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Ulcerative Colitis: HELP
Articles by Leigh Ann Shafer
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, L. A. Shafer wrote the following 2 articles about Colitis, Ulcerative.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Workplace Accommodation for Persons With IBD: What Is Needed and What Is Accessed. 2017

Chhibba, Tarun / Walker, John R / Sexton, Kathryn / Restall, Gayle / Ivekovic, Melony / Shafer, Leigh Ann / Singh, Harminder / Targownik, Laura E / Bernstein, Charles N. ·University of Manitoba IBD Clinical and Research Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · University of Manitoba IBD Clinical and Research Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · University of Manitoba IBD Clinical and Research Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Internal Medicine, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · University of Manitoba IBD Clinical and Research Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Internal Medicine, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. · University of Manitoba IBD Clinical and Research Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Internal Medicine, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Electronic address: charles.bernstein@med.umanitoba.ca. ·Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #28603056.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: People with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often experience periods of illness that interfere with their ability to work. We aimed to understand the need for workplace accommodation during periods of acute illness among persons IBD. METHODS: Participants were recruited from the population-based University of Manitoba Research Registry and received a survey including questions assessing experiences with workplace accommodations. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression modelling. RESULTS: A total of 1143 individuals responded to the survey (46% response rate), of whom 881 had experienced IBD symptoms in the workplace and were included in the analysis. The mean age was 48.3 years (standard deviation, 10.9); 61% were female. Mean IBD duration was 20.6 years (standard deviation, 10.5). Most respondents (73%) described IBD symptoms experienced in the workplace as severe to very severe. The most commonly required accommodations were time to go to medical appointments during working hours (81%), easy access to a toilet (71%), and a chance to take a break when not feeling well (54%). Most accommodations were arranged informally or through a supervisor. The accommodations required were very or somewhat easy to arrange about half the time. Being female, having high symptom severity, and high level of current distress were associated with a need for more accommodations, difficulty implementing accommodations, and not asking for needed accommodations. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides important information as to the types of accommodations that are necessary, common practices arranging for these, and level of difficulty arranging accommodations. Furthermore, characteristics associated with greater need for accommodation, reluctance to ask for them, and difficulty in arranging them were identified.

2 Article Gastrointestinal symptoms before and during menses in women with IBD. 2012

Bernstein, M T / Graff, L A / Targownik, L E / Downing, K / Shafer, L A / Rawsthorne, P / Bernstein, C N / Avery, L. ·The University of Manitoba IBD Clinical and Research Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #22621660.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: It is believed that women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have heightened symptoms around their menses. However, there is little information regarding normative changes and which symptoms emerge in relation to menses. AIM: To determine the relationship between gastrointestinal and other symptoms and menses in a population-based cohort of women with IBD vs. healthy women. METHODS: Women enrolled in the University of Manitoba IBD Research Registry who were between 18 and 65 years were mailed a survey. A control group of adult women were recruited through out-patient gynaecology clinics. Participants were asked to consider their menstrual periods in the recent several months and report on symptoms 1-5 days prior to and during the days of their menses. RESULTS: There were 151 premenopausal women with Crohn's disease (CD), 87 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 156 premenopausal controls. Mean age of menses onset was similar in all three cohorts and the percentage in each group with regular menstrual periods was similar. Premenstrually, abdominal pain was less commonly reported in UC (36.8%) than CD (51%, P = 0.034) and controls (57.6%, P = 0.002). Premenstrually, and during menses diarrhoea was more commonly reported in CD (47.7% and 59.6% respectively) than UC (26.4% P = 0.001 and 42.5%, P = 0.01 respectively) and controls (24.4%, P < 0.0001 and 28.2%, P < 0.0001 respectively). Premenstrually, women with CD (46%) vs. UC (26%) were more likely to report worsening of their IBD symptoms (P = 0.0007), but there was no difference between CD (47%) and UC (39%) for reporting worsening during menses (P = 0.24). CONCLUSIONS: Compared to healthy women, women with IBD had similar symptom experiences premenstrually, except that those with CD were more likely to have increased diarrhoea premenstrually. During menses, women with CD or UC were more likely to experience diarrhoea than healthy controls.