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Thyroid Diseases HELP
Based on 35,820 articles published since 2009
|||| 12 

These are the 35820 published articles about Thyroid Diseases that originated from Worldwide during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Thyroid hormones treatment for subclinical hypothyroidism: a clinical practice guideline. 2019

Bekkering, G E / Agoritsas, T / Lytvyn, L / Heen, A F / Feller, M / Moutzouri, E / Abdulazeem, H / Aertgeerts, B / Beecher, D / Brito, J P / Farhoumand, P D / Singh Ospina, N / Rodondi, N / van Driel, M / Wallace, E / Snel, M / Okwen, P M / Siemieniuk, R / Vandvik, P O / Kuijpers, T / Vermandere, M. ·Academic Centre for General Practice, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Belgium trudy.bekkering@kuleuven.be. · Belgian Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, Cochrane Belgium. · Division of General Internal Medicine and Division of Clinical Epidemiology, University. · Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Innlandet Hospital Trust-division, Gjøvik, Norway. · Institute of Primary Health Care (BIHAM), University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of General Internal Medicine, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Munich, Germany. · Academic Centre for General Practice, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Belgium. · Milan, Italy. · Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit in Endocrinology (KER_Endo), Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. · Division General Internal Medicine, University Hospitals of Geneva, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA. · Primary Care Clinical Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane Qld 4029, Australia. · HRB Centre for Primary Care Research and Department of General Practice, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Endocrinology/General Internal Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands. · Effective Basic Services (eBASE), Bamenda, Cameroon. · Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. · Dutch College of General Practitioners, Utrecht, Netherlands. ·BMJ · Pubmed #31088853.

ABSTRACT: CLINICAL QUESTION: What are the benefits and harms of thyroid hormones for adults with subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH)? This guideline was triggered by a recent systematic review of randomised controlled trials, which could alter practice. CURRENT PRACTICE: Current guidelines tend to recommend thyroid hormones for adults with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels >10 mIU/L and for people with lower TSH values who are young, symptomatic, or have specific indications for prescribing. RECOMMENDATION: The guideline panel issues a strong recommendation against thyroid hormones in adults with SCH (elevated TSH levels and normal free T4 (thyroxine) levels). It does not apply to women who are trying to become pregnant or patients with TSH >20 mIU/L. It may not apply to patients with severe symptoms or young adults (such as those ≤30 years old). HOW THIS GUIDELINE WAS CREATED: A guideline panel including patients, clinicians, and methodologists produced this recommendation in adherence with standards for trustworthy guidelines using the GRADE approach. THE EVIDENCE: The systematic review included 21 trials with 2192 participants. For adults with SCH, thyroid hormones consistently demonstrate no clinically relevant benefits for quality of life or thyroid related symptoms, including depressive symptoms, fatigue, and body mass index (moderate to high quality evidence). Thyroid hormones may have little or no effect on cardiovascular events or mortality (low quality evidence), but harms were measured in only one trial with few events at two years' follow-up. UNDERSTANDING THE RECOMMENDATION: The panel concluded that almost all adults with SCH would not benefit from treatment with thyroid hormones. Other factors in the strong recommendation include the burden of lifelong management and uncertainty on potential harms. Instead, clinicians should monitor the progression or resolution of the thyroid dysfunction in these adults. Recommendations are made actionable for clinicians and their patients through visual overviews. These provide the relative and absolute benefits and harms of thyroid hormones in multilayered evidence summaries and decision aids available in MAGIC (https://app.magicapp.org/) to support shared decisions and adaptation of this guideline.

2 Guideline [Procedural guideline for Iodine-131 whole-body scintigraphy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (version 5)]. 2019

Verburg, Frederik A / Schmidt, Matthias / Kreissl, Michael C / Grünwald, Frank / Lassmann, Michael / Hänscheid, Heribert / Hohberg, Melanie / Luster, Markus / Dietlein, Markus. ·für die Deutsche Gesellschaft für Nuklearmedizin (DGN). · Klinik für Nuklearmedizin des Universitätsklinikums Marburg. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Nuklearmedizin, Uniklinik Köln. · Klinik für Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Nuklearmedizin der Universität Frankfurt. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Nuklearmedizin der Universität Würzburg. · Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg, Standort Marburg, Klinik für Nuklearmedizin. ·Nuklearmedizin · Pubmed #31035298.

ABSTRACT: Version 5 of the procedural guideline for Iodine-131 whole-body scintigraphy (WBS) in differentiated thyroid carcinoma is an update of the version 4, published by the "Deutsche Gesellschaft für Nuklearmedizin" (DGN). This procedural guideline advises on how to best perform I-131 whole body scintigraphy after I-131 therapy or after application of a diagnostic I-131 activity. A representative expert group has discussed and reached consensus on the procedural guideline; the development of this procedural guideline therefore fulfils the criteria for level S1 (first step) within the classification of the German Workgroup of Scientific Medical Societies ("Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften"; AWMF).

3 Guideline Retrospective Application of the 2015 American Thyroid Association Guidelines for Ultrasound Classification, Biopsy Indications, and Follow-up Imaging of Thyroid Nodules: Can Improved Reporting Decrease Testing? 2019

Mohammadi, Manijeh / Betel, Carrie / Burton, Kirsteen Rennie / Higgins, Kevin McLughlin / Ghorab, Zeina / Halperin, Ilana Jaye. ·Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: mohammadi.mjh@gmail.com. · Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·Can Assoc Radiol J · Pubmed #30691566.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Thyroid ultrasound has been widely used to determine which nodules need further investigation. The goal of this study is to determine if using an ultrasonographic features checklist based on 2015 American Thyroid Association (ATA) guidelines can improve reporting and decrease unnecessary further testing. METHODS: In this retrospective study, ultrasonographic images of all nodules biopsied at our institution in 2014 and 2015 were reviewed by radiologists blinded to fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy result using a checklist. The checklist was prepared based on 2015 ATA guidelines. The ultrasonographic characteristics of thyroid nodules were compared with the result of biopsy to determine positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), sensitivity, and specificity for predicting malignancy. Radiologists also made an overall recommendation on need for FNA. RESULTS: A total of 425 thyroid nodule ultrasound scans were reviewed by radiologists. Biopsy results of 31 nodules were malignant and 394 were non-malignant. Malignant nodules showed higher frequency of solid composition, hypoechoechogenicity, and cervical lymph node involvement compared to benign nodules. Solid nodule composition had the highest PPV (13%) and NPV (94.7%). Extra-thyroid extension had the highest specificity (90.1%). Lesion vascularity had the highest sensitivity (83.8%), followed by hypoechogenicity (65.6%). Overall, the checklist had a positive predictive value of 9%, negative predictive value of 97.5%, sensitivity of 96.8%, and specificity of 11.14%. Radiologists determined that 10% of the nodules were very low-risk and did not require FNA. CONCLUSION: Using a checklist based on 2015 ATA guideline thyroid nodule ultrasonographic features is a sensitive tool with high NPV to predict benign thyroid nodule, thereby preventing unnecessary FNAs.

4 Guideline Thyroid ultrasonography reporting: consensus of Italian Thyroid Association (AIT), Italian Society of Endocrinology (SIE), Italian Society of Ultrasonography in Medicine and Biology (SIUMB) and Ultrasound Chapter of Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM). 2018

Rago, T / Cantisani, V / Ianni, F / Chiovato, L / Garberoglio, R / Durante, C / Frasoldati, A / Spiezia, S / Farina, R / Vallone, G / Pontecorvi, A / Vitti, P. ·Endocrinology Unit, Dept. Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa, 2, 56124, Pisa, Italy. rago@endoc.med.unipi.it. · Dept. of Radiological Science, Policlinico Umberto I, University Sapienza, Viale del Policlinico, 155, Rome, 00161, Italy. · Endocrinology Unit, University Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo Agostino Gemelli, 8, Rome, 00168, Italy. · Internal Medicine and Endocrinology Unit - ICS Maugeri, IRCCS, University of Pavia, Via S. Maugeri, 4, Pavia, 27100, Italy. · Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism Unit, Dept. Medical Science, University of Torino, Via Magellano, 1, Turin, 10128, Italy. · Dept. of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, University Sapienza, Viale del Policlinico, 155, Rome, 00161, Italy. · Endocrinology Unit, Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova, IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento, 80, Reggio Emilia, 42123, Italy. · Endocrine Surgery, Ospedale del Mare, Via Enrico Russo, Naples, 80147, Italy. · Dept. of Advanced Biomedical Science, University of Naples Federico II, Corso Umberto I, 40, Naples, 80128, Italy. · Endocrinology Unit, Dept. Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa, 2, 56124, Pisa, Italy. ·J Endocrinol Invest · Pubmed #30327945.

ABSTRACT: Thyroid ultrasonography (US) is the gold standard for thyroid imaging and its widespread use is due to an optimal spatial resolution for superficial anatomic structures, a low cost and the lack of health risks. Thyroid US is a pivotal tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of autoimmune thyroid diseases, for assessing nodule size and echostructure and defining the risk of malignancy in thyroid nodules. The main limitation of US is the poor reproducibility, due to the variable experience of the operators and the different performance and settings of the equipments. Aim of this consensus statement is to standardize the report of thyroid US through the definition of common minimum requirements and a correct terminology. US patterns of autoimmune thyroid diseases are defined. US signs of malignancy in thyroid nodules are classified and scored in each nodule. We also propose a simplified nodule risk stratification, based on the predictive value of each US sign, classified and scored according to the strength of association with malignancy, but also to the estimated reproducibility among different operators.

5 Guideline International neuromonitoring study group guidelines 2018: Part II: Optimal recurrent laryngeal nerve management for invasive thyroid cancer-incorporation of surgical, laryngeal, and neural electrophysiologic data. 2018

Wu, Che-Wei / Dionigi, Gianlorenzo / Barczynski, Marcin / Chiang, Feng-Yu / Dralle, Henning / Schneider, Rick / Al-Quaryshi, Zaid / Angelos, Peter / Brauckhoff, Katrin / Brooks, Jennifer A / Cernea, Claudio R / Chaplin, John / Chen, Amy Y / Davies, Louise / Diercks, Gill R / Duh, Quan Yang / Fundakowski, Christopher / Goretzki, Peter E / Hales, Nathan W / Hartl, Dana / Kamani, Dipti / Kandil, Emad / Kyriazidis, Natalia / Liddy, Whitney / Miyauchi, Akira / Orloff, Lisa / Rastatter, Jeff C / Scharpf, Joseph / Serpell, Jonathan / Shin, Jennifer J / Sinclair, Catherine F / Stack, Brendan C / Tolley, Neil S / Slycke, Sam Van / Snyder, Samuel K / Urken, Mark L / Volpi, Erivelto / Witterick, Ian / Wong, Richard J / Woodson, Gayle / Zafereo, Mark / Randolph, Gregory W. ·Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. · Division for Endocrine Surgery, Department of Human Pathology in Adulthood and Childhood "G. Barresi", University Hospital G. Martino, University of Messina, Messina, Italy. · Department of Endocrine Surgery, Jagiellonian University, Third Chair of General Surgery, Krakow, Poland. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Halle, Halle/Saale, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral, and Vascular Surgery, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany. · Department of Otolaryngology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, U.S.A. · Division of Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. · Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Otolaryngology, Division of Thyroid and Parathyroid Surgery, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. · Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Gillies Hospital and Clinics, Epsom, New Zealand. · VA Endocrine Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Outcomes Group, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Norwich, Vermont, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. · Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. · P.G. Stadtische Kliniken Neuss Lukaskrankenhaus GmbH, Neuss, Nordrhein-Westfalen, DE. · Department of Otolaryngology, Uniformed Services of the Health Sciences, San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A. · San Antonio Head and Neck, San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France. · Department of Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. · Department of Surgery, Kuma Hospital, Kobe, Japan. · Department of Otolaryngology, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A. · Breast, Endocrine and General Surgery Unit, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Monash University School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures, and Linguistics, Clayton, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Otolaryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Icahn School of Medicine, New York, New York, U.S.A. · Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, U.S.A. · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Imperial College Hospitals NHS Trust, St. Mary's Hospital, London, United Kingdom. · Onze-Lieve-Vrouw Hospital Aalst, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of General Surgery, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine, Edinburg, Texas, U.S.A. · Clinics Hospital, University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Otolaryngology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Surgery-Head and Neck Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, U.S.A. · 865 Indianola Drive, Merritt Island, Florida, U.S.A. · Department of Head and Neck Surgery, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Endocrine Surgery Service, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A. ·Laryngoscope · Pubmed #30291765.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this publication was to inform surgeons as to the modern state-of-the-art evidence-based guidelines for management of the recurrent laryngeal nerve invaded by malignancy through blending the domains of 1) surgical intraoperative information, 2) preoperative glottic function, and 3) intraoperative real-time electrophysiologic information. These guidelines generated by the International Neural Monitoring Study Group (INMSG) are envisioned to assist the clinical decision-making process involved in recurrent laryngeal nerve management during thyroid surgery by incorporating the important information domains of not only gross surgical findings but also intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve functional status and preoperative laryngoscopy findings. These guidelines are presented mainly through algorithmic workflow diagrams for convenience and the ease of application. These guidelines are published in conjunction with the INMSG Guidelines Part I: Staging Bilateral Thyroid Surgery With Monitoring Loss of Signal. Level of Evidence: 5 Laryngoscope, 128:S18-S27, 2018.

6 Guideline Graves' disease and pregnancy. 2018

Illouz, Frédéric / Luton, Dominique / Polak, Michel / Besançon, Alix / Bournaud, Claire. ·Service d'endocrinologie diabète nutrition, centre de référence des maladies rares de la thyroïde et des récepteurs hormonaux, CHU d'Angers, 49933 Angers cedex 09, France. Electronic address: Frillouz@chu-angers.fr. · Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, DHU risque et grossesse, hôpital Bichat-Beaujon, université Denis-Diderot-Paris VII, 46, rue Henri-Huchard, 75018 Paris, France. · Endocrinologie gynécologie diabétologie pédiatriques, Inserm U1016, institut Imagine, centre de référence des maladies endocriniennes rares de la croissance et du développement, hôpital universitaire Necker Enfants malades, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, université Paris Descartes, 75743 75743 Paris, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire, hospices civils de lyon, groupement hospitalier Est, 69677 Bron cedex, France. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30224035.

ABSTRACT: This section deals with the specificities of managing Graves' disease during pregnancy. Graves' disease incurs risks of fetal, neonatal and maternal complications that are rare but may be severe: fetal hyper- or hypothyroidism, usually first showing as fetal goiter, neonatal dysthyroidism, premature birth and pre-eclampsia. Treatment during pregnancy is based on antithyroid drugs alone, without association to levothyroxine. An history of Graves' disease, whether treated radically or not, with persistent maternal anti-TSH-receptor antibodies must be well identified. Fetal monitoring should be initiated in a multidisciplinary framework that should be continued throughout pregnancy. Neonatal monitoring is also crucial if the mother still shows anti-TSH-receptor antibodies at end of pregnancy or underwent antithyroid treatment. The risk of recurrence of hyperthyroidism in the weeks following delivery requires maternal monitoring. The long-term neuropsychological progression of children of mothers with Graves' disease is poorly known.

7 Guideline Diagnostic procedure in suspected Graves' disease. 2018

Goichot, Bernard / Leenhardt, Laurence / Massart, Catherine / Raverot, Véronique / Tramalloni, Jean / Iraqi, Hinde / Anonymous1411119. ·Service de médecine interne, endocrinologie et nutrition, hôpital de Hautepierre, hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg, avenue Molière, 67098 Strasbourg cedex, France. Electronic address: bernard.goichot@chru-strasbourg.fr. · Unité thyroïde tumeurs endocrines, institut E3M, hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France. · Service de biochimie-toxicologie, laboratoire d'hormonologie, CHU de Rennes, 35033 Rennes Cedex 09, France. · Service de biochimie et biologie moléculaire, laboratoire d'hormonologie, groupement hospitalier Est, CHU de Lyon, 69500 Bron, France. · Cabinet de radiologie, 92200 Neuilly-sur-Seine, France. · Service d'endocrinologie, CHU de Rabat, Rabat, Morocco. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30220410.

ABSTRACT: Diagnostic procedure in suspected Graves' disease has never been studied scientifically and actual practice seems quite variable, notably between countries. Recommendations are few and weak (expert opinion). This article presents the recommendations of an expert consensus meeting organized by the French Society of Endocrinology in 2016. In case of clinically suspected thyrotoxicosis, the first-line biological assessment is of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Free T4 and possibly free T3 assays assess biological severity and are necessary for treatment efficacy monitoring. Positive diagnosis of Graves' disease after biological confirmation of thyrotoxicosis does not always require complementary etiological examinations if clinical presentation is unambiguous, notably including extra-thyroid signs. Otherwise, first-line anti-TSH-receptor (TSH-R) antibody screening is recommended for its good intrinsic performance (sensitivity and specificity) and ease of access in France. Scintigraphy is reserved to rare cases of Graves' disease with negative antibody findings or when another etiology is suspected. Thyroid ultrasound scan may be contributive, but is not recommended in first line.

8 Guideline Treatment of adult Graves' disease. 2018

Corvilain, Bernard / Hamy, Antoine / Brunaud, Laurent / Borson-Chazot, Françoise / Orgiazzi, Jacques / Bensalem Hachmi, Leila / Semrouni, Mourad / Rodien, Patrice / Lussey-Lepoutre, Charlotte. ·Department of Endocrinology, Erasme University Hospital, université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Service de chirurgie viscérale et endocrine, CHU d'Angers, 49000 Angers, France. · Service de chirurgie, unité de chirurgie endocrinienne, thyroïdienne et métabolique, unité multidisciplinaire de chirurgie de l'obésité, université de Lorraine, CHU Nancy, hôpital Brabois adultes, 11, allée du Morvan, 54511 Vandœuvre-les-Nancy, France. · HESPER EA 7425, hospices civils de Lyon, fédération d'endocrinologie, université Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 69008 Lyon, France. · CERMEP-imagerie du vivant, université Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France. · Service d'endocrinologie à l'Institut national de nutrition de Tunis, faculté de médecine de Tunis, Tunisia. · Departement de médecine, CHU Beni Messous, Alger, Algeria. · Service EDN, centre de référence des maladies rares de la thyroïde et des récepteurs hormonaux, CHU d'Angers, 49000 Angers, France. Electronic address: Parodien@chu-angers.fr. · Service de médecine nucléaire, Inserm U970, Sorbonne université, groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpétrière, 75013 Paris, France. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30193753.

ABSTRACT: Treatment strategy in Graves' disease firstly requires recovery of euthyroid status by antithyroid therapy. Treatment modalities, precautions, advantages and side-effects are to be discussed with the patient. No particular treatment modality has demonstrated superiority. Pregnancy or pregnancy project affects choice of treatment and monitoring. Graves' orbitopathy is liable to be aggravated by iodine-131 treatment and requires pre-treatment assessment. Iodine-131 treatment aims at achieving hypothyroidism. Thyroid surgery for Graves' disease should preferably be performed by an expert team. In case of recurrence of hyperthyroidism, the various treatment options should be discussed with the patient. Empiric treatment of thyroid dermopathy uses local corticosteroids in occlusive dressing.

9 Guideline Graves' disease in children. 2018

Léger, Juliane / Oliver, Isabelle / Rodrigue, Danielle / Lambert, Anne-Sophie / Coutant, Régis. ·Department of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology and Reference Center for rare Diseases of Growth and Development, CHU Robert-Debre, 75019 Paris, France. · Endocrine, Bone Diseases, Genetics, Obesity, and Gynecology Unit, Children's Hospital, University Hospital, 31000 Toulouse, France. · Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, CHU Bicêtre, 94275 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Department of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology and Reference Center for Rare Diseases of Thyroid and Hormone Receptivity, University hospital of Angers, 4, rue Larrey, 49933 Angers cedex 9, France. Electronic address: recoutant@chu-angers.fr. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30180972.

ABSTRACT: R1 The diagnosis of Graves' disease in children is based on detecting a suppression of serum TSH concentrations and the presence of anti-TSH receptor antibodies. 1/+++. R2 Thyroid ultrasound is unnecessary for diagnosis, but can be useful for assessing the size and homogeneity of the goiter. 2/+. R3. Thyroid scintigraphy is not required for the diagnosis of Graves' disease. 1/+++. R4. The measurement of T4L and T3L levels is not necessary for the diagnosis of Graves' disease in children but can be useful for the management and assessment of prognosis. 1/++. R5. In the absence of TSH receptor autoantibodies, the possibility of genetically inherited hyperthyroidism must be considered. 1/++. R6. Drug therapy is the primary line of treatment for children and consists of imidazole, carbimazole or thiamazole, with an initial dosage of 0.4 to 0.8mg/kg/day (0.3 to 0.6mg/kg/day for thiamazole) depending on the initial severity, up to maximum of 30mg. 1/++. R7. Propylthiouracil is contraindicated for children with Grave's disease. 1/+++. R8. Before starting treatment, it may be useful to perform a CBC in order to assess the degree of neutropenia caused by hyperthyroidism. It is not necessary to perform systematic CBCs during follow-up. 2/+. R9. An emergency CBC should be performed if symptoms include fever or angina. If neutrophil counts are <1000/mm

10 Guideline [Recommendations for the diagnosis and follow up of the foetus and newborn child born to mothers with autoimmune thyroid disease]. 2018

Ares Segura, Susana / Temboury Molina, Carmen / Chueca Guindulain, María Jesús / Grau Bolado, Gema / Alija Merillas, María Jesus / Caimari Jaume, María / Casano Sancho, Paula / Moreno Navarro, José Carlos / Rial Rodríguez, José Manuel / Rodríguez Sánchez, Amparo / Anonymous11331104. ·Servicio de Neonatología, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. Electronic address: susana.ares@salud.madrid.org. · Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Universitario del Sureste, Madrid, España. · Endocrinología Pediátrica, Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra, España. · Endocrinología Infantil, Hospital Universitario Cruces, Barakaldo, Vizcaya, España. · Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Universitario de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, España. · Endocrinología Pediátrica, Hospital Universitario Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Baleares, España. · Sección de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu , Barcelona, España. · Institute for Medical and Molecular Genetics (INGEMM), Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, España. · Pediatría, Hospital Universitario Nuestra Señora de Candelaria, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, España. · Unidad de Metabolismo y Desarrollo, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón , Madrid, España. ·An Pediatr (Barc) · Pubmed #30177500.

ABSTRACT: The objective of this document is to review the current recommendations in the management of the foetus and the newborn child born to mothers with autoimmune thyroid disease. In 2017, the American Thyroid Association published guidelines for the diagnosis and management of thyroid disease during pregnancy and post-partum. In this guide, 97 recommendations were made, and an algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of gestational hypothyroidism was proposed. Also, in this last year, a wide review was been published on the foetal and neonatal approach of the child of a mother with Graves' disease. The importance of the determination of maternal antibodies against thyrotropin receptor in the second half of pregnancy is stressed, in order to adequately stratify the risk in the neonate.

11 Guideline Graves' orbitopathy: Diagnosis and treatment. 2018

Drui, Delphine / Du Pasquier Fediaevski, Laurence / Vignal Clermont, Catherine / Daumerie, Chantal. ·Service endocrinologie, diabétologie, maladies métaboliques, CHU de Nantes, boulevard J.-Monod, Saint-Herblain, 44092 Nantes cedex, France. Electronic address: Delphine.drui@chu-nantes.fr. · CHNO des Quinze-Vingts, 28, rue de Charenton, 75012 Paris, France. Electronic address: ldupasquier@15-20.fr. · Fondation Rothschild, 29, rue Manin, 75019 Paris, France. Electronic address: cvignal@for.paris. · Endocrinologie, cliniques universitaires Saint-Luc, université catholique de Louvain, 10, avenue Hippocrate, 1200 Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: chantal.daumerie@uclouvain.be. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #30177259.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Guideline [Iodine-131 whole-body scintigraphy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma]. 2018

Verburg, Frederik A / Grünwald, Frank / Lassmann, Michael / Hänscheid, Heribert / Luster, Markus / Dietlein, Markus. · ·Nuklearmedizin · Pubmed #30125925.

ABSTRACT: Version 4 of the procedural guideline for Iodine-131 whole-body scintigraphy (WBS) in differentiated thyroid carcinoma is an update of the version 3, which was published by the "Deutsche Gesellschaft für Nuklearmedizin" (DGN) and the "Deutsche Gesellschaft für Medizinische Physik" (DGMP) in 2007. This procedural guideline advises on how to best perform I-131 whole body scintigraphy after I-131 therapy or after application of a diagnostic I-131 activity. The updated relevant medical indications for I-131 whole body scintigraphy are given in this procedural guideline. Novel insights on the relationship bet¬ween activity and image quality were incorporated in the updated recommendations. A representative expert group has discussed and reached consensus on the procedural guideline; the development of this procedural guideline therefore fulfils the criteria for level S1 (first step) within the classification of the German Workgroup of Scientific Medical Societies ("Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften"; AWMF). Additionally, indications for WBS, timing and activity for WBS were discussed by the working group "Thyroid" of the DGN on November 30th 2012, April 19th, 2013 and on April 23rd, 2015.

13 Guideline [Update of the S2k guidelines : Surgical treatment of benign thyroid diseases]. 2018

Musholt, T J / Bockisch, A / Clerici, T / Dotzenrath, C / Dralle, H / Goretzki, P E / Hermann, M / Holzer, K / Karges, W / Krude, H / Kussmann, J / Lorenz, K / Luster, M / Niederle, B / Nies, C / Riss, P / Schabram, J / Schabram, P / Schmid, K W / Simon, D / Spitzweg, Ch / Steinmüller, Th / Trupka, A / Vorländer, C / Weber, T / Bartsch, D K / Anonymous2091258. ·Sektion Endokrine Chirurgie der Klinik für Allgemein‑, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Universitätsmedizin der Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55101, Mainz, Deutschland. Musholt@uni-mainz.de. · Klinik für Nuklearmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45147, Essen, Deutschland. · Klinik für Chirurgie, Kantonsspital St. Gallen, 9007, St. Gallen, Schweiz. · Klinik für endokrine Chirurgie, Helios Universitätsklinikum Wuppertal, Heusnerstr. 40, 42283, Wuppertal, Deutschland. · Sektion Endokrine Chirurgie, Klinik für Allgemein‑, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45147, Essen, Deutschland. · Chirurgische Klinik, Campus Charite Mitte/Campus Virchow Klinikum, Endokrine Chirurgie, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353, Berlin, Deutschland. · 2. Chirurgische Abteilung, Krankenanstalt Rudolfstiftung, Märzstr. 80, 1150, Wien, Österreich. · Sektion Endokrine Chirurgie der Viszeral‑, Thorax- u. Gefäßchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Marburg, Baldingerstr., 35043, Marburg, Deutschland. · Sektion Endokrinologie und Diabetologie - Medizinische Klinik III, Universitätsklinikum Aachen, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstr. 30, 52074, Aachen, Deutschland. · Klinik für Pädiatrie mit Schwerpunkt Endokrinologie und Diabetologie, Charité Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353, Berlin, Deutschland. · Klinik für Endokrine Chirurgie, Schön Klinik Hamburg-Eilbeck, Dehnhaide 120, 22081, Hamburg, Deutschland. · Klinik u. Poliklinik f. Allgem.-, Viszeral- u. Gefäßchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Halle, Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120, Halle, Deutschland. · Nuklearmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg, GmbH, Standort Marburg, Baldingerstrass, 35041, Marburg, Deutschland. · Sektion Endokrine Chirurgie, Franziskus Spital, Nikolsdorfergasse 32, 1050, Wien, Österreich. · Klinik für Allg.- u. Viszeralchirurgie, Marienhospital Osnabrück, Bischofsstr. 1, 49074, Osnabrück, Deutschland. · Chirurgische Universitätsklinik, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090, Wien, Österreich. · Klinik für Endokrine Chirurgie, Asklepios Klinik Lich, Goethestr. 4, 35423, Lich, Deutschland. · Anwaltskanzlei Ratajczak & Partner, Heinrich-von-Stephan-Str. 25, 79100, Freiburg im Breisgau, Deutschland. · Pathologie, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45147, Essen, Deutschland. · Klinik f. Allg.- u. Viszeralchirurgie, Ev. Bethesda Krankenhaus Duisburg GmbH, Heerstr. 219, 47053, Duisburg, Deutschland. · Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik II, LMU Klinikum der Universität München - Campus Großhadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377, München, Deutschland. · Chirurgische Abteilung, Zentrum f. Allg.- u. Viszeralchirurgie, DRK-Kliniken Westend, Spandauer Damm 130, 14050, Berlin, Deutschland. · Chirurgische Klinik, Klinikum Starnberg GmbH, Oßwaldstr. 1, 82319, Starnberg, Deutschland. · Endokrine Chirurgie, Bürgerhospital Frankfurt am Main, Nibelungenallee 37-41, 60318, Frankfurt am Main, Deutschland. · Klinik für Endokrine Chirurgie, Katholisches Klinikum Mainz, An der Goldgrube 11, 55131, Mainz, Deutschland. · Klinik für Visceral‑, Thorax- und Gefäßchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg, GmbH, Standort Marburg, Baldingerstrass, 35041, Marburg, Deutschland. ·Chirurg · Pubmed #29876616.

ABSTRACT: Thyroid resections represent one of the most common operations with 76,140 interventions in the year 2016 in Germany (source Destatis). These are predominantly benign thyroid gland diseases. Recommendations for the operative treatment of benign thyroid diseases were last published by the CAEK in 2010 as S2k guidelines (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften e.V. [AWMF] 003/002) against the background of increasingly more radical resection procedures. Hemithyroidectomy and thyroidectomy are routinely performed for benign thyroid disease in practice. The operation-specific risks show a clear increase with the extent of the resection. Therefore, weighing-up of the risk-indications ratio between unilateral lobectomy or thyroidectomy necessitates an independent evaluation of the indications for both sides. This principle in particular has been used to update the guidelines. In addition, the previously published recommendations of the CAEK for correct execution and consequences of intraoperative neuromonitoring were included into the guidelines, which in particular serve the aim to avoid bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Moreover, the recommendations for the treatment of postoperative complications, such as hypoparathyroidism and postoperative infections were revised. The updated guidelines therefore represent the current state of the science as well as the resulting surgical practice.

14 Guideline Italian consensus on diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer: joint statements of six Italian societies. 2018

Pacini, F / Basolo, F / Bellantone, R / Boni, G / Cannizzaro, M A / De Palma, M / Durante, C / Elisei, R / Fadda, G / Frasoldati, A / Fugazzola, L / Guglielmi, R / Lombardi, C P / Miccoli, P / Papini, E / Pellegriti, G / Pezzullo, L / Pontecorvi, A / Salvatori, M / Seregni, E / Vitti, P. ·Department of Medical, Surgical and Neurological Sciences, University of Siena, 53100, Siena, Italy. pacini8@unisi.it. · Department of Surgical, Medical, Molecular Pathology and Critical Area, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · U.O.C. Chirurgia Endocrina e Metabolica, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy. · Regional Center of Nuclear Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Advanced Technologies "G.F.Ingrassia", University of Catania, Catania, Italy. · Dipartimento Chirurgico Generale e Polispecialistico Chirurgia 2, AORN Cardarelli, Naples, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, University of Rome Sapienza, Rome, Italy. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Institute of Pathology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · Endocrinology Unit, Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova-IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Division of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Istituto Auxologico Italiano IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Endocrinology, Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Albano Laziale, Italy. · Endocrinology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Catania, Garibaldi-Nesima Medical Center, Catania, Italy. · Thyroid and Parathyroid Surgery Unit, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori-IRCCS 'Fondazione G. Pascale', Naples, Italy. · Cattedra di Endocrinologia, Area di Endocrinologia e Malattie Metaboliche, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy. · Istituto di Medicina Nucleare, Policlinico Gemelli, Rome, Italy. · Struttura di Terapia Medico Nucleare ed Endocrinologia U.O. Medicina Nucleare Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori Milano, Milan, Italy. ·J Endocrinol Invest · Pubmed #29729004.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Thyroid nodules are a common clinical problem, and differentiated thyroid cancer is becoming increasingly prevalent. METHODS: Six scientific Italian societies entitled to cure thyroid cancer patients (the Italian Thyroid Association, the Medical Endocrinology Association, the Italian Society of Endocrinology, the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, the Italian Society of Unified Endocrine Surgery and the Italian Society of Anatomic Pathology and Diagnostic Cytology) felt the need to develop a consensus report based on significant scientific advances occurred in the field. OBJECTIVE: The document includes recommendations regarding initial evaluation of thyroid nodules, clinical and ultrasound criteria for fine-needle aspiration biopsy, initial management of thyroid cancer including staging and risk assessment, surgical management, radioiodine remnant ablation, and levothyroxine therapy, short-term and long-term follow-up strategies, and management of recurrent and metastatic disease. The objective of this consensus is to inform clinicians, patients, researchers, and health policy makers about the best strategies (and their limitations) relating to the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer.

15 Guideline Guidelines of Polish National Societies Diagnostics and Treatment of Thyroid Carcinoma. 2018 Update. 2018

Jarząb, Barbara / Dedecjus, Marek / Słowińska-Klencka, Dorota / Lewiński, Andrzej / Adamczewski, Zbigniew / Anielski, Ryszard / Bagłaj, Maciej / Bałdys-Waligórska, Agata / Barczyński, Marcin / Bednarczuk, Tomasz / Bossowski, Artur / Buziak-Bereza, Monika / Chmielik, Ewa / Cichocki, Andrzej / Czarniecka, Agnieszka / Czepczyński, Rafał / Dzięcioł, Janusz / Gawlik, Tomasz / Handkiewicz-Junak, Daria / Hasse-Lazar, Kornelia / Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja / Jażdżewski, Krystian / Jurecka-Lubieniecka, Beata / Kalemba, Michał / Kamiński, Grzegorz / Karbownik-Lewińska, Małgorzata / Klencki, Mariusz / Kos-Kudła, Beata / Kotecka-Blicharz, Agnieszka / Kowalska, Aldona / Krajewska, Jolanta / Kropińska, Aleksandra / Kukulska, Aleksandra / Kulik, Emilia / Kułakowski, Andrzej / Kuzdak, Krzysztof / Lange, Dariusz / Ledwon, Aleksandra / Lewandowska-Jabłońska, Elżbieta / Łącka, Katarzyna / Michalik, Barbara / Nasierowska-Guttmejer, Anna / Nauman, Janusz / Niedziela, Marek / Małecka-Tendera, Ewa / Oczko-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata / Olczyk, Tomasz / Paliczka-Cieślik, Ewa / Pomorski, Lech / Puch, Zbigniew / Roskosz, Józef / Ruchała, Marek / Rusinek, Dagmara / Sporny, Stanisław / Stanek-Widera, Agata / Stojcev, Zoran / Syguła, Aleksandra / Syrenicz, Anhelli / Szpak-Ulczok, Sylwia / Tomkalski, Tomasz / Wygoda, Zbigniew / Włoch, Jan / Zembala-Nożyńska, Ewa. ·Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology Department; M.Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Institute - Cancer Center, Gliwice Branch, Wybrzeze AK 15, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland; Zakład Medycyny Nuklearnej i Endokrynologii Onkologicznej, Centrum Onkologii-Instytut im. Marii Skłodowskiej-Curie, Oddział w Gliwicach, Wybrzeże AK 15, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland. barbara.jarzab@io.gliwice. ·Endokrynol Pol · Pubmed #29442352.

ABSTRACT: Significant advances have been made in thyroid can-cer research in recent years, therefore relevant clinical guidelines need to be updated. The current Polish guidelines "Diagnostics and Treatment of Thyroid Carcinoma" have been formulated at the "Thyroid Cancer and Other Malignancies of Endocrine Glands" conference held in Wisła in November 2015 [1].

16 Guideline [Study and management of thyroid nodes by non specialist physicians: SOCHED consensus]. 2017

Tala, Hernán / Díaz, René E / Domínguez Ruiz-Tagle, José Miguel / Sapunar Zenteno, Jorge / Pineda, Pedro / Arroyo Albala, Patricia / Barberán, Marcela / Cabané, Patricio / Cruz Olivos, Francisco / Gac E, Patricio / Glasinovic Pizarro, Andrea / González, Hernán E / Grob, Francisca / Hidalgo Valle, Maria Soledad / Jaimovich, Rodrigo / Lanas, Alejandra / Liberman, Claudio / Lobo Guiñez, Maite / Madrid, Arturo. ·Unidad de Endocrinología, Departamento de Medicina Interna, Clínica Alemana de Santiago, Santiago, Chile. · Sección Endocrinología, Hospital del Salvador, Santiago, Chile. · Departamento de Endocrinología, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Departamento Medicina Interna, Centro EPICYN, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de la Frontera, Temuco, Chile. · Hospital Clínico, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Clínica Universidad de los Andes, Santiago, Chile. · Departamento de Radiología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Clínica Santa María, Santiago, Chile. · Departamento de Cirugía Oncológica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · División de Pediatría, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Hospital San Borja-Arriarán, Santiago, Chile. · Medicina Nuclear, Clínica Las Condes, Santiago, Chile. · Centro de Diagnóstico Plaza Italia, Santiago, Chile. · Unidad de Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello, Departamento de Cirugía, Clínica Alemana de Santiago, Santiago, Chile. ·Rev Med Chil · Pubmed #29189861.

ABSTRACT: The thyroid nodule is a frequent cause of primary care consultation. The prevalence of a palpable thyroid nodule is approximately 4-7%, increasing up to 67% by the incidental detection of nodules on ultrasound. The vast majority are benign and asymptomatic, staying stable over time. The clinical importance of studying a thyroid nodule is to exclude thyroid cancer, which occurs in 5 to 10% of the nodules. The Board of SOCHED (Chilean Society of Endocrinology and Diabetes) asked the Thyroid Study Group to develop a consensus regarding the diagnostic management of the thyroid nodule in Chile, aimed at non-specialist physicians and adapted to the national reality. To this end, a multidisciplinary group of 31 experts was established among university academics, active researchers with publications on the subject and prominent members of scientific societies of endocrinology, head and neck surgery, pathology and radiology. A total of 14 questions were developed with key aspects for the diagnosis and subsequent referral of patients with thyroid nodules, which were addressed by the participants. In those areas where the evidence was insufficient or the national reality had to be considered, the consensus opinion of the experts was used through the Delphi methodology. The consensus was approved by the SOCHED board for publication.

17 Guideline The 2017 Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology. 2017

Cibas, Edmund S / Ali, Syed Z. ·1 Departments of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School , Boston, Massachusetts. · 2 Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions , Baltimore, Maryland. ·Thyroid · Pubmed #29091573.

ABSTRACT: The Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology (TBSRTC) established a standardized, category-based reporting system for thyroid fine-needle aspiration (FNA) specimens. The 2017 revision reaffirms that every thyroid FNA report should begin with one of six diagnostic categories, the names of which remain unchanged since they were first introduced: (i) nondiagnostic or unsatisfactory; (ii) benign; (iii) atypia of undetermined significance (AUS) or follicular lesion of undetermined significance (FLUS); (iv) follicular neoplasm or suspicious for a follicular neoplasm; (v) suspicious for malignancy; and (vi) malignant. There is a choice of two different names for some of the categories. A laboratory should choose the one it prefers and use it exclusively for that category. Synonymous terms (e.g., AUS and FLUS) should not be used to denote two distinct interpretations. Each category has an implied cancer risk that ranges from 0% to 3% for the "benign" category to virtually 100% for the "malignant" category, and, in the 2017 revision, the malignancy risks have been updated based on new (post 2010) data. As a function of their risk associations, each category is linked to updated, evidence-based clinical management recommendations. The recent reclassification of some thyroid neoplasms as noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP) has implications for the risk of malignancy, and this is accounted for with regard to diagnostic criteria and optional notes. Such notes can be useful in helping guide surgical management.

18 Guideline Radioactive iodine therapy, molecular imaging and serum biomarkers for differentiated thyroid cancer: 2017 guidelines of the French Societies of Nuclear Medicine, Endocrinology, Pathology, Biology, Endocrine Surgery and Head and Neck Surgery. 2017

Zerdoud, Slimane / Giraudet, Anne-Laure / Leboulleux, Sophie / Leenhardt, Laurence / Bardet, Stéphane / Clerc, Jérôme / Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth / Al Ghuzlan, Abir / Lamy, Pierre-Jean / Bournaud, Claire / Keller, Isabelle / Sebag, Frédéric / Garrel, Renaud / Mirallié, Eric / Groussin, Lionel / Hindié, Elif / Taïeb, David. ·Service de médecine nucléaire, institut universitaire du cancer Toulouse oncopole, 1, avenue Irène-Joliot-Curie, 31059 Toulouse cedex 9, France. · Médecine nucleaire, centre LUMEN, curiethérapie, thyroïde, tumeurs endocrines, centre de lutte contre le cancer Léon-Berard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire et cancérologie endocrinienne Gustave-Roussy, université Paris Saclay, 114, rue Edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif, France. · Unité thyroïde tumeurs endocrines, institut E3M, hôpital La Pitié-Salpêtrière, 83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire et UCP thyroïde, centre François-Baclesse, 3, avenue Général-Harris, 14076 Caen cedex 05, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire, groupe hospitalier Paris Centre, AP-HP, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75679 Paris cedex 14, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire, hôpital Saint-Louis, AP-HP, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris cedex 10, France. · Département de biologie et de pathologie médicales Gustave-Roussy, 39, rue Camille-Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif, France. · Laboratoire d'oncologie moléculaire, institut médical d'analyse génomique, Labosud, 141, avenue Paul-Bringuier, 34080 Montpellier, France; Unité de recherche clinique, clinique Beau-Soleil, 119, avenue de Lodeve, 34070 Montpellier, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire, hospices civils de Lyon, groupement hospitalier Est, 28, avenue Doyen-Lépine, 69677 Bron cedex, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire, hôpitaux universitaires Est Parisien, hôpital Saint-Antoine, AP-HP, 184, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Antoine, 75012 Paris, France. · Service de chirurgie endocrinienne, université Aix-Marseille, CHU de la Timone, 264, rue Saint-Pierre, 13005 Marseille, France. · Département ORL et chirurgie cervico faciale, pole neuroscience tête et cou, hôpital Gui-de-Chauliac, CHU de Montpellier, 80, rue Fliche, 34295 Montpellier, France. · Service de chirurgie endocrinienne et digestive, CHU de Nantes, 1, place Alexis-Ricordeau, 44093 Nantes, France. · Service d'endocrinologie et maladies métaboliques, hôpital Cochin, AP-HP, 123, boulevard du Port-Royal, 75014 Paris, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire, hôpital Haut-Lévêque, université de Bordeaux, CHU de Bordeaux, avenue Magellan, 33604 Pessac, France. Electronic address: elif.hindie@chu-bordeaux.fr. · Service central de biophysique et de médecine nucléaire, université Aix-Marseille, CHU de la Timone, 264, rue Saint-Pierre, 13005 Marseille cedex 05, France. Electronic address: david.taieb@ap-hm.fr. ·Ann Endocrinol (Paris) · Pubmed #28578852.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline Screening for Thyroid Cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2017

Anonymous1120906 / Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten / Grossman, David C / Curry, Susan J / Barry, Michael J / Davidson, Karina W / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kemper, Alex R / Krist, Alex H / Kurth, Ann E / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Phipps, Maureen G / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Siu, Albert L / Tseng, Chien-Wen. ·University of California, San Francisco. · Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle. · University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia10Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. · University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York18James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, New York. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii20University of Hawaii, Honolulu. ·JAMA · Pubmed #28492905.

ABSTRACT: Importance: The incidence of thyroid cancer detection has increased by 4.5% per year over the last 10 years, faster than for any other cancer, but without a corresponding change in the mortality rate. In 2013, the incidence rate of thyroid cancer in the United States was 15.3 cases per 100 000 persons. Most cases of thyroid cancer have a good prognosis; the 5-year survival rate for thyroid cancer overall is 98.1%. Objective: To update the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for thyroid cancer. Evidence Review: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for thyroid cancer in asymptomatic adults, the diagnostic accuracy of screening (including neck palpation and ultrasound), and the benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected thyroid cancer. Findings: The USPSTF found inadequate direct evidence on the benefits of screening but determined that the magnitude of the overall benefits of screening and treatment can be bounded as no greater than small, given the relative rarity of thyroid cancer, the apparent lack of difference in outcomes between patients who are treated vs monitored (for the most common tumor types), and observational evidence showing no change in mortality over time after introduction of a mass screening program. The USPSTF found inadequate direct evidence on the harms of screening but determined that the overall magnitude of the harms of screening and treatment can be bounded as at least moderate, given adequate evidence of harms of treatment and indirect evidence that overdiagnosis and overtreatment are likely to be substantial with population-based screening. The USPSTF therefore determined that the net benefit of screening for thyroid cancer is negative. Conclusions and Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends against screening for thyroid cancer in asymptomatic adults. (D recommendation).

20 Guideline Consensus statement for use and technical requirements of thyroid ultrasound in endocrinology units. 2017

Martín-Hernández, Tomás / Díez Gómez, Juan José / Díaz-Soto, Gonzalo / Torres Cuadro, Alberto / Navarro González, Elena / Oleaga Alday, Amelia / Sambo Salas, Marcel / Reverter Calatayud, Jordi L / Argüelles Jiménez, Iñaki / Mancha Doblas, Isabel / Fernández García, Diego / Galofré, Juan Carlos. ·Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla, España. Electronic address: tmartin@cica.es. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Departamento de Medicina, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Valladolid, Valladolid, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Universitario Basurto, Bilbao, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Badalona, España. · Servicio de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospital Universitario Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, España. · UGC Endocrinología y Nutrición, Hospitales Virgen de la Victoria y Regional de Málaga, Málaga, España. · Departamento de Endocrinología, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, España. ·Endocrinol Diabetes Nutr · Pubmed #28440762.

ABSTRACT: Thyroid nodule detection has increased with widespread use of ultrasound, which is currently the main tool for detection, monitoring, diagnosis and, in some instances, treatment of thyroid nodules. Knowledge of ultrasound and adequate instruction on its use require a position statement by the scientific societies concerned. The working groups on thyroid cancer and ultrasound techniques of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition have promoted this document, based on a thorough analysis of the current literature, the results of multicenter studies and expert consensus, in order to set the requirements for the best use of ultrasound in clinical practice. The objectives include the adequate framework for use of thyroid ultrasound, the technical and legal requirements, the clinical situations in which it is recommended, the levels of knowledge and learning processes, the associated responsibility, and the establishment of a standardized reporting of results and integration into hospital information systems and endocrinology units.

21 Guideline American Thyroid Association Guidelines on the Management of Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Task Force Review and Recommendation on the Proposed Renaming of Encapsulated Follicular Variant Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Without Invasion to Noninvasive Follicular Thyroid Neoplasm with Papillary-Like Nuclear Features. 2017

Haugen, Bryan R / Sawka, Anna M / Alexander, Erik K / Bible, Keith C / Caturegli, Patrizio / Doherty, Gerard M / Mandel, Susan J / Morris, John C / Nassar, Aziza / Pacini, Furio / Schlumberger, Martin / Schuff, Kathryn / Sherman, Steven I / Somerset, Hilary / Sosa, Julie Ann / Steward, David L / Wartofsky, Leonard / Williams, Michelle D. ·1 University of Colorado School of Medicine , Aurora, Colorado. · 2 University Health Network, University of Toronto , Toronto, Canada . · 3 Brigham and Women's Hospital , Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · 4 The Mayo Clinic , Rochester, Minnesota. · 5 Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine , Baltimore, Maryland. · 6 Boston Medical Center , Boston, Massachusetts. · 7 Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · 8 The Mayo Clinic , Jacksonville, Florida. · 9 The University of Siena , Siena, Italy . · 10 Institute Gustave Roussy and University Paris Sud , Villejuif, France . · 11 Oregon Health and Science University , Portland, Oregon. · 12 University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center , Houston, Texas. · 13 Duke University School of Medicine , Durham, North Carolina. · 14 University of Cincinnati Medical Center , Cincinnati, Ohio. · 15 MedStar Washington Hospital Center , Washington, DC. ·Thyroid · Pubmed #28114862.

ABSTRACT: American Thyroid Association (ATA) leadership asked the ATA Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Guidelines Task Force to review, comment on, and make recommendations related to the suggested new classification of encapsulated follicular variant papillary thyroid carcinoma (eFVPTC) without capsular or vascular invasion to noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP). The task force consists of members from the 2015 guidelines task force with the recusal of three members who were authors on the paper under review. Four pathologists and one endocrinologist were added for this specific review. The manuscript proposing the new classification and related literature were assessed. It is recommended that the histopathologic nomenclature for eFVPTC without invasion be reclassified as a NIFTP, given the excellent prognosis of this neoplastic variant. This is a weak recommendation based on moderate-quality evidence. It is also noted that prospective studies are needed to validate the observed patient outcomes (and test performance in predicting thyroid cancer outcomes), as well as implications on patients' psychosocial health and economics.

22 Guideline Core Needle Biopsy of the Thyroid: 2016 Consensus Statement and Recommendations from Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology. 2017

Na, Dong Gyu / Baek, Jung Hwan / Jung, So Lyung / Kim, Ji-Hoon / Sung, Jin Yong / Kim, Kyu Sun / Lee, Jeong Hyun / Shin, Jung Hee / Choi, Yoon Jung / Ha, Eun Ju / Lim, Hyun Kyung / Kim, Soo Jin / Hahn, Soo Yeon / Lee, Kwang Hwi / Choi, Young Jun / Youn, Inyoung / Kim, Young Joong / Ahn, Hye Shin / Ryu, Ji Hwa / Baek, Seon Mi / Sim, Jung Suk / Jung, Chan Kwon / Lee, Joon Hyung / Anonymous18310893. ·Department of Radiology, Human Medical Imaging and Intervention Center, Seoul 06524, Korea. · Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 06591, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03080, Korea. · Department of Radiology and Thyroid Center, Daerim St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul 07442, Korea. · Department of Radiology and Thyroid Center, Daerim St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul 07442, Korea.; Department of Radiology, Smarton Hospital, Bucheon 14534, Korea. · Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 06351, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 03181, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 16499, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul 04401, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Human Medical Imaging and Intervention Center, Seoul 06524, Korea.; Department of Radiology, New Korea Hospital, Kimpo 10086, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 48108, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Konyang University Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daejeon 35365, Korea. · Department of Radiology and Thyroid Center, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul 06973, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Sharing and Happiness Hospital, Busan 48101, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Withsim Clinic, Seongnam 13590, Korea. · Department of Hospital Pathology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 06591, Korea. · Department of Radiology, Dong-A University Medical Center, Busan 49201, Korea. ·Korean J Radiol · Pubmed #28096731.

ABSTRACT: Core needle biopsy (CNB) has been suggested as a complementary diagnostic method to fine-needle aspiration in patients with thyroid nodules. Many recent CNB studies have suggested a more advanced role for CNB, but there are still no guidelines on its use. Therefore, the Task Force Committee of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has developed the present consensus statement and recommendations for the role of CNB in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules. These recommendations are based on evidence from the current literature and expert consensus.

23 Guideline Template for Reporting Results of Biomarker Testing of Specimens From Patients With Thyroid Carcinoma. 2017

Chiosea, Simon / Asa, Sylvia L / Berman, Michael A / Carty, Sally E / Currence, Louanne / Hodak, Steven / Nikiforov, Yuri E / Richardson, Mary S / Seethala, Raja R / Sholl, Lynette M / Thompson, Lester D R / Wenig, Bruce M / Worden, Frank / Anonymous281121. ·From the Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Presbyterian Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Chiosea) · the Department of Pathology, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Asa) · the Department of Pathology, Jefferson Hospital, Allegheny Health Network, Jefferson Hills, Pennsylvania (Dr Berman) · the Department of Surgery, Division of Endocrine Surgery (Dr Carty), and Department of Pathology (Drs Nikiforov and Seethala), University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania · Cancer Registrar at North Kansas City Hospital, North Kansas City, Missouri (Ms Currence) · the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, New York University Langone Medical Center, Tisch Hospital, New York (Dr Hodak) · the Department of Pathology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston (Dr Richardson) · the Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (Dr Sholl) · the Department of Pathology, Southern California Permanente Medical Group, Woodland Hills, California (Dr Thompson) · the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Beth Israel Medical Center, St. Luke's and Roosevelt Hospitals, New York, New York (Dr Wenig) · and the Department of Internal Medicine, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Dr Worden). ·Arch Pathol Lab Med · Pubmed #27681332.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline Diagnostics and treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in children - Guidelines of Polish National Societies. 2016

Niedziela, Marek / Handkiewicz-Junak, Daria / Małecka-Tendera, Ewa / Czarniecka, Agnieszka / Dedecjus, Marek / Lange, Dariusz / Kucharska, Anna / Gawlik, Aneta / Pomorski, Lech / Włoch, Jan / Bagłaj, Maciej / Słowińska-Klencka, Dorota / Sporny, Stanisław / Kurzawa, Paweł / Kropińska, Aleksandra / Krajewska, Jolanta / Czepczyński, Rafał / Ruchała, Marek / Lewiński, Andrzej / Jarząb, Barbara. ·Department of Paediatric Endocrinology and Rheumatology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland. mniedzie@ump.edu.pl. ·Endokrynol Pol · Pubmed #28042655.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline Management of thyroid cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines. 2016

Mitchell, A L / Gandhi, A / Scott-Coombes, D / Perros, P. ·The Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust,Newcastle upon Tyne,UK. · Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery,University Hospital of South Manchester,Manchester,UK. · University Hospital of Wales,Cardiff,UK. ·J Laryngol Otol · Pubmed #27841128.

ABSTRACT: This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. This paper provides recommendations on the management of thyroid cancer in adults and is based on the 2014 British Thyroid Association guidelines. Recommendations • Ultrasound scanning (USS) of the nodule or goitre is a crucial investigation in guiding the need for fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). (R) • FNAC should be considered for all nodules with suspicious ultrasound features (U3-U5). If a nodule is smaller than 10 mm in diameter, USS guided FNAC is not recommended unless clinically suspicious lymph nodes on USS are also present. (R) • Cytological analysis and categorisation should be reported according to the current British Thyroid Association Guidance. (R) • Ultrasound scanning assessment of cervical nodes should be done in FNAC-proven cancer. (R) • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) should be done in suspected cases of retrosternal extension, fixed tumours (local invasion with or without vocal cord paralysis) or when haemoptysis is reported. When CT with contrast is used pre-operatively, there should be a two-month delay between the use of iodinated contrast media and subsequent radioactive iodine (I131) therapy. (R) • Fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography imaging is not recommended for routine evaluation. (G) • In patients with thyroid cancer, assessment of extrathyroidal extension and lymph node disease in the central and lateral neck compartments should be undertaken pre-operatively by USS and cross-sectional imaging (CT or MRI) if indicated. (R) • For patients with Thy 3f or Thy 4 FNAC a diagnostic hemithyroidectomy is recommended. (R) • Total thyroidectomy is recommended for patients with tumours greater than 4 cm in diameter or tumours of any size in association with any of the following characteristics: multifocal disease, bilateral disease, extrathyroidal spread (pT3 and pT4a), familial disease and those with clinically or radiologically involved nodes and/or distant metastases. (R) • Subtotal thyroidectomy should not be used in the management of thyroid cancer. (G) • Central compartment neck dissection is not routinely recommended for patients with papillary thyroid cancer without clinical or radiological evidence of lymph node involvement, provided they meet all of the following criteria: classical type papillary thyroid cancer, patient less than 45 years old, unifocal tumour, less than 4 cm, no extrathyroidal extension on ultrasound. (R) • Patients with metastases in the lateral compartment should undergo therapeutic lateral and central compartment neck dissection. (R) • Patients with follicular cancer with greater than 4 cm tumours should be treated with total thyroidectomy. (R) • I131 ablation should be carried out only in centres with appropriate facilities. (R) • Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) should be checked in all post-operative patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), but not sooner than six weeks after surgery. (R) • Patients who have undergone total or near total thyroidectomy should be started on levothyroxine 2 µg per kg or liothyronine 20 mcg tds after surgery. (R) • The majority of patients with a tumour more than 1 cm in diameter, who have undergone total or near-total thyroidectomy, should have I131 ablation. (R) • A post-ablation scan should be performed 3-10 days after I131 ablation. (R) • Post-therapy dynamic risk stratification at 9-12 months is used to guide further management. (G) • Potentially resectable recurrent or persistent disease should be managed with surgery whenever possible. (R) • Distant metastases and sites not amenable to surgery which are iodine avid should be treated with I131 therapy. (R) • Long-term follow-up for patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is recommended. (G) • Follow-up should be based on clinical examination, serum Tg and thyroid-stimulating hormone assessments. (R) • Patients with suspected medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) should be investigated with calcitonin and carcino-embryonic antigen levels (CEA), 24 hour catecholamine and nor metanephrine urine estimation (or plasma free nor metanephrine estimation), serum calcium and parathyroid hormone. (R) • Relevant imaging studies are advisable to guide the extent of surgery. (R) • RET (Proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase receptor) proto-oncogene analysis should be performed after surgery. (R) • All patients with known or suspected MTC should have serum calcitonin and biochemical screening for phaeochromocytoma pre-operatively. (R) • All patients with proven MTC greater than 5 mm should undergo total thyroidectomy and central compartment neck dissection. (R) • Patients with MTC with lateral nodal involvement should undergo selective neck dissection (IIa-Vb). (R) • Patients with MTC with central node metastases should undergo ipsilateral prophylactic lateral node dissection. (R) • Prophylactic thyroidectomy should be offered to RET-positive family members. (R) • All patients with proven MTC should have genetic screening. (R) • Radiotherapy may be useful in controlling local symptoms in patients with inoperable disease. (R) • Chemotherapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors may help in controlling local symptoms. (R) • For individuals with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, initial assessment should focus on identifying the small proportion of patients with localised disease and good performance status, which may benefit from surgical resection and other adjuvant therapies. (G) • The surgical intent should be gross tumour resection and not merely an attempt at debulking. (G).

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