klinikum-graz.at. · Department of Radiology, Hospital de Santa Maria-CHLN, University Hospital, Lisbon, Portugal. · Department of Radiology, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Pediatric Radiology, Jeanne de Flandre Hospital, CHRU de Lille, Lille Cedex, France. · Department of Radiology, Golisano Children's Hospital, Rochester, NY, USA. · Department of Radiology, AOUI, Verona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, G. Gaslini Institute, Genoa, Italy. · Department of Radiology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Section of Pediatric Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital, Jena, Germany. · Department of Paediatric Radiology and Neuroradiology, V. Buzzi Children's Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Department of Radiology, Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Poole, UK. · Pediatric Ultrasound Center, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Hôpital Timone Enfants, Service d'Imagerie Pédiatrique et Prénatale, Marseille, France. · Department of Pediatric Radiology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland. · Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Unit for Paediatric Radiology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ·Pediatr Radiol · Pubmed #29796794.

ABSTRACT: At the European Society of Paediatric Radiology (ESPR) annual meeting 2017 in Davos, Switzerland, the ESPR Abdominal (gastrointestinal and genitourinary) Imaging Task Force set out to complete the suggestions for paediatric abdominal imaging and its procedural recommendations. Some final topics were addressed including how to perform paediatric gastrointestinal ultrasonography. Based on the recent approval of ultrasound (US) contrast agents for paediatric use, important aspects of paediatric contrast-enhanced US were revisited. Additionally, the recent developments concerning the use and possible brain deposition of gadolinium as a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent were presented. The recommendations for paediatric use were reissued after considering all available evidence. Recent insights on the incidence of neoplastic lesions in children with testicular microlithiasis were discussed and led to a slightly altered recommendation.

4 Guideline Intraoperative Consultation and Macroscopic Handling: The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Testicular Cancer Consultation Conference Recommendations. 2018

Verrill, Clare / Perry-Keene, Joanna / Srigley, John R / Zhou, Ming / Humphrey, Peter A / Lopez-Beltran, Antonio / Egevad, Lars / Ulbright, Thomas M / Tickoo, Satish K / Epstein, Jonathan I / Compérat, Eva / Berney, Daniel M / Anonymous2020941. ·Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences and NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford. · Aquesta Specialised Uropathology and Department of Pathology, Sunshine Coast University Hospital, Sunshine Coast, Qld., Australia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Pathology, NYU School of Medicine. · Department of Pathology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. · Department of Pathology, University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain. · Department of Pathology and Cytology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN. · Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, New York, NY. · Department of Pathology, John Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Pathology, Hopital Tenon, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris VI, Paris, France. · Department of Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. ·Am J Surg Pathol · Pubmed #29579010.

ABSTRACT: The International Society of Urological Pathology held a conference on issues in testicular and penile pathology in Boston in March 2015, which included a presentation by the testis macroscopic features working group. The presentation focused on current published guidance for macroscopic handling of testicular tumors and retroperitoneal lymph node dissections with a summary of results from an online survey of members preceding the conference. The survey results were used to initiate discussions, but decisions on practice were made by expert consensus rather than voting. The importance of comprehensive assessment at the time of gross dissection with confirmation of findings by microscopic assessment was underscored. For example, the anatomic landmarks denoting the distinction of hilar soft tissue invasion (pT2) from spermatic cord invasion (pT3 category) can only be determined by careful macroscopic assessment in many cases. Other recommendations were to routinely sample epididymis, rete testis, hilar soft tissue, and tunica vaginalis in order to confirm macroscopic invasion of these structures or if not macroscopically evident, to exclude subtle microscopic invasion. Tumors 2 cm or less in greatest dimension should be completely embedded. If the tumor is >2 cm in greatest dimension, 10 blocks or a minimum of 1 to 2 additional blocks per centimeter should be taken (whichever is greater).

5 Guideline Appendix 9: Testicular seminoma and non-seminoma: eUpdate published online 29 June 2017 (www.esmo.org/Guidelines/Genitourinary-Cancers). 2017

Oldenburg, J / Horwich, A / Anonymous3730918. ·Department of Oncology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway. · Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research, Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton Hospital, Sutton, UK. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28881930.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline Consensus Recommendations from the Spanish Germ Cell Cancer Group on the Use of High-dose Chemotherapy in Germ Cell Cancer. 2017

González-Billalabeitia, Enrique / Sepúlveda, Juan Manuel / Maroto, Pablo / Aparicio, Jorge / Arranz, Jose Angel / Esteban, Emilio / Gironés, Regina / López-Brea, Marta / Mendez-Vidal, María José / Pinto, Alvaro / Sastre, Javier / de Prado, Diego Soto / Terrasa, Josefa / Vázquez, Sergio / Powles, Thomas / Beyer, Jörg / Castellano, Daniel / Del Muro, Xavier García / Anonymous2920914. ·University Hospital Morales Meseguer, UCAM, Murcia, Spain. Electronic address: enrique.gonzalezbilla@gmail.com. · Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau, Barcelona, Spain. · University Hospital La Fe, Valencia, Spain. · Gregorio Marañón General University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Asturias, Spain. · Medical Oncology Unit, Hospital Lluís Alcanyís, Xàtiva, Spain. · Marqués de Valdecilla University Hospital, Santander, Spain. · Reina Sofía University Hospital, Córdoba, Spain. · La Paz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · San Carlos University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital Clinico Universitario, Valladolid, Spain. · Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain. · Lucus Augusti University Hospital, Lugo, Spain. · Barts Health NHS Trust - St Bartholomew's, London, UK. · University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Institut Català d'Oncologia L'Hospitalet, Barcelona, Spain. ·Eur Urol Focus · Pubmed #28753776.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: High-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) has been studied in several clinical scenarios in advanced germ cell cancer (GCC). OBJECTIVE: To establish a clinical practice guideline for HDCT use in the treatment of GCC patients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: An expert panel reviewed information available from the literature. The panel addressed relevant issues concerning and related to HDCT. The guideline was externally reviewed by two international experts. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: The efficacy of HDCT has been demonstrated in selected GCC patients. The most conclusive evidence comes from retrospective analyses that need to be interpreted with caution. HDCT can cure a significant proportion of heavily treated GCC patients. When indicated, sequential HDCT with regimens containing carboplatin and etoposide, as well as peripheral stem-cell support, is recommended. There is no conclusive evidence to recommend HDCT as first-line therapy. According to a multinational retrospective pooled analysis, HDCT might be superior to conventional CT as first salvage treatment in selected patients. There is an urgent need for prospective clinical trials addressing the value of HDCT in GCC patients who experience failure on first-line cisplatin-based CT. In patients who progress on conventional-dose salvage CT, HDCT should be considered. Treatment of these patients at experienced centers is strongly recommended. CONCLUSIONS: It has been demonstrated that HDCT cures selected GCC patients who experience disease progression on conventional rescue regimens. The panel recommends the inclusion of GCC patients in randomized clinical trials including HDCT. PATIENT SUMMARY: This consensus establishes clinical practice guidelines for the use and study of high-dose chemotherapy in patients with germ cell cancer.

7 Guideline Reporting and Staging of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors: The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Testicular Cancer Consultation Conference Recommendations. 2017

Verrill, Clare / Yilmaz, Asli / Srigley, John R / Amin, Mahul B / Compérat, Eva / Egevad, Lars / Ulbright, Thomas M / Tickoo, Satish K / Berney, Daniel M / Epstein, Jonathan I / Anonymous8770901. ·*Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford ††Department of Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom †Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Calgary Laboratory Services and University of Calgary, Calgary, AB ‡Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada §Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Centre, Los Angeles, CA #Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN **Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, New York, NY ‡‡Department of Pathology, John Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD ∥Department of Pathology, Hopital Tenon, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris VI, Paris, France ¶Department of Pathology and Cytology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden §§Members of the ISUP Testicular Tumor Panel: Brett Delahunt, Cristina Magi-Galluzzi, Ferran Algaba, Esther Oliva, Rodolfo Montironi, Robert H Young, Muhammad T Idrees, Sean R Williamson, Ming Zhou, Peter A Humphrey, Antonio Lopez-Beltran, and Joanna Perry-Keene. ·Am J Surg Pathol · Pubmed #28368923.

ABSTRACT: The International Society of Urological Pathology held a conference devoted to issues in testicular and penile pathology in Boston in March 2015, which included a presentation and discussion led by the testis microscopic features working group. This conference focused on controversies related to staging and reporting of testicular tumors and was preceded by an online survey of the International Society of Urological Pathology members. The survey results were used to initiate discussions, but decisions were made by expert consensus rather than voting. A number of recommendations emerged from the conference, including that lymphovascular invasion (LVI) should always be reported and no distinction need be made between lymphatic or blood invasion. If LVI is equivocal, then it should be regarded as negative to avoid triggering unnecessary therapy. LVI in the spermatic cord is considered as category pT2, not pT3, unless future studies provide contrary evidence. At the time of gross dissection, a block should be taken just superior to the epididymis to define the base of the spermatic cord, and direct invasion of tumor in this block indicates a category of pT3. Pagetoid involvement of the rete testis epithelium must be distinguished from rete testis stromal invasion, with only the latter being prognostically useful. Percentages of different tumor elements in mixed germ cell tumors should be reported. Although consensus was reached on many issues, there are still areas of practice that need further evidence on which to base firm recommendations.

8 Guideline [CCAFU french national guidelines 2016-2018 on testicular germ cell tumors]. 2016

Durand, X / Fléchon, A / Murez, T / Rocher, L / Camparo, P / Morel-Journel, N / Savoie, P-H / Ferretti, L / Sèbe, P / Méjean, A. ·Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie, groupe Organes génitaux externes, maison de l'urologie, 11, rue Viète, 75017 Paris, France. Electronic address: xavier.durand.urovdg@orange.fr. ·Prog Urol · Pubmed #27846929.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the oncologic comitee of the french association of urology was to establish guidelines proposed by the external genital organ group, for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of the germ cell tumours of the testis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The multidisciplinary working group studied 2013 guidelines, exhaustively reviewed the literature, and evaluated references and their level of proof in order to attribute grades of recommandation. RESULTS: The initial workup of testicular cancer is based on clinical, laboratory (AFP, total hCG, LDH) and imaging assessment (scrotal ultrasound and chest, abdomen and pelvis computed tomography). Inguinal orchiectomy is the first line treatment allowing characterization of the histological type, local staging and identification of risk factors for micrometastases. The management of stage I tumors is based on surveillance or on a risk-adapted approach with explaining to the patient the benefits/disadvantages of active treatment or watchful waiting as a function of the risk of relapse. Treatment options for stage I seminomas comprise: surveillance, chemotherapy (1cycle of carboplatin) or para-aortic radiotherapy. Treatment options for stage I nonseminomatous germ cell tumours comprise: surveillance, chemotherapy (1cycle of BEP) or staging retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy. The management of metastatic tumors essentially comprises chemotherapy with 3, 4 cycles of BEP or dose-dense chemotherapy according to the IGCCCG. Radiotherapy may be indicated in seminomas with lymph node metastasis < 3cm. Review 3 to 4 weeks postchemotherapy is essentially based on tumor marker assays and chest, abdomen and pelvis computed tomography. Surgical retroperitoneal lymph node dissection is indicated for all residual NSGCT masses > 1cm and for persistent residual seminoma masses > 3cm with 18F- FDG PET- CT uptake. CONCLUSIONS: Good Germ cell tumors specific survival rates (99% CSI, 85% CSII, III) are based on precise initial staging, adapted and strictly defined treatment and close surveillance. © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

9 Guideline [Epididymo-orchitis]. 2016

Janier, M / Dupin, N / Derancourt, C / Caumes, E / Timsit, F-J / Méria, P / Anonymous3890885. ·Centre clinique et biologique des MST, hôpital Saint-Louis, 42, rue Bichat, 75010 Paris, France. Electronic address: michel.janier@sls.aphp.fr. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Cochin, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France. · Service de dermatologie, CHU de Fort-de-France, 97261 Fort-de-France, Martinique. · Service des maladies infectieuses et tropicales, hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, 47, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France. · Centre clinique et biologique des MST, hôpital Saint-Louis, 42, rue Bichat, 75010 Paris, France. · Urologie, hôpital Saint-Louis, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75010 Paris, France. ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #27773505.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Guideline Management of undescended testes: European Association of Urology/European Society for Paediatric Urology Guidelines. 2016

Radmayr, Christian / Dogan, Hasan S / Hoebeke, Piet / Kocvara, Radim / Nijman, Rien / Silay, Selcuk / Stein, Raimund / Undre, Shabnam / Tekgul, Serdar. ·Paediatric Urology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. Electronic address: christian.radmayr@i-med.ac.at. · Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Urology, Division of Paediatric Urology, Ankara, Turkey. · Department of Urology, Ghent University Hospital, Gent, Belgium. · Department of Urology, General Teaching Hospital in Praha, and Charles University 1st Faculty of Medicine, Praha, Czech Republic. · Department of Urology, Division of Paediatric Urology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Division of Paediatric Urology, Department of Urology, Mainz University Medical Centre, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany. · Department of Paediatric Urology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children, London, UK. ·J Pediatr Urol · Pubmed #27687532.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Undescended testis is the most common endocrinological disease in the male newborn period. Incidence varies between 1.0% and 4.6% in full-term neonates, with rates as high as 45% in preterm neonates. Failure or delay of treatment can result in reduced fertility and/or increased testicular cancer risk in adulthood. OBJECTIVE: To provide recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of boys with undescended testes which reduce the risk of impaired fertility and testicular cancer in adulthood. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Embase and Pubmed were searched for all relevant publications, from 1990 to 2015 limited to English language. Data were narratively synthesized in light of methodological and clinical heterogeneity. The risk of bias of each included study was assessed. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: There is consensus that early treatment, by 18 months at the latest, for undescended testes is mandatory to avoid possible sequelae regarding fertility potential and cancer risk. The current standard therapy is orchidopexy, while hormonal therapy is still under debate. However, in some individuals the successful scrotal placement of previously undescended testes may not prevent potential negative long-term outcomes regarding fertility and testicular malignancy. CONCLUSIONS: There is good evidence for early placement of undescended testes in the scrotal position to prevent potential impairment of fertility and reduce the risk of testicular malignancy. No consensus exists on the various forms of hormonal treatment, which are assessed on an individual basis.

11 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria Staging of Testicular Malignancy. 2016

Yacoub, Joseph H / Oto, Aytekin / Allen, Brian C / Coakley, Fergus V / Friedman, Barak / Hartman, Matthew S / Hosseinzadeh, Keyanoosh / Porter, Christopher / Sahni, V Anik / Sudakoff, Gary S / Verma, Sadhna / Wang, Carolyn L / Remer, Erick M / Eberhardt, Steven C. ·Loyola University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. Electronic address: joeyacoub@gmail.com. · University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, New York. · Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, North Carolina. · Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, American Urological Association, Linthicum, Maryland. · Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. · University of Washington, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #27526969.

ABSTRACT: Testicular cancer represents only 1% of all malignancies occurring in men. However, it is the most frequent malignancy in men between the ages of 20 and 34 years, accounting for 10% to 14% of cancer incidence in that age group. In most instances, the diagnosis of testicular tumors is established with a carefully performed physical examination and scrotal ultrasonography. Tumor markers are useful for determining the presence of residual disease. Cross-sectional imaging studies (CT, MRI) are useful in determining the location of metastases. Chest radiography and CT are used to assess pulmonary disease. Fluorine-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) PET scans have slightly higher sensitivity than CT, but their role in staging testicular cancer has not been determined in a large study. FDG PET may play a role in the follow-up of higher stage seminoma after chemotherapy. Bone scans are useful in the absence of FDG PET scans and should be used when bone metastases are suspected. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

12 Guideline Guidelines on Testicular Cancer: 2015 Update. 2015

Albers, Peter / Albrecht, Walter / Algaba, Ferran / Bokemeyer, Carsten / Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella / Fizazi, Karim / Horwich, Alan / Laguna, Maria Pilar / Nicolai, Nicola / Oldenburg, Jan / Anonymous2490840. ·Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, Düsseldorf University, Düsseldorf, Germany. Electronic address: urologie@uni-duesseldorf.de. · Department of Urology, Mistelbach, Austria. · Department of Pathology, Fundacio Puigvert, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Oncology, Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation with section Pneumology, Universitätskliniken Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Medicine, University of Paris XI, Villejuif, France. · Academic Unit of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Royal Marsden NHS Trust and The Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, UK. · Department of Urology, Amsterdam Medical Centre, Amsterdam University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Urology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Health Sciences, Høgskolen i Buskerud og Vestfold, Kongsberg, Norway. ·Eur Urol · Pubmed #26297604.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: This is an update of the previous European Association of Urology testis cancer guidelines published in 2011, which included major changes in the diagnosis and treatment of germ cell tumours. OBJECTIVE: To summarise latest developments in the treatment of this rare disease. Recommendations have been agreed within a multidisciplinary working group consisting of urologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A semi-structured literature search up to February 2015 was performed to update the recommendations. In addition, this document was subjected to double-blind peer review before publication. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: This publication focuses on the most important changes in treatment recommendations for clinical stage I disease and the updated recommendations for follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Most changes in the recommendations will lead to an overall reduction in treatment burden for patients with germ cell tumours. In advanced stages, treatment intensification is clearly defined to further improve overall survival rates. PATIENT SUMMARY: This is an update of a previously published version of the European Association of Urology guidelines for testis cancer, and includes new recommendations for clinical stage I disease and revision of the follow-up recommendations. Patients should be fully informed of all the treatment options available to them.

13 Guideline AIUM Practice Guideline for the Performance of Scrotal Ultrasound Examinations. 2015

Anonymous3850837 / Anonymous3860837 / Anonymous3870837. · ·J Ultrasound Med · Pubmed #26206818.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline Testicular microlithiasis imaging and follow-up: guidelines of the ESUR scrotal imaging subcommittee. 2015

Richenberg, Jonathan / Belfield, Jane / Ramchandani, Parvati / Rocher, Laurence / Freeman, Simon / Tsili, Athina C / Cuthbert, Faye / Studniarek, Michal / Bertolotto, Michele / Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay / Dogra, Vikram / Derchi, Lorenzo E. ·Royal Sussex County Hospital Brighton and Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, Sussex, UK, Jonathan.richenberg@bsuh.nhs.uk. ·Eur Radiol · Pubmed #25316054.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The subcommittee on scrotal imaging, appointed by the board of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR), have produced guidelines on imaging and follow-up in testicular microlithiasis (TML). METHODS: The authors and a superintendent university librarian independently performed a computer-assisted literature search of medical databases: MEDLINE and EMBASE. A further parallel literature search was made for the genetic conditions Klinefelter's syndrome and McCune-Albright syndrome. RESULTS: Proposed guidelines are: follow-up is not advised in patients with isolated TML in the absence of risk factors (see Key Points below); annual ultrasound (US) is advised for patients with risk factors, up to the age of 55; if TML is found with a testicular mass, urgent referral to a specialist centre is advised. CONCLUSION: Consensus opinion of the scrotal subcommittee of the ESUR is that the presence of TML alone in the absence of other risk factors is not an indication for regular scrotal US, further US screening or biopsy. US is recommended in the follow-up of patients at risk, where risk factors other than microlithiasis are present. Risk factors are discussed and the literature and recommended guidelines are presented in this article. KEY POINTS: • Follow up advised only in patients with TML and additional risk factors. • Annual US advised for patients with risk factors up to age 55. • If TML is found with testicular mass, urgent specialist referral advised. • Risk factors - personal/ family history of GCT, maldescent, orchidopexy, testicular atrophy.

15 Guideline [Management of testicular teratoma: update by the Oncology Committee of the French Urology Association, section of External Genital Organs (CCAFU-OGE)]. 2014

Avances, C / Camparo, P / Durand, X / Flechon, A / Murez, T / Sebe, P / Soulie, M / Rigaud, J / Anonymous5840805. ·Service d'urologie, clinique Kennedy, 30000 Nîmes, France. · Centre de pathologie, 80000 Amiens, France. · Service d'urologie, hôpital Val-de-Grâce, 75014 Paris, France. · Service d'oncologie médicale, centre Léon-Bérard, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service d'urologie, hôpital Lapeyronie, 34295 Montpellier, France. · Service d'urologie, groupe hospitalier Diaconnesses Croix Saint-Simon, 75012 Paris, France. · Service d'urologie, hôpital de Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Service d'urologie, hôpital hôtel-Dieu, 1, place Alexis-Ricordeau, 44000 Nantes, France. Electronic address: jrigaud@chu-nantes.fr. ·Prog Urol · Pubmed #25199728.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The objective of this article was to focus on the pathological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of the different forms of testicular teratoma in adults. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The multidisciplinary working group has conducted a literature search on Pubmed with keywords: adult teratoma; malignant transformation; growing teratoma; chemotherapy; surgery with focus on the different forms of adult testicular teratoma. RESULTS: Teratomas of the adults are malignant and subdivided into localized and metastatic forms that may be distinguished under exclusive teratoma form, growing teratoma or teratoma with malignant transformation. The management is based on an enlarged surgical excision (testis and metastasis) with, in metastatic forms, a chemotherapy adjusted with histology. Extended follow-up beyond 10 years is necessary because of the risk of late relapse. CONCLUSIONS: Testicular teratoma is a rare tumor, which is considered malignant with a potential of metastasis. The treatment is based mainly on surgical management.

16 Guideline Evaluation and treatment of cryptorchidism: AUA guideline. 2014

Kolon, Thomas F / Herndon, C D Anthony / Baker, Linda A / Baskin, Laurence S / Baxter, Cheryl G / Cheng, Earl Y / Diaz, Mireya / Lee, Peter A / Seashore, Carl J / Tasian, Gregory E / Barthold, Julia S / Anonymous1850795. ·American Urological Assocation Education and Research, Inc., Linthicum, Maryland. ·J Urol · Pubmed #24857650.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Cryptorchidism is one of the most common pediatric disorders of the male endocrine glands and the most common genital disorder identified at birth. This guideline is intended to provide physicians and non-physician providers (primary care and specialists) with a consensus of principles and treatment plans for the management of cryptorchidism (typically isolated non-syndromic). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis of the published literature was conducted using controlled vocabulary supplemented with key words relating to the relevant concepts of cryptorchidism. The search strategy was developed and executed by reference librarians and methodologists to create an evidence report limited to English-language, published peer-reviewed literature. This review yielded 704 articles published from 1980 through 2013 that were used to form a majority of the guideline statements. Clinical Principles and Expert Opinions were used for guideline statements lacking sufficient evidence-based data. RESULTS: Guideline statements were created to inform clinicians on the proper methods of history-taking, physical exam, and evaluation of the boy with cryptorchidism, as well as the various hormonal and surgical treatment options. CONCLUSIONS: Imaging for cryptorchidism is not recommended prior to referral, which should occur by 6 months of age. Orchidopexy (orchiopexy is the preferred term) is the most successful therapy to relocate the testis into the scrotum, while hormonal therapy is not recommended. Successful scrotal repositioning of the testis may reduce but does not prevent the potential long-term issues of infertility and testis cancer. Appropriate counseling and follow-up of the patient is essential.

17 Guideline [CCAFU Recommendations 2013: Testicular germ cell cancer]. 2013

Durand, X / Rigaud, J / Avancès, C / Camparo, P / Fléchon, A / Murez, T / Sèbe, P / Culine, S / Iborra, F / Mottet, N / Coloby, P / Soulié, M / Anonymous4410783. ·Membres du CCAFU-OGE (Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie - sous-comité Organes génitaux externes et rétropéritoine). · Membres du CCAFU-OGE (Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie - sous-comité Organes génitaux externes et rétropéritoine). Electronic address: jerome.rigaud@chu-nantes.fr. · Membres experts du CCAFU-OGE (Comité de cancérologie de l'Association française d'urologie - sous-comité Organes génitaux externes et rétropéritoine). ·Prog Urol · Pubmed #24485289.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The objective of this article is to establish guidelines proposed by the external genital organ group of the CCAFU for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of the germ cell tumours of the testis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The multidisciplinary working party studied previous guidelines, exhaustively reviewed the literature, and evaluated references and their level of proof in order to attribute grades of recommendation. RESULTS: The initial work-up of testicular cancer is based on clinical, laboratory (AFP, total hCG, LDH) and imaging assessment (scrotal ultrasound and chest, abdomen and pelvis computed tomography). Inguinal orchidectomy is the first-line treatment allowing characterization of the histological type, local staging and identification of risk factors for micrometastases. The management of stage I tumours must be adapted to the risk by explaining to the patient the benefits/disadvantages of active treatment or watchful waiting as a function of the risk of relapse. Treatment options for stage 1 seminomas comprise : watchful waiting, chemotherapy (1 cycle of carboplatin) or para-aortic radiotherapy. Treatment options for stage 1 nonseminomatous germ cell tumours comprise : watchful waiting, chemotherapy (2 cycles of BEP) or staging retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy. The management of metastatic tumours essentially comprises chemotherapy with 3 or 4 cycles of BEP according to the prognostic group. Radiotherapy may be indicated in seminomas with lymph node metastasis < 3 cm. Review 3 to 4 weeks post-chemotherapy is essentially based on tumour marker assays and chest, abdomen and pelvis computed tomography. Surgical retroperitoneal lymph node dissection is indicated for all residual NSGCT masses > 1 cm and for persistent residual seminoma masses > 3 cm with (18)F-FDG PET-CT uptake. CONCLUSIONS: Germ cell tumours have an excellent survival rate based on precise initial staging, adapted and strictly defined treatment and close surveillance.

18 Guideline Testicular seminoma and non-seminoma: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. 2013

Oldenburg, J / Fosså, S D / Nuver, J / Heidenreich, A / Schmoll, H-J / Bokemeyer, C / Horwich, A / Beyer, J / Kataja, V / Anonymous2511075. ·Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #24078656.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline European Association of Urology guidelines on Male Infertility: the 2012 update. 2012

Jungwirth, Andreas / Giwercman, Aleksander / Tournaye, Herman / Diemer, Thorsten / Kopa, Zsolt / Dohle, Gert / Krausz, Csilla / Anonymous2150726. ·EMCO Private Clinic, Bad Dürrnberg, Austria. andreas.jungwirth@utanet.at ·Eur Urol · Pubmed #22591628.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: New data regarding the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility have emerged and led to an update of the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for Male Infertility. OBJECTIVE: To review the new EAU guidelines for Male Infertility. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A comprehensive work-up of the literature obtained from Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists in publications and review articles was developed and screened by a group of urologists and andrologists appointed by the EAU Guidelines Committee. Previous recommendations based on the older literature on this subject were taken into account. Levels of evidence and grade of guideline recommendations were added, modified from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine Levels of Evidence. EVIDENCE SUMMARY: These EAU guidelines are a short comprehensive overview of the updated guidelines of male infertility as recently published by the EAU (http://www.uroweb.org/guidelines/online-guidelines/), and they are also available in the National Guideline Clearinghouse (http://www.guideline.gov/).

20 Guideline Testicular cancer. 2012

Motzer, Robert J / Agarwal, Neeraj / Beard, Clair / Bhayani, Sam / Bolger, Graeme B / Buyyounouski, Mark K / Carducci, Michael A / Chang, Sam S / Choueiri, Toni K / Gupta, Shilpa / Hancock, Steven L / Hudes, Gary R / Jonasch, Eric / Kuzel, Timothy M / Lau, Clayton / Levine, Ellis G / Lin, Daniel W / Margolin, Kim A / Michaelson, M Dror / Olencki, Thomas / Pili, Roberto / Ratliff, Thomas W / Redman, Bruce G / Robertson, Cary N / Ryan, Charles J / Sheinfeld, Joel / Wang, Jue / Wilder, Richard B / Anonymous1160723. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, USA. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #22491049.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Guideline The male genital examination: a position paper of the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. 2012

Anonymous5120721 / Marcell, Arik V / Bell, David L / Joffe, Alain / Anonymous5130721. ·Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore, MD, USA. ·J Adolesc Health · Pubmed #22443851.

ABSTRACT: The male genital examination is a simple and quick clinical assessment and is important for screening and diagnostic purposes beyond the need to screen for testicular cancer. Despite the lack of evidence supporting screening for testicular cancer, the genital examination should be included as part of a male's routine physical examination, as well as when a male patient presents with genital complaints.

22 Guideline [EAU guidelines on testicular cancer: 2011 update. European Association of Urology]. 2012

Albers, P / Albrecht, W / Algaba, F / Bokemeyer, C / Cohn-Cedermark, G / Fizazi, K / Horwich, A / Laguna, M P / Anonymous5450713. ·Departamento de Urología, Universidad de Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Alemania. Peters.albers@med.uni-duesseldorf.de ·Actas Urol Esp · Pubmed #22188753.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: On behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU), guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of testicular cancer were established. OBJECTIVE: This article is a short version of the EAU testicular cancer guidelines and summarises the main conclusions from the guidelines on the management of testicular cancer. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Guidelines were compiled by a multidisciplinary guidelines working group. A systematic review was carried out using Medline and Embase, also taking Cochrane evidence and data from the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group into consideration. A panel of experts weighted the references, and a level of evidence and grade of recommendation were assigned. RESULTS: There is a paucity of literature especially regarding longer term follow-up, and results from a number of ongoing trials are awaited. The choice of treatment centre is of the utmost importance, and treatment in reference centres within clinical trials, especially for poor-prognosis nonseminomatous germ cell tumours, provides better outcomes. For patients with clinical stage I seminoma, based on recently published data on long-term toxicity, adjuvant radiotherapy is no longer recommended as first-line adjuvant treatment. The TNM classification 2009 is recommended. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines contain information for the standardised management of patients with testicular cancer based on the latest scientific insights. Cure rates are generally excellent, but because testicular cancer mainly affects men in their third or fourth decade of life, treatment effects on fertility require careful counselling of patients, and treatment must be tailored taking individual circumstances and patient preferences into account. TAKE HOME MESSAGE: Although testicular cancer has excellent cure rates, the choice of treatment centre is of the utmost importance. Expert centres achieve better results for both early stage testicular cancer (lower relapse rates) and overall survival (higher stages within clinical trials). For patients with clinical stage I seminoma, adjuvant radiotherapy is no longer recommended as first-line adjuvant treatment.

23 Guideline BASHH UK guideline for the management of epididymo-orchitis, 2010. 2011

Street, E / Joyce, A / Wilson, J / Anonymous3240699. ·Princess Royal Community Health Centre, Huddersfield, UK. Emma.Street@cht.nhs.uk ·Int J STD AIDS · Pubmed #21729951.

ABSTRACT: The BASHH UK guideline for the management of epididymo-orchitis has been updated in 2010. Consideration should be made of the changing potential aetiologies of epididymo-orchitis - mumps in non-immune individuals and tuberculosis in the immunocompromised and men from countries of high prevalence. The treatment of sexually acquired epididymo-orchitis has changed given the high levels of quinolone-resistant gonorrhoea such that ceftriaxone and doxycycline are recommended in those at high risk of gonorrhoea and doxycycline or ofloxacin in those patients where gonorrhoea is considered unlikely (negative microscopy for Gram-negative intracellular diplococci and no risk factors for gonorrhoea identified). A clinical care pathway has also been produced to simplify the management of epididymo-orchitis.

24 Guideline EAU guidelines on testicular cancer: 2011 update. 2011

Albers, Peter / Albrecht, Walter / Algaba, Ferran / Bokemeyer, Carsten / Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella / Fizazi, Karim / Horwich, Alan / Laguna, Maria Pilar / Anonymous2710696. ·Department of Urology, Düsseldorf University, Düsseldorf, Germany. Peter.Albers@med.uni-duesseldorf.de ·Eur Urol · Pubmed #21632173.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: On behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU), guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of testicular cancer were established. OBJECTIVE: This article is a short version of the EAU testicular cancer guidelines and summarises the main conclusions from the guidelines on the management of testicular cancer. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Guidelines were compiled by a multidisciplinary guidelines working group. A systematic review was carried out using Medline and Embase, also taking Cochrane evidence and data from the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group into consideration. A panel of experts weighted the references, and a level of evidence and grade of recommendation were assigned. RESULTS: There is a paucity of literature especially regarding longer term follow-up, and results from a number of ongoing trials are awaited. The choice of treatment centre is of the utmost importance, and treatment in reference centres within clinical trials, especially for poor-prognosis nonseminomatous germ cell tumours, provides better outcomes. For patients with clinical stage I seminoma, based on recently published data on long-term toxicity, adjuvant radiotherapy is no longer recommended as first-line adjuvant treatment. The TNM classification 2009 is recommended. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines contain information for the standardised management of patients with testicular cancer based on the latest scientific insights. Cure rates are generally excellent, but because testicular cancer mainly affects men in their third or fourth decade of life, treatment effects on fertility require careful counselling of patients, and treatment must be tailored taking individual circumstances and patient preferences into account.

25 Guideline [Follow-up of testicular germ cell cancer patients: interdisciplinary evidence-based recommendations]. 2011

Hartmann, M / Krege, S / Souchon, R / De Santis, M / Gillessen, S / Cathomas, R / Anonymous3420692. ·Klinik für Urologie, Universitätskrankenhaus Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52, 20246 Hamburg, Deutschland. urologe.hartmann@web.de ·Urologe A · Pubmed #21503662.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Clear treatment recommendations for patients with testicular cancer exist and their stringent application has led to significant improvements in remission and survival rates. Moreover, active surveillance has become a cornerstone in the management of clinical stage I seminomatous and nonseminomatous germ cell tumors. On the other hand, the existing recommendations for the follow-up of testis cancer patients differ widely and have been changed frequently in recent years. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Follow-up recommendations in this young patient population have to be as evidence-based as possible, feasible in order to ensure adherence, and should not be harmful. Primarily, attention has to be paid to the negative impact of unnecessary radiation exposure. RESULTS: Recently, new evidence has become available regarding the relapse pattern of different disease stages of testicular cancer, the use of imaging at follow-up, and the risks of excessive radiation due to imaging, in particular that of CT scans. An interdisciplinary multinational working group consisting of urologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists has reviewed and discussed the current evidence and on this basis formulated new recommendations for patients with germ cell tumors of the testis.

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