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Vascular Diseases HELP
Based on 99,999 articles published since 2010
|||| 17 

These are the 99999 published articles about Vascular Diseases that originated from Worldwide during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Porto-sinusoidal vascular disease. Vascular liver diseases: Position papers from the francophone network for vascular liver diseases, the French Association for the Study of the Liver (AFEF), and ERN-rare liver. 2020

Giudicelli, Héloïse / Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel / Paradis, Valérie / Bedossa, Pierre / Goria, Odile / Lambert, Vincent / Hernandez-Gea, Virginia / Dutheil, Danielle / Plessier, Aurélie / Bureau, Christophe / Valla, Dominique. ·Department of hepatology, DHU Unity, Beaujon hospital, AP-HP, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92118 Clichy, France. · Department of hepatology, DHU Unity, Beaujon hospital, AP-HP, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92118 Clichy, France; Inserm, center for research in inflammation, university of Paris, 75018 Paris, France; Reference center of vascular liver diseases European Reference Network (ERN) "Rare-Liver", France; French Network for Rare Liver Diseases (FILFOIE), Saint-Antoine hospital, AP-HP, 184, rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine, 75012 Paris, France. Electronic address: pierre-emmanuel.rautou@inserm.fr. · Department of pathology, Beaujon hospital, AP-HP, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92118 Clichy, France. · Inserm, center for research in inflammation, university of Paris, 75018 Paris, France; Department of pathology, Beaujon hospital, AP-HP, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92118 Clichy, France. · Department of gastroenterology and hepatology, Charles Nicolles hospital, university hospital of Rouen, 1, rue de Germont, 76031 Rouen cedex, France. · General medicine, 46, avenue Yolande-d'Aragon, 49100 Angers, France. · ERN rare liver, Barcelona hepatic hemodynamic unit, Liver Unit. IMDIM, CIBERehd, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, Spain; Reference center of vascular liver diseases European Reference Network (ERN) "Rare-Liver", France. · French Network for Rare Liver Diseases (FILFOIE), Saint-Antoine hospital, AP-HP, 184, rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine, 75012 Paris, France; Association of patients with vascular liver diseases (AMVF), department of hepatology, Beaujon hospital, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92118 Clichy, France. · Department of hepatology, DHU Unity, Beaujon hospital, AP-HP, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92118 Clichy, France; Reference center of vascular liver diseases European Reference Network (ERN) "Rare-Liver", France; French Network for Rare Liver Diseases (FILFOIE), Saint-Antoine hospital, AP-HP, 184, rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine, 75012 Paris, France. · Department of gastroenterology and hepatology, Rangueil hospital, university hospital of Toulouse, 1, avenue du Professeur Jean-Poulhès, 31400 Toulouse, France. · Department of hepatology, DHU Unity, Beaujon hospital, AP-HP, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92118 Clichy, France; Inserm, center for research in inflammation, university of Paris, 75018 Paris, France; Reference center of vascular liver diseases European Reference Network (ERN) "Rare-Liver", France; French Network for Rare Liver Diseases (FILFOIE), Saint-Antoine hospital, AP-HP, 184, rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine, 75012 Paris, France. ·Clin Res Hepatol Gastroenterol · Pubmed #32335045.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline [ANMCO Position paper: The network organization for the management of patients with acute coronary syndrome during the COVID-19 pandemic]. 2020

Scotto Di Uccio, Fortunato / Valente, Serafina / Colivicchi, Furio / Murrone, Adriano / Caldarola, Pasquale / Di Lenarda, Andrea / Roncon, Loris / Amodeo, Enzo / Aspromonte, Nadia / Cipriani, Manlio Gianni / Domenicucci, Stefano / Francese, Giuseppina Maura / Imazio, Massimo / Urbinati, Stefano / Gulizia, Michele Massimo / Gabrielli, Domenico. ·Cardiologia-UTIC-Emodinamica, Ospedale del Mare, Napoli. · U.O.C. Cardiologia Clinico-Chirurgica-UTIC, A.O.U. Senese Ospedale Santa Maria alle Scotte, Siena. · U.O.C. Cardiologia Clinica e Riabilitativa, Presidio Ospedaliero San Filippo Neri, ASL Roma 1, Roma. · U.O.C. Cardiologia-UTIC, Ospedali di Città di Castello e Gubbio - Gualdo Tadino Azienda USL Umbria 1, Perugia. · Cardiologia-UTIC, Ospedale San Paolo, Bari. · S.C. Cardiovascolare e Medicina dello Sport, A.S.U. Integrata di Trieste. · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Ospedale Santa Maria della Misericordia, Rovigo. · U.O.C. Cardiologia-UTIC, Ospedale Santa Maria degli Ungheresi, Polistena (RC). · U.O.S. Scompenso Cardiaco, Dipartimento di Scienze Cardiovascolari e Toraciche, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma. · Cardiologia 2-Insufficienza Cardiaca e Trapianti, Dipartimento Cardiotoracovascolare "A. De Gasperis", ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milano. · Cardiologia, ASL 3, Ospedale Padre A. Micone, Genova. · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Ospedale Garibaldi-Nesima, Azienda di Rilievo Nazionale e Alta Specializzazione "Garibaldi", Catania. · Cardiologia, Presidio Molinette, A.O.U. Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Torino. · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Ospedale Bellaria, AUSL di Bologna, Bologna. · U.O.C. Cardiologia, Ospedale Garibaldi-Nesima, Azienda di Rilievo Nazionale e Alta Specializzazione "Garibaldi", Catania - Presidente Fondazione per il Tuo cuore, Firenze - Heart Care Foundation Onlus. · ASUR Marche - Area Vasta 4 Fermo, Ospedale Civile Augusto Murri, Fermo. ·G Ital Cardiol (Rome) · Pubmed #32310917.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline Renin-Angiotensin System Inhibition in Cardiovascular Patients at the Time of COVID19: Much Ado for Nothing? A Statement of Activity from the Directors of the Board and the Scientific Directors of the Italian Society of Hypertension. 2020

Iaccarino, Guido / Borghi, Claudio / Cicero, Arrigo F G / Ferri, Claudio / Minuz, Pietro / Muiesan, Maria Lorenza / Mulatero, Paolo / Mulè, Giuseppe / Pucci, Giacomo / Salvetti, Massimo / Savoia, Carmine / Sechi, Leonardo Alberto / Volpe, Massimo / Grassi, Guido. ·Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Department of Medicine and Surgery Sciences, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Clinical Medicine, Public Health, Life and Environment Sciences, University of Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy. · Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Dept of Clinical & Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia-Medicina 2, ASST Spedali Civili Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Division of Internal Medicine and Hypertension, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Turin, Italy. · Department of Health Promotion, Mother and Child Care, Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, Unit of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · Section of Internal Medicine Terni, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Terni, Italy. · Clinical and Molecular Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Medical Area, University of Udine, Udine, Italy. · Division of Cardiology, Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, University of Rome Sapienza, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy. · IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, IS, Italy. · Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy. guido.grassi@unimib.it. ·High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev · Pubmed #32266708.

ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular diseases, in particular hypertension, as well as the cardiovascular treatment with Renin-Angiotensin System inhibitors such as Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs), are claimed once again as mechanisms of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) during the COVID-19 outbreak due to Cov-2 epidemics. In vitro studies are available to support the eventual role of ACE inhibitors and ARBs in both the promotion and antagonism of the disease. The available literature, indeed, presents contrasting results, all concentrated in experimental models. Evidence in humans is lacking that those mechanisms are actually occurring in the present COVID-19 outbreak. Here we present the reasoned statement of the Italian Society of Hypertension to maintain ongoing antihypertensive treatments. Furthermore, the Italian Society of Hypertension presents its own initiative to investigate the issue using an online questionnaire to collect relevant data in human disease.

4 Guideline Editor's Choice - European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS) 2020 Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Management of Acute Limb Ischaemia. 2020

Björck, Martin / Earnshaw, Jonothan J / Acosta, Stefan / Bastos Gonçalves, Frederico / Cochennec, Frederic / Debus, E S / Hinchliffe, Robert / Jongkind, Vincent / Koelemay, Mark J W / Menyhei, Gabor / Svetlikov, Alexei V / Tshomba, Yamume / Van Den Berg, Jos C / Esvs Guidelines Committee, ? / de Borst, Gert J / Chakfé, Nabil / Kakkos, Stavros K / Koncar, Igor / Lindholt, Jes S / Tulamo, Riikka / Vega de Ceniga, Melina / Vermassen, Frank / Document Reviewers, ? / Boyle, Jonathan R / Mani, Kevin / Azuma, Nobuyoshi / Choke, Edward T C / Cohnert, Tina U / Fitridge, Robert A / Forbes, Thomas L / Hamady, Mohamad S / Munoz, Alberto / Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan / Rai, Kumud. · ·Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg · Pubmed #31899099.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Guideline Guidelines for safe transfer of the brain-injured patient: trauma and stroke, 2019: Guidelines from the Association of Anaesthetists and the Neuro Anaesthesia and Critical Care Society. 2020

Nathanson, M H / Andrzejowski, J / Dinsmore, J / Eynon, C A / Ferguson, K / Hooper, T / Kashyap, A / Kendall, J / McCormack, V / Shinde, S / Smith, A / Thomas, E. ·Department of Anaesthesia, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK. · Association of Anaesthetists (Working Party Chair). · Department of Anaesthesia, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Sheffield, UK. · Neuro Anaesthesia and Critical Care Society (NACCS). · Department of Anaesthesia, St George's University Hospital NHS Trust, London, UK. · Royal College of Anaesthetists. · Department of Intensive Care, University Hospitals Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. · Intensive Care Societies of England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. · Department of Anaesthesia, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen. · Association of Anaesthetists. · Department of Intensive Care and Anaesthesia, North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol, UK. · Defence Medical Services. · Department of Paediatric Intensive Care, Great North Children's Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle, UK. · Paediatric Intensive Care Society. · Department of Emergency Medicine, Southmead Hospital, North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol, UK. · Royal College of Emergency Medicine. · Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, North West Deanery. · Association of Anaesthetists Trainee Committee. · Department of Anaesthesia, Southmead Hospital, North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol, UK. · Department of Anaesthesia, Royal Lancaster Infirmary, Lancaster, UK. · Departments of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, UK. · NACCS. ·Anaesthesia · Pubmed #31788789.

ABSTRACT: The location of care for many brain-injured patients has changed since 2012 following the development of major trauma centres. Advances in management of ischaemic stroke have led to the urgent transfer of many more patients. The basis of care has remained largely unchanged, however, with emphasis on maintaining adequate cerebral perfusion as the key to preventing secondary injury. Organisational aspects and training for transfers are highlighted, and we have included an expanded section on paediatric transfers. We have also provided a table with suggested blood pressure parameters for the common types of brain injury but acknowledge that there is little evidence for many of our recommendations. These guidelines remain a mix of evidence-based and consensus-based statements. We have received assistance from many organisations representing clinicians who care for these patients, and we believe our views represent the best of current thinking and opinion. We encourage departments to review their own practice using our suggestions for audit and quality improvement.

6 Guideline Diabetic Retinopathy Preferred Practice Pattern®. 2020

Flaxel, Christina J / Adelman, Ron A / Bailey, Steven T / Fawzi, Amani / Lim, Jennifer I / Vemulakonda, G Atma / Ying, Gui-Shuang. ·Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR. · Yale University Eye Center, New Haven, CT. · Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. · University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL. · Department of Ophthalmology, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, CA. · Center for Preventative Ophthalmology and Biostatistics, Department of Ophthalmology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. ·Ophthalmology · Pubmed #31757498.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Guideline Aerobic Exercise Recommendations to Optimize Best Practices in Care After Stroke: AEROBICS 2019 Update. 2020

MacKay-Lyons, Marilyn / Billinger, Sandra A / Eng, Janice J / Dromerick, Alex / Giacomantonio, Nicholas / Hafer-Macko, Charlene / Macko, Richard / Nguyen, Emily / Prior, Peter / Suskin, Neville / Tang, Ada / Thornton, Marianne / Unsworth, Karen. ·School of Physiotherapy, Dalhousie University, 5869 University Avenue, Halifax, NS B3H 3J5, Canada; and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, QEII Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Physical Therapy and Rehab Science, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas. · Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · Department of Neurology, Pasquerilla Healthcare Center, Washington, DC. · Department of Cardiology, QEII Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. · Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department Neurology, VA Maryland Health Care System, Baltimore, Maryland. · Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Psychology, St. Joseph's Health Care London, London, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Cardiology, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. · School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. · Champlain Regional Stroke Network, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Cardiac Rehabilitation, St. Joseph's Health Care London, London, Ontario, Canada. ·Phys Ther · Pubmed #31596465.

ABSTRACT: Most stroke survivors have very low levels of cardiovascular fitness, which limits mobility and leads to further physical deconditioning, increased sedentary behavior, and heightened risk of recurrent stroke. Although clinical guidelines recommend that aerobic exercise be a part of routine stroke rehabilitation, clinical uptake has been suboptimal. In 2013, an international group of stroke rehabilitation experts developed a user-friendly set of recommendations to guide screening and prescription-the Aerobic Exercise Recommendations to Optimize Best Practices in Care after Stroke (AEROBICS 2013). The objective of this project was to update AEROBICS 2013 using the highest quality of evidence currently available. The first step was to conduct a comprehensive review of literature from 2012 to 2018 related to aerobic exercise poststroke. A working group of the original consensus panel members drafted revisions based on synthesis. An iterative process was used to achieve agreement among all panel members. Final revisions included: (1) addition of 115 new references to replace or augment those in the original AEROBICS document, (2) rewording of the original recommendations and supporting material, and (3) addition of 2 new recommendations regarding prescription. The quality of evidence from which these recommendations were derived ranged from low to high. The AEROBICS 2019 Update should make it easier for clinicians to screen for, and prescribe, aerobic exercise in stroke rehabilitation. Clinical implementation will not only help to narrow the gap between evidence and practice but also reduce current variability and uncertainty regarding the role of aerobic exercise in recovery after stroke.

8 Guideline Ultrasound evaluation of varicoceles: guidelines and recommendations of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology Scrotal and Penile Imaging Working Group (ESUR-SPIWG) for detection, classification, and grading. 2020

Freeman, Simon / Bertolotto, Michele / Richenberg, Jonathan / Belfield, Jane / Dogra, Vikram / Huang, Dean Y / Lotti, Francesco / Markiet, Karolina / Nikolic, Olivera / Ramanathan, Subramaniyan / Ramchandani, Parvati / Rocher, Laurence / Secil, Mustafa / Sidhu, Paul S / Skrobisz, Katarzyna / Studniarek, Michal / Tsili, Athina / Tuncay Turgut, Ahmet / Pavlica, Pietro / Derchi, Lorenzo E / Anonymous1351165. ·University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, Derriford Hospital, Derriford Road, Crownhill, Plymouth, Devon, PL6 8DH, UK. simonfreeman@nhs.net. · Department of Radiology, Ospedale di Cattinara, University of Trieste, Strada di Fiume 447, 34149, Trieste, Italy. · Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Royal Sussex County Hospital, Eastern Road, Brighton, BN2 5BE, UK. · Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Prescot street, Liverpool, L7 8XP, UK. · Department of Radiology, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood ave, Rochester, NY, 14642, USA. · King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London, SE5 9RS, UK. · Andrology, Female Endocrinology and Gender Incongruence Unit, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, I-50139, Florence, Italy. · Department of Radiology, Medical University of Gdansk, Mariana Smoluchowskiego 17, 80-214, Gdansk, Poland. · Faculty of Medicine, Center of Radiology, Clinical Center of Vojvodina, University of Novi Sad, Hajduk Veljkova 1-9, Novi Sad, 21000, Serbia. · Department of Clinical Imaging, Weill Cornell Medical College, Al-Wakra Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, PO Box 82228, Doha, Qatar. · Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. · Department of Adult Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Bicetre University Hospital, 78 avenue du Général Leclerc, 94270, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France. · Imagerie par Résonance Magnétique Médicale et Multi-Modalités, CNRS UMR8081, Service Hospitalier Frédéric Joliot, 4, Place du Gal Leclerc, 91401, Orsay Cedex, France. · Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey. · Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, University Campus, 45110, Ioannina, Greece. · Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Istinye University, Istanbul, Turkey. · Private Hospital S.M. Maddalena, Occhiobello, Rovigo, Italy. · Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), Emergency Radiology, University of Genoa, Policlinico San Martino, Largo R. Benzi, I16122, Genoa, Italy. ·Eur Radiol · Pubmed #31332561.

ABSTRACT: Varicoceles are relatively common particularly in asymptomatic men and are even more prevalent in subfertile men, representing the most common potentially correctable cause of male infertility. Ultrasound (US) is the imaging modality of choice for varicocele evaluation, but there is no widely accepted consensus on examination technique, diagnostic criteria, or classification. In view of this uncertainty, the guideline writing group (WG) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) Scrotal and Penile Imaging Working Group (ESUR-SPIWG) undertook a literature review and assessment of the quality of relevant evidence. The group then produced evidence-based recommendations for varicocele US examination, interpretation, and classification by consensus agreement. The results are presented in the form of 15 clinical questions with a brief summary of the relevant evidence and the authorised recommendations from the SPIWG. This paper provides a short summary of the evidence evaluation and the complete recommendations.Key Points• Varicocele is a common clinical problem; it is highly prevalent amongst subfertile men and the most common potentially correctable cause of male infertility. • Ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice for varicocele assessment, but there is no generally agreed consensus on the US examination technique or the criteria that should be used for diagnosis, grading, and classification. • This paper summarises the recommendations of the ESUR-SPIWG for standardising the US assessment of varicoceles. This includes examination technique, image interpretation, classification, and reporting.

9 Guideline 2018 Update of the EULAR recommendations for the management of large vessel vasculitis. 2020

Hellmich, Bernhard / Agueda, Ana / Monti, Sara / Buttgereit, Frank / de Boysson, Hubert / Brouwer, Elisabeth / Cassie, Rebecca / Cid, Maria C / Dasgupta, Bhaskar / Dejaco, Christian / Hatemi, Gulen / Hollinger, Nicole / Mahr, Alfred / Mollan, Susan P / Mukhtyar, Chetan / Ponte, Cristina / Salvarani, Carlo / Sivakumar, Rajappa / Tian, Xinping / Tomasson, Gunnar / Turesson, Carl / Schmidt, Wolfgang / Villiger, Peter M / Watts, Richard / Young, Chris / Luqmani, Raashid Ahmed. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Rheumatology and Immunology, Medius Kliniken, University of Tübingen, Kirchheim-Teck, Germany b.hellmich@medius-kliniken.de. · Rheumatology Department, Centro Hospitalar do Baixo Vouga E.P.E, Aveiro, Portugal. · Rheumatology, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Charité, Berlin, Germany. · Internal Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Caen, Caen, Basse-Normandie, France. · Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, UMCG, Groningen, The Netherlands. · Leicester, UK. · Department of Autoimmune Diseases, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain. · Rheumatology, Southend Hospital NHS Trust, Westcliff-on-sea, UK. · Rheumatology, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria. · Rheumatology, Hospital of Bruneck, Bruneck, Italy. · Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Internal Medicine, Rheumatology and Immunology, Medus Klinken, Karl-Albrechts-Universität Tübingen, Kirchheim-Teck, Germany. · Hospital Saint-Louis, University Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Ophthalmology, University Hospitals Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Neurometabolism, Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Rheumatology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich, UK. · Rheumatology, Hospital de Santa Maria - CHLN, Lisbon Academic Medical Centre, Lisbon, Portugal. · Rheumatology Research Unit; Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Lisboa, Portugal. · Arcispedale S Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Stroke and Neurocritical Care, GLB Hospitals and Acute Stroke Centers, Chennai, India. · Rheumatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China. · University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. · Department of Rheumatology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. · Medical Centre for Rheumatology Berlin-Buch, Immanuel Krankenhaus Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology / Allerg, University Hospital (Inselspital), Bern, Switzerland. · Norwich Medical School, Bob Champion Research and Education Building, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. · Steyning, UK. · Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Science (NDORMs), University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. ·Ann Rheum Dis · Pubmed #31270110.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Since the publication of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of large vessel vasculitis (LVV) in 2009, several relevant randomised clinical trials and cohort analyses have been published, which have the potential to change clinical care and therefore supporting the need to update the original recommendations. METHODS: Using EULAR standardised operating procedures for EULAR-endorsed recommendations, the EULAR task force undertook a systematic literature review and sought opinion from 20 experts from 13 countries. We modified existing recommendations and created new recommendations. RESULTS: Three overarching principles and 10 recommendations were formulated. We recommend that a suspected diagnosis of LVV should be confirmed by imaging or histology. High dose glucocorticoid therapy (40-60 mg/day prednisone-equivalent) should be initiated immediately for induction of remission in active giant cell arteritis (GCA) or Takayasu arteritis (TAK). We recommend adjunctive therapy in selected patients with GCA (refractory or relapsing disease, presence of an increased risk for glucocorticoid-related adverse events or complications) using tocilizumab. Methotrexate may be used as an alternative. Non-biological glucocorticoid-sparing agents should be given in combination with glucocorticoids in all patients with TAK and biological agents may be used in refractory or relapsing patients. We no longer recommend the routine use of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy for treatment of LVV unless it is indicated for other reasons. CONCLUSIONS: We have updated the recommendations for the management of LVV to facilitate the translation of current scientific evidence and expert opinion into better management and improved outcome of patients in clinical practice.

10 Guideline Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2019

Anonymous2651027 / Owens, Douglas K / Davidson, Karina W / Krist, Alex H / Barry, Michael J / Cabana, Michael / Caughey, Aaron B / Doubeni, Chyke A / Epling, John W / Kubik, Martha / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Pbert, Lori / Silverstein, Michael / Simon, Melissa A / Tseng, Chien-Wen / Wong, John B. ·Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of California, San Francisco. · Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke. · Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. · Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. · Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. · University of Hawaii, Honolulu. · Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. ·JAMA · Pubmed #31821437.

ABSTRACT: Importance: An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is typically defined as aortic enlargement with a diameter of 3.0 cm or larger. The prevalence of AAA has declined over the past 2 decades among screened men 65 years or older in various European countries. The current prevalence of AAA in the United States is unclear because of the low uptake of screening. Most AAAs are asymptomatic until they rupture. Although the risk for rupture varies greatly by aneurysm size, the associated risk for death with rupture is as high as 81%. Objective: To update its 2014 recommendation, the USPSTF commissioned a review of the evidence on the effectiveness of 1-time and repeated screening for AAA, the associated harms of screening, and the benefits and harms of available treatments for small AAAs (3.0-5.4 cm in diameter) identified through screening. Population: This recommendation applies to asymptomatic adults 50 years or older. However, the randomized trial evidence focuses almost entirely on men aged 65 to 75 years. Evidence Assessment: Based on a review of the evidence, the USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that screening for AAA in men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked is of moderate net benefit. The USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that screening for AAA in men aged 65 to 75 years who have never smoked is of small net benefit. The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to determine the net benefit of screening for AAA in women aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked or have a family history of AAA. The USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that the harms of screening for AAA in women aged 65 to 75 years who have never smoked and have no family history of AAA outweigh the benefits. Recommendations: The USPSTF recommends 1-time screening for AAA with ultrasonography in men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked. (B recommendation) The USPSTF recommends that clinicians selectively offer screening for AAA with ultrasonography in men aged 65 to 75 years who have never smoked rather than routinely screening all men in this group. (C recommendation) The USPSTF recommends against routine screening for AAA with ultrasonography in women who have never smoked and have no family history of AAA. (D recommendation) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for AAA with ultrasonography in women aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked or have a family history of AAA. (I statement).

11 Guideline [Austrian Consensus on High Blood Pressure 2019]. 2019

Weber, Thomas / Arbeiter, Klaus / Ardelt, Florian / Auer, Johann / Aufricht, Christoph / Brandt, Mathias C / Dichtl, Wolfgang / Ferrari, Julia / Föger, Bernhard / Henkel, Martin / Hohenstein-Scheibenecker, Katharina / Horn, Sabine / Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra / Kepplinger, Erwin / Knoflach, Michael / Koppelstätter, Christian / Mache, Christoph / Marschang, Peter / Mayer, Gert / Metzler, Bernhard / Oberbauer, Rainer / Obermair, Florian / Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara / Perl, Sabine / Pilz, Stefan / Prischl, Friedrich C / Podczeck-Schweighofer, Andrea / Rebhandl, Erwin / Rohla, Miklos / Roller-Wirnsberger, Regina / Saely, Christoph H / Siostrzonek, Peter / Slany, Jörg / Stoschitzky, Kurt / Waldegger, Siegfried / Wenzel, Rene R / Weiss, Thomas / Wirnsberger, Gerhard / Winhofer-Stöckl, Yvonne / Zweiker, David / Zweiker, Robert / Watschinger, Bruno / Anonymous7861019 / Anonymous7871019 / Anonymous7881019 / Anonymous7891019 / Anonymous7901019 / Anonymous7911019 / Anonymous7921019 / Anonymous7931019 / Anonymous7941019 / Anonymous7951019 / Anonymous7961019 / Anonymous7971019 / Anonymous7981019. ·Abteilung für Innere Medizin II - Kardiologie, Intensivmedizin, Klinikum Wels-Grieskirchen, Grieskirchnerstraße 42, 4600, Wels, Österreich. · Universitätsklinik für Kinder- und Jugendheilkunde, Abteilung Pädiatrische Nephrologie und Gastroenterologie, Medizinische Universität Wien, Wien, Österreich. · Gemeinschaftspraxis für Allgemeinmedizin, Marchtrenk, Österreich. · Interne Abteilung, Krankenhaus Sankt Josef Braunau, Braunau, Österreich. · Klinik II für Innere Medizin, Universitätsklinikum Salzburg, Müllner Hauptstraße 48, 5020, Salzburg, Österreich. · Universitätsklinik für Innere Medizin III - Kardiologie und Angiologie, Medizinische Universität Innsbruck, Anichstraße 35, 6020, Innsbruck, Österreich. · Abteilung für Neurologie, neurologische Rehabilitation und Akutgeriatrie, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Brüder Wien, Wien, Österreich. · Abteilung für Innere Medizin, Krankenhaus Pfarrkirchen, Pfarrkirchen, Österreich. · Abteilung für Kinder- und Jugendheilkunde, Ordensklinikum Linz Barmherzige Schwestern, Linz, Österreich. · Pflegewohnhaus Donaustadt, Sozialmedizinisches Zentrum Ost - Wiener Krankenanstaltenverbund, Langobardenstaße 122a, 1220, Wien, Österreich. · Abteilung für Innere Medizin, Landeskrankenhaus Villach, Villach, Österreich. · Klinik für Innere Medizin III, Abteilung für Endokrinologie und Stoffwechsel, Medizinische Universität Wien, Wien, Österreich. · Gemeinschaftspraxis für Allgemeinmedizin Leonding, Leonding, Österreich. · Universitätsklinik für Neurologie, Medizinische Universität Innsbruck, Anichstraße 35, 6020, Innsbruck, Österreich. · Universitätsklinik für Innere Medizin IV, Medizinische Universität Innsbruck, Anichstraße 35, 6020, Innsbruck, Österreich. · Universitätklinik für Kinder- und Jugendheilkunde, Klinische Abteilung für Allgemeine Pädiatrie, Medizinische Universität Graz, Graz, Österreich. · Abteilung für Innere Medizin, Zentralkrankenhaus Bozen, Lorenz-Böhler-Straße 5, 39100, Bozen, Italien. · Klinik für Innere Medizin III, Abteilung für Nephrologie und Dialyse, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090, Wien, Österreich. · Praxis für Allgemeinmedizin, Eberschwang, Österreich. · Universitätsklinik für Innere Medizin, Klinische Abteilung für Endokrinologie und Diabetologie, Medizinische Universität Graz, Graz, Österreich. · Abteilung für Kardiologie, Medizinische Universität Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 15, 8036, Graz, Österreich. · 4. Interne Abteilung, Bereich Nephrologie, Klinikum Wels-Grieskirchen, 4600, Wels, Österreich. · 5. Medizinische Abteilung/Kardiologie, Kaiser Franz Josef-Spital, Wien, Österreich. · Primärversorgungszentrum Haslach, Haslach an der Mühl, Österreich. · 3. Medizinische Abteilung, Kardiologie und internistische Intensivmedizin, Wilhelminenspital, Wien, Österreich. · Universitätsklinik für Innere Medizin, Gemeinsame Einrichtung, Medizinische Universität Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 15, 8036, Graz, Österreich. · Landeskrankenhaus Feldkirch, Akademisches Lehrkrankenhaus, 6800, Feldkirch, Österreich. · VIVIT Institut, Feldkirch, Österreich. · Private Universität im Fürstentum Liechtenstein (UFL), Triesen, Liechtenstein. · Interne II - Kardiologie, Ordensklinikum Linz Barmherzige Schwestern, Seilerstätte 4, 4060, Linz, Österreich. · , Promenadengasse 21/3, 1170, Wien, Österreich. · Tirolkliniken, Pädiatrie I, Medizinische Universität Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Österreich. · Interne Abteilung, A.ö. Tauernkliniken - Zell am See & Mittersill, Paracelsusstr. 8, 5700, Zell am See, Österreich. · Privatklinik Döbling, Wien, Österreich. · Karl Landsteiner Institut für Kardiometabolik, St. Pölten, Österreich. · Lehrstuhl für experimentelle Kardiologie, Sigmund Freud PrivatUniversität Wien, Wien, Österreich. · Medizinische Universität Graz, Klinische Abteilung für Nephrologie, Universitätsklinik für Innere Medizin, Auenbruggerplatz 27, 8036, Graz, Österreich. ·Wien Klin Wochenschr · Pubmed #31792659.

ABSTRACT: Elevated blood pressure remains a major cause of cardiovascular disease, disability, and premature death in Austria, with suboptimal rates of detection, treatment and control also in recent years. Management of hypertension is a common challenge for physicians with different spezializations. In an attempt to standardize diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and, ultimately, to increase the rate of patients with controlled blood pressure and to decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease, 13 Austrian medical societies reviewed the evidence regarding prevention, detection, workup, treatment and consequences of high blood pressure in general and in various clinical scenarios. The result is presented as the first national consensus on blood pressure. The authors and societies involved are convinced that a joint national effort is needed to decrease hypertension-related morbidity and mortality in our country.

12 Guideline [Expert consensus statement on blood pressure measurement from the French Society of Hypertension, an affiliate of the French Society of Cardiology]. 2019

Denolle, Thierry / Anonymous1681018 / Anonymous1691018. ·Société française d'hypertension artérielle, 5, rue des Colonnes-du-Trône, 75012 Paris, France. Electronic address: denolle.thierry@wanadoo.fr. ·Presse Med · Pubmed #31732365.

ABSTRACT: Since 2016, the French Society of Hypertension has warned about the decline in the management of high blood pressure in France: stagnation, or even decreased number of people who know their blood pressure level, take a treatment and are controlled. These results are lower than those observed in many other countries. Blood pressure is measured with an old method in the doctor's office. Accepted, simple and cost-effective, this method is currently unavoidable for reasons of feasibility and social habit. It has been used in observational and intervention studies that are the basis of the medical reasoning for screening, treatment and drug control of hypertension. In practice, it is too often poorly applied and unpredictable. It is now necessary to measure blood pressure in mmHg using a validated oscillometric automatic device coupled to a specific upper arm cuff adapted to the arm circumferences for the diagnosis and monitoring of high blood pressure in the doctor's office and at home. The auscultatoric measurement is only recommended if any doubt about the reliability of the electronic measurement. Blood pressure measurement is basically performed on both arms to detect asymmetry and then on the arm with the highest blood pressure. It is performed in sitting or lying position after a few minutes of rest without speaking and without having smoked and then in standing position to diagnose orthostatic hypotension, especially in elderly, diabetic and multi-medicated subjects. The blood pressure measurement during the consultation must be repeated and include at least 3 consecutive measurements at one minute intervals. The average of the last 2 measurements determines the blood pressure level. It is recommended to perform BP measurements outside the medical environment for the diagnosis and monitoring of hypertension; Home BP measurement is preferred to ambulatory blood pressure measurement for practical reasons unless otherwise specified. The home blood pressure measurement should include three measurements in the morning at breakfast and three measurements in the evening before bedtime at one minute intervals for at least three days. Prior training must be provided. In treated hypertensive patients, a masked hypertension should be considered as an uncontrolled hypertension and antihypertensive therapy adapted accordingly. The measurement of central BP pressure (aorta) should be limited to clinical research.

13 Guideline Updated Cardiovascular Prevention Guideline of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology - 2019. 2019

Précoma, Dalton Bertolim / Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de / Simão, Antonio Felipe / Dutra, Oscar Pereira / Coelho, Otávio Rizzi / Izar, Maria Cristina de Oliveira / Póvoa, Rui Manuel Dos Santos / Giuliano, Isabela de Carlos Back / Alencar Filho, Aristóteles Comte de / Machado, Carlos Alberto / Scherr, Carlos / Fonseca, Francisco Antonio Helfenstein / Santos Filho, Raul Dias Dos / Carvalho, Tales de / Avezum, Álvaro / Esporcatte, Roberto / Nascimento, Bruno Ramos / Brasil, David de Pádua / Soares, Gabriel Porto / Villela, Paolo Blanco / Ferreira, Roberto Muniz / Martins, Wolney de Andrade / Sposito, Andrei C / Halpern, Bruno / Saraiva, José Francisco Kerr / Carvalho, Luiz Sergio Fernandes / Tambascia, Marcos Antônio / Coelho-Filho, Otávio Rizzi / Bertolami, Adriana / Correa Filho, Harry / Xavier, Hermes Toros / Faria-Neto, José Rocha / Bertolami, Marcelo Chiara / Giraldez, Viviane Zorzanelli Rocha / Brandão, Andrea Araújo / Feitosa, Audes Diógenes de Magalhães / Amodeo, Celso / Souza, Dilma do Socorro Moraes de / Barbosa, Eduardo Costa Duarte / Malachias, Marcus Vinícius Bolívar / Souza, Weimar Kunz Sebba Barroso de / Costa, Fernando Augusto Alves da / Rivera, Ivan Romero / Pellanda, Lucia Campos / Silva, Maria Alayde Mendonça da / Achutti, Aloyzio Cechella / Langowiski, André Ribeiro / Lantieri, Carla Janice Baister / Scholz, Jaqueline Ribeiro / Ismael, Silvia Maria Cury / Ayoub, José Carlos Aidar / Scala, Luiz César Nazário / Neves, Mario Fritsch / Jardim, Paulo Cesar Brandão Veiga / Fuchs, Sandra Cristina Pereira Costa / Jardim, Thiago de Souza Veiga / Moriguchi, Emilio Hideyuki / Schneider, Jamil Cherem / Assad, Marcelo Heitor Vieira / Kaiser, Sergio Emanuel / Lottenberg, Ana Maria / Magnoni, Carlos Daniel / Miname, Marcio Hiroshi / Lara, Roberta Soares / Herdy, Artur Haddad / Araújo, Cláudio Gil Soares de / Milani, Mauricio / Silva, Miguel Morita Fernandes da / Stein, Ricardo / Lucchese, Fernando Antonio / Nobre, Fernando / Griz, Hermilo Borba / Magalhães, Lucélia Batista Neves Cunha / Borba, Mario Henrique Elesbão de / Pontes, Mauro Ricardo Nunes / Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo. ·Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná (PUC-PR), Curitiba, PR - Brazil. · Sociedade Hospitalar Angelina Caron, Campina Grande do Sul, PR - Brazil. · Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brazil. · Instituto de Cardiologia de Santa Catarina, São José, SC - Brazil. · Instituto de Cardiologia do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS - Brazil. · Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campina, SP - Brazil. · Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, SP - Brazil. · Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianópolis, SC - Brazil. · Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus, AM - Brazil. · Ministério da Saúde, Brasília, DF - Brazil. · Instituto do Coração (InCor) do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP - Brazil. · Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP - Brazil. · Clínica Cardiosport de Prevenção e Reabilitação, Florianópolis, SC - Brazil. · Departamento de Ergometria e Reabilitação Cardiovascular da Sociedade Brazileira de Cardiologia (DERC/SBC), Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brazil. · Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Florianópolis, SC - Brazil. · Hospital Alemão Oswaldo Cruz, São Paulo, SP - Brazil. · Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brazil. · Hospital Pró-Cardíaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brazil. · Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG - Brazil. · Faculdade de Ciências Médicas de Minas Gerias (CMMG) da Fundação Educacional Lucas Machado (FELUMA), Belo Horizonte, MG - Brazil. · Hospital Universitário Ciências Médicas (HUCM), Belo Horizonte, MG - Brazil. · Universidade Federal de Lavas (UFLA), Lavras, MG - Brazil. · Universidade de Vassouras, Vassouras, RJ - Brazil. · Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brazil. · Hospital Samaritano, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brazil. · Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niterói, RJ - Brazil. · Complexo Hospitalar de Niterói, Niterói, RJ - Brazil. · Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP - Brazil. · Saraiva & Berlinger LTDA, São Paulo, SP - Brazil. · Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo, SP - Brazil. · Pronto Cardio, Santos, SP - Brazil. · Real Hospital Português de Beneficência, Recife, PE - Brazil. · Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), Belém, PA - Brazil. · Liga Hipertensão de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS - Brazil. · Liga de Hipertensão Arterial da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia, GO - Brazil. · FGM Clínica Paulista de Doenças Cardiovasculares, São Paulo, SP - Brazil. · Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceió, AL - Brazil. · Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, RS - Brazil. · Fundação Universitária de cardiologia do RS (ICFUC), Porto Alegre, RS - Brazil. · Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS - Brazil. · Secretaria de Estado da Saúde do Paraná, Curitiba, PR - Brazil. · Instituto de Cardiologia Preventiva de São Caetano do Sul, São Caetano do Sul, SP - Brazil. · Hospital do Coração (HCor), São Paulo, SP - Brazil. · Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto, São José do Rio Preto, SP - Brazil. · Instituto de Moléstias Cardiovasculares, São José do Rio Preto, SP - Brazil. · Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiabá, MT - Brazil. · Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia, GO - Brazil. · SOS Cardio, Florianópolis, SC - Brazil. · Universidade do Sul de SC (Unisul), Florianópolis, SC - Brazil. · Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brazil. · Laboratório de Lípides (LIM10), Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (HCFMUSP), São Paulo, São Paulo, SP - Brazil. · Instituto de Nutrição Roberta Lara, Itu, SP - Brazil. · Diadia Nutrição e Gastronomia, Itu, SP - Brazil. · CLINIMEX, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - Brazil. · Fitcordis Medicina do Exercício, Brasília, DF - Brazil. · Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR), Curitiba, PR - Brazil. · Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS - Brazil. · Hospital Santa Joana Recife, Recife, PE - Brazil. · Hospital Agamenon Magalhães, Recife, PE - Brazil. · Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA - Brazil. · Hospital São Francisco, Porto Alegre, RS - Brazil. ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #31691761.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline [ESC guidelines 2019 on diagnostics and management of acute pulmonary embolism]. 2019

Osteresch, R / Fach, A / Hambrecht, R / Wienbergen, H. ·Bremer Institut für Herz- und Kreislaufforschung am Klinikum Links der Weser, Stiftung Bremer Herzen, Senator-Weßling-Str. 1, 28277, Bremen, Deutschland. harm.wienbergen@klinikum-bremen-ldw.de. ·Herz · Pubmed #31690957.

ABSTRACT: This article on the new European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for diagnostics and management of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) focusses on new or changed recommendations compared to the previous version of the guidelines from 2014. The current risk-adjusted management algorithm for acute PE includes the clinical severity, aggravating comorbid conditions and right ventricular dysfunction. For low-risk patients early discharge and outpatient treatment are possible, whereas for high-risk patients reperfusion treatment and hemodynamic support have to be considered, depending on the hemodynamic situation and contraindications in the individual patient. Effective therapeutic anticoagulation for at least 3 months is recommended for all patients with PE. Potential indicators for extended anticoagulation are given in the guidelines (class I or class IIa recommendations). New oral anticoagulants (NOAC) are the first choice for anticoagulation in preference to vitamin K antagonists (VKA); however, they are not recommended in patients with severe renal dysfunction, during pregnancy or lactation and in patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Furthermore, a new algorithm for the follow-up after acute PE is proposed in the guidelines. In cases of symptomatic persistent pulmonary hypertension (PH) the transfer to a specialized center is recommended.

15 Guideline Hyperbaric treatment of air or gas embolism: current recommendations. 2019

Moon, Richard E. ·Depts. of Anesthesiology and Medicine, Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Environmental Physiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina U.S. ·Undersea Hyperb Med · Pubmed #31683367.

ABSTRACT: Gas can enter arteries (arterial gas embolism, AGE) due to alveolar-capillary disruption (caused by pulmonary over-pressurization, e.g. breath-hold ascent by divers) or veins (venous gas embolism, VGE) as a result of tissue bubble formation due to decompression (diving, altitude exposure) or during certain surgical procedures where capillary hydrostatic pressure at the incision site is subatmospheric. Both AGE and VGE can be caused by iatrogenic gas injection. AGE usually produces stroke-like manifestations, such as impaired consciousness, confusion, seizures and focal neurological deficits. Small amounts of VGE are often tolerated due to filtration by pulmonary capillaries; however VGE can cause pulmonary edema, cardiac "vapor lock" and AGE due to transpulmonary passage or right-to-left shunt through a patient foramen ovale. Intravascular gas can cause arterial obstruction or endothelial damage and secondary vasospasm and capillary leak. Vascular gas is frequently not visible with radiographic imaging, which should not be used to exclude the diagnosis of AGE. Isolated VGE usually requires no treatment; AGE treatment is similar to decompression sickness (DCS), with first aid oxygen then hyperbaric oxygen. Although cerebral AGE (CAGE) often causes intracranial hypertension, animal studies have failed to demonstrate a benefit of induced hypocapnia. An evidence based review of adjunctive therapies is presented.

16 Guideline [Exercise testing: New guidelines]. 2019

Marcadet, Dany Michel. ·Centre cœur et santé Bernoulli, 3, rue Bernoulli, 75008 Paris, France. Electronic address: dmmarcadet@gmail.com. ·Presse Med · Pubmed #31679896.

ABSTRACT: The GERS-P (Exercise Rehabilitation Sports Prevention Group of the French Society of Cardiology) has decided to update current guidelines regarding the practice of EKG stress tests. Since the last update dates from 1997, the GERS judged it necessary to integrate data from new works and advancements made in the last 20 years. Good clinical practices and safety conditions are better defined regarding the structure, location, material, staff competency, as well as convention with hospital structures. The diagnosis of coronary artery disease remains the principal indication for a stress test. Interpretation of the results is crucial - it must be multivariate and provide either a low, intermediate or strong probability of the existence of coronary lesions, taking into account the studied population (risk factors, age, sex and symptoms). We no longer have to talk about a "positive, negative or litigious" test. Several new indications for a stress test have been defined for the assessment of cardiac pathologies. With such indications, the use of gas expiration measurements is highly recommended in order to provide a precise prognosis for all the various cardiac pathologies : congenital, ischemic, valvular, cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, rhythm and conduction disorders, pacemaker fine-tuning, or pulmonary hypertension. Indications for stress tests and contraindications are defined according to different population subgroups, for instance : athletes, women, children, the elderly, asymptomatic patients, diabetics, hypertensive patients, peripheral arteritis disease patients, or in the context of a non-cardiac surgery pre-op visit. The new guidelines are considerably different from those dating from 1997 and further pinpoint the relevance and importance of an EKG stress test within the arsenal of complementary cardiologic exams. With the improvements made in providing diagnostic value in CAD, as well as better prognostic value for any underlying pathology, the indication for an EKG stress test has extended to all cardiovascular disease.

17 Guideline Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: 2019 National guideline. 2019

Moodley, J / Soma-Pillay, P / Buchmann, E / Pattinson, R C. ·Emeritus Professor: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa. jmog@ukzn.ac.za. ·S Afr Med J · Pubmed #31635598.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP), including pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, account for significant maternal and fetal mortality globally and especially in South Africa. Objective. To formulate clinical guidelines for the management of HDP in order to substantially reduce the number of maternal deaths from HDP. Methods. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) instrument was used to formulate the guidelines and included six domains: scope and purpose; stakeholder involvement; rigour and development; clarity of presentation; applicability; and editorial independence. Recommendations. The guideline stipulates management strategies for all levels of care where women with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are seen. It also has a detailed implementation plan. Conclusion. A clinical guideline that is of practical value has been formulated by a wide group of stakeholders. It is hoped that its dissemination and implementation by all doctors and nurses will reduce mortality and morbidity associated with HDP.

18 Guideline Society of Interventional Radiology Training Guidelines for Endovascular Stroke Treatment. 2019

Sacks, David / AbuAwad, Mazen K / Ahn, Sun Ho / Baerlocher, Mark O / Brady, Paul S / Cole, John W / Dhand, Sabeen / Fox, Benjamin D / Gemmete, Joseph J / Kee-Sampson, Joanna W / McCollom, Vance / Patel, Parag J / Radvany, Martin G / Tomalty, Robert D / Vadlamudi, Venu / Webb, Michael S / Wojak, Joan C. ·Department of Interventional Radiology, The Reading Hospital and Medical Center, West Reading, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: david.sacks@towerhealth.org. · Department of Radiology, NCH HealthCare System, Naples, Florida. · Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Division of Interventional Radiology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · Department of Radiology, Royal Victoria Hospital, Barrie, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Radiology Section of Interventional Radiology, Einstein Health Care Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Neurology, Maryland Stroke Center, Baltimore VA Medical Center and University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Interventional Radiology, Lambert Radiology Medical Group, PIH Health, Whittier, California. · Department of Neurosurgery and Endovascular Neurosurgery, Morton Plant Hospital, Clearwater, Florida. · Department of Radiology, Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Vascular and Interventional Radiology Program, Department of Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida. · Department Vascular and Interventional Radiology and Interventional Neuroradiology, Mercy Hospital Oklahoma City, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. · Department of Radiology, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas. · Department of Radiology, Huntsville Hospital, Huntsville, Alabama. · Department of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Inova Alexandria Hospital, Alexandria, Virginia. · Department of Interventional Radiology, McKay Dee Hospital, Summit Physician Specialists, Murray, Utah. · Department of Radiology, Our Lady of Lourdes Regional Medical Center, Lafayette, Louisiana. ·J Vasc Interv Radiol · Pubmed #31492529.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Guideline Guidelines for the Management of Retinal Vein Occlusion by the European Society of Retina Specialists (EURETINA). 2019

Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula / Garcia-Arumi, José / Gerendas, Bianca S / Midena, Edoardo / Sivaprasad, Sobha / Tadayoni, Ramin / Wolf, Sebastian / Loewenstein, Anat. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria, ursula.schmidt-erfurth@meduniwien.ac.at. · Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Ophthalmology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Ophthalmology, Lariboisière Hospital Paris, Paris, France. · Department of Ophthalmology, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Ophthalmology Tel Aviv Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. ·Ophthalmologica · Pubmed #31412332.

ABSTRACT: The high prevalence of cardiovascular disease particularly in the elderly population is associated with retinal vascular disease. Retinal vein occlusions represent severe disturbances of the hypoxia-sensitive neurosensory retina. Acute and excessive leakage leads to the diagnostic hallmarks of retinal hemorrhage and edema with substantial retinal thickening. Advanced diagnostic tools such as OCT angiography allow to evaluate retinal ischemia and identify the risk for late complications and will soon reach clinical routine besides fluorescein angiography. Accordingly, the duration of non-perfusion is a crucial prognostic factor requiring timely therapeutic intervention. With immediate inhibition of vascular leakage, anti-VEGF substances excel as treatment of choice. Multiple clinical trials with optimal potential for functional benefit or a lesser regenerative spectrum have evaluated aflibercept, ranibizumab, and bevacizumab. As retinal vein occlusion is a chronic disease, long-term monitoring should be individualized to combine maintenance with practicability. While steroids may be considered in patients with systemic cardiovascular risk, surgery remains advisable only for very few patients. Destructive laser treatment is an option if reliable monitoring is not feasible. Ophthalmologists are also advised to perform a basic systemic workup to recognize systemic concomitants. The current edition of the EURETINA guidelines highlights the state-of-the-art recommendations based on the literature and expert opinions in retinal vein occlusion.

20 Guideline Transcatheter closure of patent foramen ovale to prevent stroke recurrence in patients with otherwise unexplained ischaemic stroke: Expert consensus of the French Neurovascular Society and the French Society of Cardiology. 2019

Mas, Jean-Louis / Derex, Laurent / Guérin, Patrice / Guillon, Benoit / Habib, Gilbert / Juliard, Jean-Michel / Marijon, Eloi / Massardier, Evelyne / Meneveau, Nicolas / Vuillier, Fabrice. ·Service de neurologie et unité neurovasculaire, DHU NeuroVasc Sorbonne Paris-Cité, université Paris-Descartes, hôpital Sainte-Anne, Inserm U1266, 1, rue Cabanis, 75014 Paris, France. Electronic address: jl.mas@ghu-paris.fr. · HESPER EA 7425, service de neurologie et unité neurovasculaire, hôpital neurologique, hospices civils de Lyon, 69677 Bron cedex, France. · Unité de cardiologie interventionnelle, institut du thorax et du système nerveux, CHU de Nantes, 44093 Nantes, France. · Unité neurovasculaire, institut du thorax et du système nerveux, CHU de Nantes, 44093 Nantes, France. · IRD, MEPHI, service de cardiologie, IHU-Méditerranée infection, université Aix-Marseille, hôpital de la Timone, AP-HM, 13005 Marseille, France. · Service de cardiologie, université Paris-Diderot, hôpital Bichat, Inserm U1148, AP-HP, 75877 Paris, France. · Unité de rythmologie, département de cardiologie, hôpital Européen Georges-Pompidou, 75015 Paris, France. · Unité Neurovasculaire, CHU de Rouen, 76000 Rouen, France. · EA 3920, Service de cardiologie, université de Franche-Comté, université de Bourgogne-Franche-Comté, CHU Jean-Minjoz, 25000 Besançon, France. · Service de neurologie, université de Franche-Comté, CHU de Jean Minjoz, 25000 Besançon, France. ·Arch Cardiovasc Dis · Pubmed #31378692.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Unlike previous randomized clinical trials (RCTs), recent trials and meta-analyses have shown that transcatheter closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO) reduces stroke recurrence risk in young and middle-aged adults with an otherwise unexplained PFO-associated ischaemic stroke. AIM: To produce an expert consensus on the role of transcatheter PFO closure and antithrombotic drugs for secondary stroke prevention in patients with PFO-associated ischaemic stroke. METHODS: Five neurologists and five cardiologists with extensive experience in the relevant field were nominated by the French Neurovascular Society and the French Society of Cardiology to make recommendations based on evidence from RCTs and meta-analyses. RESULTS: The experts recommend that any decision concerning treatment of patients with PFO-associated ischaemic stroke should be taken after neurological and cardiological evaluation, bringing together the necessary neurovascular, echocardiography and interventional cardiology expertise. Transcatheter PFO closure is recommended in patients fulfilling all the following criteria: age 16-60 years; recent (≤6 months) ischaemic stroke; PFO associated with atrial septal aneurysm (>10mm) or with a right-to-left shunt>20 microbubbles or with a diameter≥2mm; PFO felt to be the most likely cause of stroke after thorough aetiological evaluation by a stroke specialist. Long-term oral anticoagulation may be considered in the event of contraindication to or patient refusal of PFO closure, in the absence of a high bleeding risk. After PFO closure, dual anti-platelet therapy with aspirin (75mg/day) and clopidogrel (75mg/day) is recommended for 3 months, followed by monotherapy with aspirin or clopidogrel for≥5 years. CONCLUSIONS: Although a big step forward that will benefit many patients has been taken with recent trials, many questions remain unanswered. Pending results from further studies, decision-making regarding management of patients with PFO-associated ischaemic stroke should be based on a close coordination between neurologists/stroke specialists and cardiologists.

21 Guideline Management of hypertension in pregnancy: prevention, diagnosis, treatment and long‑term prognosis. 2019

Prejbisz, Aleksander / Dobrowolski, Piotr / Kosiński, Przemysław / Bomba-Opoń, Dorota / Adamczak, Marcin / Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika / Kądziela, Jacek / Konopka, Anna / Kostka-Jeziorny, Katarzyna / Kurnatowska, Ilona / Leszczyńska-Gorzelak, Bożena / Litwin, Mieczysław / Olszanecka, Agnieszka / Orczykowski, Michał / Poniedziałek-Czajkowska, Elżbieta / Sobieszczańska-Małek, Małgorzata / Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna / Szczepaniak-Chicheł, Ludwina / Szyndler, Anna / Wolf, Jacek / Wielgoś, Mirosław / Hoffman, Piotr / Januszewicz, Andrzej. · ·Kardiol Pol · Pubmed #31322138.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Guideline [ANMCO/SIC/GISE/ARCA/SIRM Consensus document: Description of coronary atherosclerosis for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic purposes]. 2019

Casolo, Giancarlo / Abrignani, Maurizio Giuseppe / Amico, Antonio Francesco / Cademartiri, Filippo / Caporale, Roberto / Di Lenarda, Andrea / Domenicucci, Stefano / Gabrielli, Domenico / Geraci, Giovanna / Indolfi, Ciro / Limbruno, Ugo / Midiri, Massimo / Murrone, Adriano / Musumeci, Giuseppe / Nardi, Federico / Nistri, Stefano / Privitera, Carmelo / Gulizia, Michele Massimo. ·S.C. Cardiologia, Nuovo Ospedale Versilia, Lido di Camaiore (LU). · U.O. Cardiologia, Presidio Ospedaliero S. Antonio Abate, ASP 9, Erice (TP). · U.O. Cardiologia-UTIC, Ospedale San Giuseppe da Copertino, ASL Lecce, Copertino (LE). · Servizio di Imaging Cardiovascolare, Istituto di Ricerca SDN-IRCCS, Napoli. · U.O.C. Cardiologia Interventistica, Ospedale Annunziata, Cosenza. · S.C. Cardiovascolare e Medicina dello Sport, Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Integrata di Trieste, Trieste. · Divisione di Cardiologia, ASL 3, Ospedale Padre A. Micone, Genova. · ASUR Marche - Area Vasta 4 Fermo, Ospedale Civile Augusto Murri, Fermo - Presidente Associazione Nazionale Medici Cardiologi Ospedalieri (ANMCO). · U.O. Cardiologia, A.O.R. Villa Sofia-Cervello, P.O. Cervello, Palermo. · Istituto di Cardiologia, Policlinico Mater Domini, Campus Universitario S. Venuta, Germaneto (CZ) - Presidente Società Italiana di Cardiologia (SIC). · U.O.C Cardiologia, Ospedale della Misericordia, Grosseto. · Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, DIBIMED, Università degli Studi, Palermo. · Cardiologia-UTIC, Ospedale di Città di Castello, Azienda USL Umbria 1, Città di Castello (PG). · S.C. Cardiologia, Azienda Ospedaliera S. Croce e Carle, Cuneo. · S.C. Cardiologia, Ospedale Santo Spirito, Casale Monferrato (AL). · Servizio di Cardiologia, CMSR - Veneto Medica, Altavilla Vicentina (VI). · U.O.C. Radiologia, Ospedale Vittorio Emanuele, Catania - Presidente Società Italiana di Radiologia Medica e Interventistica (SIRM). · U.O.C. di Cardiologia, Ospedale Garibaldi-Nesima, Azienda di Rilievo Nazionale e Alta Specializzazione "Garibaldi", Catania - Presidente Fondazione per il Tuo cuore, Firenze. ·G Ital Cardiol (Rome) · Pubmed #31320766.

ABSTRACT: Both conventional coronary angiography and cardiac computed tomography have greatly improved our diagnostic and prognostic evaluation of patients with either suspected or confirmed coronary artery disease. Although several other tools can provide information about coronary anatomy or function, invasive coronary angiography and, more recently, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) are the most commonly used imaging modalities. Coronary atherosclerosis is the most common disease of the coronary arteries and its presence identifies patients at increased risk of events. As a matter of fact, coronary atherosclerosis represents the major determinant for the occurrence of events and the development of ischemic heart disease. Coronary atherosclerosis can translate into plaques that may eventually progress to critical stenosis causing myocardial ischemia. More commonly, atherosclerotic lesions are non-obstructive. Their presence, number and extent negatively affect prognosis independently of other mechanisms. In order to improve prognosis, optimal medical therapy should be initiated to halt disease progression and/or to stabilize atherosclerotic plaques. It is therefore of paramount importance to describe the presence of atherosclerotic lesions well beyond those lesions potentially or undoubtedly capable of inducing myocardial ischemia. These latter lesions may in fact benefit from an interventional or surgical treatment. However, most events are caused by non-obstructive lesions that may often be missed.In common practice, the description of coronary anatomy is not structured in a universal model and each Center applies its own (albeit arbitrary) rules. This consensus document is a collaborative work of some of the major Italian Scientific Societies to offer scientific support to those healthcare professionals who, at different levels, report on coronary anatomy or receive the description of coronary anatomy of patients. After a brief description of the available techniques used to explore the coronary anatomy, the best available evidence in support of a detailed description of coronary atherosclerosis is summarized. In order to promote a useful translation of the information into practice, several recommendations for the correct reporting of coronary anatomy and the suggested treatment for the different clinical scenarios are provided. The aim of this consensus document is to refine the description of coronary anatomy as offered by both invasive coronary angiography and CCTA to improve risk stratification of patients undergoing coronary imaging in clinical practice and to select the most appropriate treatment for improving cardiovascular outcomes.

23 Guideline Avoiding, diagnosing and treating well leg compartment syndrome after pelvic surgery. 2019

Gill, M / Fligelstone, L / Keating, J / Jayne, D G / Renton, S / Shearman, C P / Carlson, G L / Anonymous1971055. ·Department of Surgery, East Lancashire NHS Trust, Blackburn, UK. · Department of Vascular Surgery, Swansea Bay University Health Board, Swansea, UK. · Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Department of Surgery, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. · Department of Surgery, Northwick Park Hospital, Harrow, UK. · Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. · Department of Surgery, University of Manchester, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK. ·Br J Surg · Pubmed #31304580.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing prolonged pelvic surgery may develop compartment syndrome of one or both lower limbs in the absence of direct trauma or pre-existing vascular disease (well leg compartment syndrome). This condition may have devastating consequences for postoperative recovery, including loss of life or limb, and irreversible disability. METHODS: These guidelines represent the collaboration of a multidisciplinary group of colorectal, vascular and orthopaedic surgeons, acting on behalf of their specialty associations in the UK and Ireland. A systematic analysis of the available peer-reviewed literature was undertaken to provide an evidence base from which these guidelines were developed. RESULTS: These guidelines encompass the risk factors (both patient- and procedure-related), diagnosis and management of the condition. Key recommendations for the adoption of perioperative strategies to facilitate prevention and effective treatment of well leg compartment syndrome are presented. CONCLUSION: All surgeons who carry out abdominopelvic surgical procedures should be aware of well leg compartment syndrome, and instigate policies within their own institution to reduce the risk of this potentially life-changing complication.

24 Guideline Society of Interventional Radiology Consensus Guidelines for the Periprocedural Management of Thrombotic and Bleeding Risk in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Image-Guided Interventions-Part II: Recommendations: Endorsed by the Canadian Association for Interventional Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe. 2019

Patel, Indravadan J / Rahim, Shiraz / Davidson, Jon C / Hanks, Sue E / Tam, Alda L / Walker, T Gregory / Wilkins, Luke R / Sarode, Ravi / Weinberg, Ido. ·Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic-Phoenix Campus, Phoenix, Arizona. · Department of Interventional Radiology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Interventional Radiology, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Department of Radiology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Interventional Radiology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: alda.tam@mdanderson.org. · Division of Interventional Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia. · Division of Transfusion Medicine and Hemostasis, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Cardiology Division, Vascular Medicine Section, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. ·J Vasc Interv Radiol · Pubmed #31229333.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Guideline Society of Interventional Radiology Consensus Guidelines for the Periprocedural Management of Thrombotic and Bleeding Risk in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Image-Guided Interventions-Part I: Review of Anticoagulation Agents and Clinical Considerations: Endorsed by the Canadian Association for Interventional Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe. 2019

Davidson, Jon C / Rahim, Shiraz / Hanks, Sue E / Patel, Indravadan J / Tam, Alda L / Walker, T Gregory / Weinberg, Ido / Wilkins, Luke R / Sarode, Ravi. ·Department of Interventional Radiology, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Department of Interventional Radiology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Radiology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic-Phoenix Campus, Phoenix, Arizona. · Department of Interventional Radiology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: alda.tam@mdanderson.org. · Division of Interventional Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Cardiology Division, Vascular Medicine Section, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia. · Division of Transfusion Medicine and Hemostasis, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. ·J Vasc Interv Radiol · Pubmed #31229332.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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